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Proselytist Proselytist


1 1.


If the Pen is Mightier then the Sword? 2. 2.

How are Actions Louder then Words?


Proselytist

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(Proselytist) the practice of proselytizing.

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Proselytizing

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Convert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another.

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Is the Pen Mighty

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Proselytist

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Contents

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Cognitive Dissonance

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Conservabour

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Mind Over Matter

.11

Obamarama

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Terror

.15

Words Are Spells

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Dissinformation

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Media

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Adolf

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War

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Conspiracy

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Propaganda Machine

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6. 6.


Cognitive Dissonance

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The state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, esp. as relating to behavioral decisions and attitude change.

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‘

Guilt, Anger, Dread, Anxiety, Hunger,

’


Cognitive Dissonance

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The state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, esp. as relating to behavioral decisions and attitude change.

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odern psychology, cognitive dissonance is the discomfort experienced when simultaneously holding two or more conflicting cognitions: ideas, beliefs, values or emotional reactions. In a state of

consonant elements, or changing one of the dissonant factors. This bias sheds light on otherwise puzzling, irrational, and even destructive behavior.

dissonance, people may sometimes feel “disequilibrium”: frustration, hunger, dread, guilt, anger, embarrassment, anxiety, etc.

drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements

The theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements It is the distressing mental state that people feel when they “find themselves doing things that don’t fit with what they know, or having opinions that do not fit with other opinions they hold.” A key assumption is that people want their expectations to meet reality, creating a sense of equilibrium. Likewise, another assumption is that a person will avoid situations or information sources that give rise to feelings of uneasiness, or dissonance. Cognitive dissonance theory explains human behavior by positing that people have a bias to seek consonance between their expectations and reality. According to Festinger, people engage in a process he termed “dissonance reduction”, which can be achieved in one of three ways: lowering the importance of one of the discordant factors, adding

The theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational

. . . .

“simultaneously holding two or more conflicting cognitions” the theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements he theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new ones to create a consistent belief system, or alternatively by reducing the importance of any one of the dissonant elements

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Conservabour

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A political party promoting free enterprise and private ownership.

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9.

he “lesser of two evils” technique tries to convince us of an idea or proposal by presenting it as the least offensive option. This technique is often implemented during wartime to convince people of the need for sacrifices or to justify difficult decisions. This technique is often accompanied by adding blame on an enemy country or political group. One idea or proposal is often depicted as one of the only options or paths.

While most false dilemmas offer a “good” and a “bad” alternative, the lesser of two evils technique is a specific type of false dilemma that offers two “bad” alternatives. This technique is often used when the propagandist is trying to convince people to adopt a perspective they will be hesitant to accept. In order to make the choice more appealing an even worse alternative is presented as being the only other option. It is argued that the an imperfect option is, at any rate, better than the horrendous alternative.

The idea in politics and political science that of two bad choices, one is not as bad as the other and should therefore be chosen over the one that is the greater threat. In nations such as the united states, which has a de facto two-party system, the lesser of two evils argument is often used as a selling point for politicians. For example, a candidate who is unpopular within his or her party may suddenly appear more attrative when pitted against a member of the opposing party.

This can be clearly seen today in British politics as the two main parties pit against each other for power whilst deeming a vote for any other party as a “wasted vote”. The difference between these two parties is negligible yet through this system the voter if fooled into thinking he/she has any really choice voting for the chosen party simply into manipulation in think they’re there only choice in a bad bunch. The simply idea of variety and competitiveness with politics is corroded by this vice of the propagandist.

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Labourtive

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“Politics is corroded by this vice of the propagandist.�

A major left-of-center British party

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Mind Over Matter

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Every time a person receives new information that conflicts with an old belief system there is a battle of the mind. Left-brain is the logic baring bigoted half where as the right-brain is the creative and open side. When the brain receives new information.


Mind Over Matter

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The left and right battle – Left fighting to keep the old belief system where as the right is fighting to over turn the old belief system and replace it with the new information. Which ever wins is the view point that you adopt to be your own.

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Obamarama

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13. 13.

