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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Health & Wellness IN KLAMATH Health factors Economics, lifestyle choices affect Basin residents' health

Access

Distance, finances & availability of care challenge Basin residents

Healthy living A little exercise can make a big difference

Support & accountability

Inspiring wellness, lifestyle changes in the workplace

HERALD AND NEWS

❯❯

HERALDANDNEWS.COM

❮❮

SATURDAY, MARCH 16

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

INSIDE: A healthy outlook for all This publication is just one of several ways the Herald and News brings the goal of healthy living in Klamath County into focus. It is full of insightful information on how to start a healthy lifestyle and what is available from professionals and experts in the areas of health care and nutrition. It complements our Wednesday Life and Living section and our Weighty Matters series that runs the first Saturday of every month in the daily newspaper. The newspaper, in conjunction with Sky Lakes Medical Center and the county health department, recently conducted a health survey of the community. There were just less than 800 respondents; a good indicator that health is at the top of the minds of many. Results of this survey will be published soon. This is all part of our desire to try to help improve the overall health ranking of the county. Another in-depth survey about a year ago put Klamath County dead last in the state in many health indicators. That should serve as a wake-up call for every resident to do something for themselves. And, in reality, it is not that hard if people take responsibility for their health. There is plenty of telling information at healthyklamath.org, and much of it shows we fall well below the average when it comes to living a healthy lifestyle. It is not something that can be solved overnight. However, doing nothing is not an option. The articles contained here are produced by Herald and News staff members. They include such topics as: ■ Getting educated about a healthy lifestyle: What kinds of resources are available? ■ Growing a healthy culture through programs and education. ■ The role poverty plays in our health care ■ Access to healthy living and exercise opportunities — especially in the winter months. We hope you take the information contained here to heart. You can start today to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. Gerry O’Brien, editor

❯❯ STATISTICS PAGE 3

Health & Wellness: Poverty, obesity, lifestyle choices affect health in our area. Klamath County is rated 31st out of 33 Oregon counties ranked in the 2012 County Health Rankings and Roadmaps program.

❯❯ ECONOMY AND HEALTH PAGE 6

Below the curve: Klamath County has a high poverty rate and is below the curve in overall health, begging questions about links between the two.

❯❯ ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE PAGE 8

Distance, transportation & finances: The Klamath County Department of Public Health has identified a number of challenges for Basin residents and access to health care is principal among them.

❯❯ HEALTHY LIVING CHOICES PAGE 10

A little means a lot: Exercise can be cost-effective and help prevent or treat diseases. Exercise can be worked into a daily routine, even for the busiest lifestyle.

❯❯ SUPPORT & ACCOUNTABILITY PAGE 12

Challenge: Employees of the Klamath County Assessor's office are participating in a workplace challenge that promotes healthy eating and activity.

❯❯ TEACHING HEALTHY HABITS PAGE 13

Life lessons: Klamath Falls' YMCA brings in role models for their youth programs to exhibit healthy eating habits and active lifestyles. The hope is to set kids up for a lifetime of good health.

❯❯ COOKING FOR NUTRITION & HEALTH PAGE 14

Taste sensations: Try out recipes for "Kale Chips," "Avocado and Lime," "Hummus," "Tomato and Lemon Salad," "Ants on a Log" and "Fresh Salsa."


HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

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Determining county health factors, outcomes

Statistics

Health & Wellness Poverty, obesity, lifestyle choices affecting health By SAMANTHA TIPLER: H&N Staff Reporter

K

lamath County is rated 31st out of 33 Oregon counties ranked in the 2012 County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program. Key in that ranking is the percentage of smoking adults, obese adults and children in poverty.

SMOKING In Klamath County 24 percent of adults smoke, compared with a national benchmark of 14 percent and an Oregon percentage of 18 percent.

SMOKING

The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps proof Klamath County gram calls cigaadults smoke rette smoking the leading cause of preventable death. About 443,000 premature deaths in the U.S. are primarily due to smoking each year. Smoking is linked to cancer, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory diseases, the program’s website says.

