Page 1

D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8 / J A N U A RY 2 0 1 9 THE OUT 100

QUEER EYE THE CAST OF

E N T E R TA I N E R S O F T H E Y E A R

No 280

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN SCHOELLER


18777 Absolut Vodka spread OUT100.indd 2

11/3/18 12:15 AM


18777 Absolut Vodka spread OUT100.indd 3

11/3/18 12:15 AM


CONTENTS DEC

N UA RY 2019

T he O ut 10 0

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN SCHOELLER

280_01_TOC1_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 2

60 SOPHIE photographed by

Martin Schoeller. Styling by Mindy Le Brock Shirt by Diane von Furstenberg. Shorts by Marina Hoermanseder

M A K EU P : CH RI STI N A WALTZ. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N LOS AN G E L ES

56-131 Our vibrant celebration of the most influential LGBTQ people of the year, starring Emma Gonzรกlez, Billy Porter, SOPHIE, the cast of Queer Eye, Cynthia Nixon, Hayley Kiyoko, and many more

11/5/18 7:46 PM


18784 Cadillac unmistakable.indd 1

10/29/18 12:11 PM


“Your authenticity is your ticket to being seen.�

Masters_of_Style_2018_102518_edit.indd 4

11/5/18 8:21 PM


Photography by Matt Monath

“And through my art, my friends, and listening to myself, I got to a point where I decided I would live on my own terms while honoring where I came from.” C H A R L I E C A R V E R H A S L O N G F O U N D I N S P I R A T I O N in both honoring tradition and redefining it. This impulse can be seen in the actor’s most notable projects, like MTV’s Teen Wolf, a series that added queer subtext to the classic ‘80s film that inspired it, and the recent Broadway revival of The Boys in the Band, a gay touchstone that rather defiantly cast all openly gay actors for the new incarnation. In his life, Carver thrives in balancing that same mix of the time-honored and the slightly radical. Charlie Carver’s talent is unmistakable “There are a lot of pressures coming from a background with the expectation of having to uphold this American notion of what it means to be a man,” the 30-year-old says. “And through my art, my friends, and listening to myself, I got to a point where I decided I would live on my own terms while still honoring where I came from.”

Masters_of_Style_2018_102518_edit.indd 5

11/5/18 8:21 PM


ADVERTISEMENT

In his youth, Carver split his time between living in the Napa Valley and exploring his birthplace of San Francisco, a city that both fostered his future as a performer and encouraged him to express his personal style. While attending a performing arts high school, he remembers that he and his peers were thought of by the faculty as “wild children trying to go to big cities and make it.” There he began to define himself as having a slight “sense of mischief, and just a willingness to upset expectation and have fun.” Charlie’s sense of style helped him stand out and later led to him being discovered while he was shopping for clothes in Los Angeles. The encounter would lead him to his first TV role as the rebellious Porter Scavo on Desperate Housewives. Today, for Carver, merging tradition and rebellion involves digging into his all-American heritage and queering it in his own way. For example, he says he sometimes has an urge “to do Hollywood drag, like Steve McQueen, or Marlon Brando, or James Dean, then put a spin on it somehow.” Or, to add some flash to a garment, or to spice up a tailored jacket, he might grab some pins that belonged to his grandfather, who was involved with marine-life conservation. “They’re a little gaudy, but they were beautifully made,” Carver says. “I tack them on, even if they’re behind a lapel or something. It’s sort of my own little language. On the set of Out’s Master of Style shoot, Carver explains that even winding down, for him, has a “touch of the unconventional—and a sense of adventure”, similar to the ethos of the 2019 Cadillac XT4 that he was shooting with. He says that his self-care involves taking a pause and sometimes taking himself on solo dates, whether it’s to the movies or for a drive, preferably along Highway 1 from LA to San Francisco, where everything started for him. “It’s a little scary,” Carver says of the route. “There are no guard rails. But it’s the most rugged cliff’s-edge drive you’ll have ever have, and it’s pretty great. There’s nothing like rolling down the windows and feeling the roar of the engine underneath you.” Carver may be a rebel, but he’s a rebel with a cause, and if he has anything to impart to queer youth, it’s his own philosophy of how glancing back can help you forge ahead. “Hold part of yourself for yourself,” he says, “but at the same time, don’t be afraid. Your authenticity is your ticket to being seen as having something special to offer.” For more on the XT4 & Charlie Car ver, follow: @charliecar ver @cadillac @outmagazine Or visit Cadillac.com

6 M A R C H 2016 OUT

Masters_of_Style_2018_102518_edit.indd 6

CREDIT TK

11/5/18 8:21 PM


18785 Driving is Wonderful.indd 1

10/29/18 12:11 PM


CONTENTS DECEM

UA RY 2019

S y mp o siu m

Fore g rou nd

43. LOVE IN THE TIME OF UNCERTAINTY Colman Domingo and the necessity of Barry Jenkins’s If Beale Street Could Talk

17. A VESSEL AND A VOICE LP stays the course of delivering her guttural pop-rock with a new album. 20-27. THE AGENDA Everything in pop culture you should be talking about right now

46. INSTA-EROTICA Martin Bedolla is one of many artists navigating Instagram as their key outlet for homoerotic portfolios.

28, 30, 31. TRENDING Puffers, pop art, and boots 35. GROOMING Winter wear

49. A HISTORY OF TRANS MODELS Proof that they are not a trend but part of an undervalued and underrepresented past

36. THE GETAWAY New York’s other holiday inns 38. KITCHEN 411 Kristen Kish and her hot new eatery

50. THE NAUGHTY LIST Miss Tiger’s guide to gifting no-nos

41. LIQUIDITY The audacity of amaro

58

51. ARE PASSPORTS THE NEW BATTLEGROUND FOR TRANS RIGHTS? Transgender Americans fear new hurdles in renewing identity documents.

Billy Porter photographed by

Martin Schoeller. Styling by Brandon Garr Shirt and pants by Bottega Veneta. Glasses by Native Ken. Necklace by Dior Homme

O rbit

DEPARTMENTS 12. Editor’s Letter 14. Contributors and Feedback 135. Store Info 136. 4,000 Words

132. Gift Guide The season’s hottest items for jet-setters, chic homemakers, and grooming gurus

DECEMBER 2018 / JANUARY 2019. Volume 27, Number 5 Out (ISSN 1062-7928) is published monthly except for double issues in December/January and June/July by Here Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 241579, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Telephone: (310) 806-4288. Entire contents © 2012 Here Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Reproductions in whole or in part without express permission of the publisher are strictly prohibited. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $19.95 per year (10 issues). Annual subscription rate outside the U.S.: $54, payable in U.S. currency only. Postmaster: Send changes of address to Out magazine, P.O. Box 5236, New York, NY 10185. Out is distributed to newsstands by Curtis Circulation Co. Printed in the United States of America.

280_01_TOC2_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 8

11/5/18 7:46 PM


T:8" S:7"

S:10"

Great Taste. Only 96 Calories. MILLER LITE. HOLD TRUE.

18762 Miller Lite 280 snowglobe.indd 1

10/4/18 2:52 PM

T:10.875"

BE MERRY AND LITE


R. Kurt Osenlund Executive Editor

Joe Valentino Executive Vice President, Publisher Stuart Brockington Assistant Vice President, Associate Publisher

EDITORIAL

Alexander Kacala Deputy Editor Coco Romack Managing Editor Bobby Schuessler Editorial Director, Digital Rose Dommu Culture Editor, Digital Dennis Hinzmann Associate Editor Paul Bui Creative Director, Digital Brandon Presser Travel Editor Glenn Garner News Editor, Digital Chris Thomas Editor at Large Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves, Amelia Weiss Copy Editors Alex Blynn, Shana Naomi Krochmal, Thomas Rom, Mikelle Street, Armond White Contributing Editors Trey Strange Editorial Intern ART

David Gray Design Director Nick Mrozowski Senior Art Director FASHION

ADVERTISING

Joel Shoemaker Executive Director, Business Development Adam Goldberg Executive Director, Integrated Sales Ezra Alvarez Executive Director, Integrated Sales Paige Popdan Executive Director, Integrated Sales Stewart Nacht Senior Director, Ad Operations Tiffany Kesden Manager, Ad Operations Michael Tighe Senior Coordinator BRANDED PARTNERSHIPS

Greg Brossia Executive Vice President, Branded Partnerships Michael Lombardo Designer Brandon Grant, Jamie Treadwell Directors, Branded Partnerships Andrew Park, Eric James, John O’Malley, Michael Riggio Associate Directors, Branded Partnerships Casey Noble Manager, Branded Partnerships SOCIAL AND BRANDED CONTENT

Grant Woolhead Fashion Director Michael Cook Fashion and Market Editor Hank Griffin, Sean Rodriguez Fashion Interns

Daniel Reynolds Senior Editor, Social Media Ian Martella Social Media Editor

PHOTO

Argus Galindo Senior Fulfillment Manager Phone (212) 920-2844

CIRCULATION

Tirzah Brott Photo Director ONLINE

Eric Bui Vice President, Development Dave Johnson Creative Director, Digital Media Christopher Harrity Interactive Art Director, Editorial Tevy Khou, Michael Luong Online Photo and Graphics Producers Mayra Urrutia Front End Developer Kevin Bissada Traffic Manager Laura Villela Manager, Digital Media OPERATIONS

Kirk Pacheco Operations Director Heidi Medina Office Manager PRODUCTION

FINANCE / ACCOUNTING

Wayne Holland, James Ilario, Betsy Skidmore, Lorelie Yu PRIDE MEDIA

Nathan Coyle Chief Executive Officer Orlando Reece Chief Revenue Officer Bernard Rook Corporate Executive Vice President Eric Bui Vice President LOS ANGELES ADVERTISING AND CORPORATE OFFICES

P.O. Box 241579, Los Angeles, CA 90024 Phone (310) 806-4288 Fax (310) 806-4268 Email adinfo@out.com

John Lewis Print Production Director

NEW YORK ADVERTISING OFFICES

EASTERN EDITORIAL

P.O. Box 5236, New York, NY 10185 Phone (212) 242-8100 Fax (212) 242-8338 Email adinfo@out.com

Phone (646) 724-1660 Fax (212) 242-8338 Email letters@grandeditorial.com WESTERN EDITORIAL

P.O. Box 241579, Los Angeles, CA 90024 Phone (310) 806-4288 Fax (310) 806-4268

For new subscriptions, renewals, bill payments, and address changes, go to www.Out.com/Services, email us at subscriptions@out.com, or write to: Customer Service, Here Publishing, P.O. Box 5236, New York, N.Y. 10185.

Out is a registered trademark of Here Publishing Inc. Founders Michael Goff, Bob Hardman ©2009 Here Publishing Inc.

280_Masthead_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 10

11/5/18 7:24 PM


T:7.875” S:7”

M U S I C

F E S T I V A L

W I T H

WATCH ON DEMAND

18774 AT&T Love Loud.indd 1

A

M I S S I O N

DIRECTV

U-VERSE

CH.1239

CH.1114

10/17/18 11:30 AM

T:10.875”

S:10.125”

T H E


D E C E M B E R

20 1 8

/

J A N UA RY 20 1 9

EDITOR’S L ET TER

Generations THIS PAST JUNE, I read an article in The New York Times by Amanda Duarte. Near the end of the article, Duarte wrote, “The young are leading us, and I am not one bit mad about it.” The statement alluded to political topics, but Duarte’s piece wasn’t in the Times’s Politics section. It was a sharp and lively review of the season 10 finale of RuPaul’s Drag Race, and Duarte was talking about Aquaria, the season’s 22-year-old winner. Aquaria is included in this year’s Out100, and Duarte’s quote about youth stuck with me as I curated our portfolio, more than half of which is made up of honorees under age 35. Not only did Duarte’s piece signify how deeply queerness has penetrated the mainstream (thanks in part to this year’s Media Pioneers and Drag Race masterminds Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey), it celebrated the fact that youth, particularly queer youth, are shaping the way we live now. Young queer people embody the progress no one can stop. They are inflexibly done with systemic ugliness and toxic traditions. Unaccepting of anything that centers around a single, tired narrative, they are forcing change in the way society views normalcy, uses pronouns, embraces intersectionality, and creates media. They are heroes, like our Newsmaker of the Year, Emma González, who, alongside her tragedy-stricken classmates, decided she was sick of waiting for someone else to prevent yet more students from being murdered at school. Also in this Out100, we have Jaboukie Young-White, a gay, black, breakout comedian who fuels his work with the immediacy of his own experience; Hayley Kiyoko, an Asian-American lesbian pop star whose demand to be herself has only amplified her success; Adam Eli, an indefatigable activist who places his Judaism front-and-center with his queerness; and Josie Totah, a 17-year-old trans actress of Palestinian and Lebanese descent who challenges the notion of when’s “too soon” for someone to assume their identity. And yet, revolutions rarely come without paved roads, and while this new generation is defiantly molding what our future will look like, they and we would be unwise not to celebrate those who made modern queerness possible. This Out100 is also richly populated by more seasoned LGBTQ people— survivors who’ve lived through times when holding your lover’s hand in public was unthinkable, and when holding your lover’s hand for the last time was terribly common. These are folks who can pass on hard-won tools for resilience, like Billy Porter, our recipient of Performance of the Year, a man whose personal past and professional discrimination—against his skin color, sexual orientation, or both—didn’t stop him from crafting some of the most iconic characters in entertainment. In his company is our Hero of the Year, Cynthia Nixon, an actor-turned-politician whose run for New York Governor brought unprecedented queer visibility to a whole new arena; Dr. Renée Richards, an 84-year-old (still practicing) 12 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_08_EdLetter_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 8

“Even within our community, teachability is our strongest weapon against ignorance.” ophthalmologist who underwent gender confirmation surgery in the 1970s before competing in the U.S. Open; Hannah Gadsby, a stunningly candid Tasmanian lesbian who upended all we know about comedy with one earthshaking Netflix special; and Mickalene Thomas, a black female artist whose distinct, astounding body of work has been firmly focused on celebrating the beauty of women of color. When shaping this portfolio, we encouraged a discourse between generations, asking them what they could learn from each other, as even within our community, teachability is our strongest weapon against ignorance. The responses are profound and enlightening, and they’ve created a through line that snakes its way through these pages and complements the breathtaking photography by Martin Schoeller, an artist with the energy, enthusiasm, and wide-minded curiosity of an untainted child. Schoeller’s sensibilities were essential, as this is also the most diverse Out100 to ever go to press. That is not just an intentional choice; that is a necessary reflection. Because if we look at our current culture, and our current community, we do not see one color, one gender identity, one size, one shape, one sexual orientation, or one age. We see an exhilarating spectrum of all of the above, and it is the responsibility and privilege of Out to rejoice in that. The key hope of mine, and of my devoted team members like Coco Romack, Alexander Kacala, David Gray, Tirzah Brott, Mikelle Street, Michael Cook, Grant Woolhead, Alex Blynn, and Trey Strange is that no matter who you are or how you identify within our community, you will see some part of yourself and your experience reflected in this portfolio. And if you do, then we have done our job well. R. KURT OSENLUND, Executive Editor PHOTOGR APHY BY MARTIN SCHOELLER

11/5/18 7:24 PM


© 2018 Lenox Corporation

Life’s not so formal

18780 Lenox not so formal.indd 1

NEW Lenox Tuscany Classics Barware Collection www.lenox.com/tuscany

10/23/18 4:36 PM


DECEMBER 2018 / JANUARY 2019

CONTR I BUTOR S

MONICA CASTILLO

MARTIN SCHOELLER Our annual Out100 portfolio can be a daunting task for even the most seasoned photographers. This year, we looked to Martin Schoeller to breathe life into our “Generations” theme, and his inventive portraiture didn’t disappoint. “It was inspiring and a great learning experience working with so many people from the LGBTQ community,” he says. “I heard so many personal stories about struggles, obstacles, and victories.” For some, shooting 100 subjects—in a cross-continental, two-month marathon—would cloud their memory, but Schoeller, whose iconic work has been featured in National Geographic, Time, GQ, and many other outlets, recalls so many highlights. “I tried to be playful, to experiment, and to capture each [subject’s] personality,” he says. “Jill Soloway was so full of optimism, Indya Moore didn’t want to leave and we shot for many hours, Rain Dove is pushing boundaries, and to see Yves Mathieu dancing is mesmerizing.” Schoeller also loved undertaking this project in this specific moment in time. “I felt proud to be a tiny part of this important movement,” he said. “It was an experience that will stay with me forever.”

On the day of her phone interview with our cover star Emma González (page 62), Monica Castillo had to duck into a hallway between two offices and brave patchy reception to speak with the teenage activist. “We managed to share a lively conversation despite the bumps,” says Castillo. “She has so much wisdom to share.” Castillo has long written about film and Latinx issues, and she’s been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Guardian.

OGATA Photographing Colman Domingo (page 43) was like “filming a great movie,” said photographer Ogata. “His performance was just fantastic,” he said, recalling how Domingo moved as if he were telling a story. Ogata’s work has previously been featured in Surface magazine, with his cover of architect Tadao Ando being nominated for ASME Best Cover in 2016.

ON TH E COVE R S Billy Porter, SOPHIE, the cast of Queer Eye, and Emma González, photographed by Martin Schoeller

FE E DBACK Out’s November cover merged fashion, youth, the ever-growing power of social media, and a message celebrating the (long overdue) increased visibility of queer black men. Dressed head to toe in Dries van Noten, former Vine star and current Instagram sensation Rickey Thompson made the cover sing, and readers and followers were quick to sing its praises. “KING,” WROTE GRAMMY

winner Sam Smith on Thompson’s personal Instagram page. The contemporary millennial lexicon was on full display (between balls of fi re and heart-eyes emojis), aligning with Thompson’s verbiage.

“SO NICE TO SEE a queer black man expressing himself in all different aspects and thriving,” wrote Instagram user @kewwss on Out’s post of Thompson’s cover. Sandra Gonzalez praised our selection, saying: “You did right by picking Rickey!!!! Amazing cover.” THROUGH THE ENDLESS

exclamations of “Yass” and “Gaggg,” the cover also affected people who identify with Thompson. “It means a lot to me to see someone that looks like me (black and queer) on the cover,” user @iamnijai told Out. “You may not see it, but the diverse cover and the diverse content is making a difference for all of the marginalized groups that rarely see themselves represented.”

Porter: Styling by Brandon Garr. Sweater by Louis Vuitton. Coat by Bottega Veneta. Glasses by Native Ken SOPHIE: Styling by Mindy Le Brock. Dress and necklace available at Pechuga Vintage Queer Eye: Styling by Katie Woolley and Aneila Wendt. Brown: Jacket by The Very Warm; shirt by Abercrombie & Fitch. Van Ness: Sweater by Alexander Wang. France: Suit by Thom Browne; sweater by Zara. Berk: Sweater by H&M. Porowski: Jacket by Balmain; T-shirt by Hanes x Karla González: Styling by Michael Cook. Shirt by 3.1 Phillip Lim

COU RT ESY O F KATHY RYAN ( SCH O E LL E R )

Rickey Revelations

14 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_02_Letters_Contribs_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 14

11/5/18 7:42 PM


DEAR HIV, ’ WE DIDN T GIVE UP. XOXO, SCIENCE There is no cure, but science is still in the battle against HIV. Today’s HIV treatments may help you get to undetectable. That means the amount of virus is so low it can’t be measured in lab tests. Ask your healthcare provider about HIV and treatment options.

Learn about an HIV-1 treatment option at

TM

XOXOSCIENCE.COM

XOXOSCIENCE.COM, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. © 2018 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC5531 05/18

18727 Gilead Didn't Give Up OUT.indd 1

8/16/18 2:44 PM


Indochine_resize.indd 11 18433_Indochine.indd

8/22/17 7:44 3/31/18 3:56 PM PM


FOREGROUND

Incoming

A VESSEL AND A VOICE WITH HER NEW ALBUM, HEART TO MOUTH, LP STAYS THE COURSE OF DELIVERING HER GUTTURAL, DEVIL-MAY-CARE BRAND OF POP-ROCK. BY OWEN MYERS. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARREN CRAIG

280_02_Opener_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 17

11/5/18 7:42 PM


IF LIFE CAN FEEL like steering a wayward ship through uncertain tides, then LP’s genre-spanning guitar music peels off the barnacles underneath. With even-keeled honesty and a singing voice as potent as aged bourbon, the rakish New York-born songwriter has created soaring indie-rock out of mental strife, the pain and pathos of relationships, and hot-blooded queer intimacy. The gospel-driven “Muddy Waters,” released in 2015, exemplified those sensibilities and amplified the heart-pounding claustrophobia of the climactic scene in season 4 of Orange Is the New Black, in which an inmate brandishes a gun at a corrections officer. “The past two years have been incredible on a professional level,” LP says, speaking in low, easygoing tones that bring to mind the drawl of a Woodstock rocker. “But just because things are going good in your career doesn’t mean that you’re, like, shitting out rainbows.” On her eclectic fifth album, LP’s close-to-the-bone songwriting is emboldened by lusty explorations into dance-pop and arena-size rock. Its title, Heart to Mouth, she says, is a rubric for the emotional transparency of her music. Her voice glides and growls on its lead single, “Recovery,” a very 21st-century twist on a breakup ballad. “I feel that I am, for the lack of a better term, a fucking love addict,” LP says, with a short laugh. “I’ve gone from one relationship to the next, and I’m analyzing myself a bit.” The song was partly inspired by the navigations of social media that a breakup now calls for. You know, when you’re trying to get over an ex that still watches all your Instagram Stories. It seems like the open outlook of her songwriting has bled into her personal life, too. Her dog, an adorable Brussels Griffon named Orson Johnny Valentine, boasts an Instagram with a cool 13.8k followers (@everythingisorson). LP runs the account with her fiancée, the indie-rock artist Lauren Ruth Ward. “He had a long, majestic beard, but it got knotted so he had to get it cut,” LP says, as Orson yaps, as if on cue. “He’s so frigging cute, it’s hilarious.”

Born Laura Pergolizzi in the sleepy Long Island hamlet of Huntington Station, LP studied opera from a young age. But upon hearing the raw, dramatic voices of artists like Janis Joplin and Freddie Mercury, she decided to ignore her mother’s pleas not to “popularize” her voice and ventured into the pop world. In 2006, she signed with Def Jam, which put her in “songwriting school” with a smorgasbord of A-list composers, and she co-wrote hit songs like Rihanna’s “Cheers (Drink to That)” and less successful ones like Heidi Montag’s critically savaged 2009 single “More Is More.” LP’s swaggering personal style, which falls somewhere between Joan Jett, Cate Blanchett as Bob Dylan in I’m Not There, and the 1975’s Matty Healy, gives her a look that would make a fantastic poster on some queer kid’s bedroom wall (and likely already does). But Def Jam was unsure how to market an artist who is, as she puts it, “the fucking gayest.” “I think my image has probably worked against me,” she says. “The vastly male, heterosexual-populated music business is not necessarily looking for my type of person.” She currently releases music on Vagrant Records, a subsidiary of BMG. She’s also never bent to the whims of those fat cats in the boardroom, recognizing the power of being wholly and unapologetically herself. “I’ve been consistently open and a part of the community,” she says. “I think there’s still a lack of very high profile [LGBTQ artists]. You have Sam Smith, Adam Lambert, and Troye Sivan. But for lesbian women, [a lack of representation] is still a thing in

“Just because things are going good in your career doesn’t mean that you’re, like, shitting out rainbows.” the music world. You have Melissa Etheridge, you have Tegan and Sara, but, like, who else you got? I just think: Keep going. Things are meant to be incremental, you know. Sometimes you gain more ground by just winning the battles.” Early on in this interview, LP describes her striking, black-ink chest tattoo—which depicts a clipper ship with billowing sails—as being inspired by her turbulent artistic path. “One of the biggest things that I’m really thankful for, as a person and in my career, is my perspective,” she says. “I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I’ve seen so many fucking brilliant artists that I’ve worked with as a writer and never heard about them again.” She gives a low, throaty laugh. “I can really go, ‘Holy shit, I’m a lucky bastard!’” Given LP’s tooth-andnail determination, you suspect that luck has little to do with it.

18 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_02_Opener_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 18

11/5/18 7:42 PM


Love conquers all.

Here in Key West, anything goes. We celebrate diversity and pride 365 days a year. In fact, with everything from gay tours, clothing optional resorts and risqué cabaret to an eclectic art scene and abundant natural wonders, you might say we were out before it was in. fla-keys.com/gaykeywest 305.294.4603

Island House Resort

Key West Marriott

Parrot Key Hotel & Villas

Award-winning clothing-optional resort for men. Luxurious rooms. Poolside café and bar. Gym, sauna, steamroom, Jacuzzis. Poolside massage pavilion. 800-890-6284 or 305-294-6284 islandhousekeywest.com

This Marriott features exceptional suites, upscale amenities, complimentary Wi-Fi, complimentary transportation on the island and one of the finest restaurants. 866-679-5490 or 305-296-8100 keywestmarriott.com

Parrot Key Hotel & Villas is here! Glimmering pools, hammocks and cocktails, festive cuisine all-day – the island life awaits. 888-572-8953 or 305-809-2200 parrotkeyhotel.com

Casa Marina - A Waldorf Astoria Resort

Historic Hideaways

The Reach - A Waldorf Astoria Resort

Key West’s largest private natural beach, toes-in-the-sand dining, two dazzling pools, world-class watersports, rejuvenating spa, steps from Duval Street. 305-296-3535 casamarinaresort.com

An exceptional collection of Key West vacation rentals. Private homes, cottages, condos and townhomes you are sure to love. Weekly-Monthly-Seasonally. 800-654-5131 or 305-294-3064 historichideaways.com

Steps from Duval Street, balconies with every room, private natural beach, spectacular oceanfront dining, sparkling pool & exhilarating watersports. 305-296-5000 reachresort.com

18751 keywest OUT 280.indd 1

MCTKW-3617 Out Magazine LO1 • Dec/Jan

9/26/18 3:02 PM


THE AGENDA 11 things you should be talking about right now

6.

The Gravity of Bird Box Sandra Bullock’s new adventure is on a decimated Earth.

Ella Hunt (center) and Sarah Swire (inset)

Anna and the Apocalypse: Undead & Woke 1.

G E RA RDO JACO N E LLI / COU RT ESY O F O RI ON PICTU R ES ( A POCALYPS E ) . COU RT ESY O F N EO N ( VOX LUX ) . COU RT ESY OF N ETF LIX ( B I R D BOX )

Two stars from this madcap musical weigh in on its resonant themes. Take one part Glee, two parts 28 Days Later, and add a dash of A Christmas Story, and you’ve got Anna and the Apocalypse. This Christmas horror musical teen comedy (say that five times fast) opens November 30—just in time for you to punch up your holiday soundtrack with a chorus of zombie-elves devouring brains. End times are both festive and tuneful in Little Haven, where teenage Anna (Ella Hunt) lives an unenthused life until the threat of apocalypse forces her to step up. Quickly, she becomes a candy cane–wielding warrior straight off the pages of a manga, fending off zombies and fighting to stay alive. “She presented an opportunity to

play a badass teenage girl,” Hunt says of her character. “She’s brave, smart, and sassy but also vulnerable. She’s not your typical teenage heroine.” Among Anna’s friends is Steph (Sarah Swire), whose queer identity is seamlessly woven into the plot. “Steph is many things,” says Swire. “Being queer is just one of them. If she’s ostracized, it’s for her unusual ambition, selfless concerns, and anxious demeanor.” Steph’s deep need to help others becomes challenging as the end encroaches on her crew. For Swire, this speaks to themes that stretch far beyond a movie screen. “Steph is the generational foil to the adults in this movie,” she says, “and she’s reminiscent of my millennial peers. We have jobs that won’t honor our hard work and governments that won’t recognize minorities. If the adults responsible for paving a safe path are incapable of doing so, we’ll find a way to fight for one another to literally survive.” ALEXANDER KACALA

A starkly different apocalyptic film, Bird Box opens with Malorie (Sandra Bullock) delivering a stern and ominous monologue, made all the more unsettling once it’s clear she’s addressing two small children. This sets the tone of director Susanne Bier’s new thriller. Malorie is one of humanity’s few survivors in the wake of an onslaught of unseen creatures that lead people to manic suicide. Also starring Sarah Paulson, Bird Box toggles between events following the creatures’ arrival—with other survivors played by Trevante Rhodes and BD Wong—and five years later, when Malorie treks to a sanctuary with the two kids. Bird Box reminds us that the uncanny and unknowable are far more terrifying than anything rendered by special effects, and Bier creates anxiety around the extent of Malorie’s ruthless survival instincts. JOHN RUSSELL

Sandra Bullock and Sarah Paulson

2-5. Girls on Film: Pop Diva Edition Four fab movies about singing starlets in the spotlight Vox Lux (2018) Natalie Portman plays a weatherworn star in this timely pop drama, which merges a Britneyesque comeback tale with our national scourge of terrorist shootings.