Propaganda of the President of the united states of america


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littering generality (also called glowing generality) is an emotionally appealing word so closely associated with highlyvalued concepts and beliefs that it carries conviction without supporting information or reason. Such highly-valued concepts attract general approval and acclaim. Their appeal is to emotions such as love of country and home, and desire for peace, freedom, glory, and honor. They ask for approval without examination of the reason. They are typically used by politicians and propagandists. A glittering generality has two qualities- it is vague and it has positive connotations. Words and phrases such as “common good”, “reform”, “courage”, “democracy”, “freedom”, “hope”, “patriotism”, “strength”, are terms with which people all over the world have powerful associations, and they may have trouble disagreeing with them. However, these words are highly abstract and ambiguous, and meaningful differences exist regarding what they actually mean or should mean in the real world. George Orwell described such words at length in his essay “Politics and the English Language” In certain kinds of writing, particularly in art criticism and literary criticism, it is normal to come across long passages which are almost completely lacking in meaning. Words like romantic, plastic, values, human, dead, sentimental, natural, vitality, as used in art criticism, are strictly meaningless, in the sense that they not only do not point to any discoverable object, but are hardly ever expected to do so by the reader. When one critic writes, “The outstanding feature of Mr. X’s work is its living quality,” while another writes, “The immediately striking thing about Mr. X’s work is its peculiar deadness,” the reader accepts this as a simple difference of opinion. If words like black and white were involved, instead of the jargon words dead and living, he would see at once that language was being used in an improper way. Many political words are similarly abused. The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies “something not desirable.” The words

Obamarama Propaganda of the President of the united states of america

democracy, socialism, freedom, patriotic, realistic, justice have each of them several different meanings which cannot be reconciled with one another. In the case of a word like democracy, not only is there no agreed definition, but the attempt to make one is resisted from all sides. It is almost universally felt that when we call a country democratic we are praising it: consequently the defenders of every kind of regime claim that it is a democracy, and fear that they might have to stop using that word if it were tied down to any one meaning. Words of this kind are often used in a consciously dishonest way. That is, the person who uses them has his own private

“Change doesn’t come from Washington. Change comes to Washington.”

definition, but allows his hearer to think he means something quite different. Statements like “Marshal Pétain was a true patriot,” “The Soviet press is the freest in the world,” “The Catholic Church is opposed to persecution,” are almost always made with intent to deceive. Other words used in variable meanings, in most cases more or less dishonestly, are: class, totalitarian, science, progressive, reactionary, equality. Obama is a prime example of Glittering Generalities with he’s use of words like and “hope” and “change”. As outlined before these words have no substance too them and yet have been a major fact in the presidents success. Outlining ideas that can never be achieved thanks the ambiguous style of their announcement. Simply to please rather then inform

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Terror

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The use of violence and intimidation in the pursuit of political aims.

Terrorism error


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errorism and propaganda have each taken many forms throughout history, but terrorism as propaganda may have become one of the most destabilizing and dangerous phenomena afflicting 21st century society. Military campaigns have often sought to inspire fear in enemy soldiers as part of the battle for “hearts and minds.” Most military campaigns, however, use fear as a secondary tactic within a war whose ultimate objective is seizing or destroying the enemy’s territory, weapons, material resources and physical ability to wage war. Terrorism, by contrast, is a tactic often employed by political actors that have no hope of physically vanquishing their enemy. Instead, its goal is to defeat the enemy psychologically through the systematic, calculated use of violence and threats of violence. Terrorism originally refered to actions taken by governments, not sub-national actors. It refered to a government policy designed to instill massive fear in the populace through mass killings in order to maintain state power. The “reign of terror” launched by the Jacobin government during the French Revolution is the classic example of terrorism in it’s original sense. As the term has evolved terrorism has come to be applied more to sub-national actors instead of states, an inversion of what it originally meant. During the period from the 1870s into the 1920s, terrorism was sometimes associated with the political philosophy of anarchism, minority of whose followers

Error

The state or condition of being wrong in conduct or judgment

carried out a number of assassination attempts on corporate and government leaders. The assasin of U.S. President William McKinley was alleged to be an anarchist, but his anarchism has been disputed. This strategy, reviled by Marxists, some anarchists, and other radicals, was described by it’s supporters as “propaganda of the deed” (a term that PR industry founder Edward Bernays would later use in reference to what today’s public relations practitioners call “publicity stunts”). The strategy is sometimes erroneously attributed to 19th century anarchist Mikhail Bakunin but, while he did use the term “propaganda by the deed,” he did not use it in the sense of advocating the kind of actions carried out by the “propaganda by the deed” movement. The advocates of “propaganda of the deed” believed that the heroic, exemplary boldness of their actions would inspire the masses and make anarchist ideas famous. Unlike modern terrorists, however, they tended to target individuals whom they regarded as responsible for oppressing the masses, while avoiding violence against innocent bystanders. For example, Russian radicals intent on the assassination of Tsar Alexander II in the mid-19th century cancelled several actions out of concern that they might injure women, children or elderly persons. For this reason some do not consider these actions to be terrorist. Most anarchists argue that all states are terrorist organizations, which use violence (through police, militaries, prisons, etc.) on a systemic level to force the population into submission. “Deterrance” is just another form of terrorism.

