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JANUARY 2013

less invasive screenings

Now available

genetics & cancer: there is a liNk

ProPer Drug DisPosal what to do with outdated drugs

PrePare Now for allergy seasoN A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO

Herald-Citizen and Regional Buyers Guide Wednesday January 30, 2013


A-2 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Advertiser Index A Place For Mom...................................................16 Algood Drugs.........................................................30 Allergy, Asthma & Sinus.........................................17 Alzheimer’s Assoc.................................................30 American Behavioral Consultants..........................39 American Cancer Society......................................22 Anderson-UC Funeral Home.................................47 Andy’s Pharmacy...................................................21 Barbara Johnson, Office of Counseling.................43 Bethesda Health Care............................................45 Buckeye Home Medical.........................................40 Cedar Hills Senior Living Community....................20 Chiropractic Works................................................38 Convenient Care Clinic..........................................38 Cookeville Housing Authority.................................19 Cookeville Medical Center.......................................8 Cookeville Regional Dental Associates.................26 Cookeville Regional Medical Center................24-25 Cookeville Regional Medical Center Foundation...29 Crest Lawn Funeral Home.....................................12 Cumberland Physical Therapy...............................23 Cumberland Medical Center....................................9 Curves....................................................................34 Eye Centers Of Tennessee.....................................13 Family Care Counseling.........................................11 Family Dentistry Group..........................................14 Family Foot Center ...............................................26 Greg Groth, Attorney.............................................43 Hayes Family Dentistry..........................................19 Health Benefit Solutions........................................21 Heritage Pointe Senior Living................................27 Highland Medical...................................................48 Highlands Dermatology & Surgical Assoc.............33 Home Instead Senior Care ....................................15 Hooper Huddleston & Horner Funeral Home. . . . . . . .18 Horner Rausch Optical..........................................12 Huddleston & Shepherd Family Vision..................14 Infinity Family Practice...........................................31

Innovative Family Care..........................................42 Intrepid Health Care...............................................33 John Martin Epley Jr., M.D.....................................27 Joyce Health Care.................................................47 Kids Kare...............................................................10 Kindred Health Care..............................................36 Larco Medical & Pharmacy....................................34 Life Care Center Of Sparta....................................22 Life Care Centers Of Crossville..............................43 Medvance..............................................................39 Middle Tennessee Surgical Specialists..................41 Middle Tennessee Eye Associates........................46 Morningside...........................................................32 Mullins Vision.........................................................16 Myron B. Stringer, DDS..........................................36 New Horizons For Women.....................................28 NHC HealthCare....................................................37 Personal Growth and Learning Center..................18 Pinnacle Health Center..........................................23 Plateau Mental Health............................................38 Presley Funeral Home..............................................9 Premier Diagnostic Imaging.....................................3 Quality Home Health..............................................10 Regional Oral Surgery............................................35 Roy Byrd & Associates..........................................33 Satellite Med..........................................................32 Serenity Health.......................................................20 Susan Johnson / First Realty Company................40 Tennessee Limb & Brace.......................................45 Tennessee Hearing Instrument................................8 Ten Broeck Tennessee...........................................34 Tier 1 Orthopedics.................................................44 Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose & Throat/ Cookeville Hearing Center.....................................5 Varsity Drugs..........................................................40 Wheeler Orthodontics............................................36 Walk-In Clinic of Sparta.........................................42 Zumba/The Fitness Center....................................46


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A3

Uncompromising quality at half the cost of hospitals. You have a choice. Request the Best!

Board-certified physicians you know and trust. Daniel Coonce, MD earned his undergraduate degree from Tennessee Tech University and his medical degree from the University of Tennessee at Memphis. Dr. Coonce joined Putnam Radiology in 1982 and is a founder of Premier Diagnostic Imaging.

William Humphrey, MD received his medical degree from the University of Tennessee at Memphis. Dr. Humphrey has been associated with Putnam Radiology since 1974 and is a founder of Premier Diagnostic Imaging.

John Limbacher, MD received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt and his medical degree from the University of Tennessee at Memphis. Dr. Limbacher joined Putnam Radiology in 1980 and is a founder of Premier Diagnostic Imaging.

George Mead, MD earned his undergraduate degree at Tennessee Tech University and his medical degree from the University of Tennessee at Memphis. Dr. Mead has been associated with Putnam Radiology since 1991 and is a founder of Premier Diagnostic Imaging.

SERVICES

You Have a Choice. Request the Best! Best Value - Uncompromising quality at half the cost of hospitals. Call to compare prices. Best Service - Compassionate and convenient care by certified technologists. Best Staff - Board-certified Radiologists that you have know and trusted for years.

MRI/Open MRI CT X-ray Ultrasound Digital Mammography Nuclear Medicine Dexa Bone Densitometry Health Screenings Back Pain Management

931-528-1800 or 877-528-8898 www.premierdiagnostic.com Premier Medical Park | 315 N. Washington Ave. Suite #103 | Cookeville, TN 38501


A-4 —HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

M MEEDDIICCAALL D DIIRREECCTTOORRYY LIST OF ADVERTISERS BY SERVICE OF PHYSICIANS ON STAFF AT COOKEVILLE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER Mental Health Services (Con’t)

Allergy Clinics • Allergy, Asthma & Sinus Center ...............17

Attorneys • Greg Groth...................................................43 Assisted Living Faciities • Cedar Hills Senior Living Community......20 • Heritage Pointe Senior Living....................27 • Morningside Assisted Living.......................32 Audioprosthology/Hearing • Tennessee Hearing Instrument.....................8 • Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose & Throat. . . . .5 Charitable Organizations • American Cancer Society............................22 • Alzheimer’s Association..............................30 Chiropractic / Massage Therapy • Chiropractic Works.....................................38 • Serenity Health.............................................20 Dentistry / Oral Surgery • Regional Oral Surgery................................35 • Family Dentistry Group..............................14 • Hayes Family Dentistry...............................19 • Dr. Myron Stringer......................................36 • Wheeler Orthodontics.................................36 • Cookeville Regional Dental........................26 Dermatology •Highlands Dermatology & Surgical Assoc. 33 Elder / Home Health Care •A Place For Mom.........................................16 • Home Instead Senior Care..........................15 • Intrepid Health Care...................................33 • Quality Home Health...................................10 Eye Care/O ptometry/O phthalmology •Eye Centers Of Tennessee...........................13 • Horner Rausch Optical...............................12 • Huddleston & Shepherd Family Vision. . . . .14 • John Martin Epley, Jr. M.D........................27 • Middle Tennessee Eye Associates...............46 • Mullins Vision Associates............................16

Fitness • Curves...........................................................34 • American Behavioral...................................39 • Zumba / The Fitness Center.......................46 • Personal Growth & Learning.....................18 • Barbara Johnson, Office Of Counseling....43 Family Practice • Innovative Family Care...............................42 Natural / Alternative Health Care • Joyce Health Care........................................47 • Pinnacle Health Care...................................23 • Infinity Family Practice..............................31 Orthopedics • Tier 1.............................................................44 Funeral Homes • Anderson-Upper Cumberland Funeral Home.............................................................47 Pediatrics • Crestlawn Funeral Home............................12 • Kids Kare......................................................10 • Hooper, Huddleston & Horner Funeral Home.............................................................18 Pharmacy • Presley Funeral Home...................................9 • Andy’s Pharmacy.........................................21 • Algood Drugs................................................30 • Varsity Drugs................................................40 Hospitals • Cookeville Regional Medical Center. . . .24-25 • Larco Pharmacy...........................................34 • Highlands Medical (White Co.)..................48 • Cumberland Medical Center........................9 Physical Therapy • Cumberland Physical Therapy...................23 Housing • Cookeville Housing Authority....................19 Podiatrist • Family Foot Center......................................26 Imaging • Premier Diagnostic........................................3 Prosthetics / Orthotics • Tennessee Limb & Brace.............................45 Insurance • Health Benefits Solutions............................21 Real Estate • Susan Johnson - First Realty......................40 Medical Clinics • Satellite Med.................................................32 Skilled Nursing Facilities (Nursing Homes) • Convenient Care Clinic...............................38 • Kindred Healthcare.....................................36 • Walk In Clinic Of Sparta............................42 • Lifecare Center Of Sparta..........................22 • Cookeville Medical Center............................8 • Bethesda Health Care.................................45 • NHC Of Cookeville.....................................37 • Lifecare Center Of Crossville.....................43 Medical Schools • Medvance......................................................39 Social Security / Disability Consultants • Roy Byrd & Associates................................33 Medical Supplies • Buckeye Home Medical...............................40 • Larco Medical..............................................34 Surgical Centers • Cookeville Surgery Center............................5 • Middle Tennessee Surgical Specialists.......41 Mental Health Services • Family Care Counseling..............................11 • Plateau Mental Health.................................38 Women’s Health Services • Ten Broeck....................................................34 • New Horizons For Women..........................28


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-5

The Cookeville Hearing Center …Where YOUR Hearing Matters MOST RESTORING YOUR ABILITY TO ENJOY LIFE AGAIN

Life is enriched by the experiences we have through our senses: sight, touch, smell, taste, hearing, and balance. Our senses work together and enable us to learn and enjoy life.

At The Cookeville Hearing Center we have…

flexible solutions for YOUR unique needs

Call Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose and Throat at 931.528.1575for an appointment today. Call The Hearing Aid Center at Upper Cumberland ENT at 931.526.8863 or 800.526.8863 for an appointment.

It’s about

Accurate Diagnosis It’s about

Innovation It’s about

Empathy It’s about

Keeping You Close To Home

Our team of Ear, Nose and Throat doctors, nurses, and hearing professionals strive every day to provide you with the best and most complete Ear, Nose and Throat care in Middle Tennessee. All Ear, Nose and Throat problems, such as hearing loss, sinus issues, facial skin lesions, thyroid and parathyroid disease, and facial plastic surgery are among the services we provide to you. We also offer diagnostic testing, including CT scans, in our office for your convenience and efficient diagnosis.

100 West 4th St., Cookeville, TN 38501 • 931-528-1575 • 1-800-539-7208

You can trust the doctors and hearing professionals at Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose & Throat and The Hearing Aid Center at Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose and Throat (Cookeville Hearing Center) to diagnose and treat all your hearing problems. Audiologists cannot diagnose your hearing problems. You can rely on our team of medical doctors and audiology professionals to diagnose and treat all your hearing needs, with over 40 years of experience treating ear diseases and hearing problems. Our goal is to improve your quality of life through improved hearing. Our physician-led team, along with our hearing professionals’ expertise in meeting patients’ hearing aid needs, affords the most clinically comprehensive approach to diagnosing and treating hearing loss in our region. Also, we offer the most cost effective solutions for your hearing needs. We look forward to continuing to help you in this capacity. The Hearing Aid Center at Upper Cumberland Ear, Nose and Throat (Cookeville Hearing Center), at 100 W 4th St (across from the hospital), is your one source for all your hearing needs! Call for your appointment today – ENT doctors at 931.528.1575 or Cookeville Hearing Center at 931.526.8863 or toll-free 800.526.8863. YOU MATTER MOST… “Your service has been extraordinary! It’s extremely rare to find professionals who care so much and go out of their way to help others like you do. And I can’t remember the last time that I’ve ever heard this well. Thank you so much!”… - Dr. E.D., Cookeville

“Finally, someone helped me solve the mystery of my imbalance! Now I can get on with my life. How can I thank you enough, Cookeville Hearing Center, for giving me my life back? - L.M., Smithville

Karen Brandt

M.A., CCC-A, FAAA

The Cookeville Hearing Center EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS * EXPERT ADVICE EXTRAORDINARY TECHNOLOGY EXCEPTIONAL VALUE * EXCELLENT SERVICE

100 West 4th Street, Suite 210 Cookeville, TN 38501 931 526-8863 or 800 526-8863 www.myhearingmatters.com M-F 8:00 am – 5:00 pm


A-6 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

M OR RY Y MEEDDIICCAALL D DIIRREECCTTO OF PHYSICIANS ON STAFF AT COOKEVILLE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER Allergy & Asthma

• BRIAN SAMUEL, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

• CAROLYN ROSS, M.D. 120 Walnut Commons Lane, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2557

Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

221 North Oak, Cookeville, TN 38501, 646-0880

• SHERIF SHOUKRY, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

• C. GRAY SMITH, M.D. 400 Crawford Avenue, Monterey, TN 38574, 839-2224

• SULLIVAN SMITH, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

• JAMES STAGGS, D.O. 753-B Humble Drive, Cookeville, TN 38501, 520-1800

• WILLIAMSMITH,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

• KIM TABOR, D.O. 753-B Humble Drive, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4600

• DANNY E. STRANGE, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

Gastroenterology

OF PHYSICIANS ON STAFF AT COOKEVILLE REGIONAL• PARDEEP MEDICAL CENTER K. SHARMA, M.D. • JOHN SHIELDS, M.D.