Beyond the Lights (2014) This underrated gem sees a cop (Nate Parker) save a singer (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) from suicide, and deftly argues that love can be a key, not a hindrance, to success.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001) Despite its many stage incarnations, the film of John Cameron Mitchell’s Hedwig is the definitive version for many, who’ve worn out their DVDs watching the trans rocker get her life.

Selena (1997) Tragedy befell Latino star Selena Quintanilla-Pérez, who was murdered in 1995, but she lives on in this biopic, which introduced us to Jennifer Lopez, the actress.

20 D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_02_Agenda_1_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 20

11/5/18 8:02 PM


THE AGENDA

7.

Ismael Cruz Córdova: Holding Court

STYL I N G BY SA RA ALVITI. G ROO M E R : CH RI STI N E N E LLI

For Ismael Cruz Córdova, playing Mando on Sesame Street (2013-14) wasn’t just kid stuff—it was a radical act. “I got to talk about issues that have taken me a lifetime to affirm: loving my skin color, my hair, and my Afro-Latino identity.” Growing up in Puerto Rico with his sisters and his mom, Córdova was influenced by the “strength and resilience” of his female role models. That background amped up his investment in his latest film projects, both featuring strong female leads and both directed by women: Mary Queen of Scots (releasing Dec. 7) and Miss Bala (February 2019). “When the #MeToo movement was in full force, another actor at a coffee shop said to me, ‘It’s all girls now, man. In every job,’” Córdova says. “I said, ‘Well, it’s about fucking time.’” In Mary Queen of Scots, Córdova plays Rizzio, a dynamic and controversial figure in the court of Mary (Saoirse Ronan). Córdova praises director Josie Rourke for presenting something rare for period pieces: a queer character of color. “If we can show people having these conversations 500 years ago, why are we still in a place where people are invalidated?” Córdova says. “Casting someone like me not only opens up opportunities, it’s also a smart party move— literally. I bring music with me always. Between takes, Rizzio and Mary Queen of Scots herself lip-synched to Beyoncé’s ‘Formation.’ It was glorious.” R. KURT OSENLUND

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y R YA N P F L U G E R

280_02_Agenda_BREAKOUT_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 21

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 21

11/5/18 7:46 PM


THE AGENDA

Transitional Sound

The band’s just-announced album is a nostalgic ode to changing friendship. With indie twosome Girlpool’s early releases (such as their 2015 studio debut, Before the World Was Big), Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad always sang together—sweetly harmonizing or belting in unison, but always together. After a few years and some time spent living in different cities, their practice diverged, forcing the friends, who’d previously written all their songs in collaboration, to explore their individual identities and creative processes. When they reconvened in their hometown of Los Angeles to produce their just-announced album, What Chaos Is Imaginary (releasing February 2019), they stuck to their mellow riffs, but also made their vulnerable bellows more somber and adopted electronic elements, taking cues from Michael Jackson and the Cleaners From Venus. The new sound retains Girlpool’s poetic grit while adding a sprinkling of pop polish. And on it, Tucker and Cleo (left) and Harmony of Girlpool

Tividad sing separately. “It’s a transitional sound,” says Tucker, speaking in terms of the contextual and the physical, as the album marks the band’s first work together since Tucker began their bodily transition. “It reflects a changing moment in our sound and in our lives,” Tucker adds. “And obviously, there’s a representation of my transition sonically, through the sound of my voice, even though a lot of these songs were written when this specific change wasn’t even happening.” Tucker notes that some tracks were perfected over four years, and Tividad says, “It creates an interesting relationship between the current self and the past self.” With the slow-andsteady opener, “Lucy’s,” and the dreamy title track, the album summons a cozy haze of nostalgia. It’s music to close your eyes and sink into, a heady and introspective testament to the power of creating, which can mediate processes of forgiveness and healing. It’s also a record of two lives—and one friendship—in flux. “There’s beauty in honoring an emotion in one moment in your life, and just being grateful for that time and that feeling,” Tucker says. “And then releasing that.” COCO ROMACK

The original cast of Rent

9. The

Return of Rent

The ’90s classic comes to TV for another season of love.

Fox is about to reinvigorate Jonathan Larson’s Rent. On January 27, the network is set to air a live-TV update of the Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, exposing a new generation to its tale of young New Yorkers who chase their dreams while grappling with AIDS, addiction, and, yes, angry landlords. The original story is set in the ’90s, but its social and political turmoil keep the narrative timely. “Reaching such a vast audience with Jonathan’s extraordinary material is the most exciting aspect of being able to reinvestigate this piece,” says Michael Greif, who directed the play’s initial New York Theatre Workshop and Broadway productions and will stage direct the TV version, too. The new cast members include a dazzling marquee of young talent, with Vanessa Hudgens as Maureen, Tinashe as Mimi, Brandon Victor Dixon as Tom, and Drag Race alum Valentina as Angel. “I’ve been connected to this story for 25 years,” Greif says, “and I’ve seen its impact on so many young people. It’ll be great to show new young people a glimpse into how intense that time was, and to celebrate the extraordinary activism and cultural changes that came out of the AIDS epidemic.” Greif says Rent heralded a wave of new ways for people to see themselves, and even with stage revivals and a 2005 film adaption, those ways, of course, have evolved much further. “[It’s about] how straight characters and gay characters and characters of color related to one another,” he says, “and the notion of how a family can be formed out of so many different kinds of people.” ALEXANDER KACALA

280_00_Agenda_Rent_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 26

B E N E DI CT B RI N K ( G I RLPOO L ) . JOA N MA RCUS / COU RT ESY OF N EW YORK TH EATR E WO R KSH O P ( R E NT )

8. Girlpool’s

11/5/18 7:46 PM


THE AGENDA

11. L’Enchanteur:

Homespun and SolangeApproved

These queer twins create enigmatic heirlooms that transform lifestyles.

BioGlitz: Your New Guilt-Free Glam

10.

K E LIA A N N E A N D LUCA V E NT E R ( MA I N ) . M A D ISO N KYM B E R L I N ( H O L I DA Y G L ITZ S ET ). SON I A M A L FA ( L’ E NCHA NT EU R )

Glitter gets a responsible revamp in this hot brand’s holiday hues. Queens, beware! All that twinkles this season isn’t necessarily good for Drag Mother Earth. Glitter—as it’s typically found in cosmetics, clothes, furniture, and beyond—is composed of petroleum-based plastic fragments. After it’s tossed in the trash or washed down the drain, it pollutes the environment, is ingested by wildlife, and then poisons our own food supply. If you think the substance is hard to scrub from your stubble, imagine how difficult it is to remove from a fragile ecosystem. Some scientists have called for glitter’s ban altogether and estimate that upwards of 51 trillion microplastic particles stew in the oceans. BioGlitz, minted in 2017 as the first plant-based glitter brand, is shining a whole new light on sparkles with their game-changing biodegradable formula. With a background in sustainable product design, founder Saba Gray collaborated with an BioGlitz’s Triple Threat Holiday Glitz Set

English manufacturer to develop the glitter through a process that involves transforming cellulose derived from eucalyptus into rolls of plastic that are then coated in cosmetic pigments and .1 percent aluminum, then cut. (Some more happy news: The low metal percentage means this bling will stick to your floor less than usual.) This holiday season, BioGlitz reveals a new glitter set including hues in yuletide silver and gold, plus an always festive rainbow mix, which will have you responsibly outshining that decked-out evergreen in your grandmother’s living room. “We hope to inspire lasting change in the beauty industry as a model of sustainability,” Gray says, and that ethos extends beyond makeup products, too. “There is a reason glitter has always been a staple in the queer community. It’s an armor against a world that says you have to look a specific way and fit into a mold. Sustainability isn’t just about creating eco-friendly alternatives, but also about inspiring fundamental changes to the fabric of society so that we can all start to view life as something sacred to be celebrated and protected.” COCO ROMACK

“L’Enchanteur exemplifies the saying ‘Two heads are better than one,’” says Soull Ogun, who in 2013 launched the luxury accessory and clothing line with her identicaltwin sister, Dynasty. Inspired by numerology, folklore, and a fascination with the ephemeral, the sisters have developed a practice that reimagines everyday items as modern-day heirlooms. “As twins, our art has a similar paradigm but still has unique aesthetics,” Soull says. “Each piece we develop showcases that.” At the core of the sisters’ artistry is a keen ability to transmute the otherwise quotidian into

Soull and Dynasty Ogun

something more opulent. Their L’E Durag collection recently caught the interest of Solange Knowles, who included several styles in Saint Heron’s online Small Matter shop in October. The two also launched an art exhibit around the durags and are currently working on an installation for Art Basel Miami in December. “We want people to feel inspired and empowered on their journey of self-exploration,” Soull says. “It’s important for our designs to raise consciousness and for our community to be inspired to explore those feelings.” STEPHANIE SMITH-STRICKLAND O UT D E C E M B E R 2 01 8 / J A N UA RY 2 019 27

280_00_Agenda_BioGlitz_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 27

11/5/18 9:54 PM


Puff, Puff, Panache

Season after season, the sleek businesswear overcoat was the hottest way to keep warm, with added layering if the piece couldn’t do the job alone. But with climate change suggesting that winters will only get colder, the preference for a sharp silhouette is waning in favor of staving off the cold. Your best defense is fashion’s take on the puffer jacket, which keeps your body’s temperature high by swaddling it

28 D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_02_Trend_Puffers_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 28

in goose down. Brands like The North Face and Moncler have been delivering fare like this for years, but others—like Prada, and Thom Browne—are getting in on the game by offering just about any option you can imagine. Quilted, camo, and plaid variations are all available—and if you opt for Valentino, you can even snag something full-length. When the chill sets in, you’ll be ready with the softest, chicest body armor. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y R YA N S L A C K

11/5/18 7:41 PM

STYL I N G BY M I CH A E L COO K. G ROOM E R : SCOT T MCM AH A N. MO D E LS : PAC E CH E N AT O N E M O D E L M A N AG E M E NT A N D A N DR EW TROY AT H E RO ES M OD E L MA N AG E M E NT. CASTI N G : E RI C CA NO

FOREGROUND: TRENDING


STYL I N G BY M I CH A E L COO K. G ROOM E R : SCOT T MCM AH A N. MO D E LS : PAC E CH E N AT O N E M O D E L M A N AG E M E NT A N D A N DR EW TROY AT H E RO ES M OD E L MA N AG E M E NT. CASTI N G : E RI C CA NO

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: JACKET, $1,595, AND VEST, $1,095, BY DUNHILL; PANTS, $790, BY BOTTEGA VENETA. JACKET (OUTER), $1,590, AND JACKET (INNER), $1,690, BY VALENTINO; PANTS, $285, BY THEORY. COAT, $1,650, VEST, $1,310, AND SHIRT, $1,310, BY PRADA. COAT (AROUND WAIST), $249, BY THE NORTH FACE; COAT, $750, BY NO.21. VEST (INNER), $798, BY JOHN VARVATOS. JACKET (AROUND WAIST), $249, BY THE NORTH FACE; VEST, $1,450, BY MONCLER; JACKET, $790, BY TOMMY HILFIGER. COAT (OUTER), $1,095, BY 3.1 PHILLIP LIM; COAT (MIDDLE), $5,500, BY THOM BROWNE; COAT (INNER), $250, BY G-STAR RAW

OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 29

280_02_Trend_Puffers_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 29

11/5/18 7:42 PM


CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: JACKET, $6,950, AND SWEATER, $2,950, BY

Wearing all black may be the easiest way to dress, but this season, try your hand at mixing up colors. For inspiration, look back to the 1970s and 1980s, when the work of Ohio-born artist Patrick Nagel was ubiquitous and featured vibrant hues in eye-catching combinations. If his Art Deco aesthetic was good enough for the album covers of Charlene and Duran Duran, it can surely punch up your own image. To help you pull this off, brands like Bottega Veneta have turned out a selection of geometrically printed, color-saturated outerwear that does the work for you. If you’re feeling more self-sufficient and have a discerning eye, try layering a few monochromatic statement pieces, such as jewel-toned options from Valentino or Ermenegildo Zegna Couture. Your look will pop, and it’ll make for a more personal composition. 30 D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_02_Trend_Nagel_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 30

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE. SWEATER, $1,550, AND TURTLENECK (WORN UNDERNEATH), $850, BY HERMÈS. COAT, $2,200, JACKET, $1,200, AND PANTS, $650, BY VALENTINO; SHOES, $750, BY ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE. COAT, $3,900, AND SWEATER, $1,750, BY BOTTEGA VENETA

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y R YA N S L A C K

11/5/18 7:41 PM

TKTKTKTK

Art Pop Couture

T K T K ITNKGT KBY M I CH A E L COOK. G ROO M E R : SCOT T MCMA HA N. MO D E L : MOU SSA K E ITA AT N EW YOR K M O D E L M AN AG E M E NT. CASTI NG : E R I C CA NO STYL

FOREGROUND: TRENDING


STYLI N G BY M ICH A E L COO K. G ROOM E R : SCOT T MCM AH A N. MO D E LS : PAC E CH E N AT O N E M O D E L M A NAG E M E NT, A N DR EW TROY AT H E RO ES M OD E L M A N AG E M E NT, A N D M OU SSA K E ITA AT N EW YORK MOD E L MANAG E M E NT. CASTI NG : E RIC CANO

FOREGROUND: TRENDING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BOOTS, $179.50, BY TOMMY HILFIGER TOMMY X LEWIS COLLECTION; SOCKS, $40, BY ANONYMOUS ISM, AVAILABLE AT MRPORTER .COM. BOOTS, $1,200, BY HERMÈS; SOCKS, $24, BY FALKE. BOOTS, $1,845, BY LOUIS VUITTON; SOCKS, $28, BY FALKE. BOOTS, $950, BY THOM BROWNE; SOCKS, $35, BY MR P, AVAILABLE AT MRPORTER .COM. BOOTS, $1,725, BY VERSACE; SOCKS, $24, BY FALKE

Stomp in Style High fashion has routinely found inspiration in the most utilitarian apparel. The contents of a day laborer’s closet, though built for function, can be a treasure trove that inspires the collections of some of the most esteemed designers. The current everyday item that’s been dusted off and recast as a luxurious must-have? The hiking boot. Even if the only place you’ll be hiking to is your next meeting a few blocks away (or up to the second level of your favorite club), fashion mainstays like Tommy Hilfiger, Thom Browne, and Hermès will have you trekking in style with new boots that evoke a work-intensive look. Meanwhile, Louis Vuitton has rendered its own take in metallics with golden hardware, and Versace has added a little extra height in the sole. No matter which pair you choose, don’t let their high-end prestige scare you away from putting them to use. Boots, as we all know, were made for walking. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y R YA N S L A C K

280_02_Trend_Boots_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 31

O UT D EC E M B E R 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 31

11/5/18 8:07 PM


What is BIKTARVY®? BIKTARVY is a complete, 1-pill, once-a-day prescription medicine used to treat HIV-1 in adults. It can either be used in people who have never taken HIV-1 medicines before, or people who are replacing their current HIV-1 medicines and whose healthcare provider determines they meet certain requirements. BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about BIKTARVY? BIKTARVY may cause serious side effects: ` Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. If you have both HIV-1 and HBV and stop taking BIKTARVY, your HBV may suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking BIKTARVY without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to monitor your health.

Who should not take BIKTARVY? Do not take BIKTARVY if you take: ` dofetilide ` rifampin ` any other medicines to treat HIV-1

What are the other possible side effects of BIKTARVY? Serious side effects of BIKTARVY may also include: ` Changes in your immune system. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new symptoms after you start taking BIKTARVY. ` Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys. If you develop new or worse kidney problems, they may tell you to stop taking BIKTARVY. ` Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death.

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. ` Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. The most common side effects of BIKTARVY in clinical studies were diarrhea (6%), nausea (5%), and headache (5%). Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or don’t go away.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking BIKTARVY? ` All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any kidney or liver problems, including hepatitis virus infection. ` All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, antacids, laxatives, vitamins, and herbal supplements. BIKTARVY and other medicines may affect each other. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist, and ask if it is safe to take BIKTARVY with all of your other medicines. ` If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if BIKTARVY can harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant while taking BIKTARVY. ` If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in breast milk. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ask your healthcare provider if BIKTARVY is right for you.

Please see Important Facts about BIKTARVY, including important warnings, on the following page.

BVYC0047_BIKTARVY_A_7-875x10-875_OutMagazine_KeepEmpowering_r1v1jl.indd 2-3 18766 Biktarvy OUT 280.indd 2

10/10/18 9:13 AM

K

B


Get HIV support by downloading a free app at MyDailyCharge.com

KEEP EMPOWERING. Because HIV doesn’t change who you are. BIKTARVY is a 1-pill, once-a-day complete HIV-1 treatment for adults who are either new to treatment or whose healthcare provider determines they can replace their current HIV-1 medicines with BIKTARVY.

BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS.

BIKTARVY.COM

18766 Biktarvy OUT 280.indd 3

10/4/18 2:04 PM 10/10/18 9:13 AM


IMPORTANT FACTS This is only a brief summary of important information about BIKTARVY® and does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your condition and your treatment.

(bik-TAR-vee) MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT BIKTARVY BIKTARVY may cause serious side LLJ[ZPUJS\KPUN! ₔWorsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. 0M`V\ OH]LIV[O/0=HUK/)=`V\Y/)=TH`Z\KKLUS` NL[^VYZLPM`V\Z[VW[HRPUN)02;(9=@+VUV[ Z[VW[HRPUN)02;(9=@^P[OV\[ÄYZ[[HSRPUN[V`V\Y OLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLYHZ[OL`^PSSULLK[VJOLJR`V\Y OLHS[OYLN\SHYS`MVYZL]LYHSTVU[OZ

ABOUT BIKTARVY )02;(9=@PZHJVTWSL[LWPSSVUJLHKH` WYLZJYPW[PVUTLKPJPUL\ZLK[V[YLH[/0=PUHK\S[Z 0[JHULP[OLYIL\ZLKPUWLVWSL^OVOH]LUL]LY[HRLU /0=TLKPJPULZILMVYLVYWLVWSL^OVHYLYLWSHJPUN [OLPYJ\YYLU[/0=TLKPJPULZHUK^OVZLOLHS[OJHYL WYV]PKLYKL[LYTPULZ[OL`TLL[JLY[HPUYLX\PYLTLU[Z BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS./0=PZ[OL ]PY\Z[OH[JH\ZLZ(0+: Do NOT take BIKTARVY if you also take a medicine [OH[JVU[HPUZ! â‚”KVML[PSPKL â‚”YPMHTWPU â‚”HU`V[OLYTLKPJPULZ[V[YLH[/0=

BEFORE TAKING BIKTARVY Tell your healthcare provider all your medical JVUKP[PVUZPUJS\KPUNPM`V\! â‚”/H]LVYOH]LOHKHU`RPKUL`VYSP]LYWYVISLTZ PUJS\KPUNOLWH[P[PZPUMLJ[PVU â‚”(YLWYLNUHU[VYWSHU[VILJVTLWYLNUHU[ â‚”(YLIYLHZ[MLLKPUNU\YZPUNVYWSHU[VIYLHZ[MLLK+V UV[IYLHZ[MLLKPM`V\OH]L/0=ILJH\ZLVM[OLYPZRVM WHZZPUN/0=[V`V\YIHI` Tell your healthcare provider about all the TLKPJPULZ`V\[HRL! â‚”2LLWHSPZ[[OH[PUJS\KLZHSSWYLZJYPW[PVUHUKV]LY[OL JV\U[LYTLKPJPULZHU[HJPKZSH_H[P]LZ]P[HTPUZHUK OLYIHSZ\WWSLTLU[ZHUKZOV^P[[V`V\YOLHS[OJHYL WYV]PKLYHUKWOHYTHJPZ[ â‚”(ZR`V\YOLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLYVYWOHYTHJPZ[HIV\[ TLKPJPULZ[OH[PU[LYHJ[^P[O)02;(9=@

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF BIKTARVY BIKTARVY can cause serious side LLJ[ZPUJS\KPUN! ₔ ;OVZLPU[OL¸4VZ[0TWVY[HU[0UMVYTH[PVU(IV\[ )02;(9=@¹ZLJ[PVU ₔ *OHUNLZPU`V\YPTT\ULZ`Z[LT ₔ 5L^VY^VYZLRPKUL`WYVISLTZPUJS\KPUN RPKUL`MHPS\YL ₔ;VVT\JOSHJ[PJHJPKPU`V\YISVVKSHJ[PJHJPKVZPZ ^OPJOPZHZLYPV\ZI\[YHYLTLKPJHSLTLYNLUJ`[OH[ JHUSLHK[VKLH[O;LSS`V\YOLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLY YPNO[H^H`PM`V\NL[[OLZLZ`TW[VTZ!^LHRULZZ VYILPUNTVYL[PYLK[OHU\Z\HS\U\Z\HST\ZJSL WHPUILPUNZOVY[VMIYLH[OVYMHZ[IYLH[OPUN Z[VTHJOWHPU^P[OUH\ZLHHUK]VTP[PUNJVSKVY IS\LOHUKZHUKMLL[MLLSKPaa`VYSPNO[OLHKLKVYH MHZ[VYHIUVYTHSOLHY[ILH[ ₔ:L]LYLSP]LYWYVISLTZ^OPJOPUYHYLJHZLZJHUSLHK [VKLH[O;LSS`V\YOLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLYYPNO[H^H`PM `V\NL[[OLZLZ`TW[VTZ!ZRPUVY[OL^OP[LWHY[VM `V\YL`LZ[\YUZ`LSSV^KHYR¸[LHJVSVYLK¹\YPUL SPNO[JVSVYLKZ[VVSZSVZZVMHWWL[P[LMVYZL]LYHS KH`ZVYSVUNLYUH\ZLHVYZ[VTHJOHYLHWHPU ₔ;OLTVZ[JVTTVUZPKLLLJ[ZVM)02;(9=@PU JSPUPJHSZ[\KPLZ^LYLKPHYYOLH UH\ZLH  HUKOLHKHJOL  ;OLZLHYLUV[HSS[OLWVZZPISLZPKLLLJ[ZVM )02;(9=@;LSS`V\YOLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLYYPNO[H^H`PM `V\OH]LHU`UL^Z`TW[VTZ^OPSL[HRPUN)02;(9=@ Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with BIKTARVY.

HOW TO TAKE BIKTARVY ;HRL)02;(9=@[PTLLHJOKH`^P[OVY^P[OV\[MVVK

GET MORE INFORMATION â‚”;OPZPZVUS`HIYPLMZ\TTHY`VMPTWVY[HU[ PUMVYTH[PVUHIV\[)02;(9=@;HSR[V`V\Y OLHS[OJHYLWYV]PKLYVYWOHYTHJPZ[[VSLHYUTVYL â‚”.V[V)02;(9=@JVTVYJHSS.03,(+ â‚”0M`V\ULLKOLSWWH`PUNMVY`V\YTLKPJPUL]PZP[ )02;(9=@JVTMVYWYVNYHTPUMVYTH[PVU

)02;(9=@[OL)02;(9=@3VNV+(03@*/(9.,[OL+(03@*/(9.,3VNV36=,>/(;»:05:0+, .03,(+HUK[OL.03,(+3VNVHYL[YHKLTHYRZVM.PSLHK:JPLUJLZ0UJVYP[ZYLSH[LKJVTWHUPLZ =LYZPVUKH[L!-LIY\HY` .PSLHK:JPLUJLZ0UJ(SSYPNO[ZYLZLY]LK)=@*

BVYC0047_BIKTARVY_A_7-875x10-875_OutMagazine_KeepEmpowering_r1v1jl.indd 4 18767 Biktarvy OUT 280 PI.indd 1

10/4/18 2:04 PM 10/10/18 9:13 AM


FOREGROUND: GROOMING

R ETOUCH I N G : AN G E LI QU E A M B ROS

Winter Wear

PHOTOGR APHY BY ERIN WILLIAMS

280_02_Grooming_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 35

“WITH THE ABRUPT ONSET of winter, humidity in the air plummets, and it’s a major cause of dryness” says derm-scientist Dr. Macrene Alexiades, whose 37 Extreme Actives cream, which locks in hydration, is one of many products we’re swearing by this season to safeguard our skin from the cold. Others include SK-II Facial Treatment Essence, which moderates the skin’s renewal cycle to make it more radiant; Sisley’s Black Rose Precious Face Oil, which is

FROM LEFT: SISLEY

37 ACTIVES HIGH

BLACK ROSE PRECIOUS

PERFORMANCE ANTI-

FACE OIL, $235. SK-II LXP

AGING CREAM, $195. CLÉ

ULTIMATE REVIVAL CREAM,

DE PEAU INTENSIVE EYE

$385. AUGUSTINUS

CONTOUR CREAM, $260.

BADER CREAM, 50ML,

LA PRAIRIE SKIN CAVIAR

$265. DR. DENNIS

LUXE CREAM, $485.

GROSS ALPHA BETA

SK-II FACIAL TREATMENT

EXTRA STRENGTH DAILY

CLEANSING OIL, $70.

PEEL (30 APPLICATION

TATCHA VIOLET-C

PACKETS), $88. VINTNER’S

RADIANCE MASK, $68.

DAUGHTER ACTIVE

DIOR LE SUCRE DE

BOTANICAL SERUM,

GOMMAGE ROSE SUGAR

30ML BOTTLE, $185.

SCRUB, $105. LA MER

GIORGIO ARMANI CREMA

REPARATIVE FACE SUN

NERA EXTREMA TERRA

LOTION (SPF 30), 1.7 OZ,

PANTELLERIA SUPREME

$135. BY TERRY BAUME DE

SKIN RENEWING

ROSE LIP CARE

MASK, $125.

CRAYON, $34

rich in omega 3 and 6; and La Mer’s Reparative Face Sun Lotion Broad Spectrum (SPF 30), which draws natural ingredients from the sea to protect and nurture your lipid layer. Prep is important, too, and Dr. Alexiades advises to “keep your water temperature warm” and “apply moisturizer while your skin is still damp” for best results. With this arsenal of products, you’ll be putting your best face forward in the months ahead. MARCO PALOU OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 35

11/5/18 7:46 PM


F O R E G R O U N D : T H E G E TAWAY

The Other Holiday Inns

Five hot spots for five types of travelers hitting New York City this season WITH NEW DIGS CONSTANTLY OPENING and a revolving door of hotel refurbs, it seems there are no limits to New York’s accommodation market. And in their efforts to be key players in the hospitality game, each of the city’s top sleeps comes with a distinct point of view, offering different types of travelers a unique palette of amenities and design details. With the holiday season in full swing, we’ve put the following stays on our wish list. BRANDON PRESSER

▲ For the Trendsetter The Hoxton, Williamsburg This London import has finally arrived to the shores of New York. It’s located where worn-down warehouses meet a bevy of new condominiums in Williamsburg—just a couple of blocks from McCarren Park.

Every room sports floor-to-ceiling windows (some perfectly framing the Manhattan skyline), but most guests head up to the rooftop lounge or out into the neighborhood, following the hotel’s proprietary guide to the area.

▲ For the Spirit Sipper Arlo These sister properties—Arlo NoMad near the Empire State Building and Arlo SoHo in the eponymous retail hub—are being dubbed “Arlo Arctica” until March, thanks to a partnership with Shackleton Whisky and Symmetry Labs.

The collab has led to the transformation of social spaces in both hotels into wintry scenes inspired by Sir Ernest Shackleton’s expedition to Antarctica in the early 1900s. Expect LED lighting installations, ice sculptures, and, of course, some brand new mixology and top-shelf tipples.

▲ For the Creator Freehand , Flatiron District The Freehand is a reimagined concept in the former George Washington Hotel, which was a haven for writers as far back as 1928. Today, the hotel boasts a partnership with Bard College, hosting four resident creatives a year, who live onsite and produce artwork across a variety of media. Both students and alumni contributed to the murals and photography found throughout the property.

C O U R T E S Y O F A D R I A N G AU T ( F R E E H A N D) . C O U R T E S Y O F H OT E L S ( R E M A I N I N G )

▲ For the Mindful Traveler 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge Built from the ground up in Brooklyn Bridge Park, the 194-key property adeptly blends the soothing elements of a walk in the countryside with urban living in the heart of the city. A meditation specialist and coterie of yogis are available on demand, and the vertical garden in the lobby hints at the hotel’s commitment to all things clean, green, and LEEDcertified. In the rooms upstairs, you’ll find hemp-based mattresses, rain showers, and healthy, locally sourced snacks.