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Words are spells

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Repetition is the most basic form of manipulation.

No matter how big the lie; report it ofthen enough and the masses will regard it as truth. 17. 17.

- John F. Kennedy


Words are spells

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- Hubert Humphrey Propaganda, to be effective, must be believed. To be believed, it must be credible. To be credible, it must be true.

An entire life can be made by the choice of your words.

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Disinformation

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False information that is intended to mislead, esp. that released by a government to a rival power or the media.

Information Dis


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isinformation is intentionally false or inaccurate information that is spread deliberately. For this reason, it is synonymous with and sometimes called black propaganda. It is an act of deception and false statements to convince someone of untruth. Disinformation should not be confused with misinformation, information that is unintentionally false. Unlike traditional propaganda techniques designed to engage emotional support, disinformation is designed to manipulate the audience at the rational level by either discrediting conflicting information or supporting false conclusions. A common disinformation tactic is to mix some truth and observation with false conclusions and lies, or to reveal part of the truth while presenting it as the whole (a limited hangout). Another technique of concealing facts, or censorship, is also used if the group can affect such control. When channels of information cannot be completely closed, they can be rendered useless by filling them with disinformation, effectively lowering their signalto-noise ratio and discrediting the opposition by association with many easily disproved false claims. In espionage or military intelligence, disinformation is the deliberate spreading of false information to mislead an enemy as to one’s position or course of action. In politics, disinformation is the deliberate attempt to deflect voter support of an opponent, disseminating false statements of innuendo based on the candidates vulnerabilities as revealed by opposition research. In both cases, it also includes the distortion of true information in such a way as to render it useless. Disinformation may include distribution of forged

information

Facts provided or learned about something or someone.

documents, manuscripts, and photographs, or spreading malicious rumors and fabricated intelligence. Its techniques may also be found in commerce and government, used to try to undermine the position of a competitor. A classic example of disinformation occurred during World War II, preceding the Normandy landings, in what would be known as Operation Fortitude. British intelligence convinced the German Armed Forces that a much larger invasion force was about to cross the English Channel from Kent, England. In reality, the Normandy landings were the main attempt at establishing a beachhead, made easier by the German Command’s reluctance to commit its armies. Another act of World War II–era disinformation was Operation Mincemeat, where British intelligence dressed up a corpse, equipped it with fake invasion plans, and floated it out to sea where Axis troops would eventually recover it. Conspiracy theorists often accuse governments of spreading disinformation in a “war for your mind”, but also sometimes accuse each other of being “disinformation agents”. The problem especial in the conspiracy field is with disinformation is the muddying the water. To objectively look at current events one must be able to attain the facts and with the use of disinformation this could be come an ever greater harder task. Along with this disinformation can send down the wrong pathways ultimately ending in the absurd therefore discrediting the conspiracy movement as a whole

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Media

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The main means of mass communication regarded collectively

Believe


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our years ago on May 1, President Bush landed on the aircraft carrier USS Lincoln wearing a flight suit ... in front of a giant “Mission Accomplished” banner. He was hailed by media stars as a “breathtaking” example of presidential leadership in toppling Saddam Hussein. Despite profound questions over the failure to locate weapons of mass destruction and the increasing violence in Baghdad, many in the press confirmed the White House’s claim that the war was won.

press. While almost all the claims would eventually prove to be false, the drumbeat of misinformation about WMDs went virtually unchallenged by the media. “Buying the War” examines the press coverage in the lead-up to the war as evidence of a paradigm shift in the role of journalists in democracy and asks, four years after the invasion, what’s changed? “More and more the media become ... common carriers of administration statements,” says the Washington Post’s Walter Pincus. “We’ve sort of given up being independent on our own.”

How did the mainstream press get it so wrong? How did the evidence disputing the existence of weapons of mass destruction and the link between Saddam Hussein to 9-11 continue to go largely unreported? In the run-up to war, skepticism was a rarity among journalists inside the Beltway. The [PBS “Buying the War”] program analyzes the stream of unchecked information from administration sources and Iraqi defectors to the mainstream print and broadcast

Freedom of the press entails having access to people and events, the ability to collect news and information, as well as the ability to distribute information and our right as citizens to receive the information. In the case of political disputes, violent conflict and war each of these elements is at risk. Indeed, the first casualty of war is truth.