• ALBERT HENSEL, MD 220 N Oak St., Cookeville, TN 38501 – 520-1010 Anesthesiology

• BLAKEBUTLER,M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 310, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7877 • ROBERT H. LANDRY, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 310, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7877 • RODERICK LOVETT, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 310, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7877 • STEPHENSISKO,M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 310, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7877 • GEORGE A. STARKWEATHER, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 310, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7877 Cardiology • MARIANO BATTAGLIA, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • STACY BREWINGTON, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • R. ALEX CASE, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • BRIAN DOCKERY, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • TIMOTHY FOURNET, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • THOMAS LITTLE, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405, 1-888-391-0048 • SCOTT REISING, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405, 1-888-391-0048 • GARY REYNOLDS, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405 1-888-391-0048 • MARK WATHEN, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405, 1-888-391-0048 Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery • CHARLES T. HUDDLESTON, M.D. 203 N. Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 Cardiology-arrhythmias/electrophysiology • MARK WATHEN, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-0405, 1-888-391-0048 Cardio - Thoracic Surgery • G. TODD CHAPMAN, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349 • TIMOTHY POWELL, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349 • LEWIS WILSON, JR., M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349

• DRUMMOND VOGAN, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

• MAAN ABARI, M.D. 438 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 372-7774

Cardiovascular Thoracic Anesthesiology

• PHILLIP BERTRAM, M.D. 438 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2616

• BRUCE JOHNSON, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center 528-2541

• JOYCE BREMER, M.D. 438 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2616

• STEVE CLEMONS, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center 528-2541 • JAN HERHOLDT M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center 528-2541 Endocrinology • ROHINI KASTURI, M.D. CRMC Diabetes Center, 127 N. Oak, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2648 • JOSEPH TOKARUK, M.D. 109 West Sixth Street, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-1885

• LORRIE HENSON, M.D. 137 West Second Street, Suite 103, Cookeville, TN 38501 520-4887 • MICHAEL ZELIG, M.D. 438 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2616 General Surgery • SCOTT A. COPELAND, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • DALE DOUGLAS, M.D. 340 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-6496 • BRIAN GERNDT, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992

Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

• CHARLES T. HUDDLESTON, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992

• DALE GUILLORY, M.D. 39 East First Street, Cookeville, TN 38501 520-7520

• GEORGE L. IVEY, III, M.D. 340 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-6496

• MARKKRISKOVICH,M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501 528-1575 • THOMAS L. LAWRENCE, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575 • FREDERICK S. BRONN RAYNE, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• JEFFREY McCARTER, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • JEFF MOORE, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • KENNA WILLIAMS, M.D. 1120 Sam’s St., Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7312 Geriatrics

• GRANT ROHMAN, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• KATHERINE BERTRAM, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848

Family Practice

• PARDEEP K. SHARMA, M.D. 146 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, Tn 38501, 646-0880

• MATTHEW BOLTON, M.D. 1120 Sam’s Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7312 • ERNEST BUCHANAN, M.D. 1101 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7797 • JAMES CATES, M.D. 1120 Sam’s Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7312 • HAROLD CHERTOK, D.O. 445 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5787 • GAMAL ESKANDER, M.D. 1150 Perimeter Park Dr., Cookeville, TN 38501, 520-4900

Hematology • PAUL JACQUIN, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center, 1 Medical Center Blvd., Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2497 • VENUMADHAV KOTLA, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center, 1 Medical Center Blvd., Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2497 Hospice & Palliative Care • Chet Gentry, M.D. 3300 Williams Enterprise Dr., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-9222

E-N-T (Ear, Nose, Throat)

• JULIAN FIELDS, M.D. 866 East 10th St., Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-2155

• CHARLESE.JORDANIII,M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• STEVEN G. FLATT, M.D. 1101 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7797

• PIERCE ALEXANDER, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• SCOTT H. KEITH, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• ERICFOX,M.D. 120 Walnut Commons Lane, Cookeville, Tn 38501, 372-7788

• DAWN BARLOW, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• MARKKRISKOVICH,M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• CHET GENTRY, M.D. 3300 Williams Enterprise Dr., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-9222

• JACK CAREY, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• THOMAS L. LAWRENCE, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• JANE ANN GOTCHER, M.D. 1101 Neal Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7797

• TATIANA CHESNUT, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• FREDERICK S. BRONN RAYNE, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• HUNTERHANSEN,D.O. 189 Lantana Rd., Crossville, TN 38555, 426-0881

• APARNA CHOWDHURY, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• GRANT ROHMAN, M.D. 100 West Fourth Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1575

• AMY HIX, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848

• CHRISTIAN COOPER, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

Emergency Medicine

• THOMAS JENKINS, M.D. 445 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5787

• GAUTAM DUTTA, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• PUSHPENDRA KUMAR (P.K.) JAIN, M.D. 225 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-8899

• LINDA ESUZOR, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• KENNY LYNN, M.D. 210 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7418

• CHET GENTRY, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• CRYSTAL MARTIN, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848

• APRYL HALL, M.D. PEDIATRICS Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• CEDRIC PALMER, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848

• JEFFREY IVINS, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• MICHAEL DEBOER, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541 • WILLIAMGAILMARD,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541 • KEITHHILL,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541 • JAMESMULLEN,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541 • ROBERT PAASCHE, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, E.R., 528-2541

Hospitalists


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-7

M OR RY Y MEEDDIICCAALL D DIIRREECCTTO OF PHYSICIANS ON STAFF AT COOKEVILLE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER • RONJOHNSON,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• BERT GEER, D.O. (Gynecology Only) 100 W. 3rd Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-9047

Physiatry

317 North Hickory Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501 528-7527 or 1-800-897-1898

Plastic Surgery

• CHRISTINE PHAM, M.D. 317 North Hickory Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501 528-7527 or 1 (800) 897-1898

• DALE GUILLORY, M.D. 39 East First Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 520-7520

• AYUK TABI, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• MICHAEL S. PIPPIN, M.D. 317 North Hickory Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501 528-7527 or 1 (800) 897-1898

• CYNTHIA RECTOR, M.D. - TEN BROECK TENNESSEE, CRMC, 1 Medical Center Blvd., Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2570

Infectious Diseases

• HARRY STUBER, M.D. (Gynecology Only) 503 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 372-1746

• THOMAS GANNON, D.O. OF PHYSICIANS ON STAFF AT COOKEVILLE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER • PAIGE GERNT, M. D. 427 N. Willow Avenue, Suite 4, Cookeville, TN 38501, 854-9393

• KIM LANGLEY, M.D. PEDIATRICS Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541 • GUILLERMOMANTILLA,M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541 • FRANK PERRY, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541

• MARKPIERCE,M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 202, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2902

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

Internal Medicine

• ROBERT E. BROOKSBANK, D.D.S 33 West Third Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-6252

• ROY ANDERSON, M.D. 201 West Fifth Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-1688

• TERRELL JONES, D.M.D. 920 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 525-6059

• REXFORD AGBENOHEVI, M.D. 315 North Washington Ave., Suite 109, Cookeville, TN 38501 372-8668

Orthopedics

• LENA AROUS, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848 • KATHERINE BERTRAM, M.D. 128 North Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848 • CHRISTOPHER DILL, M.D. 1120 Sam’s St, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-7312 • DOUGDYCUS,M.D. 3698 Grundy Quarles Hwy., Gainesboro, TN 38562, 268-3224 • TIM FLYNN, M.D. 201 West Fifth Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-1688 • DONGRISHAM,M.D. 315 North Washington Ave., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-3300 • ABHAY KEMKAR, M.D. 441 Sewell Road, Sparta, TN 38583, 931-837-9048

• PHILIP ELIZONDO, M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-9518 • CARL M. HOLLMANN, M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-9518 • JAMES D. McKINNEY, M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-9518 • GREGORY ROBERTS, M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-9518

Psychiatry

Pulmonology/Critical Care • BERNADETTE HEE, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 102, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2143 • DAVID J. HENSON, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 102, Cookeville, TN 38501 520-1696 • HIMA KONA, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 102, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2143 • VIJAY RUPAN, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 102, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2143 Radiation Oncology • ALGIS SIDRYS, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2497

• JON SIMPSON, M.D. 118 Brown Avenue, Suite 103, Crossville, TN 38555, 931-484-8861

• JONAS SIDRYS, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2497

• JOHN TURNBULL, M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-9518

Radiology

• RICHARD WILLIAMS, M.D. 315 North Washington Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 525-6676

• GINNY CHARNOCK, M.D. CRMC Imaging Department, 783-2686

Pathology

• RICHARD COURTNEY, M.D. CRMC Imaging Departmen, 783-2686

• ANJU MENDIRATTA, M.D. 221 North Oak Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 646-0880

• DON ASBERRY, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• SANJAM DHILLON, M.D. CRMC Imaging Departmen, 783-2686

• JOSEPH TOKARUK, M.D. 109 West Sixth Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 372-1885

• TIM J. COLLINS, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• CLIFFORD GAME, M.D. CRMC Imaging Departmen, 783-2686

• AUDREY TOLBERT, M.D. 345 West Broad St., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2300

• SAMUEL GLASGOW, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• JASON HARDIN, M.D. CRMC Imaging Departmen, 783-2686

Medical Oncology

• ROBERT GLENN HALL, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• SPENCER MADELL, M.D. CRMC Imaging Department, 783-2686

• R. SAMUEL KINCAID, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• JOSUE MONTANEZ, M.D. CRMC Imaging Department,, 783-2686

• MEIKLEJOHN McKENZIE, D.O. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

• MICHAEL O’MAILEY, M.D. CRMC Imaging Department,, 783-2686

• WALTER DICKSON MOSS, III, M.D. 115 Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836

Thoracic Surgery

• PAUL JACQUIN, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center, 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2497 • VENUMADHAV KOTLA, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center, 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2497 • ALGIS SIDRYS, M.D. CRMC Cancer Center, 1 Medical Center Boulevard, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2497 Nephrology • LEE RAY CROWE, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 201, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2902 • FREEDOMIKEDIONWU,M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 201, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-2902 • ANJU MENDIRATTA, M.D. 221 North Oak Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 646-0880 Neurology • DANIEL DONOVAN, M.D. 105 North Cherry St., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5811 • RANDY GAW, M.D. 315 N. Washington Ave., Suite 204, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-5511 • DALIA MILLER, M.D. CRMC Professional Office Building, Suite 201, Cookeville, TN 38501 783-2902 • THUY T. NGO, M.D. 315 N. Washington Ave., Suite 201, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5633 Neurosurgery • JOSEPHJESTUS,M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 372-7716 • LEONARDOR.RODRIGUEZ-CRUZ,M.D. 105 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 372-7716

• JASON NOLAN, M.D. 115 N. Peachtree Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-2836 Pediatrics

• TIMOTHY POWELL, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349

• JAMES BATSON, M.D. 150 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1485

• LEWIS WILSON, JR., M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349

• SATYA CHAKRABARTY, M.D. 435 North Cedar Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-6100