▲ For the Homebody The Lowell, Upper East Side Despite all the exciting things to see and do around New York City, you’ll have to practically drag yourself out the door after checking into the chic, apartment-style rooms at The Lowell. The annual holiday package doubles down on the hotel’s coziness with milk and cookies for the kids (and Pommery champagne for adults), custom décor, including stockings and in-room trees, and VIP tix to Wollman Rink for ice-skating in Central Park—should you want to venture outside.

36 D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_02_Travel_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 36

11/5/18 9:54 PM


JUNE 2019 NYCPRIDE.ORG/2019

PRODUCED BY

WORLDPRIDE LICENSOR

H O S T PA R T N E R

H O S T PA R T N E R

18792 world pride.indd 1

11/3/18 9:53 AM


FOREGROUND: KITCHEN 411

The Grey Lady

Kish’s Dish

Personal history is a key ingredient of queer Asian-American chef Kristen Kish's debut eatery.

Orange Sherbet Serves 4 to 6

WHEN YOU WALK into Arlo Grey, Kristen Kish’s chic and modern restaurant inside Austin’s Line Hotel, prepare to get a taste of the chef’s life as well as her food. Along with a menu filled with creative spins on culinary memories from Kish’s childhood, Arlo Grey contains a dining area adorned with letters from her parents and framed original pages from her cooking notebooks. “Dining out has become this thing that we do as a pastime—it is our pure entertainment,” Kish says. “So if I can give any bit of who I am while also connecting with someone through food, I feel like I’m really doing my job.” For Kish, 34, the opening of Arlo Grey— which she says is “what I would name my first child”—was both a natural next step and a bit of a surprise. “I didn’t even know I wanted to open a restaurant,” says the winner of Top Chef season 10. Kish had turned down multiple offers until the design-focused Sydell Group approached her. “I was scared,” she says, “and then I went in headfirst, taking on that good, challenging, sleepless life.” Kish calls her partnership with Sydell a “complete collaboration,” having boarded Arlo Grey a bit late in its overall conception. Though Sydell had its own creative team

NOTES: You’ll need an ice cream maker for this recipe.

concentrating on minutiae like silverware and floral arrangements, Kish, a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Chicago, gave the kitchen an aesthetic and functional makeover, filling it with everything she needed to tell her story through her craft. The food is the obvious part. Savory items include a homemade mafaldini with champignon sauce, pearl onions, and Parmesan—reminiscent of the beef stroganoff Hamburger Helper that South Korea-born Kish was raised on by her adopted family in Michigan. Sweet options include Lunch Box Chocolate Cake—the chef’s spin on a Hostess CupCake with coffee, caramel, and potato chips—and orange sherbet made with goat milk soda, candied fennel, and cream, elevating Kish’s personal favorite: the Creamsicle. Nods to Kish’s life and heritage surround her restaurant goers, from the dining-room memorabilia to spray-painted letters in the bathroom that spell out, in English, the Korean version of the story of Cinderella. “I hope guests feel taken care of—and cared for—through the food, the service, the narrative, and the details,” Kish says. “That’s the definition of hospitality.” DENNIS HINZMANN

1 ½ cups fresh orange juice ¾ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons honey Pinch of kosher salt 2 tablespoons grated orange zest ½ tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 cup whole milk 1 cup heavy cream Whisk together the orange juice, granulated sugar, honey, salt, orange zest, and lemon juice until the sugar begins to dissolve, 3 to 5 minutes. Whisk in the milk and heavy cream until well incorporated. Transfer to an ice cream maker and freeze following the manufacturer’s directions. Transfer the sherbet to a lidded container and store in the freezer for at least 8 hours and up to 5 days. Plan accordingly.

R E C I P E R E P R I N T E D F R O M K R I S T E N K I S H C O O K I N G : R E C I P E S A N D T E C H N I Q U E S BY K R I S T E N K I S H W I T H M E R E D I T H E R I C K S O N . P H OTO G R A P H S © 2017 BY K R I S T I N T E I G . P U B L I S H E D BY C L A R K S O N P OT T E R / P U B L I S H E R S , A N I M P R I N T O F P E N G U I N R A N D O M H O U S E , L LC

Orange sherbet

38 D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_02_Kitchen_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 38

11/5/18 7:46 PM


18752 Colgate OUT 280.indd 1

9/26/18 3:02 PM


TR-1785_Div-LGBT_Full-ad_OUT.indd 1 18768 Titos Vodka OUT 280.indd 1

10/2/18 11:01 AM 10/10/18 9:13 AM


FOREGROUND: LIQUIDITY

The Audacity of Amaro

Drink This Now

COURTESY OF MONTENEGRO

The bittersweet but rich liqueur can be the bold star of your next favorite drink. SONNY HAD CHER. Thelma had Louise. Bartenders have amaro. The traditional herbal liqueur of Italy has been crafted along the Mediterranean for centuries, but it only recently developed a cult standing among the advanced mixology set. What is it? And why do those in-the-know love this liquer so much? Although it sounds romantic, amaro is actually blunt and straightforward. It translates to bitter in Italian (amari in plural form), and that’s precisely what defines this category of spirit. Imbued with a botanical essence—typically the work of alpine herbs, dried roots, fruit, and spices—the drink was originally prescribed as a medicinal tonic before evolving into a digestif, enjoyed neat or on the rocks. And there are a million ways it can express itself in cocktail form, which is why bartenders turn to it so frequently. “Every amaro has its own distinct flavor profile, derived from different terroir,” says Brynn Smith, who tends bar at the newly opened Duello in downtown Los Angeles. “You can really express all of the colors of the taste rainbow with them.” Montenegro, for example, is a gently

sweet, floral entry with hints of vanilla and overripe citrus. It is generally viewed as the best entry point into the category. Braulio, on the other hand, tugs the palate in a completely different direction. With bold tones of clove, peppermint, and prunes, it’s an acquired taste. And it doesn’t need to be relegated to supporting cast, either. Evelyn Chick at PrettyUgly Bar in Toronto uses the spirit to mine depth at the base of her arrangements. “It yields a lower ABV and sets the tone for a funky, diverse, and more interesting mix.” Such is the case with the easy-drinking Pink Porcelain, a cynar julep variation which blends artichoke-derived liqueur with grapefruit soda and mint on top of crushed ice. While amari cocktails tend to be lighter in alcohol, the flavor is full strength. And with great power comes great responsibility. “Amari is like ego,” warns Joel Anthony Caruso, an influential barman known as @amaroguy on Instagram. “It can be a powerful tool or a dangerous weapon, depending on the context of its use.” Ordering amaro at the bar, then, is an act of trust, and any proper bartender will respond in kind. BRAD JAPHE

Hard to Forget Ya The safest way to experiment with amari cocktails at home is to keep things simple. Smith recommends a riff on an espresso martini that she dubs “Hard to Forget Ya,” named after a song from the Britney Spears album Glory. All ingredients are combined in equal measure, stacking the rhubarb and cinnamon elements of Black Note Amaro above the winter wheat canvas of Grey Goose vodka. Invigorating and deceptively strong, it’s not that innocent, after all. RECIPE ¾ oz. Grey Goose ¾ oz. Black Note Amaro ¾ oz. Varnelli Caffè Moka (espresso liqueur) ¾ oz. espresso 3 espresso beans Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain. Serve garnished with espresso beans.

OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 41

280_02_Liquidity_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 41

11/5/18 9:54 PM


18791 macys congrats OUT 100 2018.indd 1

11/2/18 10:15 AM


S Y M POSI U M D I S PATC H E S F R O M T H E F R O N T L I N E S O F CO N T E M P O R A R Y C U LT U R E

Colman Domingo

Love in the Time of Uncertainty COLMAN DOMINGO, BARRY JENKINS, AND THE RADICAL NECESSITY OF THE FILM ADAPTATION OF JAMES BALDWIN’S IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK. By R. Kurt Osenlund

IF WE CONTINUE to progress toward a future where marginalized people are enabled to tell their own stories, particularly in media and entertainment, then Barry Jenkins is a storyteller who’s been ahead of the curve. In the summer of 2013, five years after the release of his breakout indie Medicine for Melancholy, the writer-director was simultaneously developing two scripts. The first was Moonlight, Jenkins’s collaborative adaptation of Tarrell Alvin McCraney’s play In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue, about a gay black man hustling through three torrid stages of life. The second was If Beale Street Could Talk, Jenkins’s take on James Baldwin’s 1974 novel about a young black woman in 1970s Harlem

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y O G ATA

280_03_SympOpener_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 43

who’s pregnant with the child of her wrongfully imprisoned lover. Moonlight, as much of the world knows, was a radical achievement—a film that was not only queer, but consummately, unapologetically black, without any on-screen infiltration by white actors. Its critical success may have been expected, but even for the least-jaded cinephile, its being awarded 2016’s Oscar for Best Picture was a norm-shattering shock and inspired hope that a REFRESH button had been hit. In some ways, Beale Street (in theaters November 30 ), with its depiction of black love, is even more radical. There are white faces among its cast, but they are few. One is a cop, who reminds us that 40 years have yielded next to no progress in dismantling systemic police racism. Another is a

“It is very bold and subversive to hold a frame on an AfricanAmerican face— close up.”

OUT DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 43

11/5/18 7:42 PM


SYMPOSIUM

lawyer whose key scene sees him educated on how to properly address the locked-up father-to-be. If Beale Street has, in any way, been made for white audiences, it is for their education. As celebrated as Jenkins may be, it’s audacious for him to have chosen to adapt the rich work of James Baldwin. For long stretches, characters are simply shown living—holding each other, holding space— just as they do in Baldwin’s pages. They are not on the screen to entertain but rather to be seen, by white viewers for whom that particular existence might not be normal, and by black viewers for whom that existence, particularly, is. “It is very bold, and revolutionary, and subversive to hold a frame on an AfricanAmerican’s face—close-up on eyes, nose, lips, and teeth for an extended period of time,” says actor Colman Domingo, who in Beale Street plays Joseph, father to Tish (KiKi Layne), the pregnant young woman. “When you look at that, you cannot deny our humanity.” Domingo, a gay, black actor-writer-director with a vast wealth of TV, film, and stage credits to his name (from Passing Strange and The Scottsboro Boys to Selma and The Birth of a Nation), describes Jenkins’s approach to filmmaking as “wildly emotional.” He says that Beale Street is “smashing tropes of what we’ve seen and witnessed in the cinema for ourselves and for white folks. And not even with a sledgehammer. It’s throwing in so much grace.” Born and raised in West Philadelphia (yes, he

went to high school with Will Smith), Domingo found his own grace in fleeing to San Francisco to explore nudist camps and astrology, arriving in New York to build a decorated career, and marrying a man with whom he now owns a home in Los Angeles. But first, he found James Baldwin. How old were you when you first encountered Baldwin’s work?

I was 17. The first thing I read was Giovanni’s Room and then I read The Fire Next Time. He is our modern-day Shakespeare. He interrogates things that are deeply personal to me—about America, about brotherhood, about love, and about how we move forward. I wanted to know how to navigate this world and he offered me lessons. When you’re stepping out as an artist, as a black gay man, and as an intellectual, you’re looking for someone who’s done it before and who’s wrestled with the same things. Even now, I carry his work around in my pocket.

“How do we look at history and examine who we are in white and black America? Baldwin gives you words when your mouth is hanging open every day as you watch the news.”

Tell me more about why Baldwin is important to you right now.

He speaks to my soul when I’m wrestling with the things I’m trying to figure out. Again, how do we move forward? How do we find the light in all this darkness? How do we look at history and examine who we are in white and black America? He gives you words when your mouth is hanging open every day as you watch the news. He helps you redefine or realize why things are the way

44 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_03_SympOpener_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 44

11/5/18 7:42 PM

COU RT ESY O F A N N A PU R NA PICTU R ES ( JAM ES A N D LA YN E )

Director Barry Jenkins on the set of Beale Street


Actors Stephan James (above) and KiKi Layne

“I’m not someone who settles just because there’s representation there. More can be done. Let’s not just take what’s been given, let’s also question it at times.”

Colman Domingo

they are. Why things haven’t been dealt with when it comes to race and culture and oppression. Why Americans are all about the money and less about the human. He gives words to it so you can say, “Okay, I’m not alone in this.” James Baldwin makes me feel like I’m not alone.

COU RT ESY O F A N N A PU R NA PICTU R ES ( JAM ES A N D LA YN E )

How else do you feel that Beale Street, the film, normalizes black experience?

It doesn’t suffer the tropes that you usually see in other films about black womanhood, where they’re all being strong and sassy and running things. It’s about ordinary people doing extraordinary things within the means that they can do them, which I think is revolutionary. Joseph Rivers, my character, is not a showy man in any way. He’s not a leadingman character; it’s a supportive role, but it’s not a character we usually see in films about African Americans. In most representations, there’s a hardness to us. But here we have scenes where two men can be unapologetic and not be afraid to be affectionate with each other. We have brotherhood and sisterhood. The more we see images like that, the more it’ll make a larger impression. Tell me about your chemistry with Regina King, who plays your wife in the film.

The moment I met Regina, I knew she was my wife and I was her husband. There was no, “How are we going to do this?” We were open to dancing with each other, and there’s a scene in which we literally are. We were taking in the spirit of the room, and

we became that family. Barry threw the cameras on. He watched this thing happening, this organic thing. He made sure the camera was running and captured it. It’s in the film now. It was one of those moments when I honestly felt like it was something...else. It was the spirit of everything—of the way Baldwin wrote those characters and all the love in that house. And in that small moment you saw what our leading lady, Tish, was built of. You know why she is the way she is and why she’s strong and passionate. How can artists and filmmakers further improve representation like this?

We have a responsibility to, as much as possible, get on the other side of the camera as directors, producers, financiers, studio heads, you name it. Because that’s the only way we’re going to make any changes. There are changes being made, but we also have to look at who’s writing this material. I’m very critical, especially about stories from our experience as black, gay, and other. I’m not someone who settles just because there’s representation there. More can be done. Let’s not just take what’s been given, let’s also question it at times. Are we telling the stories the way we can best tell them and in the most complex ways? I want to make sure we are, and I’m going to help push it, whether it’s from the outside or the inside. We should be doing all we can so it’s about serving our communities—artfully, thoughtfully, and respectfully. OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 45

280_03_SympOpener_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 45

11/5/18 7:42 PM


SYMPOSIUM

Post Me Like One of Your French Girls MARTIN BEDOLLA IS ONE OF MANY ARTISTS NAVIGATING INSTAGRAM AS THEIR KEY OUTLET—AND MONEYMAKER—FOR HOMOEROTIC PORTFOLIOS. at Grand Rapids Community College and taking a few drawing classes, he declared fi ne art as a major and took his practice more seriously, later MARTIN BEDOLLA had already been posting his attending Kendall College of Art and Design. illustrations on Instagram (@martinbedolla) for “After I graduated, I actually started exploring about two years prior to 2016, but that year marked what I wanted my style to be and what I wanted a turning point for the artist. “A friend of mine to say with my work,” Bedolla says. “Initially, I suggested I do Kinkcember,” Bedolla wrote in a always thought nudes—like, classical nudes—were post on December 1. He was citing one of a series of fascinating and sensual. So I started there.” monthly themes, like Inktober and MerMay, that Those initial nudes had Bedolla leaning toward serve as prompts for visual artists on social media. the female form, pulling visual cues from Leonardo He tweeted: “Naturally, I said sure. Haha. First up. da Vinci’s sketches and the paintings of Caravaggio Bondage.” and Michelangelo—searching for softness and The image Bedolla uploaded with that caption delicacy. But after joining Instagram in 2013 and depicted a male figure, pantless, with a reddening fi nding an audience that preferred his male figures, butt, a blushing face beneath fabric tied over his Bedolla honed his focus. mouth, and his hands above his head (out of frame, At fi rst, those male figures were portraits, but presumably tied up). For Bedolla, the post and sometimes the occasional was the fi rst of 31 that stretched “casual nude,” as he describes over the next few weeks. (As it. A handful of followers sent in he became more detailed, some images of themselves for Bedolla pieces took more than a day to to draw, and he did. But after that create, so his Kinkcember wound fi rst Kinkcember series, which up ending in January.) His art he repeated in 2017 and plans to featured men in various states of do again this year, things took a undress, some of them bound or defi nitive turn. gagged, one of them fellating a “When I started doing more candy cane, and others burying risqué things, people were like, his nose in someone’s armpit. ‘Oh, draw me, like one of your At one point, an Instagram Live French girls,’” Bedolla says, stream of Bedolla creating one of laughing. “They would send the pieces got his IG streaming casual shirtless photos just to privileges revoked because of the see if I would draw them. I did at content. But the series drummed fi rst, but as my following grew, up a flood of followers—hundreds and I did Kinkcember, and I per week, according to Bedolla— Blue 3 got more things on my plate, even though most of the artwork and people kept sending things in...I can’t draw was posted without hashtags. That flood pushed everyone.” the 27-year-old, who hails from Grand Rapids, With the more salacious art has come more Mich., over the 30,000-follower mark, and it salacious content. By Bedolla’s count, since changed the way he interacted with the platform. that fi rst series, he’s received more than 150 “Right after that fi rst Kinkcember, it was a big personal photos and videos, some quite explicit, spike in engagement,” Bedolla says. from followers to use as reference material for Art fi rst came to Bedolla in a way it does for new pieces. Using a variety of body shapes and many teens: through doodling. But after enrolling By Mikelle Street

46 D MEACRECM H B2E0R1 62 0O1 U 8 T/ J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9 O U T

280_04_symp_Bedollas_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 46

TKTKTKTK

“When I started doing more risqué things, people were like, ‘Oh, draw me, like one of your French girls.’ They would send casual shirtless photos just to see if I would draw them.”

I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y M A R T I N BCERDEODLI LT AT K

11/7/18 1:14 PM


TKTKTKTK

compromising positions, Bedolla renders them in his trademark cherubic style and adds them to his feed, taking care to hide some of the more objectionable bits behind pencils or strategically placed strips of text. “I’m really careful,” says the artist (who typically works in graphite, watercolor, and ink). “I’ve gotten things taken down maybe a handful of times, and I’ve seen other people get their stuff censored or even their accounts deleted. I rely on Instagram for a lot, especially selling my work, but also getting it out there and having people see it. So as much as I might want to post more explicit things, it’s not worth the repercussions.” Bedolla isn’t the only gay artist who uses Instagram as a part of his practice. The social media network has become gallery, artist salon, studio, and portfolio for a generation of creatives. Zach Grear (@zachgrearart), who illustrates on found imagery, says he uses Instagram as a portfolio and that it’s the driver for the majority of his sales and commissions. The same goes for Zachary Brunner (@zacharyiswackary), a fulltime commercial illustrator who not only uses his Instagram to post his personal work—which led to his being offered a solo gallery show—but also to connect with other gay artists around the world. Another artist, Adam Chuck (@adam_chuck) has

Dark Paradise 2

connected with both galleries and his models via Instagram. But as much as the platform can be a benefit, it can be a hindrance, too. “You can get shadowbanned,” says St. Louisbased artist Ryan Stephens (@ryantheart), referring to a phenomenon where a user’s posts go up but are kept from his followers’ feeds (as opposed to the outright censoring of posts and banning of accounts, both of which have happened to Stephens). “Sometimes if my artwork gets too risqué, even if it’s censored, the next month of posts seem to go unnoticed by followers. It’s strange how inconsistent my likes and comments are, and a lot of homocentric artists have been having this same issue on Instagram.” Multimedia artist Gio Black Peter (@gioblackpeterx) curated an exhibition this year called “The Violators,” featuring the work of 15 artists who have been censored on social media in some way. Bedolla, however, skirts all that by altering his work to pass guidelines. At the same time, he juggles the ever-changing, engagement-focused algorithm. “That really plays a role in shaping what I post,” he says. “I still draw whatever I want, but I’ve learned that I’ve kind of pigeonholed myself because people go to my art to see homoerotic content or explicit things, and when I don’t post that, and do something more PG-13 or more casual, they aren’t interested.” That lost engagement can mean new posts aren’t as visible. Trying to switch platforms is an option, but not the most attractive one. Says Chuck, “Instagram works the most because it’s something everyone has and uses. I have a website, but it doesn’t give me the same traffic. And on Tumblr, the work gets discredited and it’s a bit chaotic.” Bedolla is plugging full steam ahead with Instagram. It’s the source of 90 percent of his art business, which currently makes up half his income. “The ultimate message that I want to deliver with my art is nothing super deep or super spiritual,” he says. “It’s just, ‘Sex is good, and sex sells.’ And not just sex as in intercourse, but just sexual things in general.” He pauses. “And, of course, I like to push it a bit.” OUT DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 47

280_04_symp_Bedollas_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 47

11/7/18 1:15 PM


SHOULD HIV PREVENTION MATTER TO ME? I AM LIVING WITH HIV.

I AM HIV NEGATIVE.

t

YES! See how we can all help stop the virus in our bodies and communities.

UNBC5787_HSTV_Prevention_Gatefold_Blue_TheAdvocate_DR1.indd All Pages 18724 Gilead HSTV Gatefold OUT.indd 2

8/14/18 10:23 AM


TT

ITITSTARTS STARTSWITH WITHTESTING. TESTING. Everyone Everyoneshould shouldget gettested, tested,and and regularly regularlyretested, retested,to toknow knowififthey they have havethe thevirus. virus.

IFIFYOU YOUDODOHAVE HAVEHIV HIV

IFIFYOU YOUDON’T DON’THAVE HAVEHIV HIV

You Youcan canprotect protectyour yourhealth. health. There Thereisisno nocure curefor forHIV, HIV,but but your yourhealthcare healthcareprovider providercan can tell tellyou youhow howHIV HIVtreatment treatmentcan can help helpyou youlive liveaahealthier healthierlife. life.

You Youcan canprotect protectyour yourhealth healthtoo. too. Use Usecondoms condomsand andpractice practice safer safersex. sex.Never Nevershare shareneedles. needles. Get Getretested retestedregularly. regularly.And Andask askaa healthcare healthcareprovider providerabout aboutall all the theways waysto toprevent preventHIV. HIV.

PREVENT PREVENTTHE THESPREAD SPREADOFOFHIV. HIV.REALLY. REALLY. Starting Startingand andsticking stickingto toHIV HIVtreatment treatmentcan canlower lowerthe theamount amountof ofvirus virus ininthe thebody bodyso somuch, much,ititcan’t can’tbe bemeasured measuredby byaatest. test.It’s It’scalled calledbeing being undetectable. undetectable.According Accordingto tocurrent currentresearch, research,sticking sticking to totreatment treatmentevery everyday dayand andstaying stayingundetectable undetectable basically basicallyeliminates eliminatesthe therisk riskof ofspreading spreadingHIV HIV through throughsex. sex.HIV HIVisisstill stillininthe thebody, body,and andbeing being undetectable undetectabledoesn’t doesn’tprevent preventother otherSTIs. STIs.So Souse use condoms condomsand andpractice practicesafer safersex. sex. Watch Watch“Treat “Treat22Prevent” Prevent”to tosee seehow howititworks. works. YouTube.com/HelpStopTheVirus YouTube.com/HelpStopTheVirus

18724 Gilead HSTV Gatefold OUT.indd 3

8/14/18 10:23 AM


THERE’S THERE’SSOMETHING SOMETHINGEVERYONE EVERYONECAN CANDO. DO.

Here Hereare aretwo tworesources resourcesthat thatcan canhelp. help. Watch Watchvideos, videos,fifind ndaatesting testinglocation, location, and andreset resetwhat whatyou youknow knowabout aboutHIV. HIV. HelpStopTheVirus.com HelpStopTheVirus.com YouTube.com/HelpStopTheVirus YouTube.com/HelpStopTheVirus HelpStopTheVirus.Tumblr.com HelpStopTheVirus.Tumblr.com

Get Getthe theanswers answersyou youneed, need, privately, privately,on onyour yourphone. phone. HIVanswers.com/app HIVanswers.com/app

Ask Askaahealthcare healthcareprovider providerabout aboutall all the theways waysyou youcan canhelp helpprevent preventHIV. HIV. HIV HIVANSWERS, ANSWERS,the theHIV HIVANSWERS ANSWERSLogo, Logo,GILEAD, GILEAD,and andthe theGILEAD GILEADLogo Logo are aretrademarks trademarksofofGilead GileadSciences, Sciences,Inc. Inc.AllAllother othermarks marksare arethe theproperty propertyofof their theirrespective respectiveowners. owners.©©2018 2018Gilead GileadSciences, Sciences,Inc. Inc.AllAllrights rightsreserved. reserved. UNBC5787 UNBC578706/18 06/18

18724 Gilead HSTV Gatefold OUT.indd 4

8/7/18 8/7/184:29 4:29 PMPM 8/14/18 10:23 AM


SYMPOSIUM

Trans Models Are Not A Trend

WHILE VISIBLE INCLUSION IS GROWING IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY, THEIR PRESENCE IN THE BUSINESS GOES BACK DECADES—PART OF AN UNDERVALUED AND UNDERREPRESENTED HISTORY.

IN EARLY SEPTEMBER, headlines boasted that Marco Marco underwear’s latest fashion show at New York Fashion Week was “groundbreaking.” Part of a history-making fashion month where a reported 83 openly trans women were cast across 52 shows (the most ever), the Marco Marco presentation featured the likes of Dominique Jackson, Trace Lysette, Laith Ashley, and Aydian Dowling. It was said to be the first in NYFW history to boast a runway that exclusively featured transgender models. But in the days following, many of those stories had to be edited, and their proclamations dialed back, as social media began to point out that while Marco Marco probably now holds the record for the most trans male models in a runway show, the event was not the first of its kind. Another brand, created by a trans woman of color, had done the same three years before: In 2015, Gogo Graham put on her first NYFW show, displaying her fifth collection of one-of-a-kind pieces for (and modeled by) trans femmes. As trans models begin to find increased representation in the industry, they face a new set of challenges—like historical erasure—as brands attempt to tokenize them, and use them as pawns in a culture where identity politics are at the forefront. Confronting those challenges with the access they do have is an opportunity afforded to them not only through society’s changing attitudes, but through inroads made by their predecessors, who are part of a collective, 60-plus-year history that, to many, is unknown. IT WAS A PAIR OF FRIENDS, actresses Sarah Churchill and Julia Lockwood, who got April

Ashley to move back to London after she underwent gender confirmation surgery in Casablanca. It was 1960, and she was 25 at the time, making her one of the first Britons to have the procedure. When Ashley followed Churchill and Lockwood’s advice, and returned to her home country later that year, the duo introduced her as a model. Ashley signed with an agent who began booking her out six months in advance with top photographers. “They all knew about my operation—they all knew who I was,” Ashley told interviewers for a documentary of her life, now in development. “None of the photographers gave a damn about my past. They wanted me in their portfolio.” But she also began to get runway and editorial work. Her high point was appearing in British Vogue, shot by photographer David Bailey. “To come from the backstreets of Liverpool, and here you are in the most glamorous situations… it was a dream come true,” she said. But that dream came to an end in 1961 when tabloids outed her, causing all brands to stop working with her. And though she tried to restart her career (she signed with an agency in Spain), jobs were canceled once her identity was unveiled. Ashley was one of the first on a timeline of trans models that stretches through to today. For the first half-century, trans models worked with varying success, typically without discussing their gender identities in an effort to book jobs. Thus, most made it into the historical record only if they were outed. After Ashley came Tracey Norman, known to some as Tracey Africa, who hit the height of her career early, appearing as the face of a new hair dye in Clairol’s line in 1975. Because that product became one of the brand’s bestsellers,

“To come from the backstreets of Liverpool, and here you are in the most glamorous situations…it was a dream come true.” —April Ashley

OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019

280_04_symp_TransModels_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 42

11/5/18 7:26 PM

COU RT ESY O F GOGO G RAH A M ( G RAH A M AN D H E R MOD E LS ) . COU RT ESY O F A NASTAS IA GA RCI A ( L EYNA B LOOM )

By Mikelle Street


COU RT ESY O F GOGO G RAH A M ( G RAH A M AN D H E R MO D E LS ) . COU RT ESY O F RYAN PLUG E R ( H A R I N E F ) . COU RT ESY OF A NASTASI A GA RCI A ( L EYNA B LOOM )

they extended her first contract by four years, marketing the dye for a total of six. Norman was also shot for Vogue Italia with Irving Penn, at a rate of $1,500 a day. She’d go on to shoot for Ultra Sheen, Avon, and Essence before being outed among fashion insiders around 1981. A relocation to Paris briefly revived her career, working with Balenciaga, but after moving back to the United States, her career ended when word of her transness spread again. (Elsewhere, South African-born Lauren Foster’s career also ended shortly after a 1980 spread in Vogue Mexico.) The story of Caroline Cossey, also known as Tula, is more complex. After working with Australian Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and a string of small brands throughout the 1970s, Cossey was slotted for a job that has become a part of her legacy: a cover spread for a 1981 issue of Playboy. The gig came as a lead-up to the release of the James Bond movie For Your Eyes Only, in which Cossey appeared as an extra. And though she was outed in 1982 by a British tabloid, she made a comeback in 1991, shot by Playboy for a solo spread that described her as a “beautiful woman who was born a boy.” The accomplishment added her name to a short list of out trans models who have posed for the magazine, though all the others modeled for international editions. Thierry Mugler routinely cast trans models to walk in his runway shows. Teri Toye opened the Steven Sprouse show in 1984. (She served as its muse.) She walked as an out trans model for Mugler, Chanel, and Jean Paul Gaultier in her three-year career, and shot for German Vogue. Many point to her as the first out trans model. Connie Fleming, known as “Connie Girl,” also walked for Mugler, as did Roberta Close, who

appeared on the cover of Brazilian Playboy in 1984 and 1989. Close joined supermodels Naomi Campbell and Linda Evangelista (as well as actor Tracee Ellis Ross) on the runway in 1991. Fleming also walked for Vivienne Westwood and was shot by Steven Meisel. In 2003, Barbara Diop, a Senegalese model, made international headlines. After working in Milan, walking runways, and even making an appearance in Vogue Italia, she moved to Cape Town to continue her career. In 2003, when she led Team Zimbabwe as part of the Cricket World Cup, she was outed in the local press, and though she initially denied being trans, she eventually admitted it as the story spread internationally. “I’ve always said that the person who walks through the door first leaves the door cracked,” Norman told New York magazine of her legacy in 2015. “There was a perception that a transgender woman couldn’t be passable and work in fashion magazines and land contracts. I proved that wrong. I left the door cracked for other [transgender people] to walk through.” And while Norman—as well as Ashley, Cossey, Diop, Fleming, and Close—inched that door open as a passable model who didn’t discuss her identity, in 2009 it got a shove when Isis King appeared on America’s Next Top Model as the first openly trans model of the franchise. She lasted only five episodes, but in doing so, she brought the conversation to the surface of public consciousness, and helped widen the gap for a new generation to walk through the door and be publicly out and successful in the industry.