Media

The main means of mass communication regarded collectively

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Adolf

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German Nazi dictator during World War II

By the skillful and sustained use of propaganda one can make a people see even heaven as hell or an extremely wretched life as Paradise


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Hitler

German Nazi dictator during World War II

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War

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A state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state.

“One cannot wage war under present conditions without the support of public opinion, which is tremendously molded by the press and other froms of propaganda�

- Douglas MacArther


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ar propaganda is that branch of public relations devoted to manipulating people’s attitude toward a war or war in general, rather than engaging in open dialogue. It includes both pro-war propaganda, by governments and war industrialists, and anti-war propaganda by pacifists or enemy sympathizers. What makes it propaganda isn’t the sincerity or insincerity of its originators but its methods of media manipulation, going beyond lies to misdirection, loaded vocabulary, staged events, and fallacious demagoguery, all of which can be justified/rationalized by a ‘good’ cause, whether patriotic or idealistic. To be fully effective, war propaganda requires the compliance of a nation’s journalism establishment and its willingness to curtail its role as watchdog and become a lapdog, passing on government propaganda. War propaganda is used to confuse and demoralize enemies and also to influence public opinions in friendly countries. Often, a nation at war uses propaganda to influence its own citizens. According to British scholar F.M. Cornford, “Propaganda is that branch of the art of lying which consists in very nearly deceiving your friends without quite deceiving your enemies.” Between states it may involve lying about the potential for new weapons, which can either impress opponents

War

A state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state.

into dealing, or convince them that something which is feasible is in fact not, to give the disinforming party a headstart in researching the weapon or technology. Propaganda versus democracy is frequently debated in political science - there is a natural tension between government, which must keep secrets sometimes, and the right of the governed to know what is going on and consent. To obtain consent for war with minimal effort, many standard techniques have been employed: Terrorism as propaganda to excuse invasive and confiscatory measures due to the “constant threat” which may in fact be manufactured or funded by one’s own government but serve as an excuse for foreign wars or domestic terror, e.g. Burning the Reichstag. Cooked intelligence selectively shared to increase public fear or willingness to support a war, e.g. War on Iraq During a war, almost any unusual event can be exploited for positive publicity to “prove” how “bad” the enemy is, or how “uncertain” the situation was or is in the country (should one’s own troops do something wrong) - thus the troops are brave and good. After a war, “feel good” stories are employed to convince voters that they did the right thing, and should support future wars, and the leaders that lead them.

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Conspiracy

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A belief that some covert but influential organization is responsible for an unexplained event.

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onspiracy propaganda refers to an approach to contemporary events which is usually opposite to the Mainstream propaganda. News and events are blended through a conspiratorial view of History, according to which, major events (wars, terrorist attacks, economic crisis, etc.) are planned by a covert international elite of entrepreneurs, intellectuals, journalists and politicians.

They serve an ultimate goal, world domination,

This elite decides the course of actions in secret meetings, as the annual meeting of the Bilderberg group and the Bohemian Grove. Its members take part in occult ceremonies, and they belong to think tanks and groups as the Council of Foreign Relations (CFR) and the Trilateral Commission, and to secret societies like the Skull and Bones.

All this mass of data is characterized here as propaganda, not because it is because it should be dogmatically disproved without examination, but because it is usually presented as opposite to the Mainstream propaganda and because, everyone who follows Conspiracy propaganda gradually tends to became an inverse dogmatic rationalist, he considers dogmatically false anything coming from Mainstream propaganda.

which in this context, is described by a specific use of the political term New World Order. In the context of Conspiracy propaganda, belong also allegations about UFOs being covert government programs, accusations about chemtrails being chemicals deliberately sprayed in the atmosphere, testimonies about the existence of secret governmental Mind Control programs and underground bases, etc.

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Conspiracy

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We now live in a nation where docters destroy health, lawyers destroy justice, universities destroy knowledge, goverments destroy freedom, the press destroy information, religion destroys, morals and our banks destroy the economy -Michael Ellner

A belief that some covert but influential organization is responsible for an unexplained event.

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You’ve just switched on the Propaganda Machine Do you hold the remote to it, or does it to you? How to seperate the wheat from the chaff? how to identify the journalists crying wolf from the whistleblowers being muzzled? 29. 29.

You consume their lies churning the misinformation inside; paraphrasing excerpts of half-truths and summarised lies They stimulate sensationalism and stifle questioning minds Digitally touched-up photographs being taken out of context and misquotations pull the wool over your eyes like the blanket of ignorance that incinerates whatever education you had before switching to the Propaganda Machine


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If you Look Before you Leap? 3. 3.

How is he who Hesitates Lost?


2. 2.



Proselytist