Urology

• CHRISTOPHER CLIMACO, M.D. 758 South Willow Avenue Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-6173 • LLOYD D. FRANKLIN, M.D. 150 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1485 • CHET GENTRY, M.D. 3300 Williams Enterprise Dr., Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-9222 • APRYL HALL, M.D. Cookeville Regional Medical Center, 528-2541 • CARRIE LOGHRY, M.D. 150 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1485 • CEDRIC PALMER, M.D. 128 N. Whitney Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 783-5848 • MARIA TERESA S. RAMOS, M.D. 758 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-6173 • LESLIE TREECE, M.D. 150 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1485

Obstetrics/Gynecology

• NEIL TREECE, M.D. 150 North Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1485

• MICHAEL P. CASAL, M.D. 1080 Neal Street, Suite 200, Cookeville, TN 38501, 520-1529, (931) 823-9970

Pediatric Cardiology

• MICHAEL COLE, M.D. 317 North Hickory Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501 528-7527 or 1 (800) 897-1898

• CHRISTOPHER CLIMACO, M.D. 758 South Willow Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-6173

• LAURETTA CONNELLY, M.D. 109 West Sixth Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-6945

• G. TODD CHAPMAN, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349

• QUINTON CANCEL, M.D. 320 North Oak Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5547 • TIMOTHY R. COLLINS, M.D. 254 West Seventh Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, 520-6270 • LEE S. MOORE, M.D. 320 North Oak Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5547 • CHARLES T. WOMACK M.D. 320 North Oak Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-5547 Vascular Surgery • G. TODD CHAPMAN, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349 • SCOTT A. COPELAND, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • BRIAN GERNDT, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • JEFFREY McCARTER, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • JEFF MOORE, M.D. 203 North Cedar Avenue, Suite A, Cookeville, TN 38501, 528-1992 • TIMOTHY POWELL, M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349 • LEWIS WILSON, JR., M.D. 228 West Fourth Street, Suite 301, Cookeville, TN 38501, 526-4349


A8 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Get rid of those old medications No need to hoard those outdated medications at home — just dispose of them in the permanent drop box at the Cookeville Police Department, 10 E. Broad St. Dropping some in are, from left, Power of Putnam coalition director Bill gibson, Lt. Mike Smith and CPD administrative assistant Nadine Shera. Amy Davis | HeraldCitizen

By AMY DAVIS HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — You’ve kept them in the back of your medicine cabinet for years. Just in case. After all, you may need those old meds again some day — and what’s the harm in using them a little past the expiration date? Plenty, says Power of Putnam coalition director Bill Gibson. “Almost all medications have an expiration date, and some lose their potency as time goes on and become ineffective for what you might take them for,” he said. But some actually gain potency. “They become stronger, and the chemical makeup changes over time,” he said. “It may

be something that could actu- a ally harm you if you take it beyond the expiration date.” m And that’s not the only w downside of keeping old t meds. s “It’s a risk factor for theft, particularly with narcotics,” m Gibson said. “Having those on hand makes you a target.” n But cleaning out the medi- t cine cabinet isn’t as simple as s just flushing or trashing its D contents — not if you care t about the environment. w “If people flush them down the commode or try to dispose of them in the trash, those s chemicals eventually end up in the ground water,” Gibson m said. b So, rather than hoarding, flushing or trashing unwanted m medications, Gibson encour- p t See DrugS, Page 9 p


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-9

MEDICAL DIRECTORY DRUGS: Dispose of properly From Page 8

ages proper disposal. And while Power of Putnam — the community’s anti-drug coalition — coordinates with law enforcement to offer multiple drug take-back events during the year, Gibson says there’s no need to wait until then. Just stop by the Cookeville Police Department. Since early last fall, CPD has had a permanent drug disposal drop box at its main station at 10 E. Broad St. The 420-pound secure box, obtained from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, is available 24 hours a day for anyone with medications to discard. And so far, public response has been good. “People have really been using it,” Gibson said. Those wishing to dispose of medications may come inside the CPD lobby any time to be directed to the box. Acceptable items include prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, pet medications, medicated ointment, lotions or drops, liquid medications in leakproof containers, inhalers and pills in any

packaging, including glass, plastic container, Ziploc bag or foil. Unacceptable items include illegal drugs and narcotics, blood sugar equipment, thermometers, IV bags, personal care products (such as shampoo and lotions), bloody or infectious waste, needles, sharps and syringes with needles. “Power of Putnam will continue to have drug take-backs, but what we really encourage people to do is not wait for an event that may be two or three months out,” Gibson said. “When you finish using a prescription, take it to the police department and turn it in to the drug collection box.” Medications should be kept in original containers if possible with personal information marked through. The drop-off is anonymous with no questions asked, Gibson said. “Nobody’s going to question where you got them or what you’re doing with them,” he said. The drug disposal box is emptied monthly with its contents incinerated. For more information about proper drug disposal, call POP at 520-7531 or CPD at 526-2125.


A-10 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Virtual colonoscopy offers less recovery time By laura MilitaNa HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — Screenings are essential when it comes to preventing any type of cancer. Some of those procedures can take all day — one being the dreaded colonoscopy. With technology moving at a fast pace in the medical field, there is now a less invasive method of scanning the colon with a virtual colonoscopy. “There are some advantages to having the CT colonoscopy done,” Bryan Henson, B.S., R.T., head of imaging at Premier Diagnostic Imaging said. “Mainly, there’s no sedation involved, it takes less than 30 minutes and a lot of other organs are seen as well.” The CT colonoscopy uses low dose radiation CT scanning to obtain an interior view of the colon (the large intestine) that is otherwise only seen with a more invasive procedure. However, it is not covered by most insurance plans.

tracey Payne, r.t. with Premier Diagnostic imaging, shows how the virtual colonoscopy works. Laura Militana | Herald-

See Virtual, Page 11

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-11

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

VIRTUAL: Non-invasive procedure not for everyone From Page 10 At Premier, they use a multi-slice spiral computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen, which allows radiologists to create pictures on the computer that look similar to those seen by conventional colonoscopy. The radiologist analyzes the CT data to detect colon polyps for cancers. “There is still a bowel prep that needs to take place,” Tracey Payne, radiologic technician, said. “There’s a two day liquid diet bowel cleansing that needs to be done.” This type of exam is not for everyone though. “Anyone who has a family history of colon cancer or polyps needs to have the traditional colonoscopy done,” Dr. William Humphrey, radiologist, said. “We can’t do biopsies with the CT colonoscopy. This type of procedure is for those who are asymptomatic (someone producing no symptoms).” The procedure begins by having a small tube placed in the rectum to inflate the colon with carbon dioxide, which is easily

“Anyone who has a family history of colon cancer or polyps needs to have the traditional colonoscopy done. We can’t do biopsies with the CT colonoscopy. This type of procedure is for those who are asymptomatic (someone producing no symptoms).” Dr. William Humphrey Radiologist

absorbed by the body. A CT scan is performed while the patient lies on their back and then their stomach. Within 10-20 minutes, the procedure is over and the patient is free to do whatever — eat, work or drive without delay. “The colon can be seen on different planes and other organs can be scanned as well,” Henson noted. “We get a big box of images

and we’re able to see the entire abdomen.” If polyps are detected on the CT colonoscopy, the patient will have to undergo a traditional colonoscopy to get a biopsy and removal. Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and can potentially be prevented if colon polyps are discovered and removed early.

Tumors take years to develop before becoming an aggressive cancer. The American Cancer Society suggests a colonoscopy once every 10 years or CT colonoscopy once every five years. Individuals at increased risk or with a family history of colon cancer may start screening at age 40 or younger and may be screened at shorter intervals. Risk factors for the disease include a history of polyps or having a family history of colon cancer. Signs and symptoms of colon cancer include a persistent change in bowel habits, the presence of blood in the stool, abdominal discomfort or pain, bloating and unexplained weight loss. Recent studies indicate that CT colonoscopies are able to detect 90 percent of polyps 10 millimeters or more in diameter — the same rate reported for conventional colonoscopy. This is an alternative for those patients who are not able to undergo conventional endoscopic colonoscopy procedures. “It’s a wonderful technology,” Humphrey said.

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A-12 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Regular dental exams can prevent future health problems By LAURA MILITANA HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

Amye Wright | Herald-Citizen

Dr. Kenneth Martin inspects a patient’s mouth for any signs of tooth decay or gum disease.

COOKEVILLE — Going to the dentist is not a high priority on anyone’s list. But oral health is just as important as anything else. “A nice smile is one of the best investments you’ll make in your life,” Dr. Kenneth Martin of the Family Dentistry Group said. “It makes you feel better. It helps you in every facet of your life.” It does involve more than just a pretty smile — it’s about prevention. A good time to start teaching kids about good oral hygiene regimen is as early as possible, which Dr. Martin says is a good time to instill habits into children’s minds. “It’s good to get them the best start possible,” he said. He suggests getting kids to visit the dentist as early as possible with mom or dad. “Bring the kids to the dentist

with you so they can see what is going on,” he said. “It helps them build confidence. They’ll see it’s okay after three or four visits.” Dr. Martin has been practicing general dentistry in Cookeville for a little more than 38 years. “The key to longevity is to provide gentle dental care with heart,” he said. “Treat customers like a family. Satisfied customers are the best referrals. That’s how you grow your practice.” He recommends seeing the dentist twice a year. There are two levels to dentistry,” he said. “There’s an oral exam and then there are X-ray films.” With X-rays, the gums can be evaluated and different angles allow the dentist to see in between the teeth. Flossing is an especially important habit to form, he said. “Flossing daily cleans between the teeth,” he said. “It breaks up the plaque that can cause tooth decay. It’s a fact that nobody likes

to floss — it’s too much work — but with new tools, it’s easier. Just add it to your daily routine for a healthier mouth.” Oral health plays a vital role in overall health. “The inflammation in the mouth is not just confined to the mouth,” he said. “It affects the heart, lungs, kidneys and other areas of the body.” There is correlation between gum disease and heart disease and diabetes. “That wasn’t even thought of until 15 years ago,” he said. “It’s a big factor in diabetes.” If you don’t visit the dentist often, things can get carried away. “A lot can happen in six months or a year,” he said. “All it takes is a visit to prevent damage from being done. It’s expensive getting a crown put in or an extraction or a root canal done. You’re taking a chance if you don’t get an exam done. “We’re here to not be mean, but to help you.”

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-13


A-14 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

MedVance offers courses in phlebotomy, EKG By AMY DAVIS HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — In a medical emergency, every second counts. And having the right medical professionals with the right skills on hand in those first critical moments can make all the difference. Sometimes, it’s just a matter of earning a new certification — which is why MedVance Institute is offering new continuing education classes in phlebotomy and EKG. “It’s something we’re very happy to offer to help members of our community with their continuing education,” said Jamie Williamson, dean of education. “Perhaps they don’t want to come here and go through a whole diploma or degree program, but with this program they can add to the education they already have.” The phlebotomy technician program was the first of the two to be offered, having begun in October with all six students completing the 80-hour course and passing the national certification exam. See CourSeS, Page 15

MedVance Institute phlebotomy instructor Sharon McNeil, left, looks on as student Amanda Adams, certified nursing assistant, learns about vein selection for blood withdrawal work. The next 80hour phlebotomy class is set for April 2. Ty Kernea | HeraldCitizen

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-15

MEDICAL DIRECTORY COURSES: MedVance offers new classes From Page 14 That same class is underway once again, having begun Jan. 8, with students learning about disease control, anatomy, medical terminology, vein selection, patient identification, biohazard techniques, risk factors and legal issues associated with blood collection and veinpuncture. The other new class — a 60-hour EKG technician program — will be offered for the first time starting Feb. 18. Williamson said he’s already seen interest from potential students from a variety of backgrounds, including a first responder. “He (the first responder) said when he arrives on the scene, (the electrocardiogram) is one of the things he cannot do because he’s not EKG-certified,” Williamson said. “He has to stop and wait until the EMS workers get there. So he was really excited and said he would probably be enrolling because it’ll allow him to do more in his role.” Williamson said both programs will continue throughout the year, alternating every other month. The accelerated, fast-paced course is ideal for those looking for a fast track into the work place or a career change. “Our programs are typically nine months to two years long, but these continuing education courses are just one month long, so they can help somebody quickly get some additional skills or a certification in either phlebotomy or EKG,” he said. Williamson said the courses are designed for students

who have medical or healthcare experience or training. “We’ve had quite a few people come through the program who are certified nursing assistants,” he said. “With one or both of these certifications, it really helps open up some additional career opportunities and may increase their pay.” As for the upcoming EKG class, Williamson says he’s looking forward to it. “If it goes as well as our phlebotomy class, we’re real excited about it — and every indication is that it will,” he said. He said students will train to become certified electrocardiogram technicians. “They’ll be learning how to put on the electrodes and do the EKG tests monitoring the heart waves,” he said. The 60-hour course will be offered in the evenings, while the phlebotomy classes are held on evenings and Saturdays. “We have some great certified instructors for those courses,” Williamson added. The next phlebotomy class starts April 2 with 40 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab. Afterward, students are qualified to take the national certification exam through the National Healthcareer Association. “We’re looking forward to seeing what kinds of students — what kinds of backgrounds — will come to us for these classes,” Williamson said. For more information about the continuation education program, call Williamson at 526-3660.

Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen

Certified nursing assistant Dawn Cooper, left, learns about electrocardiogram monitoring from instructor Sharon McNeal. MedVance will offer its first continuing education 60-hour EKG technician class starting Feb. 18.

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A-16 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Prepare now for allergy season By AMY DAVIS HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — Allergy sufferers know the symptoms well. Sneezing. Itchy, watery eyes. Runny nose and coughing. Drainage in the throat. And they know the culprits — pollen, pets, mold, dust mites and plenty of other triggers. But what to do? Dr. Erin Rohman of Allergy, Asthma & Sinus Center in Cookeville sees it all the time — and she expects to see it even more as the allergy season is soon to set in. “Of course, the tree pollens begin in the spring, and then shortly after that we have grass pollens,” she said. “So, we don’t get much of a break between spring and summer. And once allergies get started, people typically deal with it several months, and it’s usually related to the pollen counts.” Even though some allergy symptoms don’t arrive until spring, Rohman recommends early preparation. “If your doctor has prescribed some maintenance allergy medicines, you should go ahead and get started on those before the spring pollens arrive,” she said. “I typically tell patients that if they have stopped their allergy medicines for the winter, they need to go ahead and restart those on a daily basis about late February.” Rohman pointed out that more than 50 percent of the population suffers from allergy symptoms, which can arise at any time and be caused by a variety of sources. “For people who have flare-ups in the spring, the main problem is pollens,” she said. “But dust mites, cat and dog dander and mold are also big problems for people, although those aren’t necessarily a seasonal problem.”

Dr. Erin Rohman of Allergy, Asthma & Sinus Center in Cookeville tests a young patient for allergies. Ty Kernea | HeraldCitizen

But avoidance measures can be taken to avoid the worst — such as washing bedding in hot water every two weeks to rid of dust mites and keeping home and car windows closed during peak pollen seasons. “There are also covers for beddings — encasings for mattresses and pillows that can help people who have problems with dust mites,” Rohman said. Another thing to keep in mind is asthma, a chronic condition that can develop in people of any age. “One of the main triggers for asthma is allergies,” Rohman said. “So, if you suffer from both, chances are that when the allergy season picks up, your asthma picks up as well. Of course, other triggers for asthma include smoke exposure, exercise and upper respiratory viruses like the common cold.” While asthma has no cure, it can be managed. “Controlling asthma so that you can carry on your daily activities and the life you want is what we’re all about,” Rohman said.

“That’s why we promote medications and allergy shots — because we don’t want you to be limited by your asthma.” For those who believe they may have allergies and are looking for some relief, a trip to the doctor’s office may be in order.

“Allergies are best diagnosed when allergy skin testing is performed in the office of a board-certified allergist,” Rohman said. “The skin testing is combined with a patient’s history and physical exam to make a complete diagnosis.” She explained that the initial part of the test consists of pricking a patient’s skin with a small amount of an allergen to see if an allergic response results. Once allergies are diagnosed, a plan for treatment can begin. “The great thing about being an allergist and working in an allergy office is that we can improve patients’ quality of life,” Rohman said. “We can improve their work or school performance and even improve their sleep. There are so many aspects of a patient’s wellbeing that we can improve with very simple measures. “It’s very rewarding to see people who come back and say, ‘Wow, I don’t have to sit out at the soccer game anymore while my friends are playing’ or ‘I haven’t missed a day of work in a year.’ Those are all rewarding aspects for sure.”

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-17

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Genetics testing changing cancer detection By LAURA MiLitAnA HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen

erin Young, breast health nurse navigator, and Dr. Jeff Moore, general/breast surgeon, look over recent scans with a patient.

Schedule an appointment with one of our board certified allergists.

2

Get skin tested.

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Start a treatment plan that’s right for you.

Step

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THE ALLERGY, ASTHMA & SINUS CENTER ...where allergies meet relief

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COOKEVILLE — Your DNA can tell a lot about you. Through genetic testing, doctors can learn about a variety of health issues — and possibly even give your family members a heads up. Genetic testing can also be helpful in the fight against breast cancer. Patti Atnip can attest to that. “Think of the lives that could be saved,” she said of the genetic testing. “Early detection could save lives.” Atnip’s story begins in 1982. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast that year. She opted to go through the mastectomy and reconstruction. Four years later — to the same month — breast cancer was found in her other breast. She went through the mastectomy and reconstruction with that one as well. “I never had chemo because there was no lymph node involvement,” she said.

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A-18 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

GENETICS: Changing cancer detection From Page 17 “I went for many years after with no incidences of anything.” Then, in 2009, she was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer. “That was a surprise because I had no symptoms really. I had just gained a little weight.” At the urging of her husband, she went to see her gynecologist. “The doctor examined me and ordered an ultrasound,” she recalled. “After the ultrasound, the doctor came in and told me to see a specialist in Nashville. The next day they had me (in Nashville) for that appointment, after going to Premier for an MRI, and it was confirmed I had a mass. The next day, I had the hysterectomy. It happened so fast.” With her history of cancer, he suggested she undergo genetic testing. “I was tested and shown to be positive to be a carrier of the mutated BRCA 1 gene,” she said. “It wasn’t really a surprise, I’d had breast cancer, I’d had ovar-

ian cancer. But then I had to think about my daughters.” Letters were sent out to members of her family to encourage everyone to get tested. Her two daughters tested, with one coming out negative and the other positive. “She now has to be extra vigilent and watched closely,” Atnip said. “She’ll have to be tested regularly.” This is not a test offered to women who have no family history of breast cancer. It is tailored toward those patients who have specific known risks — any woman who has a personal history of breast cancer under the age of 50 when diagnosed, any woman who had two close family members (mother, sister, etc.) with breast cancer under age 50 when it developed. “This is not a good screening test for the entire population,” Dr. Steve Copeland, general surgeon, said. “It would not be cost-effective to screen the entire general population unless they met

these few risk factors.” Insurance does pay for it, including TennCare and Medicare if certain criteria and guidelines are met. “For years, we didn’t really understand what causes breast cancer and to a good degree, we still don’t know for certain except in those cases where someone has a mutation in their DNA or genetic makeup that gives them a much-higher risk for developing breast cancer than the general population,” Copeland said. “We’ve known that, but it’s only been in the last decade or 15 years that we’ve had a test that can identify who those individuals are. About 10 to 15 percent of women who get breast cancer will carry the genetic mutation that causes breast cancer. Eighty-five to 90 percent of those women who get breast cancer do not have that genetic defect. Just because you don’t have the genetic defect doesn’t mean you won’t get breast cancer. If you do carry that genetic defect, studies will show there’s a 50 to 85 percent lifetime

risk of getting breast cancer.” This test helps the entire medical team to determine the treatments that is best for that particular patient. “If a patient was negative and was low risk, she may opt to undergo breast conservation where she keeps the breast but the tumor is removed with radiation therapy, and not undergo a mastectomy,” Copeland said. “If she knew she was a carrier of the gene and has a high risk of getting breast cancer in the future, she could do a radical operation and remove both breasts and do immediate or delayed breast construction,” Copeland said. “That’s useful information (for the medical team) to help counsel (the patient) in the direction she wants to go.” CRMC began the testing less than 10 years ago, and was made available for this type of use in the late 1990s. It took a few years for practitioners to understand it. See GeneticS, Page 19

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-19

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Empowering People

GENETICS: Changing cancer detection From Page 18

Atnip went through intense chemotherapy following her hysterectomy. “I didn’t have one port, I had two,” she said. “I had one in the chest and one in the peritoneal cavity. It was heavy duty and halfway through, it made me so sick fthat it took an ER visit and a hospital stay to get stabilized.” She couldn’t complete the treatment in the peritoneal cavity, but continued the chest therapy. “It was brutal, but I survived,” she said. But the treatments had consequences. She now has peripheral neuropathy in her feet and fingertips. “It’s a trade-off,” she said. “If it did what it was supposed to do, got any stray cancer cells around, then it was worth it to go through it.” She now eats healthy, adding a number of greens to her diet, and takes a number

of supplements. “It’s frightening, painful and harrowing to get cancer,” she said. “But being surrounded by a positive support group makes all the difference.” Copeland encourages patients who have an abnormality on the breast or diagnosed with breast cancer to ask their doctor about genetic testing. Those who know they had a family member or two who had breast cancer to speak to their family doctor or any doctor they have a relationship with about genetic testing. “It (the genetic testing) is an important tool in the fight against breast cancer from a preventative (standpoint), or lowering the risk, to get breast cancer in those patients who carry the gene, as well as giving us information so we can better counsel and educate the patient on options on how to reduce their risk going forward.”

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A-20 —HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Less invasive biopsy options available SPARTA — The discovery of a lump in the breast can be a terrifying moment for a woman, as breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, exceeded only by lung cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, about 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women in 2013. About 39,620 women will die from breast cancer this year. The chance that breast cancer will be responsible for a woman’s death is about 1 in 36 (about 3 percent). Death rates from breast cancer have been declining since about 1989, with larger decreases in women younger than 50. These decreases are believed to be the result of earlier detection through screening and increased awareness, as well as improved treatment. But with regular mammograms, the risk of dying from this disease can be decreased by finding lumps that are deep within the breast. And with new technology, biopsies can be done with minimal scarring and discomfort. This new technology is called stereotactic breast biopsy, a procedure that gets samples from a mass, micro-calification or other findings that cannot be felt during a breast exam but can be seen on a mammogram or ultrasound. “This is a pre-operative diagnosis to help the sur-

geon determine surgical management,” radiologist Dr. Gary Militana, who performs the procedure, said. “No sedation or general anesthesia is necessary for this procedure.” Dr. Militana is certified through the American Board of Radiology and has been reading mammograms at Highlands Medical Center for 20 years. The service has been offered nearly two years now at Highlands Medical Center, formerly White County Community Hospital, and a number of patients have benefitted from the procedure. “This procedure requires less recovery time,” lead mammographer Margie Smith said. “After the procedure, which takes about an hour, the patient can go back to their normal routine.” Smith has more than 40 years experience in radiography and has seen technology in this field grow immensely. She has worked at Highlands Medical Center for 34 years and has been the lead mammographer for about the last 10 years. The equipment consists of a digital mammogram machine — equipment already in place at Highlands Medical Center — linked to a computer with a needle guidance system. See BiopSy, page 21

Laura Militana | Herald-Citizen

Dr. Gary Militana, radiologist, and Margie Smith, mammographer, are pictured in the mammography room at Highlands Medical Center. The equipment, a digital mammogram machine, is adaptable to perform stereotactic biopsies.