“It’s not just trans people [that have issues with modeling.] It’s all people under the umbrella minority.” —Leyna Bloom

IN 2008, WHEN LEYNA BLOOM moved to New York at 17, she didn’t see many trans models in fashion. King’s appearance would come a year

D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_04_symp_TransModels_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 43

11/6/18 8:09 AM


Above: notable trans models in the industry throughout the years. Inset, left: April Ashley. Inset, center: Leyna Bloom

later on Top Model (a show on which Bloom herself once considered competing), and Lea T would make her debut in 2010 as a face of Givenchy. (It was stipulated in contracts that then creative director Riccardo Tisci disclose her transness in all interviews.) But with inspiration from women of ballroom like Onjenae Miller and Tanay Pendavis, as well as supermodels, she found her blueprint. An early shoot with Antoine Verglas—who has shot supermodels like Claudia Schiffer and Stephanie Seymour for Elle, Vogue, and Victoria’s Secret—went viral. From there, Candy, a magazine founded in 2009 dedicated to celebrating trans people, got in touch with Bloom. She made her appearance in a Candy cover story for the magazine’s fifth-anniversary “transversal” issue, released in December 2014. She was shot alongside King as well as other trans women like Janet Mock, Yasmine Petty, and Geena Rocero (who had come out in a TED Talk earlier that year). “It was all of these amazing, dynamic women,” Bloom says. “I kept asking, Why me?” The Candy spread served as Bloom’s coming-out and set her on a path that would see her work with brands like Chromat, LaQuan Smith, and the Blonds; become the first trans woman shot for Vogue India, in 2017; and, most recently, appear in Jeremy Scott’s Moschino for H&M ad campaign. Bloom’s success came in a flood of firsts for out trans models in fashion. Carol Marra became the first trans woman to walk Brazil’s Fashion Rio in 2010. Lea T and King also got early starts—the former covered Elle Brazil and LOVE in 2011, while the latter was a face of American Apparel in 2012— but in 2014 the winds seemed to change following an ad campaign for Barney’s that was shot by Bruce Weber and featured 17 trans models. That same year, Ines Rau was photographed for a special

issue of Playboy and Lea T booked a Redken hair campaign—the first major beauty campaign for an out trans model. The following year, the first three all-trans agencies opened in the United States: Slay Model Management in Los Angeles; Transcendence Icon in Boise, Idaho; and Trans Models in New York. Elsewhere, India saw the launch of Bold, while Thailand’s Apple Models had already opened the first trans division of an existing agency in 2014. Since then, trans women have inked deals with beauty brands (Valentina Sampaio with L’Oréal in 2016), signed to IMG Worldwide (Hari Nef in 2015), appeared in lingerie campaigns (Aurel Haize Odogbo in 2016), and walked in fashion week shows all over the world, including India, where Anjali Lama appeared in Lakmé Fashion Week in 2017. They’ve graced the covers of Elle UK (Nef in 2016), Harper’s Bazaar India (Rocero and Norman in 2016), and Vogue Paris (Sampaio in 2017). Trans men are also forging paths: Laith Ashley appeared in a Barney’s ad and has also worked for H&M and Diesel. Casil McArthur has walked for Coach and Marc Jacobs, and done ads for Kenneth Cole. But representation brings new challenges. “I think of myself as just a model who happens to be trans. That’s it,” says Torraine Futurum, who has worked with Proenza Schouler, Urban Outfitters, and others. “When they call someone a trans model, it sort of sends the message that people should only reach out to that model when they want a trans person, which is limiting.” And that tokenizing can be evidenced in a variety of ways. Case in point: When Bloom appeared in Vogue India, she was misidentified as Rocero. Additionally, models have to fight notions of a “trans look” or aesthetic. “Casting directors often have a preconceived notion of what a trans person looks like,” says Cecilio Asuncion, founder of Slay Model Management. “What they don’t understand is that there is not one look. A challenge we often have is [our models] don’t fit this mold or image that casting directors have in their head.” As Bloom points out, these challenges are layered over the roadblocks any other minority model might face. Trans bodies that are older, disabled, non-white, or fall outside the industry’s “straight size” definitions find themselves at odds with the establishment’s gatekeepers. That said, there have been some recent landmarks for intersectional models. In September, Aaron Philip, a black, trans, disabled teen signed to Elite Models, and Chella Man, a deaf, Jewish-Asian, genderqueer model signed to IMG. Whether this is a trend or a sustained change in the industry will only be told over time, but as with Ashley, Norman, and Toye, it’s a series of firsts that could give birth to a whole new legacy. The full version of this story published on Out.com. OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 49

280_04_symp_TransModels_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 44

11/5/18 7:27 PM


SYMPOSIUM

The Naughty List OUR GUEST COLUMNIST DIGS INTO HER LITTLE SHOP OF HOLIDAY HORRORS AND WARNS AGAINST GIFTING NO-NOS. By Miss Tiger

THROUGHOUT HANUKKAH and the days following Christmas, my phone gets more action than a muscle bunny cruising for carrots! People call with stories of their holiday peril, and (while I should confess that these calls give me life) they’re dilemmas, hunny! When I ask what’s wrong, the answers always begin with the ephemeral, “What happened was...” Take my best friend, the dearly departed Treva Perry, who was on the other end of one of those calls. Treva couldn’t reach me via cellphone, and desperate to kiki, she dialed Directory Assistance and was given my grandma’s landline. The phone rang. I was painting faces on Raggedy Ann dolls; Grandma Daisy was donating a bunch of them to the church bazaar. Treva was having a moment, so I gingerly asked, “What’s the matter?” She replied, “Well, what happened was—my goddamn Christmas gift! You know pageant queens like a fur, but this shitty-ass Salvation Army coat is shedding everywhere and smells like mothballs!” Needless to say, Treva’s boyfriend was never heard from again. The balding fur was gifted to an upand-coming drag queen, who made leg warmers out of it. I thought of my bestie when finding myself in a similar situation. Like many other unicorn queers, I love me some Sailor Moon! Under the tree was a beautifully wrapped gift. I meticulously opened it, and to my initial delight, it appeared to be a Sailor Moon doll. Upon closer inspection, the embroidered stitching labeled her as Sailorr Monz. My (then) boyfriend admitted to thinking I wouldn’t notice the difference and suggested returning it to AliExpress. AliExpress?! Babies, I clutched the pearls, and not only did she get returned, but I sent him on his merry way, too! There’s a lesson to be learned here: Don’t be one of those fools who perpetrates Santa Claus Fraud or disrupts the sanctity of the Eight Days of Hanukkah. Inconsiderate gifts will ruin a holiday, a relationship, and one’s already questionable reputation. So avoid giving the following gifts from hell! LOTTERY TICKETS Even if the recipient manages to win a dollar or two, chances are the other thing they’ll be scratching is their head, wondering why you gave them a discount gift. Your boo will be removing 50 D EC EM B ER 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_03_SympTiger_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 50

silver gunk from underneath their nails, not to mention your skin. And it won’t be from fabulous back-scratching sex! SEX TOYS This misfire will bring a whole new meaning to two Christmas classics. You went for “O Come All Ye Faithful” and wound up with “All I Want for Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth.” BARGAIN EAU DE TOILETTE There’s a reason it was a “flea market find.” There’s a reason this old bottle of Pasha De Cartier is less desirable than a bottle of Old Spice. And there’s a reason it’s mostly alcohol: You’ll be guzzling it to heal your wounded heart after the breakup. MERMAN STATUETTES, MERMAN ORNAMENTS, MERMAN ANYTHING Shame on West Elm’s wholesale buyer having the nerve to retail mustachioed mermen snow globes. And shame on the people who used their West Elm store credit to buy them as gifts! THE INFAMOUS FRUITCAKE If people still get tuberculosis, believe me, folks still get fruitcake. The only fruitcake delivery I want is a visit from my Uncle Arthur. After 65 years of starring roles in community theater, this queen’s got the nerve to blame his bachelorhood on looking for the perfect wife. Gurl, please!

“Don’t be one of those fools who perpetrates Santa Claus Fraud or disrupts the sanctity of the Eight Days of Hanukkah.”

COUNTERFEIT LOUIS VUITTON These are usually given by social-climbing, shortterm boyfriends. They actually buy the real thing for themselves. How do you think they got the box to put your fake shit in? A smart queen will sashay into LV to get it authenticated...then immediately sashay away realizing that the hint of formaldehyde wasn’t a “new wallet smell” after all! Get to know Miss Tiger at MissTiger.com. I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y M I S S T I G E R

11/5/18 7:42 PM


T K TOTOG K T K TRAPHY K PH BY H U NT E R A BRA MS ( PROT ESTS ). COU RT ESY OF JOH N VI CTO RY A N D DAN N I AS KI N I ( ASKI N I ) . COU RT ESY OF JA N U S ROS E ( ROS E )

TKTKTKTK

SYMPOSIUM

Are Passports the New Battleground for Transgender Rights? AS TRUMP OFFICIALS PUSH TO DEFINE SEX—VERSUS GENDER—AS THE NEW LEGAL BASIS OF IDENTITY, TRANSGENDER AMERICANS FEAR NEW HURDLES IN RENEWING PASSPORTS AND IDENTITY DOCUMENTS. By Anne-Christine d’Adesky and Achy Obejas

ON SEPTEMBER 14, a sudden move by the State Department prompted a wave of anxiety among transgender Americans about a fresh assault on their rights. Overnight, the department had changed the terms and language on its website affecting transgender applications for passports, only to swiftly (though partially) reverse course after the CREDIT TK

280_04_symp_TransImmigration_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 51

flood of protests that followed. The words “gender transition” had been changed to “sex transition” in several places, and helpful links to groups— including the American Medical Association—with information for transgender petitioners had been removed. Under fire, the department claimed no changes had been made in official policy. It claimed the language tweaks were merely designed to bring the web page in line with government protocol. U.S. passports and passport applications have always used the term ‘sex’ as a marker, explained a department official, adding that the links “were inadvertently removed” and then put back in. Trans activists say some changes remain. Now comes news that the website tweak is likely part of a sweeping effort under Trump to

“They are trying to make a distinction between biological sex and gender. The larger question is why anyone should prove their gender.” —Janus Rose

O U T D E C E M B E R 2 0 1O 8 U/TJ AMNAURACRHY 22001169 5511

11/5/18 7:26 PM


SYMPOSIUM

THE PASSPORT WEBSITE tweak also follows complaints of denials and delays in passport renewals for several transgender individuals in recent months. Today, one of them, Danni Askini, founder of the Seattle-based Gender Justice League, remains so embroiled in her passport debacle that she’s no longer living in the U.S. and has applied for asylum in Sweden, still without a permanent passport in mid-November. She’s resigned as head of her organization, fears arrest if she tries to return, and remains bitter about her prospects. “This whole issue has been a nightmare for me that hasn’t ended,” Askini says. While her case has unique features, transgender activists worry such cases signal a troubling turn in Trump’s LGBTQ policy. The department change in language has legal implications for transgender citizens and continues the Trump administration’s rollback of LGBTQ rights and accessibility, which began two hours after Trump was sworn in with the deletion of all mentions of the LGBTQ community from the White House website. The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) has led the fight to maintain Obamaera policy on transgender rights. The language changes, NCTE media relations manager Gillian Branstetter said, “caused an upset and a lot of confusion” for trans clients. She also stressed that the NCTE feels it’s important for transgender individuals to continue to apply for passports as is their right. Dakini and others argue that trans citizens 52 D M EAC R EC M H B2E0R 1 62 0O1U8T/ J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9 O U T

280_04_symp_TransImmigration_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 52

Previous page: Activists Adam Eli and Chella Man at October’s “Hell No to the Memo” rally in New York City. Above: Danni Askini (top). Janus Rose

AT 36, ASKINI IS an outspoken trans activist in her adopted hometown of Seattle. Born in Maine, she came to her sense of gender early and, by age 17, had been granted an amended birth certificate listing her name change and her gender as female. In 2007, she applied for a passport with her female name and gender and used it to travel. After starting the Gender Justice League in Seattle, her political profile kept rising. She even ran for an open State Legislature seat in Seattle’s 43rd District, which includes the Capitol Hill area, hoping to be its first trans representative. Instead, she dropped out to fight I-1515—a 2016 ballot measure to limit trans bathroom access—which eventually failed. Askini’s current trouble began before she sought to renew her passport. Since 2013, as the League’s head, she had organized the annual Seattle Trans Pride, an event that’s drawn up to 10,000 attendees. But prior to this year’s Trans Pride, she received death threats from the Proud Boys, as well as a national neo-Nazi group, and local alt-right groups. “I found out my name was among those listed in a ‘hunting guide’ they put out,” Askini says, though she hasn’t seen the rumored guide herself. She said that on the eve of Pride, her car was rearended. “The assailants were three young white men with buzz cuts in a green Ford pickup truck from Oregon,” she wrote in a blog post. She says she filed a report with the local police, the Department of Justice, and even the FBI—to no avail. “I left (the U.S.) because I felt no one was going to protect me. That’s why I really needed to get my passport renewed fast.” Askini applied for the renewed passport, handing in the one from 2007 which had since expired, as well as her birth certificate. “It’s what anybody does to obtain a passport,” she says. Instead of an expedited passport, she

TKTKTKTK

are being subjected to a new and greater level of scrutiny than in the past. They worry that such policing may become retroactive and deter individuals from seeking passports. A 2015 National Transgender Discrimination Survey showed that only one-fifth (21 percent) of transgender people successfully updated all of their IDs and records with their new gender; one-third of those who transition updated none of their IDs/ records.

erase gender as a legal concept—and by extension, transgender identity. On October 22, The New York Times reported on a leaked memo drafted last spring by the Department of Health and Human Services that detailed a Trump administration goal of establishing a legal definition of sex under Title IX, the federal civil rights law. It would define sex as “male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth.” And subsequently, “The sex listed on a person’s birth certificate, as originally issued, shall constitute definitive proof of a person’s sex unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence.” The proposal will be presented to the Justice Department before the year’s end, and if approved, could eradicate federal recognition of an estimated 1.4 million trans Americans—including their passports and amended birth certificates. Within minutes of the Times story, a Twitter storm broke out to protest the proposal, and vigils were underway. Tweeted Lambda Legal: “We will not stop fighting for your rights and you #WontBeErased by this heartless administration. #TransRightsAreHumanRights.” As protests expand, the ACLU has promised a fierce battle to stop the memo from becoming law.

CREDIT TK

11/5/18 9:04 PM


TKTKTKTK

received a letter that shocked her. It requested other documents, including a birth certificate from before her completed gender transition. Afraid of more alt-right attacks, she secured an interim two-year passport with help from Oregon Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal and flew to Sweden for a break. In the latest twist, she says the state department has accused her of obtaining her amended 2007 passport through fraud—a crime punishable by a minimum of 10 years in prison. “I’ve applied to become a refugee here in Sweden because my visa ran out after 90 days, and I was going to be illegal,” she says. “It’s all so crazy.” From Stockholm, Askini has started a crowdsourced fundraising campaign to hire lawyers and defend herself. “I was told that if I try to go back, I could be arrested and put in detention,” she says, unsure of with whom she spoke about the matter on a passport phone line. “It’s so egregious what I’m being subjected to.” Askini’s case is complicated because she entered foster care at age 15, when a Maine judge ordered her case sealed. “My original birth certificate is not recoverable,” she says. With the help of a Maine-based family attorney, she has unsealed her child welfare documents for the department. Another lawyer, Lucas Cuellar, is working on her passport. “As far as I know, she has provided all the documentation they need,” says Cuellar. “She has a birth record that has been provided.” Janus Rose, a New York tech engineer, also took to Twitter to complain that her request for an amended passport was delayed. Rose completed her gender transition and submitted a standard letter from her clinic, signed by both her doctor and a nurse-practitioner, to obtain a passport with her correct gender marker. Her legal name change was approved a year later. She included the original medical letter in her application for an amended name change on her passport. Her request was rejected. “Apparently it didn’t spell out the doctor-patient relationship, even though my doctor signed it, and it was the letter they’d always used for trans cases,” Rose says. With the ACLU’s help, she got a new letter with updated language from the same clinic and doctor and now has her updated passport. “It was a process I should not have gone through in the first place,” she says, still upset. “If other clinics send out this wording, I worry [about] the next time people who use that template will have to renew or correct the information on their passports. It unsettles me that they did this retroactively.” So does the department’s effort to replace gendered language. “It is not appropriate,” Rose says, highlighting that trans activists have long fought against biology as an essential marker of identity and the binary of male-female. “They are CREDIT TK

280_04_symp_TransImmigration_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 53

Carmen Carrera (top right) and others protest for trans and GNC rights.

trying to make a distinction between biological sex and gender.” She adds, “The larger question is why anyone should have to prove their gender.” As she points out, three states and two municipalities have taken the lead to add an “x” to some documents to indicate a non-binary gender identity. Similarly, Mx. is increasingly accepted as a non-gendered alternative to Ms. or Mr. As the leaked HHS memo reveals, Trump officials seek to reverse the tide. FOR TRANS FOLKS NOW, says attorney Cuellar, “What I’m seeing is that…people are being asked for more and more evidence. The goal posts keep moving.” “Our right to exist is not a matter of public debate,” adds Rose about the Trump administration’s memo. “If the law views our existence as illegitimate, then the law itself is illegitimate.” OUT DECEMBER 2018 OU / TJ AM NA URACRHY 22001169 5 3

11/5/18 7:26 PM


T:15.75� S:14.875�

LIVE VIVIDLY.

8;$:'V\VWHPRQO\ZRUNVDWVSHHGVXSWR03+$PD]RQ$OH[DDQGDOOUHODWHGORJRVDQGPRWLRQPDUNVDUHWUDGHPDUNVRI$PD]RQFRP,QFRULWVDIoOLDWHV The Lexus+Alexa app requires an Android smartphone running version 5.0 and above. Apple iOS available in early 2019. Options shown. Š2018 Lexus.

18786 lexus spread Live Vividly replacement.indd 2

10/31/18 5:16 PM


T:15.75” S:14.875”

Make a statement at every turn, with the city-smart agility and handling of the Lexus UX, with available Hybrid AWD 1 and F SPORT. Turn heads, with its sculpted exterior, stunning headlamps, and race-inspired interior. And elevate your commute with Amazon Alexa compatibility.2 Because every journey should be exciting. It brings us great pleasure to congratulate this year’s OUT100 honorees. Your drive to live in full color is an inspiration to us all.

18786 lexus spread Live Vividly replacement.indd 3

lexus.com/UX | #LexusUX

10/31/18 5:16 PM

T:10.875”

S:10.125”

INTRODUCING THE FIRST-EVER LEXUS UX AND UX F SPORT.


56 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Opener_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 56

11/5/18 7:35 PM

H A I R : K E I S U K E CH I KAM OTO. M AK EU P : ZAC HART. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY

Indya Moore


THE 24TH ANNUAL

2018: GENERATIONS

H A I R : K E I S U K E CH I KAM OTO. M AK EU P : ZAC HART. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY

Our vibrant celebration of the most influential LGBTQ people of the year, starring Emma Gonzรกlez, Billy Porter, SOPHIE, the cast of Queer Eye, Cynthia Nixon, Jeremy Scott, Hayley Kiyoko, and more

Photography by Martin Schoeller

O U T D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 57

280_04_100_Opener_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 57

11/5/18 7:35 PM


Billy Porter IT’S RARE TO SEE an actor sustain a flawless performance through a two-hour film. On FX’s Pose, as the electric ball emcee Pray Tell, Billy Porter did it through a season of eight one-hour episodes, segueing from clocking competitors on the year’s fiercest runway to mourning the loss of his onscreen lover to AIDS to sharing tender chemistry with co-star and fellow Out100 honoree Mj Rodriguez—all without a visible hint of effort. “It had to be Pose,” Porter says between takes of this cover shoot, his first for Out. “And I had to be ready for it. I had to live through what I lived through.” Before creator Ryan Murphy called Porter about joining Pose in June 2017, the performer had just come off the previous TV pilot season un-cast, unfulfilled, and in the midst of what he calls a “breakdown.” “I was like, Is this gonna work out? Should I try something else? It’s been 30 years now,” Porter says. And while those 30 years have surely not been without highlights, his uphill climb suggests he’s one of the more resilient stars in showbiz. Porter was brought up in the Pentecostal church in Pittsburgh, came out as gay at 16, and says that “every bad thing that could happen happened” (that included bullying, condemnation by family, and—as he revealed to Out.com in a crushing op-ed on October 31—childhood sexual abuse). One strength Porter always knew he had, though, was his singing voice, and in 1990, it brought him to New York City, where he landed his first theater role in the original cast of Miss Saigon. And yet, while also studying acting at Carnegie Mellon, he faced new challenges. “I was pigeonholed into the only thing that the industry could handle at the time: the magical fairy faggot,” Porter says. “Don’t get me wrong: What I was given was an opportunity to stop the show, but when it came to my humanity, nobody wanted to discuss that.” Spend an hour with Porter, and you’ll see all the facets of him that also make up Pray Tell: the excitement, the anger, the pain, the gratitude, the irrepressible animation, and, most of all, the spirit. It was also in the ’90s that Porter began to grasp his artistic integrity and what he wanted to give the world. As he reminisces he invokes philosophies snagged from Maya Angelou and Oprah. “How can I be of service?” he says. “What does that mean—service—in an industry that’s inherently narcissistic? How do you do that? You look the motherfuckers in the face who say you have to hide, and you

choose authenticity when it’s not popular.” But that’s not easy for a gay man of color who knows his unique gifts make him “very specific,” and alternately too nuanced and too dynamic for the many drab roles he’s been offered. It took more of the ’90s and some of the 2000s—when he was releasing some of his first music, eventually living in Los Angeles, and facing rejection while chasing standard notions of fame—for Porter to really start living his truth. “I didn’t even know I wasn’t dreaming big enough,” he says. “I was so busy trying to fit in, and then it was like, You don’t fit in, and you ain’t supposed to fit in.” Porter moved back to New York in 2002 “with a new kind of creative identity,” writing and directing plays before finding the first two roles in which he actually saw something of himself. One was as Belize in Broadway’s 2010 revival of Angels in America; the other was as drag queen Lola in the original run of Kinky Boots—a role for which he refused to creatively compromise, and one that won him a Tony in 2013. “And this is the service part,” Porter says. “Somebody needed me to stand on that stage as a black, out, gay actor, who took every hit that comes with that kind of life, to stand triumphant and be rewarded for making the right decision.” He pauses, muses some more, then later says, “So, the journey to what you’re responding to in Pose is all of that. That whole life.” Porter praises Murphy as a creative who “understands theater people, and the forgotten person,” and Porter, now 49, had long identified as both. He was originally asked to play the dance teacher on the show, and respectfully took the audition but advised it wasn’t the best use of his skills. It was then that Murphy wrote Pray Tell for Porter—a part that has him matching wits with ball consultants like Jack Mizrahi and Twiggy Pucci Garcon, paying tribute to the friends he lost to AIDS in the ’90s, and being as “specific” as he wants. “What I love about being the age I am, and having been in the business for so long,” he says, “is that I get to show up, and I don’t have to prove that I’m worthy or deserving. It’s like, Can he act? That question was on the table for a long time. Today, it’s nice, and I’m trying to breathe into it. How am I happy for myself while the world is falling apart? I’m trying to find that balance and lean into the joy while simultaneously going out and fighting every day.” —R. KURT OSENLUND

STYL I N G BY B RA N DO N GARR. STYLI N G ASS I STANT : K E R E N E G RAH AM. G ROOM E R : LASO NYA G U NT E R. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY

Performance of the Year

58 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_BillyPorter_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 58

11/5/18 7:38 PM


STYL I N G BY B RA N DO N GARR. STYLI N G ASS I STANT : K E R E N E G RAH AM. G ROOM E R : LASO NYA G U NT E R. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY

Coat by Christian Siriano. Sweater and pants by Mr. Turk. Shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti O U T D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 57

280_04_100_BillyPorter_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 59

11/5/18 7:38 PM


SOPHIE

THERE’S ELECTRICITY among the youthful crowd awaiting SOPHIE’s emergence onstage inside Brooklyn Steel, a repurposed manufacturing plant. I stand mid-orchestra, pressed against Juul-sucking fans, as crimson lasers buzz overhead and a hum rumbles from the speakers. At stage right, the artist manifests, her form distorted behind a maze of screens. Slowly, she traverses the stage, a lithe silhouette, until she takes her place at its center. Swaddled in a gauzy wrap that billows over a latex skirt and rhinestone bralette, she arches her spine. Sounds crescendo into a cry of “Take me to Dubai”—a tease of a new track of the same name—and SOPHIE commands me to move. That was September, and what I witnessed was a metaphor for the Scotland-born, Los Angeles-based producer-turned-pop-star’s rising career, which has involved a hard-won struggle toward stepping into view. A little more than a year ago, “SOPHIE” was still a faceless moniker for a musician affiliated with producer A.G. Cook— with whom she worked on material for soda-sapphic pop persona QT—and the subgenre of PC Music, known for its exaggerated electronic riffs. Soon, questions swirled about SOPHIE’s biography and gender. As she invited other artists to perform onstage in her place and avoided questions about her provenance, SOPHIE left most fans with only her name to go by. Many presumed she was a male studio geek hiding behind the feminine alias, a notion bolstered by interviews in The New York Times and Rolling Stone, in which the masculine pronoun was used. But with the October 2017 release of the video for her single “It’s Okay to Cry,” we finally saw SOPHIE. I, was that a teardrop in your eye? I never thought I’d see you cry, she croons straight into the camera, her face framed by a pyramid of auburn-red curls and her hand caressing her cherry pout. The green-screen weather behind her shifts from marshmallow clouds to a thunderous downpour. This, clearly, was the moment that SOPHIE was ready to bare herself—visually, emotionally, sonically—and to fully embody her art as a singular entity. “That was just a time when everything aligned,” SOPHIE says, speaking to me just after that September show, with a soft sense of hurt crackling in her voice. “Even now, it’s difficult for me to reenter the headspace I was in before. It’s not a totally natural state of being for me to be visible. But

it’s something I’m learning a lot from—it can be helpful and nourishing to feel embodied. I didn’t used to feel like my physical self bore any resemblance to what I felt inside.” Her reluctance to appear as a frontwoman was also, perhaps, an effort to detangle the whole identity narrative before it eclipsed her work. “My music is political, but talking about politics is boring,” she says. “I’d rather have a more emotional conversation through the music. You can say something more multidimensional. Pop music is the most relevant format we have to discuss anything. A song can have meaning to people anywhere, without any context.” SOPHIE’s music is an innovation when it comes to the electro-pop formula: a brain-tingling ecstasy of disparate (and often disorienting) synthetic sounds that are at once conceptual and surprisingly danceable. Her 2015 compilation album, Product, caught widespread attention with the sped-

60 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_SOPHIE_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 60

11/7/18 1:49 PM

STYL I N G BY M I N DY L E B ROCK. M A K EU P : CH RI STI N A WALTZ. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU D IO, LOS AN G E L ES

Artist of the Year


STYL I N G BY M I N DY L E B ROCK. M A K EU P : CH RI STI N A WALTZ. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU D IO, LOS AN G E L ES

Shirt by Diane von Furstenberg

up, high-pitched vocals of “Bipp” and the fizzing bubblepops of “Lemonade.” SOPHIE says, “I make music to process my feelings;” however, the saccharine sweetness of her songs is often born of hard times. “Living in London—sometimes I was really miserable, and [Product is] the music I created at that time. It certainly wasn’t a celebration of feeling great or lemonade.” With this past June’s release of SOPHIE’s first studio album, Oil of Every Pearl’s Un-Insides, which contains “It’s Okay to Cry,” the artist stuck to her signature plastic-pop vernacular while expanding to new, experimental territory. It’s a vulnerable departure, with singles like the beat-heavy “Ponyboy,” as well as “Faceshopping,” which interrogates the line between artificiality and reality. It also boasts a roster of increasingly ambitious tracks, like “Is It Cold in the Water,” a composition that swells with synths as a voice breathes, I’m

freezing / I’m burning / I’ve left my home. “I’m trying to get to a point with my music where I’m just responding exactly to the way my body feels in that moment,” she says. IT’S THREE DAYS after SOPHIE’s Brooklyn Steel performance, and she’s drowsy, having spent a late night polishing new tracks in the studio. “My sign is Virgo,” she says, noting that she identifies with Virgo’s perfectionist tendencies. It’s a proclivity that resulted in her canceling a string of European tour dates—as well as a controversial Tel Aviv show—in lieu of finishing new songs, but it’s also drawn high-profile collaborators like Lady Gaga, Rihanna, and Madonna. “It’s a long way to come for someone who felt completely isolated from the music world and music experiences,” SOPHIE says, invoking a word that might describe her own art. “It’s surreal.” —COCO ROMACK OUT DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 61

280_04_100_SOPHIE_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 61

11/7/18 1:49 PM


STYL I N G BY M I CH A E L COOK. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Sweater by Acne Studios. Pants by A.P.C.

