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Austrian architect Otto Wagner was one of the notable pioneers of modern Viennese architecture. His contemporary style can be seen in Majolikahaus, a building that was ahead of its time when completed in 1899. Today, the apartment building is a historical structure but is still celebrated for being an excellent example of the Secession Style, the Viennese version of Art Nouveau. The building owes its name to the majolica ceramic tiles that grace its entire façade, creating floral shapes that elegantly climb up the front of the building. The Majolikahaus currently houses retail stores on the ground floor with apartments situated right above them.

Vienna’s impressive Gasometer City is a direct result of the call for the revitalization of protected monuments in 1995. The phase ushered in several ideas for new uses of old structures, including four gas tanks dating back to 1896. Four designs were chosen by architects Jean Nouvel (Gasometer A), Coop Himmelblau (Gasometer B), Manfred Wehdorn (Gasometer C) and Wilhelm Holzbauer (Gasometer D), which were completed between 1999 and 2001. The Gasometers presently are now home to 615 modern flats, an events hall, student dormitory, movie theatre, medical centre and shopping mall. While the inside of the Gasometers has been gutted and renovated, their signature red brick façade was left intact and the buildings are considered Viennese heritage buildings. ■

The Vienna issue  

Here & There Magazine's final issue of volume two takes you to the musical city of Vienna.

The Vienna issue  

Here & There Magazine's final issue of volume two takes you to the musical city of Vienna.

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