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-21

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

BIOPSY: Less invasive procedure available From Page 20 The first part of the procedure will seem much like a regular mammogram, except that you are lying down instead of standing up. The breast is compressed with a compression paddle, just like in a mammogram, to allow an X-ray to be taken to ensure the area of the breast containing the abnormality is correctly centered in the paddle window. When the position is confirmed, two stereo X-rays will be taken — images of the same area from different angles. With the help of a computer, the exact positioning of the biopsy needle is determined from the stereo images. The biopsy needle device will then be positioned for the correct angle of entry. A local anesthetic will be injected into the breast, and when that goes into effect, the physician will insert the biopsy needle into the breast. At this time, a new set of stereo X-rays will then be taken to ensure proper needle placement, and the tissue samples are acquired. A small metallic “clip” is left in the area of the biopsies to facilitate identification and localization of the area in the future.

breast cancer, several options are available to the patient to remove the tumor and stage the disease (assess if the cancer has spread). The patient may elect to have a lumpectomy performed or a mastectomy, depending on the patient’s desire to preserve breast tissue or to possibly avoid radiation therapy after surgery. During the surgical procedure to remove a breast tumor, a specialized process for identifying an armpit lymph node — Sentinel Lymph Node excision — will be performed. This is a process of introducing a radioactive chemical and blue dye into the breast, usually at the site of a tumor. The surgeon will then use specialized equipment to identify and remove the lymph node in the armpit where the chemical and dye first spread. This lymph node is the “Sentinel Lymph Node,” essentially the Laura Militana | Herald-Citizen doorway to the lymph system where the canMargie Smith, left, lead mammographer and radiologic technician at High- cer would spread. lands Medical Center, looks over a stereotactic biopsy with Dr. Gary Militana, It is used to stage the breast cancer to see if it has spread. radiologist who performs the procedure. Surgery can be performed at Highlands The tissue sample is then sent to the pathol- will be discussed. Medical Center’s Same Day Surgery departogist, with that report going to the referring If a positive path report comes back... ment with Dr. Kevin Purgiel handling the physician, where further treatment options If a biopsy does come back and indicate operation.

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A-22 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Trauma therapy can help patients move forward By aMY DaVIS HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — Sometimes, a memory can be too much to bear — too traumatic. A death. A terrible crime. A natural disaster. Whatever the cause, images and feelings are seared into the mind — buried deep — the brain failing to process them. Never putting them in the past, never quite letting go of the pain. And then — bam. The memory is triggered. Your throat tightens. It’s hard to breathe — and the trauma is fresh all over again. “Trauma is when an abnormal event happens to a normal person, and the response to that can be very critical,” said Dr. Carole Lovell, a licensed clinical social worker and founder and director of Personal Growth and Learning Center in Cookeville. “Trauma can include not only stuff that happens but stuff that doesn’t happen — like when a person grows up and is not nurtured and getting the things they need.” Lovell explained that traumatic memories are stored in the brain stem and that sufferers are usually able to func-

Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen

Dr. Carole Lovell of Personal Growth and Learning Center in Cookeville helps a patient work through a See TRauMa, Page 23 traumatic memory during an EMDR therapy session.


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MEDICAL DIRECTORY

TRAUMA: Patients can benefit from therapy From Page 22 tion normally — until something triggers them. “It causes an overreaction,” she said. “Anytime we overreact to a situation, that’s some type of flashback. It’s about something else. And a lot of times it causes irritability and hypervigilance.” But help is out there, says Lovell. In particular, she recommends EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing), a form of psychotherapy used to resolve disorders resulting from traumatic experiences. “EMDR desensitizes a memory and reprocesses it so that it doesn’t block people,” said Lovell, an approved EMDR consultant. She explained that when people are traumatized, different parts of the brain work in different ways to cope. “The emotional part centers in the right side of the brain, and the thinking part centers in the left side,” she said. “When people have repeated trauma, or sometimes just one trauma, they get stuck in that emotional side of the brain.”

The key, she said, is talking about the painful memories in a safe environment, forcing the left and right sides of the brain to work together to process them. At the same time, trauma patients partake in bilateral brain stimulations, which combine eye movements, bilateral sounds, visualized images and body sensation to stimulate optical nerves. As a result, new connections are made in the brain, reducing the symptoms associated with the traumatic memories. “They watch lights – that’s how the eye movement starts,” Lovell explained. “There’s also a tactile part, where they hold little vibrators, and an auditory part, where they have headphones. It forces the brain to process that memory, and it desensitizes it so the person can let go of it.” Treatment at Personal Growth and Learning Center begins with an assessment, and the number of sessions depends on the situation and severity. “Anybody who comes here gets an initial assessment,” Lovell said. “Some people we refer for medication management, but most

of the time we try other methods to try to deal with it.” In addition to offering EMDR, Personal Growth and Learning Center helps individuals in such areas as depression, anxiety, grief, post traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity, anger management, marriage counseling,

family therapy and more. It’s all about helping people move forward, Lovell said. “I love what I do because it works,” she said. “When you help a person feel better and function better, it’s very rewarding.” For more information about the center, visit www.personalgrowthcenter.com.

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A-26— HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Proper home care crucial after leaving the hospital By AMY DAVIS HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — First goal: going home. Second goal: staying home. But sometimes, that’s easier said than done when it comes to checking out of the hospital. And for those who need a little extra help when that time comes, home health care may be the answer. “Preventing readmission within 30 days of a discharge is one of our number one goals,” said registered nurse Kristie Burchett, business development representative for Quality Home Health in Cookeville. For Quality, it all begins with a call from the hospital when a patient is deemed ready to go home but could benefit from some followup care in the days and weeks to follow. “The RN team leader from our office goes over to the hospital and meets the patient and answers any questions they have about home health because a lot of times it’s new to them, and they have some fears and con-

Registered nurse Ashley Sirmans of Quality Home Health enjoys a home visit with patient Madie Ruth Russell. Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen

See HoMe, Page 27

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-27

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

HOME: Care important to avoiding hospital return From Page 26 cerns,” Burchett said. The home health representative then helps patients — who, for the most part, are from the geriatric population, Burchett said — fill out a personal health record, which is taken to all doctor appointments. Then, depending on the diagnosis, therapies are arranged to help patients follow their doctor’s orders to get better at home while working toward regaining their independence. “We offer physical therapy, occupational therapy, wound care therapy, speech therapy, home health aid for personal care and skilled nursing,” Burchett said. “We also do social work services to help get patients set up for any community resources that might be available to them.” The number of visits and level of care depends on the diagnosis — which can be anything from bone fractures to chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, COPD, kidney disease and anemia. “We teach them about their medicines and instruct them to keep those follow-up ap-

pointment with the MD because a lot of times they get home and get to feeling better and say, ‘Oh, I don’t need to go back to the doctor,’ but they do,” Burchett said. In addition, home health handles any lab work ordered by the doctor and tends to wounds. “We see those and take care of those,” Burchett said. “Any supplies the patient needs, we provide those while they’re in our service.” It’s all about helping patients recover in the comfort of their own homes — without them having to immediately return to the hospital. Another Quality Home Health service that can help them achieve that is telehealth monitoring. “We’ve actually reduced our rehospitalization rate 13 percent in our telehealth patients because of these monitors,” Burchett said. “They’re just phenomenal.” She said the monitors are set up in patients’ homes, checking vital signs daily and sending the information through the phone line to a nurse monitoring them. Burchett added, “It’s really important for (the older) population to know that home

health is available so that they can stay in the comfort of their home — so they don’t have to leave and be put into an inpatient facility. “And with home health checking on them, we’re going to find things early on so they’re not having to go into the hospital or go to the emergency room. The nurses are coming out and checking their vitals and

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listening to their lungs and checking them over from head to toe. “Then, if there’s an issue, we call the doctor. From there, the doctor may order different therapies in the home, may order us to bring blood work into the office... usually it’s a last resort to send them to the ER because that’s the mindset the doctors are wanting to get away from.”


A-28 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

My family’s experience with dementia M

y grandmother was the strongest woman I have ever known. She was strong in her faith and independence. When my grandfather was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s Disease, she took care of him up until his death. She didn’t let his illness and slow progression get her down. She was positive throughout the whole ordeal and was always busy, running him to this specialist and that specialist, never dwelling on how life would change once he was gone. She never expressed sadness — not that I remember. Shortly following his death, she took in her mother — who was in her mid 90s — and took care of her until she needed to enter a more specialized care Laura unit. Militana All that happened nearly 20 years ago, believe it or not. This last Christmas was the first one my family had without her. She died last August from a form of senior onset dementia. The diagnosis was a bit of a shock, to say the least, because my grandmother was a pretty healthy, vibrant woman who had raised five kids and survived the Depression, not to mention that she nearly died at a very young age, which contributed somewhat to her ongoing congestive heart failure and fluid build up. Being that she was an only child (which was rare at that time), she always remarked about how all of her friends and family (mainly cousins she grew up with) were all gone and she was still here. She had great pride in her family and was loved by everyone. I guess it all began about five years ago, maybe a little more. She lived alone for the longest time until one night fell and hurt her back. The doctors determined she needed some surgery to repair it. Then she had carpal tunnel surgery. She became a bit more of a homebody then, wanting her daughters to come stay the night with her. She would call my parents at 3 a.m., saying she needed to go to the hospital. But then when my parents arrived, she showed confusion as to why they were there. She didn’t remember making the phone call. She began boxing things up and talking about moving into a senior living community where she could get together with

people her age and have fun — go on trips, see plays, things of that sort. She even had my dad and one of his siblings go to the funeral home to pre-plan and pay for her funeral — which was a really good thing because by the time she died, her mind was gone. The decision was made to move her into a nearby senior living community. She was still independent to a degree — she stopped driving for one — and still sharp as a tack. But there were people’s names she couldn’t remember or what she did recently. She was starting the downfall. Her condo — which held a lot of memories, as she had been there a long time — was cleaned up and sold. Her car and furniture she didn’t need anymore were sold. Heirlooms were handed down so they wouldn’t get lost in the move. She spent one year in the independent part of the community until she fell out of her chair and broke her shoulder, which required physical therapy for proper healing. Following an evaluation, it was determined that she needed more specialized care. She was moved into the more intensive care part of the community. With every passing year as she went further and further down, she was moved into different levels of care. She was placed in the nursing home of the church she attended, which closed less than six months after she moved in due to loss of funding. Fortunately, a new complex just a few miles from my parents house was nearing completion — a complex that had staff who were specialized in dealing with Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients. My mom immediately got on the phone to get my grandmother moved in. However, it took a few months longer than anticipated to get the facility up and running and the residents moved in. In between the time her church’s nursing home closed and the new place opened (this was early 2012), she spent a few weeks in the psych unit at Centennial. Her medications were out of control. She was in a manic state where she was depressed one minute and hostile the next. She was convinced the nurses were trying to kill her whenever they came in to give her medication. (She might have been on to something, as the psych nurses and doctors found a lot of things wrong with the medications she was put on.) It was questionable if she was going to even make it to my wedding, which was in early April. Things turned around, slowly but surely.

She made it to my wedding. We’ve got photographic proof, photos that I placed around her room to remind her of the event every day. The last few months were a roller coaster. She was in and out of the psych ward, as she went through another phase. She went from throwing fits like a two year old, then screaming at the nurses and throwing things to downright crying her eyes out. My mom documented these events to keep the family updated. But then there were funny times too. Like the last time my mom took her to the hospital before she fell and broke her hip, which eventually ended her life. My poor grandmother couldn’t remember anything she said or was said five minutes ago, or five seconds ago. She would continually ask my mom while they were in the car the same questions. “Where are we going?” “To the hospital.” “Why?” “Because you said you don’t feel good.” Repeat those questions and answers about 10 times.