58 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_EmmaGonzales_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 62

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Emma González

STYL I N G BY M I CH A E L COOK. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Newsmaker of the Year

ON FEBRUARY 14, Emma González’s life was forever changed when a gunman walked into her high school, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, in Parkland, Fla. But her story didn’t end after the news trucks moved on. In response to the tragedy, she and her classmates organized a protest so powerful, it has grown into a national movement. A month after the tragedy ripped through their school, students led the March for Our Lives protest in Washington, D.C. There, González took to the podium and offered a silent tribute that lasted 6 minutes and 20 seconds—the same amount of time it took for 17 of her classmates and teachers to be killed, and 17 more to be injured. Her moving gesture quickly made headlines and became the most talked-about moment from the daylong demonstration. The massive turnout for the march was a surprising show of support surrounding grisly acts that, for too long, had been accepted with apathy in our country. Even González was struck by how large the crowd was. “I got up onstage, and none of us could go anywhere,” she says. “If we wanted to move, we couldn’t because of how many people were there.” If that protest were all González and her classmates had accomplished this year, it would have been a landmark achievement. But their work to change the national conversation about gun violence continues, and it energizes González to meet more people, advocate for gun law reform, and bring to the forefront issues facing communities of color. “One of the coolest experiences for me was the Peace March in Chicago on Friday, June 15,” she says, explaining that activists in Chicago organized marches every Friday to combat the city’s high rate of gun violence in the summer months. “We marched through the streets and neighborhoods, and we were all chanting, screaming, and singing. And we brought the press with us to shine more light on the event.” Before the Parkland shooting, González was already involved with advocacy and organizing, having served as the president of her school’s Gay Straight Alliance during her senior year, working with about 30 students. “Thirty kids is a lot for a school with 3,000 people,” she says. “Most of them weren’t out, but they came anyway. They had shoulders to cry on. We had a really good group—they were able to help me, and I was able to help them.” As part of her GSA duties, González taught her classmates about queer milestones, and she feels passionately that

younger queer generations should learn from the past. “They can learn the history of our culture, and our community, and the fight, and the struggles,” she says. “Every time you go to a Pride event, it’s a celebration of love, but it’s also a remembrance of everything that started the beginning of being accepted in this society, which doesn’t always want to accept us.” Indeed, not everyone celebrated the arrival of a bold and confident queer Latinx woman on the national stage. Almost immediately after González’s first public appearances, trolls began attacking her online. In a Facebook post, Congressman Steve King’s campaign (R-Iowa) linked her to communist Cuba for wearing a patch of the country’s flag on her jacket. González, whose father is Cuban, defended herself and cited the elected official’s racist comments. “If somebody’s trying to challenge my Cuban identity, they are usually—if not obviously—racist,” she said. “Look at the things he said, and what he called me. What he said was bottom-of-the barrel. He was not even trying. He went out of his way lots of times to call out various people and say things about minority groups.” To González, identity is fluid and more encompassing than basic labels. “Identity to me means the way that you describe yourself when someone says, ‘Describe yourself,’” she explains. “If I were to describe my identity, I would say that I am half Cuban, I’m bald, I’m bisexual, I’m 5-foot-2, I like to write, I like to partake in the arts, and I like to crochet. I would hope that if I were introducing myself to somebody, through those things, they would be able to get an understanding of who I am.” Despite so much sadness in one year, González feels hopeful for the future. “There are so many people who are coming forward and being like, ‘Yep. I am not straight. I am not cis. And I am here to stay,’” she says. “Our society doesn’t need to be cis, heteroromantic, heteronormative, and heterosexual all the time. We have these different people, and they’re beautiful, and I’m just so glad to know that there are so many people who are out. And even if they’re in the closet, they still know who they are.” And González’s determination to prevent others from experiencing the horrors of a mass shooting will stretch long after this year. “The fact is that gun violence is still prevalent in our society,” she says. “We’re going to be fighting for this until it’s fixed.” —MONICA CASTILLO OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 63

280_04_100_EmmaGonzales_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 63

11/5/18 7:38 PM


The Cast of Queer Eye Entertainers of the Year

IT’S EASY FOR US to become casualties of our own feeds— constantly consuming the 24-hour news cycle until we’re consumed by it ourselves. With sexual abuse scandals, shootings at schools and places of worship, leaked memos about trans erasure, and ugly spats in a nation that’s never been more Red versus Blue, gloom abounds. Enter the new Fab Five—Bobby Berk, Karamo Brown, Tan France, Antoni Porowski, and Jonathan Van Ness—who aim to make things a little brighter. On Queer Eye, Netflix’s 2018 reboot of Bravo’s reality makeover show Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (which debuted in 2003), this diverse quintet isn’t just bettering the lives of the on-air subjects they primp, encourage, and advise, they also affect viewers at home— inspiring us to be better, too, and to challenge the status quo. TV revivals are undeniably trending, but Queer Eye doesn’t feel like it exists just to be part of a fad. With its cast alone, its arrival announced that “queer” doesn’t look like it did 15 years ago, and one of its key, empowering messages is vital for the mainstream: LGBTQ people, rather than being a burden, have the ability, strength, and desire to improve people’s lives. The Netflix production proves that Bravo’s established formula still works, but the magic touch that clinched Queer Eye’s success comes down to the infectious, harmonious, and varied personalities of its fresh faces: the spirited Berk, the cool and collected Brown, the ever-stylish France, the sensual Porowski, and the high-heeled Van Ness. Together, they share a wit and rapport that make us want to watch—and, probably, binge. “The original show was a trailblazer,” says Van Ness, the new grooming guru with a wealth of sassy quips to match his pristine cascade of hair. Berk, the design expert whose religious struggles have enriched his on-air narrative, adds, “I love that we’re able to take such a groundbreaking show from a pivotal time in my development and still make it work today.” But Queer Eye has done far more than pay homage to its predecessor. The Fab Five are using their new gig to facilitate countless far-reaching conversations, and because they’re leading with empathy, unlikely sources are listening. “I received a message from a pastor who told me he’d been preaching against homosexuality his entire life and changed his ways after watching our show,” Berk says. “He said he 64 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

will never preach that way again.” “We’re taking our message of self-care and compassion global,” says Van Ness, noting that the show touches people on a national level and also abroad, as Netflix reaches hundreds of countries, which essentially means that Queer Eye is blanketing the world with queer visibility. Says France, the impeccably outfitted style honcho: “The messages I get from people in the Middle East, saying that they’re hopeful after seeing themselves represented on TV... that really gets me everytime.” Porowski, the culinary-focused, fan-certified hunk of the group, says “kindness has always been [his] best ammunition,” and he, too, is seeing international feedback. “A boy in Poland messaged me about the current political climate and his fear of walking the streets safely,” Porowski


STYL I N G BY KATI E WOO LL EY AN D A N E I LA W E N DT. H A I R A N D M AK EU P : KRISTI N K E NT. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT STAG E PO RTKC, KA N SAS CITY

says. “He said it meant the world to see me march in Montréal Pride this past summer. He said I gave him hope. I never thought I could have that effect on someone.” One of the most tearjerking moments of Queer Eye’s first season came when the boys flipped the script and reached out to a gay man, AJ, who’d never had the chance to come out to his father before he passed away. The episode culminated in AJ coming out to his stepmother by reading a letter he wrote to his late dad. AJ’s long-withheld sadness and anxiety (he stayed quiet for 30 years) poured out in a cathartic wave of tears, reminding us that isolation, regret, and internalized pain are unhealthy for all people. For Brown, the culture vulture and the franchise’s first black cast member, expanding what those people look like on Queer Eye is a conscious goal. “It’s important to us that

the heroes we work with reflect the diversity of voices and viewpoints that make this country what it is,” he says. “I’m looking forward to more people seeing themselves in the faces of our season 3 heroes.” What Brown doesn’t acknowledge is that to someone, somewhere, he’s a hero, too, just like the rest of his castmates. (He also happens to be an alum of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and he salutes fellow Out100 cover star Emma González for her and her peers’ fight for gun law reform.) Today, as distressing things happen, we shouldn’t look away, but we should search for folks who can offer some respite from the gloom. The cast of Queer Eye is doing that, with bright colors and bold patterns. And we’re watching. —ALEXANDER KACALA OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 65


Dr. Renée Richards DR. RENÉE RICHARDS doesn’t quite relate to the modern state of queerness. She is quick to acknowledge that, in her day, “calling someone queer was an invitation for a punch in the nose.” Yet, this 84-year-old has been honored for years by human rights and LGBTQ entities (including SAGE, which gave her a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006). She is most widely known for her links to professional tennis, and a landmark court case that ultimately allowed her to compete as a woman in the 1977 U.S. Open—despite the discrimination she’d faced when she was outed for being transgender. She’s never quite felt like an advocate because she never quite had an official “coming-out,” at least in the way it’s currently defined. But all that aside, Richards’s life is one of profound heroism and self-affirmation, lived at a time in which people like her dared not be visible. Today, she still practices her first passion of ophthalmology, seeing patients at her home, where she lives with her two dogs, Rocco and Romeo. And while her views may not fully align with the LGBTQ zeitgeist, she has one thing to say to our oppressive administration: “41 years a man. 43 years a woman. Do not erase!"

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT RI CH ARDS'S H OM E I N CARM E L, N. Y.

Legend

66 S EP T EM B ER 2015 OUT

280_04_100_ReneeR_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 66

11/5/18 10:09 PM


STYL I N G BY G RA NT WOO L H EA D. H AI R : R E B E KAH FO R ECAST AT TH E WA LL G ROU P. M AK EU P : M ATI N AT TRAC EY M AT TI NG LY. NA I LS : L IA N G AT HON EY A RTI STS. DR ESS BY SA LVATOR E F E R RAGAMO. PHOTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YORK CITY

Cynthia Nixon Hero of the Year

WHEN IT COMES TO LGBTQ visibility in politics, we’d never seen anything like Cynthia Nixon’s very public run for New York governor against incumbent Andrew Cuomo. Nixon didn’t beat Cuomo, but she shattered traditional notions of who can run for office. “It felt great to be running as a woman, but especially as a queer person and a mother of a trans man during a time when having a voice is so important for our community,” says Nixon, who bowed out with grace and a heroic message of encouragement for “young people, young women, and young queer people who reject the gender binary.” Nixon continues her dedication to progressive ideals, and she walked away from her experience with priceless lessons. “The things I’ve faced may be small compared to what many others have gone through,” she says, “but life teaches me to have compassion for myself first so I can really hear what other people tell me about their truths and challenges.”

280_04_100_Cynthia_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 67

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Jeremy Scott

DESIGNER Jeremy Scott has touched almost every aspect of fashion. He operates as the creative director for both his namesake label and the Milan-based high-fashion brand Moschino, and this year, he launched a collaboration with H&M. And though he serves up the typical red carpet fare for models and celebrities, Scott frequently imbues those looks with powerful messaging and the aesthetics of queerness. “Being a queer person today means being vocal about what’s right, shining light on others who deserve it, and supporting causes and people—in every domain—that are championing us,” says Scott, who’s trumpeted inclusion by casting the likes of Teddy Quinlivan and fellow Out100 honorees Aquaria and Mj Rodriguez for his H&M campaign. “It means trying to broaden the vision people have of our community.” 68 S EP T EM B ER 2015 OUT

280_04_100_JeremyScott_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 68

G ROO M E R : J USTI N TYM E. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS ANG E L ES

Stylemaker of the Year

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey

G ROO M E R : E RI K TO RPP E. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU D IO, LOS AN G E L ES

Media Pioneers

WITH MORE THAN a million weekly viewers, and nine Emmys under its belt (five of them awarded this year alone), RuPaul’s Drag Race has become a household phenomenon, bringing a historically countercultural art form into the living rooms of countless mainstream viewers. RuPaul may be the (impeccably beat) face of the show, but Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey, the two men at the helm of Los Angeles-based production company World of Wonder, are the media masterminds behind the juggernaut. Barbato and Bailey launched World of Wonder in 1991, and since then, from Party Monster to Drag Race, they’ve been championing queer projects that impact the way we’re all perceived by the broader population. The longtime creative partners are visionary trailblazers, and they know the benefits of both learning from the past and championing the advancement of young queer people. “They’re the future,” Bailey says. “And the survivors from Stoneman Douglas High, in particular, are an endless inspiration to us.” Adds Barbato: “All generations can learn that age is a state of mind, but whatever age we are, we stand on the shoulders of others who came before, and we owe so much to them for their sacrifices.” OUT S EP T EM B ER 2015 69

280_04_100_Barbato&Bailey_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 69

11/5/18 7:42 PM


Indya Moore ROUGHLY TWO years ago, Indya Moore feared they might descend back into homelessness. Instead, they’re thriving as one of the brightest breakout stars of Pose, this year’s beloved ode to ballroom culture. Moore has helped bring the stories and struggles of trans women, past and present, to TV viewers around the world. “My mom understands experiences I have so much clearer now,” Moore says of the Pose exposure. “I feel respected in a way I definitely deserve. I know part of it is my mom being proud, but most of it is the themes in the show that drew us closer as a family.” Moore credits trans pioneers like Leiomy Maldonado, Isis King, Laverne Cox, and Janet Mock for making them feel more human, and Moore adamantly uses their voice offscreen to raise awareness and inspire action regarding trans and GNC rights.

280_04_100_Indya_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 70

H A I R : K E I S U K E CH I KAM OTO. M AK EU P : ZAC HART. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E L L E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Actor, Activist

11/5/18 7:33 PM


Danica Roem Legislator

IN THE 2017 ELECTION, Delegate Danica Roem’s meteoric rise in her home state of Virginia claimed her a seat at the table—a historic first for the country. Roem says, “As the first out-and-seated transgender state legislator in the United States, I have an enormous responsibility to deliver on the core quality-of-life issues my constituents need me to prioritize—like traffic, jobs, schools, and health care—while setting a good example so the next generation of LGBTQ leaders know that they can succeed because of who they are and not despite it.” Roem voted to expand Medicaid to 400,000 Virginians across the commonwealth, including 3,800 of her uninsured constituents in the 13th District. And she’s not finished. “It’s a great feeling to know that come January 1, thousands of my constituents will have access to quality, affordable health insurance,” she says. “But I also know thousands more still won’t be able to afford private health insurance while earning too much for Medicaid. This means we have a lot more work to do to make health care a right in our commonwealth, not a privilege.”

Kimahli Powell

RO E M : G ROO M E R : ZAC HA RT. BOTH PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU D I O, N EW YO R K CITY

Executive Director, Rainbow Railroad IN THE SPIRIT of the Underground Railroad, Rainbow Railroad is a Canadian charitable organization that helps LGBTQ people around the world seek freedom from the state-sponsored violence and persecution they face in their home countries. It has aided more than 500 people in need, and at its head is Kimahli Powell, who since joining as executive director in 2016, has led the organization through successful interventions in Chechnya and Egypt. “My personal highlight of the year,” he says, “was seeing a group of Egyptians (who were either arrested or faced prosecution just for raising the rainbow flag at a Mashrou’ Leila concert in Cairo last year) reunited after making it safely to Toronto this summer. As the band played onstage, we watched them dance together, wrapped in rainbow flags, hugging and crying.”

OUT DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 71

280_04_100_Roem_Powell_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 71

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Wanda Sykes

ONE OF THE HOTTEST entertainment happenings this year was the return of Roseanne, and many didn’t know that Wanda Sykes was one of the creative forces behind it. She had been working as a writer and consulting producer for the ABC series, but quit after Roseanne Barr wrote a racist tweet comparing former Obama aide Valerie Jarrett to an ape. (Sykes was first to cut all ties, before the network fired Barr.) Her mere existence as a queer woman of color in the comedy world has sparked social progress, but Sykes looks to the student survivors from Parkland for her own inspiration. “I believe they will make positive change in not just gun laws, but in human and equal rights for all,” she says. “In general, younger queer people are doing it: They are organizing. They are a force. Older people can learn from them to be more daring, be bold, be impatient.” Sykes recently struck a deal with Netflix for her fifth comedy special, which is scheduled to hit the streaming service in 2019, with Sykes center stage and in the spotlight, where she belongs.

Julio Torres Comedian, Writer

WHEN JULIO TORRES envisions his future, he sees bridal couture. “I know that, as a comedian, wedding dresses are so not my problem, but...I don’t know...I feel like I have some ideas,” Torres quips, noting that, in addition to starring alongside Fred Armisen and Ana Fabrega in HBO’s upcoming Spanish-language series Los Espookys, he’s also down to try his hand at designing for brides. “I just fear that if I go down that rabbit hole, I won’t come out of it the same,” he says. On a more serious note, the Saturday Night Live writer, who has quirky comedy and offbeat humor down to a tee, believes these are dire times we’re living in. On what it means to be LGBTQ in 2018, he says, “It’s about realizing that we’re in a state of emergency, caring about issues beyond those in our immediate community, and having empathy for the plight of others.”

SYK ES : MA K EU P : PATRICK D E FO NTB RU N E FO R MCH U S I NG TA RT E COS M ETI CS. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N LOS A N G E L ES. TOR R ES : M A K EU P : E L IZA B ETH YOO N. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E L L E R STU DIO, N EW YORK CITY

Comedian, Writer, Actress

72 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Sykes_Torres_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 72

11/5/18 7:29 PM


KIYO KO : STYLI N G BY N ICO LAS KLAM. H AI R : GU I SCH O E D L E R FO R EXCLU S IV E A RTISTS U SI N G O R I B E H AI RCA R E AN D VA R I S. M A K EU P : M A R LA VAZQU EZ. COAT BY BOT T EGA V E N ETA . PHOTOG RAPH E D I N LOS ANG E L ES

Hayley Kiyoko Singer, Songwriter

THERE MAY BE no better sign of the times than Hayley Kiyoko. Three years ago, the pop singer arguably risked her career when she dropped the same-sex anthem, “Girls Like Girls”. But instead of backfiring in a world fraught with ignorance, the release turned out to be, quite possibly, the best decision of Kiyoko’s life—its success proving that there is indeed a large audience for an out, proud, Asian-American, lesbian singer. This year, she’s catapulted further into the spotlight with the release of her debut album, Expectations, and an MTV Video Music Award for Push Artist of the Year. “I am literally pinching myself daily,” Kiyoko says, adding that while she’s been on tour, her devout fans have shared “their personal stories of overcoming their own struggles and finding the courage to love themselves.” Those same fans have dubbed Kiyoko their “Lesbian Jesus,” helped to popularize her viral hashtag #20GayTeen, and, perhaps, cemented her place in the echelons of pop stardom. OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_Kiyoko_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 73

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Mj Rodriguez TWO MOMENTS changed Mj Rodriguez’s life this year: The first was the announcement that her hit breakout show, Pose, would be renewed for a second season. The other? Seeing queer pop queen Janelle Monáe perform for the first time. “She stands for something,” Rodriguez says. “She’s a freedom fighter and always has been.” The power of playing Blanca Rodriguez-Evangelista—a trans, HIV-positive woman of color—on Pose is not lost on Rodriguez, and she looks forward to many more stories like it. “Now, more narratives will be told,” she says. While she’s excited about new happenings, like her November opening in American Repertory Theater’s ExtraOrdinary, a retrospective nod to a decade of musical theater, the actress also looks back to how the trans women who came before her shaped her ability to succeed. “Queer youth can learn the history of how we persevered,” she says, “and how our ancestors marched and fought for the rights we have today.”

Kate McKinnon Comedian, Actor

BEST KNOWN FOR her playful caricatures of Hillary Clinton, Kellyanne Conway, and Jeff Sessions, Kate McKinnon does impressions of politicians to make an impression on politics as a whole. “I love doing [impersonations] of politicians because the task is always to imagine the private lives of these people whose job it is to project an image of staunch, unflinching leadership and grace,” McKinnon told Vanity Fair last year, “and that’s just not how human beings, in their heart of hearts, work.” SNL’s first-ever openly lesbian cast member is also the show’s foremost source of salvation: In a world rife with fake news, partisan reporting, and staggeringly tone-deaf output from elected officials, comedy—and often McKinnon’s comedy—has become a rare beacon of truth. This year, she starred in The Spy Who Dumped Me opposite Mila Kunis and graced the cover of GQ’s comedy issue alongside Sarah Silverman and Issa Rae. The Upright Citizens Brigade alum is now prepping to play Grunhilda in the film version of the graphic novel The Lunch Witch while working on an untitled movie about Fox News’ Roger Ailes.

RO DRI G U EZ : H A I R : N AT E J U E RG E N S E N. M AK EU P : ZAC H ART. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY. M CKI N NON : HA I R : JOS E PH M A I N E AT J E D ROOT. M A K EU P : VI CTOR H E N AO AT B E RNST E I N & AN DRI U LLI. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT BATH H OUS E STU DIOS, N EW YOR K CITY

Actress

74 D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8 / J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9 O U T

280_04_100_rodriguez_McKinnon_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 74

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Jacolby Satterwhite

PH OTOG RAPH E D I N BROO KLYN, N. Y.

Artist

EARLIER THIS YEAR, animator and visual artist Jacolby Satterwhite opened his solo exhibition “Blessed Avenue” at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in Chinatown. Highly acclaimed, the show transported viewers to another world—an Afrofuturist queer fantasy where dancers mix voguing with martial arts—and continued Satterwhite’s trend of maternal inspiration. (Reifying Desire, his six-part video series that displayed at the Whitney Biennial in 2014, explored sex and philosophy through his mother’s drawings of objects.) “I feel like I have ultimate agency as a creative human being living my authentic truth,” Satterwhite says of his queerness, which has always factored heavily in his work. He is currently collaborating with Spanish architect Andrés Jaque on a piece for a 2019 London exhibition, preparing three more solo shows, and working on a top-secret music video for a high-profile artist. He feels that younger LGBTQ folks should focus on learning “the principles of stoicism, patience, and restraint” from older generations, who in turn can learn from our youth “to expand, blur, and interrogate the language of identity and desire.” O U T D E C E M B E R 2 01 8 / J A N UA RY 2 019 75

280_04_100_Satterwhite_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 75

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Daniela Vega “DO NOT SQUEEZE that anxiety accelerator,” warns Daniela Vega. “Enjoy the transitions because they are an organic and natural part of the human experience. Don’t fear them.” The actress is talking about transitions in the broader sense—whether it be gender, sexuality, or simply a new chapter in life—but she could just as well be reflecting on her own journey. This year, the Chilean breakout star appeared in the Oscar-winning film A Fantastic Woman, and made history as the award ceremony’s first-ever openly transgender presenter. “As a community, we can expand the horizons—expand the limits of empathy and tear down walls,” she says. Vega is next slated to star in the Chilean crime drama La Jauría, as well as in Netflix’s adaptation of Armistead Maupin’s queer classic Tales of the City.

H A I R : N AT E J U E RG E N S E N. M AK EU P : ZAC H ART. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YORK CITY

Actress

76 D EC E M B E R 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 O U T

280_04_100_Vega_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 76

11/5/18 7:26 PM


EV E R ET T : G ROO M E R : N ATAS HA S M E E FO R EXCLU S IV E ARTI STS U SI N G AU R E L IA S KI N CAR E. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY. ON UORA H : STYL I NG BY M A RCI RODG E RS. HAI R : MY E RS LANSKY. MAK EU P : AL EXA ANG E LOPOU LOS. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YORK CITY

Rupert Everett Actor, Director

RUPERT EVERETT has major staying power. Breaking onto the scene in the early 1980s, Everett has been an outspoken, out-and-proud actor and writer for decades. In a significant way, he’s seen firsthand the cultural sea change in attitudes toward the LGBTQ community. In a recent interview with Vulture, Everett said, “Now is a moment of great opportunity for everyone. It feels to me that, for [the younger] generation, the future’s up for grabs. When you see what’s happening, you can’t [help but] be thrilled.” And this year—after nearly 10 years of industry pushback and financial roadblocks—The Happy Prince, a biopic written by, directed by, and starring Everett as poet and queer icon Oscar Wilde in his final days, finally hit theaters. Speaking to a packed audience at a Manhattan screening of the film, the director said, “Wilde is a very important figure—a gay person who worked in a largely heterosexual world.” Everett can relate.

Nneka Onuorah Filmmaker

THIS YEAR has been fruitful for Nneka Onuorah. In addition to working as a field producer on Elegance Bratton’s My House, she served as a field director on Netflix’s First and Last, which surveys America’s criminal justice system. She also bought a home and worked on her first narrative film with Dee Rees, whom she calls “the most amazing black lesbian director.” Onuorah is powering ahead with her work as she moves into 2019. She’s co–producing a new show for Viceland Paris with directing partner Giselle Bailey about immigrant communities in the French ballroom scene, and she’s directing a documentary feature, hinting that it “will break open a lot of issues around oppressed people who struggle with the idea of freedom” and “discuss things we’ve been afraid to admit in society,” Onuorah says. “Through defying what social constructs were indoctrinated in me, I have been able to become a truly free person, and to not define myself by what I see around me, but to live in my own innate beauty.”

OUT DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 77

280_04_100_Everett_Onuorah_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 77

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Michelle LeClair & Tena Clark MICHELLE LECLAIR spent years as a devoted member of the Church of Scientology, reportedly donating millions to the religion and serving as a spokesperson. But, as she outlines in her memoir Perfectly Clear, LeClair was humiliated by the church when she came out as gay— discrimination that led her to defect and to choose her wife, Tena Clark, over what had become a stranglehold. “Sharing my love story with millions of people,” LeClair says, has been this year’s highlight. Clark (who’s also a film-score composer) released a memoir this year, too, called Southern Discomfort, about her coming of age in the oppressive rural South. With their joint book tours, and LeClair’s multiple TV appearances, these two women brought their stories to the masses this year. The duo imparts wisdom and expresses admiration as they observe different generations of the LGBTQ community. “I would hope that younger people will never forget the struggle we have been through and never take it for granted,” says Clark. Meanwhile, LeClair observes, “It’s so amazing to see how this generation is so much more accepting of everyone. Older generations, like mine, can learn a great deal from the way young queer people accept things and see both themselves and sexuality as fluid.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YORK CITY

Authors

78 DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_LeClair&Clark_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 78

11/5/18 7:34 PM


DeRay Mckesson Activist

IT WAS A FEW years ago, in the aftermath of Ferguson, that DeRay Mckesson came to the forefront as one of the key voices associated with the Black Lives Matter movement. But this activist continues his work fueling important conversations, this year in particular around issues of race and mass incarceration. In Texas, he worked with the Austin Justice Coalition to battle a troubling police union contract, and on his podcast, Pod Save the People, he uncovers news and narratives that are often missed or ignored by the mainstream. “I want to be able to live as loud as possible, in the fullness of who I am—every day, in every space—and in 2018, I feel closer to that than I’ve ever felt before,” Mckesson says. This year, he also released his debut book, On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope. “[Queer people] are opening up new space every day and filling that space with sounds that were once forbidden.”