OBESITY Adult obesity is at 27 percent in Klamath County, compared with the 25 percent national benchmark and 26 percent in Oregon. The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program also rates other factors that can contribute to obesity. Klamath OBESITY County’s rate of physical of Klamath County inactivity adults are obese isn’t far off from Oregon and national percentages. In Klamath County about 21 percent of adults are physically inactive, which matches the national benchmark but is below Oregon’s 18 percent.

27 percent

24 percent

Stopping smoking can lead to immediate health benefits at any age, the website says.

In Klamath County nine people per 1,000 have access to recreational facilities in Klamath County, compared with 12 in Oregon and a national benchmark of 16. In Klamath County about 54 percent of people have access to healthy foods, compared to 61 percent throughout Oregon. At the same time, 45 percent of restaurants in Klamath County classify as fast See STATISTICS, page 4

www.countyhealthrankings.org/oregon

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

STATISTICS

From page 3

food, compared with an Oregon percentage of 43, and a national benchmark of 25 percent. The program’s website says being overweight or obese increases the risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension, stroke, liver disease, sleep apnea, respiratory problems, osteoarthritis and a general poor health status.

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Oregon: 2012 County Health Rankings The 2012 County Health Rankings report ranks Oregon counties according to health outcomes and health factors. Counties also receive a rank for mortality, morbidity, health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment. Those having high ranks (e.g., 1 or 2) are estimated to be the “healthiest.”

Online information for the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program: ❯❯ Klamath County rankings: http://bit.ly/ZhJr2o ❯❯ Risk factors: Smoking: http://bit.ly/ZhJBHh Obesity: http://bit.ly/ZhJHyB Poverty: http://bit.ly/z9WwzG

POVERTY The program says 26 percent of Klamath County children live in poverty, compared with a national benchmark of 13 percent and 22 percent in Oregon. The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program measures other factors that can contribute to poverty: The program listed Klamath POVERTY County’s 2012 unemployment rate at 13.4 of Klamath County percent, above children live in poverty the state’s 10.8 percent and the national benchmark of 5.8 percent.

resulting from poverty are present at all ages, children in poverty face greater risks,” the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps website says. “Children face greater morbidity and mortality due to greater risk of accidental injury, lack of health care access, and poor educational achievement. Early (or prenatal) poverty may result in development damage. Children’s age-five IQ correlates more with family income than with maternal education, ethnicity, and single female-headed household.” In Klamath County 32 percent of children live in a single-parent household compared to 30 percent in Oregon and a national benchmark of 20 percent.

26 percent

The program listed Klamath County’s median household income at $37,370, below Oregon’s amount of $46,536. It also said 50 percent of Klamath County children are eligible for free school lunch, compared to 42 percent statewide. The program identifies poverty as insufficient income to meet the needs for food, clothing and shelter, and measures it according to the federal poverty threshold. Poverty affects health in that it determines whether families can get access to health insurance, pay for medical care, afford healthy food, afford safe housing and access basic goods. In Klamath County, 23 percent of people are uninsured, compared to 19 percent in Oregon and a national benchmark of 11 percent. Nineteen percent of Klamath County residents said they could not see a doctor due to cost, compared to 15 percent statewide. “While negative health effects

OTHER ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE The rate of population per primary care physician is better in Klamath County than the rest of the state, but worse than the national benchmark. The County Health Rankings and Roadmaps program lists one physician to every 842 Klamath County residents. That’s a bit better than the Oregon ratio of one physician to 984 residents. The national benchmark is 631 residents per physician. Having a sufficient number of www.countyhealthrankings.org/oregon