Then my mom got a different answer out of a different response. “I know why I don’t feel good,” my grandmother said. My mom’s ears perked up. “Oh yeah? What’s that?” she asked. “I’m pregnant.” Silence. My mom, after a moment of composing herself and getting back on the road, asked her to repeat what she said. “I know why I don’t feel good. It’s because I’m pregnant. Look at me! I’m the first 90 year old mother. I bet they’ll have the last laugh.” My mom then started laughing and asked who the father was. My grandmother soon followed. By the time they reached the hospital, I’m sure the nurses thought they both needed to be admitted they were laughing so hard. Then there were the stories nobody had ever heard before. Then there were the stories she told while on medication, mainly for pain. She became paranoid, thinking there was a conspiracy to bury her alive and in the

See Dementia, Page 30

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MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Routine eye exams key to early detection By LAURA MILITANA HERALD-CITIZEN Staff

COOKEVILLE — The old saying “The eyes are the windows to the soul” may be more factual than you realize. According to Dr. Jennifer Peek at Eye Centers of Tennessee, regular eye exams can detect a myriad of health problems. “There is more to eye health than just vision,” Peek said. “Anything detected early is treatable.” Among the eye disorders that can be caught with regular exams are glaucoma, macular degeneration, cataracts, and detached retinas. “There are also a lot of things we can tell by changes in the eye,” she said. “Those changes could lead to something else.” Peek encourages parents of young children to get them examined early. “We can get a baseline, a starting point, at that time,” she said. “Vision is vital for their development and learning.” During a basic eye exam, dilation of the pupils are done, which allows for a more thorough exam.

Laura Militana | Herald-Citizen

Dr. Jennifer Peek of Eye Centers of Tennessee encourages healthy vision with regular exams. “Through dilation, we see the optic nerve, have cataracts, there’s a new procedure now blood vessels, check the macula to see if it’s available. healthy and the peripheral retina,” Peek “It’s called refractive cataract surgery,” said. Peek said. “We’re able to remove the Technology has also come a long way with cataract and place an implant (an IOL, inregards to the vision field. For those who traocular lens) in its place. It gets them out

of glasses or contacts.” Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. In fact, there are more cases of cataracts worldwide than there are of glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy combined, according to Prevent Blindness America (PBA). Today, cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. And as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020, PBA says. For patients with glaucoma, eye drops are prescribed. “It’s an eye disease that increases eye pressure and slowly leads to tunnel vision,” she said. “There are no symptoms or pain and a lot of times is irreversable.” A retinal specialist is on hand once a week at Eye Centers of Tennessee to consult with patients who may suffer from any of these disorders or symptoms. “To keep your vision healthy, eat a healthy, colorful diet, take care of yourself and wear sunglasses,” she said.


A-30 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

PCHD caters to uninsured, underinsured, underserved County health department provides treatment, screenings and condition management PUTNAM COUNTY — The Putnam County Health Department provides several key screenings and offers treatment of acute problems and management of some chronic medical conditions. The PCHD Primary Care Clinic targets those who are uninsured, underinsured and underserved. The clinic features an in-house pharmacy with limited formulary for established patients. No controlled substances are prescribed. Health care management includes examination, diagnostics, treatment, referral, and coordinated assistance. Fees are based on a sliding scale that is dependent on things like household size and income. There is a minimum fee of $5 per visit.

• Breast and cervical cancer screening program — Reach and serve lower income, uninsured, underinsured women for these basic preventative health screening exams. Mammograms are only available for women 50-64 years old unless meeting certain requirements. • Children’s special services — case management services for families. Provides comprehensive medical care for children with physical disabilities from birth to 21 years of age. • Communicable disease treatment — Provide treatment and testing for all reportable diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, STDs, HIV and TB. • Dental services — includes sealants, cleaning, fluoride treatments, fillings,

DEMENTIA: A family’s experience From Page 28 wrong grave at the wrong cemetery. She was also in a lot of pain due to the broken hip. The doctors then determined she couldn’t live in that kind of pain with a broken hip, so they opted to do surgery. She came out of it and then shortly there-

after went downhill. She shut down. She didn’t eat anymore. A few days later, she was in no more pain. Hindsight is 20/20, as the old saying goes, but if you notice some changes in your older family members, please get some evaluations done. Dementia can be slowed down.

minor extractions, repairs and referrals for procedures requiring general anesthesia. Available by appointment only for uninsured and TennCare children up to age 21. • Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) — checkups and health care services for children from birth until age 21 to detect and treat health problems. EPSDT checkups are free for all children who have TennCare. • Family planning — women’s and men’s health exam and birth control program. • HUGS (Help Us Grow Successfully) — home-based intervention services for pregnant/postpartum women, children birth through the age of five and their primary caregivers. • Women, infant, and children (WIC) — A special supplemental nutrition program designed to provided supplemental food to low-income pregnancy, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infants and children until the age of five. It is based on income guidelines.

Non-medical services • Certify and issue death certificates for anyone deceased within the last three years. • General environmental services — Inspect and issue permits for restaurants, camps, swimming pools, temporary food permits, issue rabies tags to veterinarian offices, investigate reported animal bites and any suspicious animal activity, inspect county school grounds/buildings, including cafeterias, child care facilities, tattoo and piercing establishments. • Issue transit and cremation permits. • Vital records — Issuance of birth certificates for anyone born in 1949 or after. • Voter registration — Provider voter registration forms for anyone eligible to vote in Tennessee. The Putnam County Health Department is located at 701 County Services Dr. in Cookeville. Hours are Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call (931) 528-2531 for an appointment.

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931-526-8010 931-526-8011 fax

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We Also Have A Large Selection Of Unique Gifts


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-31

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Debunking many myths about foot care By KATHIE CHAPMAN Special to the HERALD-CITIZEN

COOKEVILLE — Old wives’ tales and myths are fun to laugh at, and we believed them growing up — “Step on a crack and you’ll break your mother’s back.” But there are other myths that are no laughing matter, especially when they involve your health. Here are some common myths about foot care and the realities behind them: Myth: Shoes cause bunions. Reality: Bunions are most often caused by an inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. It is not the bunion itself that is inherited, but certain foot types makes a person prone to developing a bunion. While wearing shoes that crowd the toes together can, over time, make bunions more severe and painful, shoes themselves do not necessarily cause bunions. Although some treatments can ease the pain of bunions, only surgery can correct the deformity. Myth: A doctor can’t fix a broken toe.

Reality: Nineteen out of the 26 bones in the foot are toe bones. There are things a podiatrist can do to make a broken toe heal better and prevent problems later on, such as arthritis or toe deformities. Broken toes that aren’t treated correctly can also make walking and wearing shoes difficult. A podiatrist will x-ray the toe to learn more about the fracture. If the broken toe is out of alignment, the surgeon may have to insert a pin or screw to reposition the bone. Myth: Corns have roots. Reality: A corn is a small build-up of skin caused by friction. Corns may result from a hammertoe deformity, a deformity in which the toe knuckle rubs against the shoe. The only way to eliminate these corns is to surgically correct the hammertoe condition. A corn may have a central core of hard material, but corns do not have roots. Attempting to cut off a corn or applying medicated pads can lead to serious infection or even amputation. A podiatrist can safely evaluate and treat corns and the conditions contributing to them.

Myth: Foot pain is normal as we get older. Reality: Foot pain is not normal at any age. Podiatrists can provide relief for painful conditions such as arthritis, corns, bunions, hammertoes and complications of diabetes. Pain is usually an indication that something is wrong. Myth: All children have “growing pains” at one time or another. Reality: There is no such thing as “growing pains.” Children who complain about leg and foot pain might have flat feet or another disorder that should be evaluated immediately. Myth: I can’t get skin cancer on my feet. Reality: Skin cancers can occur anywhere on the body, regardless of sun exposure. Podiatrists recommend routine foot self-exams to spot suspicious moles, freckles and other spots on your feet that show the signs of melanoma or other types of skin cancer. Myth: Duct tape can remove a plantar wart. Reality: Although there are many folk remedies for warts, patients should be

aware that these remain unproven and may be dangerous. Patients should never try to remove a wart themselves; this can do more harm than good. Early intervention is recommended to prevent warts from growing larger and/or spreading. Myth: Cotton under an ingrown toenail will relieve the pain. Reality: Cotton placed under the nail can be harmful. It can easily harbor bacteria and encourage infection. It may provide temporary relief but it will not change the way the toenail grows. A podiatrist can perform a simple office procedure that can permanently correct the problem. There are many misconceptions about foot ailments and cures. Many people may suffer unnecessarily by taking bad advice. Seek proper professional treatment from Dr. Stephen J. Chapman, Dr. Lynn Rosenbaum or Dr. Summer Weary at Family Foot Center when you experience any foot problems. Kathie Chapman is the office manager at Family Foot Center.


A-32 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Women: Catch problems early with regular screenings To help detect health problems in the early stages, women should consider a varity of screenings. Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms, examples being blood pressure checks and mammograms. You can get some screenings, such as blood pressure readings, in your doctor’s office. Others, such as mammograms, need special equipment, so you may need to go to a different office. After a screening test, ask when you will see the results and who to talk to about them. Breast Cancer Ask your health care team whether a mammogram is right for you based on your age, family history, overall health and personal concerns. Cervical Cancer Have a Pap smear every one to three years if you are 21 to 65 years old and have been sexually active. If you are older than 65 and recent Pap smears were normal, you do not need a Pap smear. If you have had a hysterectomy for a reason other than See WoMEN, Page 34

Index of Health Screening Recommendations Colorectal cancer.......................35 Skin cancer ................................35 Breast cancer .............................45 Cervical cancer..........................45 Prostate cancer ..........................43 Testicular cancer ........................43 Hypertension .............................46 Cholesterol ................................46 Diabetes (Type 2) .......................46 STDs ..........................................46 HIV............................................47 Hepatitis C.................................47 Tuberculosis (TB)........................47 Vision Assessment ......................47 Eye exam ...................................39 Audiological exam .....................39 Hearing assessment....................39 Osteoporosis..............................39 Dementia...................................43

Men: Screenings help catch problems early

Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms, and men have plenty to be aware of. Blood pressure checks and tests for high cholesterol are examples. You can get some screenings, such as blood pressure readings, in your doctor’s office. Others, such as colonoscopy, a test for colorectal cancer, need special equipment, so you may need to go to a different office. After a screening test, ask when you will see the results and who you should talk to about them.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm If you are between the ages of 65 and 75 and have ever been a smoker, talk to your doctor or nurse about being screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). AAA is a bulging in your abdominal aorta, the largest artery in your body. An AAA may burst, which can cause dangerous bleeding and death. Colorectal Cancer See MEN, Page 38

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-33

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

“Helping Disabled People Win The Benefits They Deserve”

CMC earns ACR gold seal CT accreditation COOKEVILLE — Dr. Pushpendra K. Jain, MD, and his colleagues and staff at Cookeville Medical Center, PC & Affiliated Entities, have announced that their facilities in both Cookeville and Gainesboro have been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in computed tomography (CT) as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). CT scanning — sometimes called CAT scanning — is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and tailor treatments for various medical conditions. Using a holistic and evidence-based approach, Cookeville Medical Center, a privately and locally owned family medicine and urgent care practice with a full laboratory and an extensive diagnostic center, provides innovative and comprehensive medical care to all ages. “We cannot be more thrilled about this recent accolade given to our remarkable organization that has served and grown with this community over the past 15 years,” said Natasha Jain, chief operating and marketing

officer. “With this distinction, which could not have been made possible without our talented staff, particularly our knowledgeable physicians, providers and radiology technicians, we continue to aim for excellence in the quality of medical care and strive to provide the highest level of comprehensive primary and urgent care medicine paired with ambulatory services in a patient-centered environment all under one roof.” The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR practice guidelines and technical standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed. ACR accreditation is recognized as the gold standard in medical imaging.

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931-372-0251 251 S. Willow, Suite 2, Cookeville

ROY BYRD & ASSOCIATES email: roybyrd@frontier.com

Dr. Richard S. Hall: Fellow of American

Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Fellow of American Academy of Dermatology, Fellow of American Society for MOHS Surgery, Member of American Board of Dermatology. Graduate of Vanderbilt University, 27 years experience. Practice limited to skin cancer surgery, primarily MOHS micrographic surgery.

Dr. Richard H. Gentry: Board Certified with

American Academy of Dermatology. Graduate of University of South Carolina, over 30 years experience. Practice limited to general dermatology

Scott Jarrell, PA-C: Graduate of University of Front row left to right: Cynthia Rittenberry, Deborah Farley, Rochelle Lamb DCNP, Scott Jarrell PA-C, Cathy Kinnaird, Nikki Tallent, Kisha Goins Back row left to right:Justin Cox, Christy Buck, Natalie Carlile, Dr. Richard Hall, Dr. Richard Gentry

We’ve been providing trusted dermatological advice and care for over 19 years in the Upper Cumberland. If you have questions or concerns about sun damage, acne or any other skin condition, it’s important to get professional advice. Call us today to schedule your appointment. We accept Medicare and Blue Cross.