Yen Tan

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YO RK CITY

Filmmaker

“THESE DAYS, WE COULD ALL use more empathy in our lives,” Yen Tan says of how people can learn from one another. That’s evident in his latest movie, 1985, which tells the holiday homecoming story of a closeted man struggling to reconcile his orientation and HIV status while visiting his conservative family. But Tan has never shied away from queerness. His 2002 feature debut, Happy Birthday, depicts five characters, scattered across the globe, who grapple with the potential dangers of gay love. Meanwhile, his 2014 short, Until We Could, celebrates the United States Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage. A brave defector from the Hollywood idea that queer films don’t resonate with audiences, Tan envisions great change. He says, “It’s been tremendously inspiring to see the collective uprise of different movements across the country to resist what’s happening in our world.”

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 79

280_04_100_DeRay_TenTan_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 79

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Amber Hikes Community Organizer

Brendon Urie Musician

THIS PAST SUMMER, Panic! at the Disco frontman Brendon Urie broke the gay Internet with his announcement that he identifies as pansexual. The statement validated a generation of adolescent crushes that began when Urie’s band released its 2005 single “I Write Sins Not Tragedies.” Even before his declaration, the 31-year-old singer had built up a decade’s worth of LGBTQ street cred. He has released sexy anthems like “Girls/Girls/Boys,” stepped into a pair of Kinky Boots on Broadway, and pledged $1 million to GLSEN to support schools working to create student-led GSA clubs. Now, months later, Urie is still soaking in the feeling of being out and letting it merge with the rest of his life. “I feel free,” he says. “Being able to not allow one thing to define you is a beautiful thing.”

H I K ES : PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YO RK CITY. U R I E : G ROO M E R : D EVA N W E ITZM A N. PH OTOG RA PH E D I N LOS A NG E L ES

LAST YEAR, when Amber Hikes opted to add two new colors to Philadelphia’s pride flag—brown and black, to represent people of color—little did she know she’d spark a national conversation about race and racism in the LGBTQ community. At this year’s Met Gala, Lena Waithe made a bold statement by wearing a version of the flag as a cape on the red carpet. The executive director of the Philadelphia Office of LGBT Affairs, Hikes says, “After the mind-blowing impact of the More Color More Pride flag my office introduced in June 2017, it’s been humbling to witness people all over the country and world having honest, and often challenging, conversations about the reality of racism within our own community. This past year, I watched us move beyond the symbolism of the added stripes and to the task of real inclusion—beginning with interrogating the systems that serve to oppress so many of us.” She adds, “I am proudest of the work the people have done to shift power into the hands of the community.”

80 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Hikes_Urie_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 80

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Ryan Murphy

STYL I N G BY JOS E PH TU RLA . G ROO M E R : E RI N A N D E RSO N. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Producer, Director, Showrunner THIS JUNE, Ryan Murphy changed entertainment history when his FX series Pose debuted with the largest cast of trans actors—and the largest assemblage of trans crew members—since the dawn of television. It was a landmark in representation, putting rarefied and sensitive experiences (gender identity, ballroom culture, the AIDS crisis) into the hands and mouths of people who have lived them— and still do. In May, Murphy told The New York Times, “I’ve always been interested in underdogs,” but at this stage in the utterly tireless creative’s career, that feels like an understatement. From Nip/Tuck to Glee to American Horror Story, Murphy has been barreling toward intensified inclusion of not just underdogs but every kind of other, be they queer, non-white, non-cis, people with disabilities, or—as Out100 cover star Billy Porter says—“the forgotten.” Murphy put a name to this inclusion with Half, his initiative to fill 50 percent of his production teams with women and minorities. In addition to Pose, he revived The Boys in the Band for Broadway this year with an all-queer cast, and peeled back the devastating layers of 1990s homophobia with the Emmy-winning American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace. By the time you read this, he’ll surely have done something else worth celebrating. OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_Murphy_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 81

11/5/18 7:35 PM


Sue Nabi Beauty Mogul

Kiersey Clemons Actor

IN THIS YEAR’S film Hearts Beat Loud, Kiersey Clemons plays Sam, a young woman grieving the death of her mother and exploring her sexuality with her girlfriend Rose, played by fellow queer actor Sasha Lane. Sam’s orientation is never addressed in the movie, but in real life, Clemons is vocal about her queerness—and about how LGBTQ people of all ages can be more inclusive: “I think, young and old, we can do better at making the voices of marginalized people our priority,” she says. Now 25, Clemons previously played a recurring character on Transparent and a lesbian tomboy in the 2015 film Dope, about a group of self-proclaimed geeks in a tough Los Angeles neighborhood. Now booked for several upcoming roles—she’ll be the voice of Darling in Disney’s live-action remake of Lady and the Tramp and will appear in Fox’s live production of Rent—Clemons says she feels inspired by the love of her girlfriend. “My partner and I talk about how much of a privilege it is to love each other,” she says. “And not just because we’re queer, but because we are not all guaranteed the experience of love.”

N A B I : PH OTOG RA PH E D AT N AB I’ S HO M E I N LO N DO N. CL E MO N S : H A I R : RA N DY STO RG H I L L AT OPU S B EAUTY. M A K EU P : SA M U E L PAU L AT FORWA R D A RTI STS. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N LOS A NG E L ES

“BIG CORPORATIONS have a key role to play in making the world an inclusive place,” says Sue Nabi, who co-founded the Orveda luxury skincare line and serves as the company’s CEO. “They should invest millions to make sure everyone is trained to learn and understand the diversity of our world, especially in terms of gender choices.” Nabi, who previously served as president of Lancôme and L’Oréal, knows what it’s like to be misgendered, as she was earlier this year on a train between London and Paris. “It was a negation of who I am,” she says. Looking forward, Nabi is excited to expand Orveda in the United States, and she specifically hopes the LGBTQ community will support the brand’s “green, clean, vegan, and genderless” products. What does it mean for Nabi to be LGBTQ in 2018? “It means I am a normal, healthy, and free person,” she says. “And 100 percent part of our society.”

82 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Nabi_Clemons_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 82

11/5/18 10:09 PM


Chella Man

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT CH E LLA M AN'S HO M E I N BROO KLYN, N. Y.

Model, Artist, Activist IN SEPTEMBER, Chella Man became the first trans man ever signed to IMG Models, but the highlight of his year, he says, was easily January 10—the day he got top surgery. “I will never forget or take for granted the love that I woke up to on that day,” says Chella, who also identifies as genderqueer and is pictured here with his girlfriend, photographer and performance artist MaryV Benoit. He adds, “I am forever grateful for this privilege, as I know the positivity of a moment like this is rare.” That positivity came from the thousands of followers he has amassed since May 2017, when he began publicly sharing his transition on YouTube and Instagram. His perspective is an intersectional one—he is a deaf, Jewish, Chinese teen—and it’s become an integral component of his art, much of which is based on self-portraiture. After being a notable presence in protests combating Trump’s recent threats against trans and GNC rights, Chella will take part in a series of speeches and panels across the United States.

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 83

280_04_100_Chella_man_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 83

11/5/18 10:09 PM


Desmond Is Amazing Drag Kid

FEW THINGS are more indicative of the phenomenon of drag than the rise of drag kids. If there’s a leader of that movement (a RuPaul Jr., if you will), it’s 11-yearold Desmond Napoles, who goes by Desmond Is Amazing and whose motto “Be yourself, always,” has inspired many children to defy bullies and become their authentic selves. This year, Desmond was a featured speaker at the Teen Vogue Summit, performed at Wigstock 2.HO with Lady Bunny and Neil Patrick Harris, and is currently working on a children’s book. Of his generation, Desmond says, “We are proof that things are getting better, and in my opinion, it’s also good to speak with your LGBTQ+ peers, since we are all going through similar life experiences. People should support each other more and shade less.” Amen.

Law Roach AFTER COMING to prominence in the fashion industry by styling multi-talented superstar Zendaya, picking up new clients like Céline Dion and nabbing a gig as a judge on the revamped America’s Next Top Model, Law Roach doubled down on his work this year. For the Oscars, he put Tom Holland in Hermès (marking his first major red carpet collab with a male client), and he styled Anne Hathaway for the entirety of her Ocean’s 8 red-carpet run. Looking beyond fashion, at the broader evolution of queer culture, Roach says, “I think older people can learn tolerance from the younger generation—and I think it’s already happening. Vice versa, younger people can learn patience. They want everything instantly, but things don't always happen overnight.”

ROACH : SW EAT E R A N D PANTS BY YO H J I YA MA MOTO. PHOTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY

Stylist

84 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Desmond_Roach_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 84

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Hannah Gadsby G ROO M E R : MO LLY G R E E NWA LD. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT RI CH A RD N EUTRA'S H A I L EY H OU S E, LOS A N G E L ES

Comedian, Writer

THIS PAST JUNE, when Netflix released a filmed performance of her stand-up act, Nanette, it took only 69 minutes for Hannah Gadsby to change the way we think about a lot of things: her, ourselves, Picasso, and, most of all, comedy. Though she threw in brilliantly timed tidbits of levity, the unfiltered Tasmanian was largely seen pouring her soul out onto the stage of the Sydney Opera House, angrily confronting toxic masculinity, courageously addressing sexual assault, and defiantly condemning the tradition of self-deprecation for marginalized comics. It was a tearinducing triumph that garnered rapturous praise, and Gadsby—who, today, is spending her time writing a book and gardening—says, “I am overwhelmed by the support I’ve been shown for telling my own story.” OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_Hannah_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 85

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Alana Mayo ALANA MAYO IS redefining Hollywood with broad strokes and bold moves. The 34-year-old is a 12-year veteran of the film industry, spending much of her career at Paramount, where she worked on films like Selma and Fences. Earlier this year, she joined actor Michael B. Jordan to help build out his media company, Outlier Society, and together they’re producing a variety of TV, film, and digital projects, all with an inclusion rider. In September, inspired by Jordan and Mayo, WarnerMedia announced it was also launching a company-wide commitment to diversity and inclusion in front of and behind the camera. “There are always practical lessons to be gained from the failings and triumphs of a previous generation,” says Mayo, “but that connectivity is what’s most important to me: knowing that your experience—good or bad—is not simply your own, but shared by many of those who came before or after you.”

Natalie Morales Actor

WHEN NATALIE MORALES sees older queer people at Pride parades, she bawls. “I think about all they probably went through, and it simultaneously breaks my heart and makes me so happy,” she says. “I feel lucky that so many people before me paved a road that’s less rocky than theirs was.” Known for her roles in Parks and Recreation and Battle of the Sexes, Morales (who’s also a writer and director) grew up with no queer Latina role models. So when she came out last year on social media, she did it to fill a gap in representation. “There are still so many kids and adults who need to see themselves represented publicly,” she says. In August, she organized The ___ Variety Hour, a night of musical numbers and sketch performances that raised more than $23,000 for the March for Our Lives. She’s currently in production on NBC’s new sitcom Abby’s, about a makeshift backyard bar, in which she plays the title role.

M A YO : MA K EU P : JAN IC E KI N JO. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY. M O RA L ES : STYLI N G BY KI M MY E R I N K E RT ES. STYL I NG ASS I STA NT : M A R I A ZA KHA R. HA I R : A DDI E MARKOWITZ. MAK EU P : MYRIAM AROUG H ETI. SU IT BY CH AI K E N. J EW E LRY BY DA NA R E B ECCA D ESI G N S. S H O ES BY CASAD E I. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N LOS ANG E L ES

Producer

86 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Mayo_Morales_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 86

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Love Bailey

PH OTOG RAPH E D I N LOS A N G E L ES

Director, Performance Artist DEEP IN THE desert of Southern California, a goddess with a shenis and a taste for the bombastic has cultivated a queer utopia. Her name is Love Bailey—self-professed “Hollywood Hooker” and mother matriarch of the Slather Studios art collective. Her Savage Ranch has become as iconic as she has, and this year, it was on that stretch of land where she collaborated with the likes of Violet Chachki, Dita Von Teese, and Bebe Huxley to create music videos, films, and more. It’s also where she’s broken through what she calls “veils of shame” with her mother, who’s since embraced her as a trans woman. “We’ve built a life together on the Savage Ranch,” Bailey says of her mom, “and we’ve turned it into an artist residency for others to experience their own stories of liberation.” Produced by Nowness, a documentary about that very union can be seen on YouTube. “We can all learn from each other,” Bailey says, “regardless of our age.” OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 87

280_04_100_LoveBailey_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 87

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Writer, Director, Producer JANET MOCK is rewriting our cultural narrative one project at a time. Over the summer, Mock made history as the first trans woman of color to write and direct for a television series when she worked behind the camera on Ryan Murphy’s Pose. The show had already made headlines for assembling the largest cast of trans actors ever, but with Mock as part of the crew and in the writers room, Pose cemented its status as one of the most important shows on TV. A pillar of her community and pop culture at large, Mock released her second book, Surpassing Certainty: What My Twenties Taught Me, last year, and one thing she’s learned is that different generations of queer people need each other. “Younger folk can learn about herstory and the collective struggle for liberation,” she says. “Older folk can be challenged and pushed to evolve with the times, learning to embrace more experiences and identities.”

280_04_100_JanetMock_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 88

H A I R : GA BI LO P EZ. MA K EU P : SAI S H A B E ECHA M. PHOTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS AN G E L ES

Janet Mock

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Bella Thorne

TH O RN E : STYL I N G BY M I KI E L B E NYAM I N. H A I R : IA N JAM ES. JACK ET AN D S H O RTS BY M A RC E LO BU R LO N. TOP BY M ES H KI. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N S H E R M A N OA KS, CA L I F. K E NWORTHY : PHOTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YORK CITY

Actor, Singer

“I DON’T REALLY give a fuck—call me whatever you want,” Bella Thorne says in regard to her preferred gender pronoun. That candor, fearlessness, and open-mindedness are what define this former Disney star, who’s challenging what it means to be a contemporary ingenue in Hollywood. With four films out this year and more than 18 million followers on Instagram, the 21-year-old is among the most-watched people on earth. And in August her return to music was revealed, signing with Epic Records for What Do You See Now?—her debut album. Being queer, Thorne says, means being part of a group that “accepts me for all of my quirkiness, all of my flaws, all of me.”

Gus Kenworthy Freeskier, Olympian

“I SEE SO MANY young queer people living their true lives so unabashedly and unapologetically, and it makes me immensely proud,” says Olympic medalist Gus Kenworthy. “To be an LGBTQ person in 2018 is to be visible. We’ve come a long way, but it’s important for young queer people to recognize that generations before them fought and died to get us to where we are now.” Kenworthy’s sense of obligation to community and openness has helped other queer folks feel more seen, and he’s not finished: Next summer, he’ll bike the 545-mile AIDS/LifeCycle down the California coastline. He’s pledged to raise $1 million for the cause. “I have friends and people in my life who are HIV-positive, and I’ve seen the stigma that surrounds the disease,” he says. “I want to do what I can to fight for those affected.”

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 89

280_04_100_Thorne_kenworthy_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 89

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Albert Imperato

“YOU DON’T HAVE to wait, or ask for permission, to be who you are,” Albert Imperato says of being queer in 2018. But the fact that the world’s attitude toward LGBTQ people has changed so much over time still astounds the native New Yorker, who’s worked in the music and recording industry for more than 30 years. “I would have never imagined that someone who grew up as closeted as I was would be able to live a life openly with a guy, much less marry one,” he says. A co-founder of 21C Media Group, which offers publicity and consulting services in music and the performing arts, Imperato specializes in fostering the work of classical musicians, and his clients have included Audra McDonald and queer tenor Nicholas Phan. The diehard Beethoven lover also writes, and he’s working on a podcast and a memoir about his family—particularly his brother, who died from AIDS complications. Imperato is encouraged by the daring of queer youth. He says, “We must all be vigilant, not only about protecting our rights, but the rights of anyone who is being oppressed.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT E'S BAR, N EW YO RK CITY

Classical Music Publicist, Writer

90 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Imperato_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 90

11/5/18 7:39 PM


Baby Yors

YO RS : H A I R : K E I SU K E CH I KAM OTO. M AK EU P : S E IYA I I BUCH I. JACK ET BY TH E B LO N DS. H OWAR D : G ROO M E R : ZAC HA RT. BOTH PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YO RK CITY

Singer, Songwriter BABY YORS IS a singing, dancing, and gyrating embodiment of the notion that the American dream may not be dead after all. Born in a small city in Argentina, where his talent and theatricality were stifled, the artist pushed himself to hone a multitude of crafts—from guitar and piano to acting and ballet—until he got himself to New York City. Now 27, Baby has released four singles and two music videos this year (which he also directed and co-produced), and he’s finishing work on a debut album (dropping in 2019 ), but he says, “The most memorable moments happened onstage.” The Bowie-esque performer is particularly inspired by the “love and communication” of young activists like Out100 cover star Emma González. He wants to think about queerness on a global scale. “It’s imperative that we’re aware of queer people in other parts of the world,” he says. “Some places haven’t seen any change, and we have to use our voices and resources to shine a light on them, because they need it and deserve it.”

Silas Howard Director

“BE IN GRATITUDE, be angry, fight like hell, bring a look,” says Silas Howard, celebrated trans director of top shows Transparent, Pose, High Maintenance, and This Is Us. “I am so impressed by our LGBTQ youth,” he says. “I’m blown away by the art and activism in our community.” Howard’s own art practice flourished this year: His latest feature film, A Kid Like Jake, which tells the story of two Brooklyn parents with “a 4-year-old genderexpansive child,” is a poignant view into the complicated nature of identity. It premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to a standing ovation. “Young queer people intuitively know things older generations had to work to understand,” Howard says. “It’s cliché, but elder queers really need to listen and extend opportunities to our youth right now.”

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 91

280_04_100_Howard_Yors_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 91

11/5/18 7:39 PM


xxxx

Kathy Tu and Tobin Low THE AIRWAVES ARE are packed with a slew of podcasts (even queer ones), but best friends and co-hosts Kathy Tu and Tobin Low have managed to set themselves apart. In their podcast Nancy for WNYC, the pair, who are both Asian-American and gay, concentrate on issues surrounding sex education, pop culture, and politics, especially as they relate to their own lives. Of his life, Low says, “It’s a small victory, but I took my shirt off multiple times this past summer. And no, I had not worked out especially hard to get a summer body. It felt like a personal accomplishment in a lifetime of body image insecurities.” That frank self-awareness is what bridges the gap between this duo and their thousands of weekly listeners. They’ve shared their coming-out stories and have encouraged listeners and guests (like last year’s Out100 Artist of the Year, Lena Waithe) to do the same. This past fall, they started a listenerdriven confessionals segment they find especially impactful. “It’s a project called ‘I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You…’ inspired by one of our episodes,” Tu says. “We got a lot of different responses—funny, sad, strange, and moving. We love hearing from the Nancy community, and are always looking for ways to share our stories with each other.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT WNYC STU D IOS, N EW YO RK CITY

Podcast Hosts

92 D EC E M B E R 2018 / J A N UA RY 2019 O U T

280_04_100_Tu_Low_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 92

11/5/18 7:26 PM


Eric Marcus

Podcast Host, Historian AS THE CREATOR, host, and co-producer of the podcast Making Gay History (now in its fourth season), Eric Marcus knows that, though the LGBTQ community has overcome daunting obstacles before, plenty more lie ahead. Inspiring listeners with tales of heroes from the past, the podcast dips into our community’s folklore in hopes of creating—and maintaining—an educational channel between older and younger generations of LGBTQ people. “Younger people can learn from us older folks that they’re not alone,” he said. “They have a proud history, and there’s a decades-long road map of resistance they can draw on to fight the battles of today and tomorrow.” Marcus is also founder and chair of the Stonewall 50 Consortium, a group of organizations and institutions that plan exhibitions and programming linked to the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. “We can’t take our hard-won rights for granted,” Marcus adds. “We have to organize, vote, and actively fight for our place in the world.”

Jake Resnicow

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YO RK CITY

Event Producer

AS SOMEONE who’s mounted large-scale parties from New York to Las Vegas, Jake Resnicow is used to seeing LGBTQ people revel in the results he’s worked for behind the scenes. But in 2018, nothing compared to producing the main floor of Vienna’s Life Ball. There, Resnicow and his team from the international party brand Matinée Group, unleashed life-size robots, marionette-like dancers, and a diverse lineup of guests, all in the name of raising global funds for—and awareness of—HIV/AIDS. “I have family and friends who have been personally affected by HIV,” Resnicow told Out in June. “I see the real difference Life Ball is making each year around the world and continue to be inspired and motivated to do more and continue to give back.” He’s now planning a lineup of events to celebrate WorldPride NYC 2019 and the 50th anniversary of Stonewall.

O U T D E C E M B E R 2 01 8 / J A N UA RY 2 019 93

280_04_100_Marcus_Resnicow_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 93

11/5/18 10:21 PM


Steven Kolb

President and CEO, CFDA

Mia Lidofsky Filmmaker

“WE NEED MORE positive queer narratives in the world—it’s vital,” says Mia Lidofsky, creator and director of Strangers, a queer comedy-drama series about love, life, and the things we do to make both work, starring Zoë Chao and Meredith Hagner. Hosted on the Facebook Watch streaming service, Strangers is now in its second season, has earned industry accolades, built a dedicated audience, and easily found its place among Facebook Watch’s most popular shows. “Between making season 2 of Strangers and marrying the love of my life, 2018 has been big for me,” Lidofsky says, referring to her longtime partner—and now wife—dancer and choreographer Celia Rowlson-Hall. “I feel lucky to be a gay woman and a filmmaker in 2018, and to have the rights, privileges, and acceptance that I do. It’s my mission to tell stories in which queer lives and love are celebrated. I want to see queer characters win.”

KO LB : A LL CLOTH I N G BY TO M FO RD. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY. L I DO FS KY : PH OTOG RA PH E D AT L I DOFS KY HOM E I N B ROOKLYN, N. Y.

AS THE HEAD OF the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), Steven Kolb has brought his background of nonprofit service (previously raising funds for HIV/AIDS and cancer) and put it to tirelessly effective use. In addition to managing CFDA efforts like Fashion Targets Breast Cancer and its Health Initiative (addressing concerns about underweight models), this year, Kolb partnered with Glamour on “The Glass Runway,” a study about gender inequality and workplace safety. He also worked with clothing giant PVH on an inclusivity and diversity conference, which united fashion’s leaders to, as he says, “create steps toward greater representation in our industry.” He believes “there is more power and life” in older queer people leaving their comfort zones, and he saw that firsthand at Telfar Clemens’s recent NYFW show. “The audience was a multicultural and multigenerational mix,” Kolb says, “with Telfar’s unisex clothes and a performance by queer South African duo Fela Gucci and Desire Marea. It felt like the future had arrived.”

94 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_KOLB_Lidofsky_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 94

11/5/18 10:21 PM


Hungry

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT H U N G RY'S HO M E I N B E RL I N

Drag Queen

WITH DRAMATIC, anime-esque undereye makeup, generous pearl appliqués, and bright colors blended to otherworldly perfection, Berlinbased queen Hungry creates surreal “distorted drag” looks (as aptly defined by her Instagram bio). It was Hungry’s brush—and glue stick—that transformed Icelandic pop icon Björk into a preternatural alien orchid for the cover of her album Utopia and subsequent European tour. Crypto-cosmic illusions culled from the darkest fever dream, Hungry’s looks showcase a detached femininity in which “gender has lost its relevance completely,” and this is emblematic of a future she envisions. “It is, of course, important to tend to everyone’s personal identity in daily life,” she says, but she hopes that we’re “getting to a point where gender is not even a relevant question or categorization anymore.”

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 95

280_04_100_Hungry_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 95

11/5/18 7:39 PM


Mara Wilson THE ’90S CHILD STAR of Matilda, Mara Wilson transformed perceptions when she came out as queer in 2016—specifically, a Kinsey scale 2 with a crush on Janelle Monáe. In the past few years, the Big Hero 6 series voice actor and author of Where Am I Now? True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame has become a sharp-tongued Twitter superstar, especially for the young people who follow her. “This coming generation seems to be a lot more thoughtful and considerate than mine was, and their activism and knowledge of the world go so much deeper,” Wilson says. She adds that young LGBTQ people can teach older generations that gender and sexuality exist on a spectrum, but noted that labeling oneself as part of the queer community is also a right that’s earned. “These labels are a part of who we are,” she says. “It’s important to understand the history behind them and the bravery it took to embrace them.”

Justin Simien

Writer, Director, Producer IN SEASON 2 of his thought-provoking Netflix series Dear White People, a satire that dissects the experiences of black students at a predominantly white university, creator Justin Simien dives into gay life through the lens of a newly out, black student. And though that storyline was powerful in its own right—it pushed back on the commonly depicted, easy-breezy coming-out tale—Simien points to shooting Bad Hair, his second feature film, as the highlight of his year. The movie, an offbeat tribute to black women, is now in production, and as Simien looks ahead, he also reflects. “The generation before ours inherited hard-fought tools to turn their passions into plans and fight for the rights of queer people,” he says. “The younger generation is expanding culture to make space for myriad ways to define gender and sexuality, as they struggle on to turn outrage into action.”

WI LSO N : H A I R A N D MA K EU P : DA N I E LL E CH RYSO HO I S IS. S I M I E N : STYLI N G BY DOUG LAS H ICKM AN, J R. SH I RT : SLAT E D E N I M CO. HAT : GOOR I N B ROS. BOTH PHOTOG RA PH E D AT TH E STU DIO, LOS ANG E L ES

Actor, Writer

96 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Wilson_Simien_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 96

11/5/18 10:21 PM


The Blonds G ROO M E R : ZAC HA RT. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU D IO, N EW YO R K CITY

Fashion Designers

THIS YEAR, David and Phillipe Blond celebrated 18 years of professional partnership, and they capped things off by collaborating with Disney, which backed their appropriately outrageous S/S ’19 NYFW show, “Disney Villains x The Blonds.” The duo—who are also a couple—sent everyone from Paris Hilton to fellow Out100 honoree Dominique Jackson down the runway in especially fantastical twists on the intricately bejeweled, rock-inspired looks that have become hallmarks of their label. Nodding to the fact that this pair have always woven their mutual love of cult pop culture into their clothes, David, the creative director, says

the show “was a childhood dream come true.” And despite dressing virtually every prominent pop diva in music, Phillipe, the designer, says his key highlight was The Blonds’ collaboration with MAC. “We created a line of cosmetics that’s universal and genderless,” he says, “so anyone can wear it.” David and Phillipe have long cracked the norm, but they know that’s not easy for everyone. “In 2018, it’s great to be queer because we now have certain freedoms,” David says, “but there are still many threats to our way of life, and people all over the globe are still fighting for basic human and civil rights.”

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_TheBlonds_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 97

11/5/18 7:29 PM


E.T. Chong

“YOUNGER QUEER people can learn to be more compassionate and resilient,” E.T. Chong says of what his generation can learn from those who’ve come before. The founder of Onegaishimasu, a monthly queer AsianPacific Islander S&M party in Brooklyn, Chong continues, “Creating and connecting communities is no easy task—imagine doing the work without the platform and information of the internet.” But through his recurring event, Chong does that work by not only donating 100 percent of Onegaishimasu’s profits to charities, runaway youth centers, and shelters, but also by giving his spare time toward those same efforts. Moving into 2019, he’s looking forward to a residency at RecessArt, where he hopes to begin planning the world’s first LGBTQ K-pop music festival.

Kim Petras Singer, Songwriter

AFTER WRAPPING her performances in Troye Sivan’s Bloom tour (which saw her team up with the “My My My!” singer in more than 25 cities), Kim Petras says the highlight of her year was seeing all her fans. “I love them so much!” exclaims the German-born artist, who in 2017 topped Spotify’s charts with her debut single, “I Don’t Want It at All.” Spotify named her a RISE artist, and risen she has, becoming the most visible trans pop star in history and dropping bop after bop this year, from “Can’t Do Better” to “Heart to Break,” which climbed the Billboard charts. Though her first full album is still in the works, the 26-year-old released a self-produced mixtape in October called Turn Off the Light, Vol. 1, which pays homage to scary movies and guest-stars Elvira. Of the state of the LGBTQ community, Petras says, “The general population has become increasingly accepting of us, but younger queers must activate to continue this progressive trend—especially now, in the face of the current administration’s attacks on trans rights as well as trans and HIV-positive people in the military.”