See STATISTICS, page 5


HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

STATISTICS

From page 4

primary care physicians is essential to getting people preventative care, the program’s website says. Such access also can ensure referrals to specialty care if needed. Having health insurance does not necessarily ensure access to physicians, the website says. (As listed

earlier, in Klamath County 23 percent of people are uninsured.) Lack of transportation, lack of knowledge of preventative care, long waits for appointments and an inability to pay a high deductible also can act as barriers to primary care.

stipler@heraldandnews.com; @TiplerHN

A Local glance: County Health Rankings Health behaviors

Klamath Oregon

Excessive drinking Motor vehicle crash death rate Per 100,000 population

Sexually transmitted infections Chlamydia rate per 100,000 population

Teen birth rate

Teen birth rate per 1,000 female population, ages 15-19

Social & Economic Factors

13 %

16 %

23

14

179

303

48

35

Klamath Oregon

High school graduation

63 %

66 %

Some college

55 %

64 %

Unemployment

13.4 %

10.8 %

Children in poverty

26 %

22 %

Children in single-parent households

32 %

30 %

Physical environment

Klamath Oregon

Air pollution-particulate matter days *

3

12

Access to recreational facilities #

9

12

45 %

43 %

Fast food restaurants

Demographics

Klamath Oregon

Below 18 years of age

23 %

23 %

65 years and older

16 %

14 %

Rural

36 %

21 %

www.countyhealthrankings.org/oregon * Annual number of unhealthy air quality days due to fine particulate matter # Rate of recreational facilities per 100,000 population

Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Economy & health

High poverty rate affects health of Klamath residents By DEVAN SCHWARTZ H&N Staff Reporter

K

lamath County has a high poverty rate and is below the curve in overall health, begging questions about links between the two. The county ranked 31st out of 33 Oregon counties in health outcomes according to a recent study by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. Klamath County’s 20.9 percent poverty rate also places it 6 percent above the state average, according to 2009 Census data. Experts agree poverty diminishes families’ access to health care, nutritious food and exercise opportunities. In Klamath County, this means many residents must utilize social services such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly known as food stamps) or the Women, Infants and Children Program. Some feel social services create high levels of government spending and a culture of dependence, though a recent article on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation website argues that the United States’ high levels of health care spending are paired with low levels of social services spending. Either way, the numbers indicate many Klamath County residents are poor, unhealthy and reliant on what services are available.

❯❯ Since

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

❯❯ SNAP

The 2012 Hunger Factors Assessment found 28 percent of Klamath County residents receive SNAP benefits, the third-highest usage in Oregon. The federal program is meant to increase low-income households’

KL AMATH COUNT Y’S POVERT Y R ATE

nutrition by increasing their purchasing power. SNAP can be used for grocery purchases at many local stores, and seasonal farmers markets. But according to Janeen Wadsworth, former interim CEO of Oregon Food Bank, SNAP benefits are usually exhausted before the end of the month.

28 20.9 Percent

Since 2007, Oregon has seen an 86 percent increase in SNAP usage, though Greg Chandler of the Department of Human Services Self-Sufficiency Office said only 70 percent of those eligible in Klamath County receive benefits.

AP SIDENTS RECEIVE SN RE TY UN CO H AT OF KL AM

Percent

2,700

KL AMATH CLIENTS

PARTICIPATE IN WIC

WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN PROGRAM

❯❯ WIC

According to Klamath County Public Health, the Women, Infants and Children Program provides food and nutrition information to lowerincome pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, and infants and children under age 5; WIC also provides information that helps families access maternal, prenatal and pediatric health care services. WIC coordinator Sue Schiess said the program is vitally important in the Basin, and is a really good resource for the community by providing education and nutritious foods. She said 2,700 clients participate in Klamath County.