Nebraska, 9 years experience. United States Air Force Veteran, Air Force Special Operations Command Physician Assistant of the Year, Nationally certified Physician Assistant. Practice consists of medical dermatology, specializing in skin cancer detection and treatment. Accepting new patients.

Rochelle Lamb, DCNP:Graduate of

Vanderbilt University, 14 years experience. Nationally Board Certified Nurse Practitioner in Dermatology. Practice limited to general dermatology. Now accepting new patients.


A-34 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

WOMEN: Screenings From Page 32 cancer, you do not need a Pap smear.

Chlamydia, other Sexually Transmitted Diseases Sexually transmitted diseases can make it hard to get pregnant, may affect your baby, and can cause other health problems. Have a screening test for Chlamydia if you are 24 or younger and sexually active. If you are older than 24, talk to your health care team about being screened for Chlamydia. Ask your doctor or nurse whether you should be screened for other sexually transmitted diseases.

care team about being screened for depression, especially if during the last two weeks: • You have felt down, sad or hopeless. • You have felt little interest or pleasure in doing things. Diabetes Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medication for high blood pressure. Diabetes (high blood sugar) can cause problems with your heart, brain, eyes, feet, kidneys, nerves, and other body parts.

High Blood Pressure Starting at age 18, have your blood pressure checked at least every two years. High Colorectal Cancer blood pressure is 140/90 or higher. High Have a screening test for colorectal cancer blood pressure can cause stroke, heart atstarting at age 50. If you have a family histack, kidney and eye problems, and heart tory of colorectal cancer, you may need to failure. be screened earlier. Several different tests can detect this cancer. Your health care team High Cholesterol can help you decide which is best for you. Starting at age 20, have your cholesterol checked regularly if: Depression • You use tobacco. Your emotional health is as important as See women, Page 36 your physical health. Talk to your health


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-35

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Cancer Screening

Colorectal cancer

Skin cancer

Ages 19-49

Ages 50-65

Not routine except for patients at high risk. Risk factors include: • Personal/family history in a first-degree relative • Specific genetic syndromes • Inflammatory bowel disease • Non-cancerous polyps

1. Annual fecal occult blood test (FOBT) plus (at discretion of the MD) a sigmoidoscopy every 5 years OR 2. Annual fecal occult blood test (FOBT) plus (at discretion of the MD) a colonoscopy every 10 years. Each of the screening strategies has advantages and disadvantages. Decisions about the level of screening should be based on risk/benefit analysis, including anticipated effectiveness, strength of evidence and complexity of each testing strategy.

Periodic total skin exams at least annually. Frequency at physician discretion based on risk factors. Risk factors include: Age, personal history of skin cancer or repeated sunburns early in life, family history, certain types and a large number of moles, light skin, light hair and light eye color, sun-sensitive skin and chronic exposure to the sun.

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t Regional Oral Surgery Center, we pride ourselves on providing full-service oral and maxillofacial surgical care to patients throughout the Upper Cumberland. Now celebrating 27 years in practice, we have the most experience and the best-equipped facility for oral and maxillofacial care available in the region. To find out more, call or click today: (931)528-6252  ‹ RegionalOralSurgery.com 33 West Third Street  ‹ Cookeville, TN 38501

Exceptional Treatment, Compassionate Care.

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27 years with the creation of an informative and interactive website: www.RegionalOralSurgery.com


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-37


A-38 —HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

MEN: Screenings can help catch disease early From Page 32 Have a screening test for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you may need to be screened earlier. Several different tests can detect this cancer. Your doctor can help you decide which is best for you. Depression Your emotional health is as important as your physical health. Talk to your doctor or nurse about being screened for depression especially if during the last two weeks: • You have felt down, sad, or hopeless. • You have felt little interest or pleasure in doing things.

Talk with your health care team about HIV as prostate cancer or skin cancer, for example, ask about them. Immunizations screening if any of these apply to you: • Get a flu shot every year. • You have had unprotected sex with multiTake Preventive Medicines If You • If you are 65 or older, get a pneumonia ple partners. need Them shot. • You have sex with men. • Depending on health problems, you may • You use or have used injection drugs. Aspirin need a pneumonia shot at a younger age or • You exchange sex for money or drugs or If you are 45 or older, ask your doctor if you need shots to prevent diseases like whooping have sex partners who do. • You have or had a sex partner who is HIV- should take aspirin to prevent heart disease. See Men, Page 47 infected or injects drugs. • You are being treated for a sexually transPreferred Provider: BCBS / PHCS / Medicare / UHC / Aetna mitted disease. N o Lengthy No Lengthy • You had a blood transfusion between 1978 VA Authorizations Accepted Tr e a t m e n t Treatment and 1985. Questions Questions about about your your insurance? insurance? Plans Plans • You have any other concerns. C Call all u uss - w we ew will ill v verify erify y your our iinsurance nsurance a and nd g give ive y you ou a an n e expected xpected p patient atient p portion ortion b before efore y you ou e even ven sschedule! chedule!

Syphilis Ask your doctor or nurse whether you should be screened for syphilis.

Diabetes Get screened for diabetes if your blood Overweight and Obesity pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medication for high blood pressure. Diabetes The best way to learn if you are overweight (high blood sugar) can cause problems with or obese is to find your body mass index your heart, brain, eyes, feet, kidneys, nerves (BMI). You can find your BMI by entering your and other body parts. height and weight into a BMI calculator, such as the one available at www.nhlbisupHigh Blood Pressure Starting at age 18, have your blood pressure port.com/bmi/. checked at least every two years. High blood A BMI between 18.5 and 25 indicates a normal weight. pressure is 140/90 or higher. High blood pressure can cause strokes, Persons with a BMI of 30 or higher may be heart attacks, kidney and eye problems and obese. If you are obese, talk to your doctor or heart failure. nurse about seeking intensive counseling and getting help with changing your behaviors to High Cholesterol If you are 35 or older, have your cholesterol lose weight. Overweight and obesity can checked. Have your cholesterol checked lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. starting at age 20 if: It’s Your Body • You use tobacco. You know your body better than anyone • You are obese. • You have diabetes or high blood pressure. else. • You have a personal history of heart dis- Always tell your doctor or nurse about any changes in your health, including your vision ease or blocked arteries. • A man in your family had a heart attack and hearing. Ask them about being checked for any condition you are concerned about, before age 50 or a woman, before age 60. not just the ones here. If you are wondering about diseases such HIV

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Our mission is to serve individuals, families and communities through prevention, treatment and recovery services, e n s u r i n g t h a t h e l p t o d a y l e a d s t o a b e t t e r t o m o r r o w. We accept TennCare, Medicare, private insurance and private payment plans.

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013— A-39

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Other Screenings Comprehensive medical eye exam (including glaucoma testing

Audiological exam Hearing Assessment

Osteoporosis

Ages 19-39 1. At least once for patients 19-29 with no risk factors. 2. At least twice for patients 30-39 with no risk factors. 3. Every 3-5 years for high risk. Risk factors include: African-American ancestry, age, family history of glaucoma, diabetes, mellitus and severe myopia

Ages 40-65

Ages 65+

Every 1-2 years

Every 2-4 years

Comprehensive audiological examination by audiologist recommended. If normal, repeat every 3 years. if abnormal, repeat in 1 year.

General hearing screening as part of annual physical examination

Consider preventive measures, such as dietary calcium and vitamin D intake, weight-bearing exercise and smoking cessation.

Consider risk of osteoporosis in all post-menopausal women. Risk factors include age, female gender, family/personal history of fractures as an adult, face (Caucasian/Asian), small bone structure and low body weight (under 127 pounds), certain menopause or menstrual histories, lifestyle (smoking, little exercise, etc.) and certain medications/chronic diseases. • Consider risks and benefits of hormonal and non-hormonal therapies. • Provide BMD testing for all postmenopausal women who have one or more additional risk factors for osteoporotic fracture. • Consider preventive measures related to fracture risk, such as dietary calcium and vitamin D intake, weight-bearing exercise and smoking cessation.

Provide BMD testing for all, regardlesss of risk. • Specific environmental measures to prevent falls.

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A-40 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Ten ways to shape up your family reunion to prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Family reunions offer a chance to bond with relatives, learn about your heritage, share recipes, and celebrate with your whole family. When learning about your heritage, it is also important to find out if Type 2 diabetes runs in your family. Having a family history of type 2 diabetes increases your risk for developing the disease. Take the first step today toward lowering your risk for type 2 diabetes and improving your health and the health of future generations. Find out if you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes affects the lives of millions of African Americans in the United States. But there’s hope for you and your family. Research shows that losing a small amount of weight – 5 to 7 percent of your current weight or 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person — can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half. The key step to preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes is to lose a small amount of weight by making healthy food choices and being physically active 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Beginning with your next reunion and afterwards, follow these 10 tips from the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to shape up your family, lose weight, and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes: Choose activities your entire family will enjoy. 1. Dance it away! A dance contest is a fun way to show the younger people in your family the dances you used to do when you were their age — and they can show you some of their moves as well! Or turn up the music and do the Electric Slide, the Cha Cha Slide, and other favorite group dances. 2. Be physically active with younger relatives. Play with younger children, nieces, nephews, and cousins. Go swimming, toss a softball, or do jumping jacks. 3. Get up, get out, get moving! If your family reunion is held in a park, go for a bike ride, a brisk walk on a nature trail, or any other activity that helps get your heart rate up. 4. Focus on fun! Activities such as scavenger hunts, potato sack races, and double-dutch contests are easy ways to have fun and be physically active. 5. Make it a family affair. Involve everyone in a friendly game of basketball, flag

football, volleyball, or tag. Have a plan for what, when, and how much you will eat. 6. For starters, try a salad with a twist. Prepare a rainbow fruit salad with a large peeled and diced mango; 1 peeled and sliced kiwi; 2 cups blueberries, halved strawberries, and seedless grapes; 2 nectarines; and 2 sliced bananas. Top with a small amount of honey-orange dressing made with 1/8 cup unsweetened orange juice, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, ¼ teaspoon ground ginger, 1 ½ tablespoon honey, and a dash of nutmeg. Number of servings: 12 Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Stay Young at Heart Recipe Collection 7. Why fry when you can bake, broil, or grill? Instead of fried chicken, fire up the grill and remove the skin and fat from chicken breasts, drumsticks, or thighs and lightly coat them with barbeque sauce. Instead of fried catfish, try baked fish seasoned with herbs, spices, or lemon juice. 8. Try low-fat versions of your favorite side dishes. Prepare homemade macaroni and cheese with nonfat and low-fat milk and cheese. Smother greens with smoked turkey or low-sodium chicken broth instead of fatback. 9. Re-think your drink. Whenever possible drink water – the healthy, no-calorie beverage. Instead of a regular 20-ounce soda or sweetened fruit drink, choose sugar-free soda. 10. Reach for a healthy treat. Instead of cobblers, cakes, or pies for dessert, eat a piece of fresh summer fruit such as peaches, nectarines, or apricots. To order your free copy of the More than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes tip sheet and other free resources to help African American families lower their risk for type 2 diabetes, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) or visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org. You can also check out the National Kidney Disease Education Program’s Make Health a Family Reunion Affair guide by visiting www.nkdep.nih.gov or calling 1866-454-3639. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

“We are dedicated to providing the highest quality equipment and services to patients and caregivers in the middle Tennessee area.”