P ETRAS : STYLI N G BY MAT TH EW M AZU R. STYLI N G ASS I STANT : VIT TO RIO PUG L IA NO. M A K EU P : M E L ISSA M U R DI CK. DR ESS BY E R I C SCH LOS B E RG. BOTH PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E L L E R STU DIO, N EW YORK CITY

Event Producer, Philanthropist

98 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Chong_Petras_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 98

11/5/18 7:38 PM


STYL I N G BY PC WI LLI AM S. STYLI N G ASSI STANT : S HA RI FA ROS E. J U M PS U IT BY O RA NG E CU LTU R E. N ECKLAC E BY LOVI SA . PHOTOG RA PH E D AT HAZ E STU DI O, LON DON

MNEK

Singer, Songwriter WHEN MNEK (born Uzoechi Osisioma Emenike) dropped his debut album, Language, this past September, it was the culmination of a lifelong dedication to both absorbing and making music. Now 23, the Londonborn artist has been producing since he was around 8, and he’s been fascinated with ’90s icons like Janet Jackson and Mariah Carey since he was 5. “Releasing an album is something I’ve always wanted to do, and I’m so proud of it,” he says. MNEK has just completed a mini U.K. tour tied to that album, and now he’s collaborating with Clean Bandit and Little Mix while planning more shows for next year. His music isn’t only fulfilling him; it’s affecting people’s lives. “Someone tweeted me—a black man in his 30s,” MNEK says, “and he told me my album helped him come out, which I thought was so amazing. The fact that my music helps anyone is so humbling and rewarding.”

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_MNEK_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 99

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Jessie James Keitel Actor, Performance Artist

LANDING A GUEST spot on a culturally acclaimed TV show is any actor’s dream, but for Jessie James Keitel, the honor came with a double dose of prestige. This summer, the actor jumped from a quick cameo in the Netflix film Alex Strangelove to a role on TV Land’s beloved series Younger as the pansexual, homo-romantic, genderqueer personal assistant Tam—helping to usher in a new era of diversity for genderqueer characters. Still, for the actor and drag performer, this year has been as much about bringing visibility to TV and film as it has been about embracing their own identity. “I had to unpack many years of internalized queerphobia to become who I am today and I’m grateful that the bad brought me good,” Keitel explained of their journey. Through all that, they’ve embraced the “privilege, joy, and goddamn responsibility” of being queer in 2018.

Nick Fager

“I TRY TO HELP my clients embrace all parts of themselves because it opens up more space for living,” says Nick Fager, co-founder of Lighthouse, an organization connecting queer people with LGBTQ-affirming medical professionals and specialists. “So many of the problems we see in the world today happen because people are clinging to outdated, binary thinking about what it means to be a man or a woman, or to be gay or straight.” But Fager sees a bright future ahead: Expansive Therapy, his private practice, became bicoastal this year (serving clients in New York City and San Francisco), and he’s been finding inspiration in his fellow queers—notably Out100 Newsmaker of the Year, Emma González. “Her sense of self and the strength of her voice fighting injustice as a young queer woman is truly remarkable and shows how far we’ve come as a country,” Fager says. “She gives me so much hope about our queer, feminist future.”

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Psychotherapist

100 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Keitel_Fager_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 100

11/5/18 7:34 PM


A heartfelt thank you to

for its support of

18790 Gilead congrats OUT 100 2018.indd 1

11/2/18 10:15 AM


Aquaria

PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YO RK CITY

Drag Superstar FOR AQUARIA, 2018 has been a year of big wins. On season 10 of RuPaul’s Drag Race, the New York-based club queen stunted (pretty) as she charged toward an explosive finale that saw her crowned the winner. And what she’s done since her coronation has also left us starstruck. One of the fastest queens from the franchise to crack 1 million Instagram followers, the 22-year-old also headlined a breathless North American tour that hit more than 30 cities. “Being able to perform across America, as well as abroad, has brought me so much validation and pride,” she says. Moreover, Aquaria recently signed with IMG Models in New York, has a book in the works, and—of course—more tour dates on the horizon. She’s a hardworking, self-made superstar, but she also wields vital awareness. “Being LGBTQ in 2018 means you must be a fighter,” she says. “It means being registered to vote and taking every opportunity we have to exercise this right. It means not forgetting any letters in that acronym, whether they apply to you or not.” OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_Aquaria_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 102

11/6/18 9:31 AM


Jaboukie Young-White Comedian

AT 24, JABOUKIE Young-White is sitting on top of the world. The newly minted Daily Show correspondent has his hand in myriad projects, frequently appearing on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon while also writing for Netflix’s American Vandal and Big Mouth. A comedian whose stand-up is built on what it’s like to be gay and black today, Young-White uses his viral prowess to turn the microscope on underrepresented experiences. “For me, there’s a weird duality to being an LGBTQ person in 2018,” he says. “Our cultural contributions, past and present, are slowly gaining more mainstream recognition. I think that makes people point to media representation and say, ‘See, things are better!’ To a certain extent, they are, but LGBTQ employment discrimination and the whole gay-trans ‘panic’ murder defense are still legal in much of America. Things are getting better, but we can accomplish a lot more.”

Stan Sloan

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YO RK CITY

Executive Director, Family Equality Council WHEN REFLECTING on memories of Family Week, the world’s largest annual gathering of LGBTQ parents and their kids, Stan Sloan points out the story of a straight dad and his 7-year-old gay son. “He wanted to bring the family there so his son could see that his future could be as normal as anyone else’s,” Sloan says. As the head of a national queer nonprofit, Sloan works to advance legal equality for queer families at the state and federal levels. He interacts with some of our community’s youngest members, who Sloan says have a lot to teach the world about questioning gender and sexual orientation, including older folks who understand that legal change comes through patience and hard work. For Sloan, the most important issue facing queer families in 2018 is poverty, which he says disproportionately affects LGBTQ people. “Now is our opportunity to make sure all people at all economic levels are reaping the benefits of increased acceptance and visibility.”

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 103

280_04_100_sloan_Jaboukie_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 103

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Figure Skater, Olympian

ALMOST EXACTLY one year ago, many Americans didn't know Adam Rippon. Today, Rippon is practically a household name, thanks to his moves on the ice at the 2018 Winter Games in South Korea (where he snagged a bronze medal) and his unwavering resistance outside the rink. Rippon very publicly denounced the choice of Vice President Mike Pence to lead the United States Olympic delegation, given Pence’s support for antigay legislation. The Olympian also brought politics into an arena that’s known for political neutrality, forcing the nation to experience a dialogue about LGBTQ acceptance, whether they were ready or not. His brazen beliefs, actions, and authenticity earned him a spot on the Time 100, as well as a correspondent job on Good Morning America and a judging gig on Dancing With the Stars: Junior. It’s our youth who help keep Rippon motivated, like fellow Out100 honoree Seth Owen. “Here’s a valedictorian who was rejected by his parents because of his sexuality,” Rippon says. “To see the support of the community helping him achieve his goals was truly inspiring.”

STYL I N G BY M I CH A E L COOK. H AI R : NAT E J U E RG E N S E N. M AK EU P : ZAC H ART. PA NTS BY VA L E NTI N O. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY

Adam Rippon

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_AdamRippon_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 104

11/5/18 7:42 PM


Munroe Bergdorf B E RG DO RF : HA I R : N AT E J U E RG E N S E N. M AK EU P : ZAC H ART. JACO BSO N : HA I R : P ET E R BUTL E R AT TRAC EY M AT TI N G LY U S I NG OR I B E. M A K EU P : R E B ECCA R ESTR E PO AT TRAC EY M AT TI NG LY US I NG SU RRAT T B EAUTY. BOTH PHOTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YORK CITY

Model, Activist

MUNROE BERGDORF is a force to be reckoned with. Last year, the 30-year-old beauty made headlines for becoming the first trans model to front a campaign for L’Oréal in the U.K. Her bold opinions may have cut that gig short, but she’s also used her voice to advocate for LGBTQ and POC communities. Earlier this year, her first major documentary, What Makes a Woman?, aired on British network TV. “It was a deeply personal film that felt very much like the beginning of a new era for me,” Bergdorf says. More recently, she has been using her platform to shine a light on the discrimination people face on dating apps, especially “POC and trans users.” Her criticism resonated so loudly that it helped prompt Grindr to release the video series Kindr, a diversity and inclusion initiative aiming to combat “racism, bullying, or other forms of toxic behavior.” She’s proof that if you’re loud enough, you can’t be ignored.

Abbi Jacobson

Actor, Writer, Illustrator

“I FEEL MORE of a responsibility to represent my experience through my work, and I feel it’s a very exciting and important time to be doing so,” says Broad City star Abbi Jacobson, who came out as bisexual in a Vanity Fair interview earlier this year. The revelation came shortly before Jacobson released her new book, I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff, in which, amid rambling recounts of hilarious and emotional experiences, she writes about her first breakup with a woman. Alongside co-creator Ilana Glazer, Jacobson is about to enter Broad City’s final season in January, but she’s also working on a few other television projects, including a reboot of the 1992 feminist classic A League of Their Own. She says one of her hopes is that queer people strive to take note of their history—and their future: “Older queer people remind us how far we’ve come; younger queer people are showing us where we’re going.”

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 105

280_04_100_Bergdorf_Jacobson_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 105

11/5/18 10:21 PM


xxxx

Seth Owen WITH A 4.61 GPA and an acceptance letter from Georgetown University, Seth Owen’s childhood dream of going to college seemed within reach. However, when he received his financial aid package from the school, a different reality set in: It had been sent based on an expected contribution of tuition from his family—who’d kicked him out of their home for being gay. But Owen’s story has a happy ending. Teachers at his high school rallied together and created a GoFundMe for the valedictorian, raising $141,636 to send him to college. Since then, Georgetown has amended his parental contribution to $0, and even Ellen DeGeneres (who also featured him on her show) awarded him an additional $25,000. In turn, Owen plans to pay it forward with his leftover money. He explains, “I’m currently setting up a scholarship foundation for students who’ve shown a capacity to be resilient and who’ve overcome obstacles in their lives.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY

Student

106 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Owen_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 106

11/5/18 7:28 PM


Sue Bird

Basketball Player, Olympian

B I RD : G ROO M E R : ZAC H ART. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY. SA LP ET E R : PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E L L E R STU DI O, N EW YO R K CITY

THREE-TIME WNBA champion, four-time Olympian, and superstar Seattle Storm point guard Sue Bird crossed yet another threshold this year: She and her partner, professional soccer player Megan Rapinoe, became the first openly gay couple to appear on the cover of ESPN magazine when they graced the publication’s Body Issue. “A huge part of what I’m doing is encouraging others and inspiring the next generation of ballers,” Bird says. “I now know the importance of coming out and being myself...for others and for my own wellbeing. If I can be an example of a person living their truth, and it can encourage others to do so, the ways LGBTQ people are viewed will continue to change and normalize.”

Adrian Salpeter Producer

FOR ADRIAN SALPETER, being queer today means acknowledging his own “luck and opportunity,” remaining “aware and vigilant,” and remembering the past. “Queer people are writing their own histories, so the exchange of ideas from one generation to the next is key to survival,” he says, pointing to the fact that even two decades after the murder of Matthew Shepard, five states (including Wyoming, where Shepard died) have still not passed hate-crime protection laws. The five-time Tony-nominated theater, film, and TV producer worked on the recent Broadway production of Mean Girls, turned 40 this year, and toiled away at upcoming projects, like Beetlejuice: The Musical (which opens on Broadway in April 2019 ) and Española, a one-hour crime drama directed by José Padilha. This year he was most inspired by the Russian LGBT Network, a hotline and support group that helps queer people fleeing violence in Chechnya, and he’s grateful that he can use his platform as a collaborator for queer and nonqueer people alike. “As a creative producer, I get to support and enable many artists,” he says, “all in the pursuit of storytelling.”

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 107

280_04_100_Bird_Salpeter_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 107

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Dominique Jackson Model, Actress

HAVING BEEN a member of the ballroom community since 1993, Dominique Jackson helped bring that scene, its culture, and the art of voguing to TV screens the world over via her fictional House of Abundance on Ryan Murphy’s Pose. As Elektra, the sharp-tongued mother of the house, she plays a key role in the show’s presentation of a complex and nuanced tale of trans women in the 1980s. “I was deeply inspired by LeBron James including me in his Instagram post about women of color on magazine covers,” Jackson says. In August, James posted a series of covers featuring women of color who, in his words, are “setting great examples.” The post featured Jackson’s Out cover with Indya Moore and Mj Rodriguez. “It spoke volumes to respect and inclusivity,” Jackson says. “He was unapologetic in including us, and as an amazing role model, he is setting a new tone for how trans women of color are viewed in communities of color.”

Mathew Shurka

ACCORDING TO the UCLA School of Law, upwards of 700,000 people in the United States have received some form of harmful conversion therapy. Mathew Shurka, co-founder of the Born Perfect campaign, wants to bring that number down to zero. “Failing conversion therapy and being in a committed relationship with a man has been my greatest success,” Shurka says. He has worked tirelessly to galvanize public support for a nationwide ban on conversion therapy, testifying at a dozen hearings and speaking with more than 160 legislatures this year alone. Now, even Hollywood is paying attention: Shurka consulted on The Miseducation of Cameron Post and Boy Erased, two major, acclaimed films about queer teens grappling with these issues. “The world has really transformed,” says Shurka. “We are living in a time when LGBTQ people are more free than ever before, and are able to have a voice among families, friends, and governments.”

JACKSO N : H A I R : KI ES U KI CH I KA MOTO. M AK EU P : JO H N M E N D EZ. BOTH PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YOR K CITY

Co-Founder, Born Perfect

108 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Jackson_Shurka_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 108

11/5/18 7:33 PM


Nico Santos

Zeke Smith

CRAZY RICH ASIANS made history (and saw tremendous success at the box office) as the first contemporary English-language Hollywood film with an all-Asian cast in 25 years. In the ensemble was Nico Santos, playing the role of Oliver, a self-described “rainbow sheep of the family.” The character served as a rare supportive face for the film’s lead, and the role furthered Santos’s mission to show the spectrum within the queer and Asian community. “The success of Crazy Rich Asians and other movies like Black Panther and Love, Simon is truly inspiring,” Santos says. “I keep hearing stories that other projects centering on POC or LGBTQ characters are being greenlit by studios and networks. It’s because these movies have proven time and again that people are thirsty to see themselves reflected back in culture.”

LAST YEAR, Zeke Smith had no idea that a fellow Survivor castaway—and an LGBTQ one at that—would out him as trans to both the show’s contestants and its national audience. But the moment changed Smith’s life forever. He returned from the game to a life of activism and a regular writing gig at the Hollywood Reporter. “I’m awed by the freedom allowed to me by the Survivor team to turn my outing into a moment that advanced acceptance of trans people and provided much-needed visibility of trans men,” Smith says. Today, he tours college campuses and companies to teach people about queer allyship, and he views the world around him as one full of potential. “To be queer is to be a trailblazer,” Smith says, adding that his boyfriend, Nico Santos, taught him to love himself.

H A I R : JAM ES DU N H AM. M AK EU P : AS H L E E M U LL E N. PH OTOG RAPH E D I N LOS A N G E L ES

Actor

Activist, Writer

OUT D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 109

280_04_100_Santos&Smith_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 109

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Nicolas “Herrenscheide” Endlicher DJ

WHEN NICOLAS ENDLICHER helped found Herrensauna, a queer-run party collective that stands out even in the infamous nightlife scene of Berlin, he had no idea it would grow to such popularity. But the 27-year-old DJ’s first party raged, and soon he was hosting them across Europe, creating safer spaces for wild enjoyment. Endlicher spent the last year traveling, shuttling most frequently between Paris and Berlin to work on his sets. (He also made a memorable appearance in Drew Lint’s erotic gay thriller M/M.) Endlicher is currently both excited and nervous about an upcoming gig on Berlin’s music channel Boiler Room. He says queer people of all ages need to learn to listen to each other. “One of the most important aspects of intergenerational communication is to actually stop talking and to truly pay attention to others,” he says. “We’re used to others not listening to us or not caring about us. Let’s at least treat each other better than that.”

Layshia Clarendon IN ADDITION TO being one of the WNBA’s top point guards, the Connecticut Sun’s Layshia Clarendon is one of the league’s most vocal advocates for LGBTQ rights and visibility. Clarendon—a devout Christian, lesbian, gender-nonconforming b-baller—bravely joined the #MeToo movement in January when she filed a civil lawsuit against the regents of the University of California, citing negligence after she was assaulted by an athletic department employee. “Women have been fighting back and speaking up, but finally the veil was lifted and some very powerful men were held accountable for their actions,” she says. “I am inspired to continue to rage against the system.”

E N DLI CH E R : PH OTOG RA PH E D I N B E RLI N. CLA R E N DO N : G ROO M E R : M ATI LD E CA M POS. PH OTOG RA PH E D I N LOS ANG E L ES

Basketball Player

110 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Endlicher_Clarendon_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 110

11/5/18 7:38 PM


SW EAT E R BY PY E R MOSS. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO R K CITY

Antwaun Sargent Writer

“I’M ALWAYS GRATEFUL that I have the opportunity to be in constant conversation with artists of color around the world,” says art critic Antwaun Sargent. Profiling some of the industry’s top names—like fellow Out100 honoree Mickalene Thomas and past honoree Kehinde Wiley, whose portrait of Barack Obama hangs at the Smithsonian—Sargent has, in his writing, increased visibility and awareness for contemporary black artists. This year marked his first foray into curation with Aperture Foundation’s “The Way We Live Now,” which brought together 18 emerging photographers whose works explored sexuality, gender, race, and representation. “Labels are for cans,” Sargent says. “Younger queer people seem less concerned with maintaining arbitrary definitions of how to act, and I think that has made the community a little less transphobic, racist, and sexist.” OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_AntwaanSargent_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 111

11/5/18 7:42 PM


Comedian

WITH HER STAND-UP special Rape Jokes, in which she shares her own experience as a survivor of sexual violence, Cameron Esposito is making sure the national conversation around sexual assault emphasizes the voices of survivors. Online sales of the special have raised more than $75,000 for RAINN, the nation’s largest anti–sexual violence organization, and with sales of the album version during her fall tour, she expects the funds raised to exceed $100,000. Of those who’ve come before her, Esposito says, “I have learned patience and how to find joy in dark times from queer folks older than me.” And in highlighting LGBTQ luminaries on her podcast, Queery, she’s pushing for a brighter, safer future for queer folks of all ages. “I’m here to fight for you and with you,” she says, “but also to share joy and love.”

Peppermint

Drag Queen, Actress

PEPPERMINT HAD us hooked the moment she walked through the workroom doors last year on season 9 of RuPaul’s Drag Race, where she proved to mainstream audiences that being a drag queen and a trans woman are not mutually exclusive. Since then, the New York star has used her platform to make an impact on the entertainment world, strutting from the gay bars of Hell’s Kitchen to the theaters of Broadway, and starring as Pythio in the original cast of Head Over Heels. According to the producers of the jukebox musical (which features songs from the catalogue of the Go-Go’s) Peppermint is the first trans woman to originate a principal role on Broadway. “Overwhelming discrimination and lack of opportunities have plagued the trans community for a very long time,” she says. “But we’ve crossed a threshold, and we’re starting to hear inspirational stories of trans women of color being invited into spaces and industries we have not been welcome in: film, television, and, now, Broadway.”

P E PP E RM I NT : STYLI N G BY JASO N L E BLO N D. H A I R : PAU L WARR E N. M AK EU P : D EJA S M ITH. DR ESS, B R EASTPLAT E, A N D N ECKPI EC E BY XTI A N D E M E DI CI. CROWN BY KOVA BY SASCHA . N ECKLAC E ( WORN AS H EADBAN D ) BY CASTL ECLI FF NYC. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YORK CITY. ES POS ITO : MA K EU P : RACH A E L VAN G. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS A N G E L ES

Cameron Esposito

112 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Esposito_Peppermint_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 112

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Justin Torres

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT TO RR ES'S HO M E I N LOS AN G E L ES

Writer

LAST SEPTEMBER, 155-mile-per-hour winds ravaged Puerto Rico—where Justin Torres’s family traces their heritage—and in the year since, the U.S. government’s inaction and the LGBTQ response to the crisis have left the writer envisioning a lengthy path to justice. “The mainland queer community has paid attention to the island’s queer community,” he says, “but it will be a very long recovery.” In 2011, Torres authored We the Animals, a heartfelt and semiautobiographical novel about three Puerto Rican-American brothers becoming men (whatever those are), and this year, he worked with director Jeremiah Zagar on releasing the film version. It opened in August to widespread critical acclaim, after netting a NEXT Innovator Prize at Sundance. Torres—who says queerness means celebrating difference and showing solidarity for marginalized people—believes young people should continue to demand to be equally cared for, while older queer people should focus on transferring their knowledge. “It is the job of the old to discern,” he says, “to transform experience into wisdom and to keep alive the lessons available from queer history.” OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 113

280_04_100_Justin_Torres_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 113

11/5/18 10:21 PM


Brielle “Tati” Rheames AS ONE OF the leading cast members on Elegance Bratton’s My House, Viceland’s award-winning docuseries about today’s New York ballroom community, Brielle Rheames brought her own narrative into the spotlight. Viewers came to see her vogue under the ballroom name Tati 007 but stuck around for the very real conversations she had with her friends and even her mother about her identity as a trans woman of color—and what that means as she moves through the world. “LGBTQ culture is reaching a pivotal moment within mainstream media,” she says. “For years, we’ve been used and haven’t gained any recognition for our talents or culture. But now, we’ve showed up, showed out, and put our feet on their necks. And we aren’t letting up.”

280_04_100_Rheames_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 114

M A K EU P : S E IYA I I BUCH I. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY

Voguer

11/5/18 7:29 PM


Michael Ausiello

Journalist, Author

SPOILER ALERT: THE HERO DIES, Michael Ausiello’s memoir of his late husband Kit Cowan’s battle with neuroendocrine cancer, has touched millions since its release last year. It brought Ausiello’s relatable story of hope, humor, and loss onto mainstream America’s bedside tables. A film adaptation of the book is currently underway, with The Big Bang Theory’s Jim Parsons starring and producing. Another exciting recent development? “J.J. Abrams and Ben Stephenson at Bad Robot [Productions] told me they want to turn my childhood into a television show,” says Ausiello, who’s also the creator and editorial director of TVLine. The yet-to-be-named series will chronicle Ausiello’s television-obsessed, closeted childhood in 1980s New Jersey. All these queer narratives, Ausiello says, are tantamount to our safety: “We can no longer afford to be complacent. Our community is under attack, and it’s more important than ever for us to be visible and tell our stories.”

Rain Dove

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DIO, N EW YO RK CITY

Model

RAIN DOVE recently made headlines for shaking up the #MeToo movement, having released text messages that detailed how Asia Argento, a #MeToo advocate, allegedly had a sexual encounter with an underage colleague. “I did not want to be complicit in something that could be a crime,” Dove told CNN in August. But, then, Dove has always had the courage to cause a stir. The proudly androgynous model, who’s landed spots in both menswear and womenswear campaigns, has been a vocal critic of beauty standards and the fashion industry’s confusion about what to do with someone like them. (It’s fitting that they’re now dating another rebel, Rose McGowan.) Dove is comfortable being addressed as any gender as long as the intent is positive, but they realize the power of pronouns. “I respect people’s identities with their own personal labels,” they told the Guardian in September. “But I think the world would be better off if we saw people as intentions and vessels.”

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 115

280_04_100_Dove_Ausiello_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 115

11/5/18 7:38 PM


Collin Martin Soccer Player

WHEN PROFESSIONAL soccer midfielder Collin Martin decided to come out on Twitter just hours before his Minnesota team was set to host a Pride match in support of their local LGBTQ community, he couldn’t have known the outcome. But his announcement garnered international attention, as he’s currently the only out male athlete in any professional sports league. Other major league players have come out in the past, but industry pressure, intense public scrutiny, and a lack of team support tend to force players into early retirement. “I feel like a lot of older queer people have had to persevere a lot in their professions to earn respect and achieve great things,” says Martin. “I’m extremely proud to be gay, and I feel very fortunate to live in Minneapolis, a city that has an amazingly supportive LGBTQ community.” Perhaps times are changing? Martin’s coming-out experience may count as one indicator.

Blair Imani “I’M BLACK FIRST,” Blair Imani told Tucker Carlson on Fox News last June when he asked if she would identify as American before all of her other identities. In the same interview, Imani, a convert to Islam, came out as queer. The founder of Equality for HER, an organization that offers free online resources about health and education for women and nonbinary people, she’s spent the past year getting her new book, Modern HERstory: Stories of Women and Nonbinary People Rewriting History, into the hands of every young person she could find, while drawing inspiration from the activism of the Parkland shooting survivors. “I try to use my platform as an out queer Muslim to show others that we exist,” she says. “We are proving to the world that you can be a queer person of faith and be touched by the love and light of Allah.”

BOTH PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY

Author, Activist

116 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Martin_Imani_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 116

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Jill Soloway

G ROO M E R : J USTI N TYM E. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SO LOWA Y'S O FFI C E I N LOS A N G E L ES

Author, Showrunner

CREATOR OF Amazon’s Transparent, Jill Soloway sees a stark divide between queer generations in 2018. “I don’t feel younger queer people have anything to learn from older queer people. We are so backwards and behind and stuck in our ways,” Soloway says. “Older people have so much to learn from young people—like how to use social media. If Jesus, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King could change the world without social media, we had better figure out how to do that with social media, and soon.” Their new memoir, She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy explores Soloway’s family dynamics, the creation of Transparent, their nonbinary identity, and of course, fighting The Man. “We have to come up with new ways to fight the patriarchy," Soloway says. “It’s my belief that creating an intersectional power movement of other-ized people—women of color, trans people, disabled people, and many others—is our next move.” O U T D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8 / J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 9 1 17

280_04_100_Soloway_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 117

11/5/18 10:27 PM


Becca McCharen-Tran Fashion Designer

WHILE HER architecture-inspired swimwear and activewear are notable on their own, Becca McCharen-Tran, founder of the label Chromat, has earned her fair share of applause for the decision to consistently cast a highly diverse roster of female and femme-identified models for her runway shows, spanning race, age, body size, and shape. And it’s not just on the runway: This year, Chromat expanded its size range to 3X through a partnership with Nordstrom. As much as the Brooklyn resident gives her models and collaborators a platform, she also learns from them. Of working with Ericka Hart, a sexuality educator, activist, and model who appeared in Chromat’s F/W ’18 show, McCharen-Tran says, “I have learned so much about how to be a better white ally and how to leverage my privilege from watching her Instagram stories and hearing more of her perspective as a queer black femme. She is an inspiration to me, and I am so glad to have had the opportunity to collaborate with her.”