1150 Perimeter Park, Ste A Cookeville, TN 38501

931-526-5545 Ron Whaley & Gretchen Roark Whaley

601 Vickers Place Cookeville, TN On the hill beside Big Lots

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• Free delivery in city limits • Individual compounding to your specifications


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-41


A-42 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY

Tennesseans urged to get flu vaccine NASHVILLE — Influenza activity is widespread across most of the United States, including Tennessee, with intense activity in some regions of the state and more flu activity overall than in recent flu seasons. The Department of Health urges all Tennesseans who have not yet received a flu vaccine to get one now to help protect vulnerable people around them, their families and themselves from the flu virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that people who have had this year’s vaccine are about 60 percent less likely to have to visit a medical provider for treatment of influenza illness than unvaccinated people. “We expect several more weeks of influenza activity in Tennessee, so we want everyone who hasn’t yet been vaccinated to do so now,” said Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “People who are still unvaccinated are at the most risk of getting sick and spreading the virus to others. At this point, some vaccine providers may have exhausted their supplies, so those who still need flu vaccine may need to call more than one provider to locate it.” Dreyzehner and Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam have both received their annual flu vaccinations and urge all Tennesseans to get vaccinated against the flu. Hear from them in a video available on the TDH website at http://health.state.tn.us/Flu/index.htm. For those who do fall ill with the flu, treatment with antiviral medication may help. Antiviral medications can reduce the length and severity of illness when started early, ideally within 48 hours of onset of illness. People at high risk for developing serious complications from the flu, such as young children, pregnant women, people over age 65 and those with chronic health conditions,

should contact their health care providers to learn if antiviral medication or other treatment is recommended. Antiviral treatment initiated as soon as possible is especially important for those in high-risk groups and for people who are very sick with influenza, such as those requiring hospitalization. “Classic symptoms of the flu include fever, body aches, sore throat and cough. Anyone at high risk of serious illness who thinks they may have the flu should contact their healthcare provider promptly to determine if treatment with an antiviral medication could help them,” said Kelly Moore, MD, MPH, medical director of the Tennessee Immunization Program. “The vaccine is our best protection, but it is important to know that treatment may help prevent some serious complications if you do get sick.” People who are sick should stay home to recover to prevent spreading illness to coworkers and others. TDH recommends not returning to work or school until 24 hours after your fever goes away in order to minimize the chances of spreading the flu to others. It’s also important to practice good health habits to protect yourself from the flu and other winter viruses and to prevent spreading them to others if you do get sick. Good health habits include frequent hand washing with soapy water, keeping hands away from your face, getting plenty of rest, eating a healthful diet and covering coughs and sneezes with a sleeve or tissue. To find flu vaccine providers in your area, visit the Department of Health website at http://health.state.tn.us/FluClinic/Default.as px or visit http://flushot.healthmap.org/. For more information about TDH services and programs, visit http://health.state.tn.us/.

Walk In Clinic of Sparta, LLC Family and Preventive Medicine Wayne Durbin, PA-C Physician Assistant, Certified

Common Colds • Diet Programs • B12 Injections 396 N. Spring Street Sparta, TN 38583

Phone (931) 836-2228 Fax (931) 856-2258

spartawalkinclinic@yahoo.com NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED • MONDAY - FRIDAY 8 AM-5 P.M.


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-43

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Cancer Screening

Prostate Cancer

Ages 50-65

Ages 19-39

Prostate cancer screening not routine

Cancer Screening

Perform Digital Rectal Exam (DRE) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) for patients at high risk for prostate cancer. Risk factors include: • Family history • African-American ancestry

Ages 50-65 Perform Digital Rectal Exam (DRE) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). The PSA should be performed only if life expectancy is over 10 years.

All Ages Independence is calling.

Testicular Cancer

Perform clinical testicular exam on a quarterly basis (or in conjunction with other health examinations) and as part of annual physical examination.

Skilled nursing and short-term rehabilitation

931.484.4782

Dementia

Ages 50+ Be alert for possible signs of declining cognitive function in older patients. • Evaluate mental status in patients who have problems performing daily activities • Examine patients suspected of having dementia for other causes of changing mental status, including depression, delirium, medication effects and coexisting medical illnesses.

Barbar a J. Johns on Licens e d Clinical S o cial Worker 729 S. JEFFERSON AVE., COOKEVILLE, TN 38501-4013

TELEPHONE: (931)528-4150

By App oint ment onl y Individual, Gr oup, Mar it al & Re l a t i o n s h i p C o u n s e l i n g Ot her Ment al Healt h Couns elin g MEDICARE, TENNCARE SELECT, OTHER COMMERCIAL INSURANCES ACCEPTED LOCATED IN JEFFERSON SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER ACROSS FROM WAL-MART

37700

Other Screenings

80 Justice St. Crossville, TN 38555


A-44 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

The

TOP TIER in Orthopedic Care

John M. Turnbull, M.D.

F

Gregory J. Roberts, M.D.

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or more than three decades, Tier 1 Orthopedics (formerly Upper Cumberland Orthopedic Surgery) has specialized in

the care of our patients’ musculoskeletal systems — bones, joints, ligaments, muscles, nerves and related structures of arms, legs, IHJRHUKWLS]PZ6\YVY[OVWLKPJZ\YNLVUZHYLIVHYKJLY[PÄLK each having mature judgment, successful experience and high X\HSPÄJH[PVUZ(JVTTP[TLU[[VSLHKPUNLKNLVY[OVWLKPJJHYLOHZ led to our being the primary provider of orthopedic services to Cookeville Regional Medical Center, which has received numerous

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T1Institute.com


HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-45

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Cancer Screening

Breast Cancer

Cervical Cancer (pap test)

Ages 19-39 1. Perform clinical breast exam and quarterly breast assignments. 2. Mammogram for patients at high risk. Risk factors include: • Family history of pre-menopausal breast cancer (mother or sister) • Personal history of breast ovarian/endometrial cancer

1. Perform clinical breast exam and quarterly breast assessments. 2. Mammogram every 1-2 years at discretion of primary care prescriber

1. Every 1-3 years for women who have been sexually active and have a cervix. 2. Three-year intervals generally begin after 3 consecutive negative results 3. Screening may not be necessary if the patient has had a total hysterectomy for noncancerous disease. Risk factors include: • Failure to receive regular Pap tests • History of cervical tumors • Infection with HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) or other sexually transmitted diseases • High-risk sexual behavior • HIV/AIDS

WOMEN: Screenings Balance the calories you take in from food and drink with the calories you burn off by your activities. • Be tobacco free. For tips on how to quit, go to www.smokefree.gov. To talk to someone about how to quit, call the National Quitline: 1-800Take Steps to QUITNOW (784-8669). Good Health • If you drink alcohol, have no more than • Be physically active and make healthy one drink per day. A standard drink is one food choices. Learn how at 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one www.healthfinder.gov/prevention. five-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of • Get to a healthy weight and stay there. 80-proof distilled spirits.

From Page 36 Talk with your health care team about whether you need vaccinations. You can also find which ones you need by going to www2.cdc.gov/nip/adultimmsched/.

Ages 50-65

Ages 65+

1. Every 1-3 years at physician discretion. 2. The Pap test may be omitted after age 65 if there is documented evidence of regular previous screenings that are consistently normal.


A-46 —HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Recommended Screenings

All Ages

Hypertension

At every acute/non-acute medical encounter and at least once every year at time of annual physical examination.

Cholesterol

Every five years beginning at age 19 with fasting lipoprotein profile (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride). If the testing opportunity is non-fasting and total cholesterol is >200 mg/dl or HDL is < 40mg/dl, follow up with a lipoprotein profile.

Diabetes (Type 2)

Every 3 years, beginning at age 45. Screen more often and beginning at a younger age for those who are overweight and if risk factors are present. Risk factors include age, first-degree relative with diabetes, physical inactivity, race/ethnicity (African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian), high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol/lipid levels, history of gestational diabetes or birth of a baby > 9 pounds, impaired glucose tolerance or polycystic ovary syndrome. A fasting blood sugar is the preferred diagnostic test. The 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test is also acceptable. See MA Department of Public Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program information at www.state.ma.us/dph/fch/diabetes/.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis)

For Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: • Sexually active patients under age 25: Screen annually. • Patients 25 and over: Screen annually, if at risk. Risk factors include inconsistent use of condoms and new or multiple sex partners in last 3 months, new partner since last test, history of an/or current infection with sexually transmitted disease, partner has other sexual partner(s). • Screen pregnant women in first and third trimesters For Syphilis: • Screen if at risk. Risk factors include a history of an/or current infection with another sexually transmitted disease, having more than one sexual partner within the past 6 months, exchanging sex for money or drugs, and makes engaging in sex with other males. • Screen pregnant women at the first prenatal visit and in the third trimester, if at risk.

The Fitness The Fitness Center Center

620 S. Jefferson Ave Suite 206 (Adams Place complex, behind Abel Gardens)

Cookeville, TN 38501

93 931.239.0502 931.239.0502

Promoting Promoting health health a and nd well-being well-being b by y sstrengthening trengthening the b the body ody a and nd ccalming alming tthe he mind. mind. O Offering ffering a vvariety ariety o off Y Yoga oga a and nd Z Zumba umba cclasses. lasses. Beginner tto Beginner oa advanced. dvanced. C Corporate orporate a and nd p private rivate g group roup sessions, sessions, parties a parties and nd sspecial pecial events events up upon rrequest. upon equest.

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HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013 — A-47

MEDICAL DIRECTORY Recommended

All Ages

Screenings

Periodic testing of all patients at increased risk and testing of pregnant women at increased risk. Risk factors include: Having recived blood or blood products prior to 1985, homosexual or bisexual behavior, drug abuse, history of prior sexually transmitted diseases, new or multiple sex partners, sex partners who have engaged in high risk behaviors and inconsistant use of condoms.

HIV

Hepatitis C

Periodic testing of all patients at high risk. Risk factors include injection of illegal drugs, receipt of a blood transfusion or solid organ transplant before July 1992, receipt of blood product for clotting proglems before 1987, longterm kidney dialysis, evidence of liver disease, receipt of tattoo and/or body piercing.

Tuberculosis

Annual tuberculin skin testing in accordance with regulatory standards, agency policy and DCD guidelines Risk factors include: Anyone in congregate living situations. For those in indepdendent living situation: having spent time with someone with known or suspected TB, having HIV infection, coming from a country where TB is coomon, having injected illegal drugs, living in U.D. where TB is more common (e.g. shelters, migrant farm camps, prisons, etc.). Determine the need for repeat skin testing by the likelihood of continuing exposure to infectious TB.

Vision

General ocular (vision) screening as part of annual physical examination.

MEN: Screenings Balance the calories you take in from food and drink with the calories you burn off by your activities. • Be tobacco free. For tips on how to quit, go to www.smokefree.gov. To talk to someone about how to quit, call the National Quitline: 1-800-QUITNOW (784-8669). • If you drink alcohol, have no more than two drinks per day if you are 65 or younger. Take Steps to Good Health If you are older than 65, have no more than • Be physically active and make healthy one drink a day. A standard drink is one 12food choices. Learn how at ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler, one 5www.healthfinder.gov/prevention. ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of • Get to a healthy weight and stay there. 80-proof distilled spirits. From Page 38 cough or shingles. Talk with your doctor or nurse about whether you need vaccinations. You can also find which ones you need by going to: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/default.htm.

Joyce HealthCare • Accept Most Insurance Plans • Accepting New Patients Including Medicare • Accepting New TennCare Patients MONDAY & TUESDAY 8AM - 5PM WEDNESDAY 8AM - 12PM THURSDAY 11AM - 7PM FRIDAY 8AM - 4PM CLOSED 12-1 FOR LUNCH

Karen Joyce, APN, BC Supervising Physician, ROY ANDERSON, MD

315 N. WASHINGTON • SUITE 102

931-528-5273

Anderson – Upper Cumberland Funeral Home 2131 South Grundy Quarles Hwy. Gainesboro, TN 38562 Locally Owned and Family Operated (931) 268-1550 or (931) 858-7474 Obituary Line: (931) 268-1551 We honor all existing pre-arrangement and insurance plans. We invite you to come by and visit with us.


A-48 — HERALD-CITIZEN/REGIONAL BUYERS GUIDE, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Wednesday, January 30, 2013


Medical Directory