M A K EU P : ZAC H A RT. M O D E LS : G E E N A ROC E RO AN D V E RO N I CA PO M E E AT I PM. PH OTOG RA PH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY

xxxx

118 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_McCharen-Tran_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 118

11/5/18 7:34 PM


STYL I N G BY KATI E Q I AN. G ROO M E R : N ATH AN I E L D EZA N. RO B E BY M I N A B I N E B I N E. PA NTS AVA I LA BL E AT NOW PR. N ECKLAC E BY B E N IT EZ J EW E L E RS. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N LOS A NG E L ES

Keiynan Lonsdale

Actor, Singer

KEIYNAN LONSDALE continues to be a refreshing, and even sweet-natured, revolutionary. This past summer, the actor played a key role in Love, Simon, the first gay teenage rom-com ever to be released by a major studio. Lonsdale’s preferred pronoun is “tree, since we all come from nature anyway.” He’s one of many peaceful warriors in his generation, as evidenced by his wide-minded views on sexuality and gender identity, and his nonconforming approach to expressing himself and dressing up. (In June, he rocked a drapey, golden showstopper at the MTV Movie & TV Awards, where he accepted the “Best Kiss” award for Love, Simon.) He’s soon slated to appear in Weetzie Bat, the film adaptation of Francesca Lia Block’s cult 1980s Los Angeles novel, but he has his eyes on another passion project. “What’s taken up most of my time and energy right now is my debut album,” he says. “It’s been an emotional and spiritual rollercoaster. It’s made with the deepest respect for love and the world, and I really can’t wait to share it.” OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_Lonsdale_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 119

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Marti Gould Cummings IF BEING IN DRAG is a form of protest, then Marti Gould Cummings is working double time. The New York City drag-queen-turned-politician found her civil voice after the 2016 election, and has been projecting it through the nearest microphone or megaphone ever since. Today, she’s as regular a face at protests and rallies as she is at nightclubs and gay bars. She’s also the rare queen with a legit government seat, working on the mayor’s Nightlife Advisory Board. “I want to get young people involved in politics as I figure out my future in politics,” she says, “and possibly become a candidate for office myself.” Before that, Cummings is celebrating her 2018 highlights: performing for Cynthia Nixon during her gubernatorial campaign and being a featured guest at the revival of Wigstock, New York’s massive drag festival. “[Wigstock] felt like being at a really fun high school reunion where all the misfits got back together,” she says. “Being in the green room with so many iconic queens was a dream come true, and being able to see them perform for a whole new generation was beautiful and inspiring.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D AT ROXY N A I L SA LO N, N EW YO RK CITY

Drag Queen, Politician

120 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_MartiGouldCummings_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 120

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Lauren Jauregui

JAU R EG U I : STYLI N G BY J E N N I F E R AUSTI N. H A I R : J U STI N E M ARJA N. MA K EU P : CA R L E N E K EA RN S. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS A NG E L ES. HA BA NA : PHOTOG RA PH E D AT SCHO E L L E R STU DIO, N EW YORK CITY

Singer, Songwriter

LAUREN JAUREGUI is ready to fly solo. The singer, who got her start with popular girl group Fifth Harmony, is soaring to new heights with her own career, recently releasing her first single, “Expectations,” with the promise of more tracks and a full album soon to come. “My personal highlight of this year,” she says, “has been being granted my freedom to explore myself creatively and write these songs and make art I can put my soul into.” The outspoken artist spends her free time penning open letters to the current administration, protesting everything from the Muslim ban to the Kavanaugh nomination. When asked what it means to be LGBTQ in 2018, Jauregui firmly responds, “It means being a human.”

Chris Habana Jewelry Designer

IN AUGUST, designer Chris Habana celebrated a decade of his namesake jewelry line in trademark fashion: goth, but glamorous. Also serving as the brand’s S/S ’19 presentation, the show was gorgeously macabre, and with models of all stripes and sizes rocking Habana’s art—which can be worn virtually anywhere on the body—it was strikingly diverse. “There have been a lot of hard events this year,” he says, “and it’s inspired me to be as vocal in my work as I can.” Habana grew up between the Philippines and the United States. When he moved to New York in the early 2000s, he set to work as a clothing designer but, by 2007, decided to focus on jewelry instead. Since then, Habana has released a secondary line, MY ENEMY, comprising mostly gold pieces with religious symbols. His aesthetic, albeit beautiful, speaks to dark trends he sees impacting queer lives. “In 2018, racism, sexism, classism, and dictatorships have all taken center stage,” he says. “We queer people who’ve had defense mechanisms from a young age are realizing there are other things worth fighting for.”

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 121

280_04_100_Jauregui_Habana_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 121

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Ashlee Marie Preston Media Personality, Activist

Scotty Bowers Veteran, Playboy

THOUGH 95-YEAR-OLD Scotty Bowers has been out of the business for years, his reputation as an Old Hollywood hustler and pimp has stayed with him, particularly in regard to how he catered to the proclivities (sexual and otherwise) of the stars of yesteryear, male and female alike. A former Marine, Bowers—as a litany of stories attest—was a key figure in the era of the Celluloid Closet, allegedly finding same-sex dates for the likes of Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn. This was during a time when studios laced their contracts with morality clauses (while the police raided gay clubs), meaning that Bowers’s services proved invaluable for Los Angeles’s burgeoning queer community. Much of this was outlined in this year’s documentary Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood. “Several people said nice things to me at the theater about how I changed their lives,” says Bowers, who also served as a source for sexologist Dr. Alfred Kinsey. “I didn’t know these people, but they were saying thank you, and that I helped them, and that they’re not in the closet anymore. That’s inspiring, baby.”

PR ESTO N : PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCHO E LL E R STU D IO, N EW YO RK CITY. BOW E RS : G ROO M E R : AN A N DA TUY ES. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT CHAT EAU M A R MONT, LOS A NG E L ES

AN UNAPOLOGETIC and resilient figure, Ashlee Marie Preston is leading conversations many are too shy to have, some of them at the national level. One example of this fearless dialogue was her TEDx Talk in Pasadena titled “Effective Allyship: A Transgender Woman’s Take on Intersectionality.” Her #ThriveOver35 campaign is pointing out social determinants and barriers that lead to many black trans women not living beyond 35 years old. She’s also currently preparing to launch a campaign that holds TSA accountable for the transphobia, xenophobia, and ableism they perpetrate under the guise of “national security.” She says, “In 2018, LGBTQ has become synonymous with possibility. For generations, we feared our identity to be an impediment on our ability to survive, but today, our tenacity and perseverance set us up to thrive. We have the capacity to do and be anything.”

122 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Preston_BOwers_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 122

11/5/18 7:28 PM


Diana Tourjée

PH OTOG RAPH E D I N BROO KLYN, N. Y.

Journalist

EARLIER THIS YEAR, Diana Tourjée received a GLAAD Media Award for her in-depth Vice documentary on another of this year’s Out100 honorees: Danica Roem, the first openly transgender woman elected to the Virginia General Assembly. A journalist who came out as trans as a kid, Tourjée chips away at gender binaries and cis-heteronormativity in her columns for Broadly, while her video work highlights the diverse perspectives and contributions trans people are making to culture and politics. For younger queer people, she cautions against viewing history as irrelevant. “Elder queer people are one of our most valuable resources to understanding the state of modern politics and culture,” she says. Tourjée is currently writing a book about legendary drag queen Flawless Sabrina’s investigation into the Houston Mass Murders of 1973.

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 123

280_04_100_Tourjée_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 123

11/5/18 10:27 PM


STYL I N G BY KAT TYPALDOS. STYLI N G ASS ISTA NT : M E LA N I E WAI NWRI G HT. M AK EU P : E M I LY A M I CK U SI N G M AC COS M ETICS. S H I RT BY DR I ES VA N NOT E N. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT THOM AS'S STU DI O I N B ROOKLYN, N. Y.

Mickalene Thomas Artist

OVER THE SPAN of her two-decade career, Mickalene Thomas has become known for adding black women into the fine art canon as fully realized muses. The artist creates large-scale, highly stylized, rhinestone-encrusted, collaged representations, that evoke the richness and texture Thomas sees in these women, be they celebrities or her own mother. It’s a highly original aesthetic that, in 2018, led to her shooting Cardi B for W and creating collages of her partner, Racquel Chevremont, for Harper’s Bazaar. Similar collages and paintings will exhibit in Thomas’s first Canadian museum solo show at Toronto’s Art Gallery of Ontario, opening November 29. “To be LGBTQ in 2018 is to use your voice to provide opportunities for other LGBTQ people that don’t have the resources,” Thomas says. She does this herself with Chevremont via Deux Femmes Noires, a platform that debuted this year to increase visibility for queer artists and artists of color. OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 XX

280_04_100_MickaleneThomas_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 124

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Max Mutchnick

M UTCH N I CK : G ROO M E R : DAN I E LL E WALCH. PH OTOG RA PH E D O N TH E S ET OF WI LL & G RAC E I N W EST HO L LYWOOD. CAVA L LO : STYL I NG BY J ESS I CA MA RGO L I S. S U IT BY A KR I S PU NTO. S H I RT BY FRAM E D E N I M. PHOTOG RAPH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS ANG E L ES

Producer and Co-Creator, Will & Grace

WHAT WOULD THE national conversation around LGBTQ issues sound like without Will & Grace? Certainly, not nearly as funny. “Being a member of the LGBTQ community is far and away the greatest gift of my life,” says Max Mutchnick. “It’s given me everything I cherish.” In 2018, the multi-award-winning NBC comedy was revitalized by Mutchnick and his creative partner David Kohan after nearly 11 years off the air, bringing old friends Will, Grace, Jack, and Karen back to prime time. As revolutionary—and hilarious—as ever, the show affirmed the pair’s ability to write masterfully across gay generations. “We could learn to stop searching for what makes us different and get more in touch with what makes us the same,” Mutchnick says about the relationship between younger and older queer people. “We all want to be loved as we are, and we all want a good parking spot.”

Francesca Cavallo Author

FRANCESCA CAVALLO is creating a progressive female-centric future one page at a time. For the author, who co-created Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls with fellow queer writer Elena Favilli, there is no other option. She helped to craft these stories—100 bedtime tales about 100 extraordinary women—because she knows the power of female role models. And she made sure they were gay as hell, too. “I work as hard as I can to normalize homosexuality and to inspire children all over the world to embrace their identity, free of guilt or shame,” says Cavallo, who grew up in southern Italy. With their mix of cultures, eras, genders, and orientations, the Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls books have sold millions of copies, been translated into more than 30 languages, and nabbed the 2018 Publishers Weekly Star Watch award. Says Cavallo, “It was a great honor to receive a prestigious award from the leaders of the very industry we are here to disrupt.”

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 125

280_04_100_Mutchnick_Cavallo_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 125

11/5/18 7:35 PM


xxxx

Jordan Roth THE PRESIDENT OF Jujamcyn Theaters, Jordan Roth is one of the most influential figures on Broadway. This past season, his company’s five venues played hits like Frozen, Mean Girls, and The Book of Mormon, while he also served as a producer on the Tony-winning revival of Angels in America. Regarding who inspired him this year, Roth cites another Out100 honoree. A pivotal moment, he says, was “watching Hannah Gadsby allow herself to be wholly seen [on her Netflix special Nanette], not just by expressing who and why she is, but by questioning comedy, the very form of expression that, until that moment, had allowed her to be seen.” Roth is now working on a monthly magazine, Warmly Jordan, which will explore “the theatrical wherever it exists in our culture— in politics, media, fashion, art, technology, and beyond.”

G ROO M E R : JO H N NY CA RUSO. COAT BY G IV E N CHY. PH OTOG RAPH E D BACKSTAG E AT TH E WA LT E R K E RR TH EATR E, N EW YO RK CITY

Producer

126 D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_JordanRoth_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 126

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Kehlani

K E H LA N I : STYLI N G BY DA N ASI A S UT TON A N D N ICO LAS KLAM. H AI R : C ESA R D E L EON RAM I R EZ. M A K EU P : TROY E BATIST E. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT TH E STU DI O, LOS A NG E L ES. SCH M I D : PHOTOG RAPH E D AT RICHARD N EUTRA'S HAI L EY H OUS E, LOS ANG E L ES

Singer, Songwriter “DAY BY DAY, I see young queer people redefining identity, redefining sexuality, and following their hearts in full confidence and compassion,” says Kehlani, reflecting on the generational differences between the old queer guard and the new. Confidence and compassion are virtues that have also been key to this singer’s own path. Nominated for a Grammy this year for her track “Distraction,” the 23-year-old is redefining what it means to be a young pansexual woman. She’s become an advocate for mental health after surviving a suicide attempt last year; helped run a nonprofit called WATERisLIFE, which aids indigenous communities across the world; and launched a wellness app called Flora. She’s also pregnant, a development the candid artist shared with her fans in October. “I never felt true comfort with my femininity until I got older,” Kehlani says. “Today, I truly realize how beautifully feminine my masculinity is, and how beautifully masculine my femininity is.”

Karl Schmid

Journalist

EARLIER THIS YEAR, when ABC reporter and onair personality Karl Schmid came out to the world as HIV-positive, he had no idea of the response he would receive. “My inbox is still being flooded with messages of thanks and support from total strangers all around the world, from Pakistan to Russia, Venezuela to the Philippines,” he says. This worldwide embrace culminated when Schmid participated in the first-ever Positive Flame torch procession through the streets of Amsterdam, along with fellow torchbearers like Nobel Laureate Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, activist Peter Staley, and the only known person to be cured of HIV, Tim Brown. “Now more than ever, we need a new conversation about HIV,” he says. “Undetectable equals untransmittable, and people need to understand that. The dangerous and unnecessary stigma must stop. But only by talking about it can we break down that stigma.”

OU T D EC E M B E R 2018 / JA N UA RY 2019 127

280_04_100_Kehlani_Schmid_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 127

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Yves Mathieu

WHEN HE’S NOT modeling for Thom Browne or Calvin Klein, or walking runway for Pyer Moss (as he did at the F/W ’18 show in February), Yves Mathieu is volunteering at homeless shelters, senior citizen homes, and centers for troubled LGBTQ youth. “What the young can learn from the old,” he says, “is that it’s OK to worry, but don’t stress too much over your current situation. Older queer people were once young, too, and they’re here now, so it’s possible to make it out, no matter how much darkness is thrown your way.” Mathieu—who’s also pursuing music—seems adamant to be kind, and the very best version of himself. Seven years sober, he also rescues abandoned pit bulls and nurses them back to health, and a highlight of his year was joining New York’s Women’s March in January, where he carried a sign that read, “Trans Women Too.” For him, being LGBTQ in 2018 means, “Inclusion, inclusion, inclusion! We’re so damn diverse, so we should celebrate that diversity and not hide it. We don’t all look alike, we don’t all act the same, and that’s a beautiful thing.”

PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YO RK CITY

Model, Activist, Musician

128 D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Yves_First_SECOND_FINAL.indd 128

11/5/18 7:26 PM


Samantha Ronson

RO N SO N : H A I R : A N DY L ECO M PT E AT TH E WALL G ROU P. M AK EU P : DUSTY STA RKS. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT RI CH A R D N EUTRA'S HA I L EY HOU S E, LOS A NG E L ES. E L I : T-S H I RT BY ZACH G R E E R. PHOTOG RAPH E D AT E LI'S HOM E I N N EW YORK CITY

Musician

WHEN SHE woke up on November 9, 2016, Samantha Ronson feared being queer for the first time in nearly two decades. (The last time had been when Ellen lost her sitcom after coming out.) “We went from a president who lit up the White House like a rainbow, and supported the LGBTQ community, to a new administration that was— well, I don’t need to tell you,” she says. A Jewish lesbian from a family of music-makers, Ronson began her DJ career almost by accident in 2002, when clubs she frequented offered her a turn on the mixer. Since then, she has appeared in the music videos of Usher and Alicia Keys and worked with other artists like Wale and Slash. She’s spent the last year touring with her band, Ocean Park Standoff, and waiting for Donald Trump to resign. “It’s a scary time to be queer in America, but it’s also a beautiful time,” she says. “There are so many people working to suffocate all that hate with light. It gives me hope that this is the last breath of the old America fighting for air.”

Adam Eli Activist

IT’S BEEN MORE than a year since Adam Eli launched Voices 4, an activist group committed to “advancing global queer liberation,” with a 600-person march from Stonewall Inn to Trump Tower to protest the torture of queer Chechens. Since then, the Jewish activist—sporting his signature pink yarmulke—has become one of the most prominent young faces in a wave of contemporary activism not seen since ACT UP reminded the world that “Silence = Death” 30 years ago. Eli’s indefatigable passion has led him from the streets of Manhattan and Washington, D.C. (to protest the sale of firearms and Muslim bans), to London and Paris (to foster an international network of like-minded organizers). For Eli, being queer means taking action. “Hate does not discriminate,” he says, “and prejudice has shockingly low standards for its choice of subject. None of us are safe until all of us are safe.”

OUT D ECEM B ER 2018 / JAN UARY 2019 129

280_04_100_Ronson_Eli_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 129

11/5/18 10:27 PM


Anthony Rapp Actor

Jerome LaMaar Designer, Creative Director

“THE PERSONAL highlight of my year was my rebirth,” says Jerome LaMaar, who has had a long history as a designer—working for various brands when he was as young as 15 before launching his own Bronx-based venture. “I wanted to show that I was more than just a fashion designer,” he adds. That he did, co-directing and producing a web series for Uniqlo and inking deals with Puma, Google, Panorama Music Festival, and more. His consulting and creative directing work has dovetailed with his exploration of a variety of other new territories. “I’m really focused on elevating our approach to sustainability and eco-friendly, futuristic ideas,” he says. “I feel blessed to be able to create newness everywhere I go.”

RA PP : G ROO M E R : E RI N A N D E RSO N FO R EXCLU S IV E ARTI STS US I N G D IO R B EAUTY. PH OTOG RA PH E D AT SCH O E LL E R STU DI O, N EW YOR K CITY. LA M A A R : PHOTOG RA PH E D I N TH E BRONX, N. Y.

FOR ANTHONY RAPP, being LGBTQ today means “being vigilant, awake, and aware of the backlash that continues to mount against our community.” The actor—who originated the role of Mark in Broadway’s Rent and still makes music with castmate Adam Pascal—took a stance on justice for sexual trauma survivors last year when he accused Kevin Spacey of climbing on top of him in bed when he was 14. (Since then, in the momentum of #MeToo, several others have come forward to accuse Spacey.) But Rapp has forged ahead with his career, amping up TV’s queer representation as chief engineer on CBS All Access’s Star Trek: Discovery. With fellow queer actor Wilson Cruz, he delivered the first-ever onscreen gay kiss in the franchise’s history. As for what young queer people should seek to learn from older generations, he says it’s “focused, organized, grassroots activism.”

130 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_04_100_Rapp_Lamaar_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 130

11/5/18 10:27 PM


xxxx

Josie Totah H A I R : TI FFA NY DAUG H E RTY. M AK EU P : A MY CHAN C E. PHOTOG RA PH E D AT TH E STU D I O, LOS A NG E L ES

Actress

IN A COMING-OUT essay published on Time.com in August, Josie Totah made an announcement, writing, “My pronouns are she, her, and hers. I identify as female, specifically as a transgender female.” Already known for her roles in Glee, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Champions, Totah continued, “When my friends and family call me Josie, it feels like I’m being seen. It’s something everyone wants: to feel understood. I believe that I am transgender to help people understand differences. It allows me to gain perspective, to be more accepting of others, because I know what it feels like to know you’re not like everyone else.” Totah’s bold coming-out was her personal highlight of the year. She says, “Being an LGBTQ person in 2018, I feel empowered and ignited to fight harder for change and acceptance within and around the community.”

OUT DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 131

280_04_100_JosieTotah_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 131

11/5/18 7:34 PM


Orbit TH E PEOPL E, PL ACE S, A N D TH I NGS PU L L I NG US I N

Gif t Guide

The season’s hottest items for jet-setters, chic homemakers, and grooming gurus MASTER & DYNAMIC BOTTEGA VENETA AIRPOD CASE

WIRELESS HEADPHONES

$320, BottegaVeneta.com

$299, MasterDynamic.com

BURTON DEREK ROSE CASHMERE

SNOWBOARD

HOODIE $775, DerekRose.com

CARRY BAG $269.95, Burton.com

PRADA GALLERIA BAG $2,990, Prada.com LOUIS VUITTON

Travel

ESCALE TIME ZONE 39 WATCH $12,100, LouisVuitton.com MICHAEL KORS DOPP KIT $98, MichaelKors.com

VALEXTRA PASSPORT

RALPH LAUREN FLASK

HOLDER $475,

$250, RalphLauren.com

Valextra.com

HERSCHEL SUPPLY CO. FANNY PACK $34.99, Herschel.com

LOTUFF BACKPACK $1,500, KATAMA SWIM TRUNKS $165, KatamaSwim.com

RIMOWA ESSENTIAL TRUNK $980, Rimowa.com

LotuffLeather.com

COU RT ESY O F B RAN DS

APL SNEAKERS $200, AthleticPropulsionLabs.com

132 DECEM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_06_Orbit_GiftGuide_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 132

11/5/18 7:23 PM


SMEG JUICER $750, AVAILABLE AT Williams-Sonoma.

MASTER & DYNAMIC FOR ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE TURNTABLE $3,795, Zegna.com

GUCCI CHAIR $2,600, Gucci.com

LÉON & GEORGE HOUSEPLANTS

CALVIN KLEIN X PENDLETON PETER

$109 - $599,

WOOL SADDLE BLANKET in

LeonandGeorge.com

Cobalt + Red, $320, CalvinKlein.com

Home

DIPTYQUE CANDLE $495, DiptyqueParis.com

OUTDOOR FELLOW CANDLE $48, OutdoorFellow.com

SNOWE 20 PIECE TOWEL SET $285, SnoweHome.com

HERMÈS TAROT

HEIRLOOMIST PERSONAL MEMORABILIA

CARDS $120,

PHOTOS by Shana Novak, price available

Hermes.com

COU RT ESY O F B RAN DS

upon request

INTERIOR ILLUSIONS PLUS LAMP

BOTTEGA VENETA PILLOW

$150, available at AhaLife.com

$740, BottegaVeneta.com

GREY GOOSE MARTINI FOUNTAIN, SFERRA ROBE $195, Sferra.com

$1,500, available at TheLine.com

BROOKLINEN CORE SHEET SET $129, Brooklinen.com

OUT D EC EM B ER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 133

280_06_Orbit_GiftGuide_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 133

11/5/18 7:23 PM


ROJA AMBER AOUD FRAGRANCE $765, DYSON

AVAILABLE AT

HAIRDRYER

BergdorfGoodman.com

$499.99,

CLARISONIC MIA

Dyson.com

SMART 3-IN-1 BEAUTY DEVICE $199, Clarisonic.com

LAB SERIES SMOOTH SHAVE TRIO $49, LabSeries.com

Grooming

SISLEY VELVET NOURISHING CREAM $220, Sisley-Paris.com

TRUE SONS HAIR DYE GROWN ALCHEMIST

FOAM $30 MONTHLY

BODY CREAM $31,

SUBSCRIPTION,

GrownAlchemist.com

TrueSons.com

BYREDO HAND WASH $65, Byredo.com

BRICKELL PURIFYING CHARCOAL FACE WASH $13,

PHILIPS NORELCO

BrickellMensProducts.com

SHAVER $299.99, USA.Philips.com

CLOVE & CREEK CloveAndCreek.com

ORIBE COLLECTOR SET $285, Oribe.com

AESOP PARSLEY SEED ANTIOXIDANT SKIN CARE KIT $150, Aesop.com

TKTKTKTK

BODY SCRUB $32,

MAAPILIM WINTER SURVIVAL KIT $79, Maapilim.com

134 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

280_06_Orbit_GiftGuide_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 134

11/5/18 7:24 PM


STORE INFO

3.1 Phillip Lim 31PhillipLim.com

Dior/Dior Homme Dior.com

37 Actives DrMacrene.com

Dr. Dennis Gross DrDennisGross.com

A.P.C. APC.fr

Dries Van Noten DriesVanNoten.be

Abercrombie & Fitch Abercrombie.com

Dunhill Dunhill.com

Acne Studios AcneStudios.com

Eric Schlösberg EricSchlosberg.com

Akris Punto Akris.ch

Ermenegildo Zegna Couture Zegna.com

Alexander Wang AlexanderWang.com

Frame Denim Frame-store.com

Balmain Balmain.com

G-Star Raw G-Star.com

Billy Reid BillyReid.com

Giorgio Armani Armani.com

Bottega Veneta BottegaVeneta.com

Giuseppe Zanotti Giuseppe Zanotti.com

Casadei Casadei.com Castlecliff NYC Castlecliff.nyc Christian Siriano ChristianSiriano.com Clé de Peau CleDePeaubeaute .com Common Projects Common Projects.com Converse Converse.com Dana Rebecca Designs DanaRebecca Designs.com TKTKTKTK

Falke Falke.com

Augustinus Bader AugustinusBader .com

By Terry ByTerry.com

Diane Von Furstenberg DVF.com

Aquaria photographed by Martin Schoeller

Givenchy Givenchy.com Good American GoodAmerican.com Goorin Bros. Goorin.com H&M HM.com Hanes Hanes.com Hermès Hermes.com J. Brand JBrandJeans.com John Varvatos JohnVarvatos.com Kova by Sascha KovaBySascha.com La Mer CreamdeLaMer.com

La Prairie LaPrairie.com

Mr. Turk MrTurk.com

Sanayi 313 Sanayi313.com

Thom Browne ThomBrowne.com

Louis Vuitton LouisVuitton.com

Native Ken NativeKen.com

Sisley Sisley-Paris.com

Tom Ford TomFord.com

Lovisa Lovisa.com

No. 21 NumeroVentuno .com

SK-II SK-II.com

Tommy Hilfiger usa.Tommy.com

Slate Denim Co. SlateDenim.com

Valentino Valentino.com

Tatcha Tatcha.com

Versace Versace.com

The Blonds TheBlonds.nyc

Vintner’s Daughter VintnersDaughter .com

Marcelo Burlon MarceloBurlon.eu Marina Hoermanseder Marina Hoermanseder.com Meshki Meshki.com Mina BineBine MinaBineBine.com Moncler Moncler.com Mr. Porter MrPorter.com

Orange Culture OrangeCulture.com Pechuga Vintage PechugaVintage.com Prada Prada.com Pyer Moss PyerMoss.com Saint Laurent YSL.com Salvatore Ferragamo Ferragamo.com

The North Face TheNorthFace.com The Very Warm TheVeryWarm.com Theory Theory.com

Xtian de Medici XtiandeMedici.com Yhoji Yamamoto YhojiYamamoto.co.jp Zara Zara.com

OUT N OV EM B ER 2018 87

280_06_Orbit_StoreInfo_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 135

11/5/18 7:24 PM


Clockwise from top left: “Fresh voice” Nneka Onuorah channels Spike Lee, Ryan Murphy ponders his next TV triumph, Desmond Is Amazing zooms toward a future where he can continue to be himself...always, Peppermint gets served while serving.

280_07_Backpage_FIRST_SECOND_FINAL.indd 88

O N UO RAH : STYLI N G BY M ARCI RO DG E RS. H A I R : MY E RS LAN SKY. MA K EU P : A L EXA A N G E LO POU LOS. TO P BY STUZO CLOTH I NG. PHOTOG RA PH E D I N N EW YOR K CITY. M U R PHY : STYL I NG BY JOS E PH TU RLA . G ROOM E R : E RI N AN D E RSON. PH OTOG RAPH E D AT SCH EO LL E R STU DI O, N EWYO RK CITY. D ES M O N D : PH OTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YO R K CITY. P E PP E R M I NT : STYL I N G BY JASON L E B LON D. HA I R : PAU L WA R R E N. M AK EU P : D EJA S M ITH. CROWN BY KOVA BY SASCHA . PHOTOG RAPH E D I N N EW YORK CITY.

4,000 WOR D S

...Baby One More Time

A last look at some of our favorite moments with our Out100 honorees

136 DECEM BER 2018 / JANUARY 2019 OUT

11/5/18 7:24 PM


MEET

BUMBLE’S GAY DATING APP

18787 chappy.indd 1

11/2/18 8:45 AM


T:7.875” S:7.375”

RAISE THE WORLD’S STANDARDS.

INTRODUCING THE FIRST-EVER LEXUS ES F SPORT. The love you express; the family that surrounds you; the sophistication you embody. These all combine to make you, you. :LWKEROGVW\OLQJDQGPHWLFXORXVFUDIWVPDQVKLSWKHoUVWHYHU/H[XV(6)63257SDUWRIWKH(6OLQHLVPDGHWR HOHYDWHZKDWPDWWHUVWR\RXWKHPRVW$ORQJZLWKDQHZKS1/9HQJLQH$PD]RQ$OH[DDQGDYDLODEOHVSHDNHU 0DUN/HYLQVRQ®3XUH3OD\VXUURXQGVRXQGWKH(6)63257VXSSRUWV\RXUGULYHWRVHWQHZVWDQGDUGVIRUHOHJDQFH

18770 Lexus Raise Standards OUT 280.indd 1

OH[XVFRP(6 _ /H[XV(6

10/10/18 9:55 AM

T:10.875”

S:10.375”

3HUIRUPDQFHoJXUHVDUHIRUFRPSDULVRQRQO\DQGZHUHREWDLQHGZLWKSURWRW\SHYHKLFOHVE\SURIHVVLRQDOGULYHUVXVLQJVSHFLDOVDIHW\HTXLSPHQWDQGSURFHGXUHV'RQRWDWWHPSW $PD]RQ$OH[DDQGDOOUHODWHGORJRVDQGPRWLRQPDUNVDUHWUDGHPDUNVRI$PD]RQFRP,QFRULWVDIoOLDWHV7KH/H[XV$OH[DDSSUHTXLUHVDQ$QGURLGVPDUWSKRQHUXQQLQJYHUVLRQ DQGDERYH$SSOHL26DYDLODEOHHDUO\0DUN/HYLQVRQ ®LVDUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNRI+DUPDQ,QWHUQDWLRQDO,QGXVWULHV,QF

OUT100 2018 280 Dec Jan  
OUT100 2018 280 Dec Jan