Two bills currently in the state Legislature could significantly impact the program, and Schiess hopes both are passed. House Bill 2921 would appropriate money from the general fund to the Oregon Health Authority for the Women, Infants and Children Program, effective July 1. House Bill 2992 would authorize the Oregon Health Authority to operate the Farm Direct Nutrition Program, enabling participants in the Women, Infants and Children Program to purchase fresh produce at farmers markets or roadside stands. “We already have a really great

farmers market program and (HB 2992) would help support that. Being able to offer fresh foods is another way to improve health,” said Schiess. Fruit and vegetable vouchers are part of the existing food package, Schiess said, and can be used at farmers markets. A separate farmers market program, with $20 vouchers, also is offered on a first-come, first-served basis during summer months. The WIC program changed a few years back to include fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains, Schiess said. See ECONOMY, page 7

2007, Oregon has seen an 86 percent increase in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program usage, although only 70 percent of those eligible in Klamath County receive benefits.


Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

ECONOMY

From page 6

PREVENTATIVE CARE

‘ ... exercise along with diet has such an impact on a person’s long term health. Especially with kids we’re seeing more obesity, so keeping our kids and ourselves active helps stem the increase.’

❯❯ Access to exercise HEALTH CARE

❯❯ Access to health care

Klamath County has repeatedly been identified as a medically underserved area and population, according to the county’s public health department. Its annual plan for fiscal year 2012-13 predicts continued cuts to state and federal funding and increased operating costs. This could lead to further cutbacks of available services, such as closing the family planning program, which the public health department argues would “exacerbate this issue and further marginalize the population.” Any such budget cuts would disproportionately impact poor residents of Klamath County, who typically have the fewest available resources.

Exercise is increasingly cited by health care experts as a form of preventive care, though access is often tied to economics. Cold winters and slippery surfaces make walking in Klamath County difficult at times, and gym memberships can often be too expensive for those with tight budgets. Sue Schiess, Klamath County’s Women, Infants and Children coordinator, said the statistics don’t look good, but many people in the Basin are committed to making our community healthier. One example is Mike’s Fieldhouse at Steen Sports Park. The walking track is utilized by senior citizens, parents and others every weekday morning from 7 to 10 a.m. The cost is $2 for a single session, or $15 for a 15-use punch card. YMCA members walk free and one soccer field is used as a children’s area. The Community Partners Seeking Better Health, an informal local coalition, seeks to address health issues in the Klamath Basin. As part of this program, medical residents at Cascades East Rural Family Medicine Residency Program chose individuals to take part in a free five-month project providing guidance for better

— Sue Schiess, coordinator Klamath County Women, Infants and Children

nutrition, inspiring regular exercise and empowering people to make better health choices. Unfortunately the program is on hiatus, according to Sky Lakes Medical Center public relations and marketing coordinator Tom Hottman. But the need remains the same. Schiess said “exercise along with diet has such an impact on a person’s long-term health. Especially with kids we’re seeing more obesity, so keeping our kids and ourselves active helps stem the increase.” Even if it’s not a structured activity, Schiess said exercise improves quality of life and lowers the community’s health care costs. dschwartz@heraldandnews.com

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Access to Health Care ❯❯ SKY LAKES STROKE PATIENTS BENEFIT FROM TECHNOLOGY & SPECIALISTS

Klamath Basin residents challenged by distance & access to health care By DEVAN SCHWARTZ H&N Staff Reporter

T

he Klamath County Department of Public Health has identified a number of challenges for Basin residents and access to health care is principal among them.

Long travel distances, transportation and financial barriers contribute to Klamath County continuing to be ranked “among the bottom in both health indicators and health outcomes,” the public health department states in its most recent annual report. It can also take weeks to get an appointment with local primary care physicians. Cascades East Family Medicine Clinic reported no openings for at least two or three weeks. Sky Lakes Family Medicine Clinic was booked until the third week of June

H&N photo by Devan Schwartz

Remote appointment: Dr. Konrad Eppel, a doctor at Sky Lakes Medical Center, shows off what they call the robot — a machine that allows stroke patients to be seen remotely by neurologists from Providence Portland Medical Center.

when called on March 1. And with recent changes to health coverage under the new coordinated care organization system, some patients have complained about being switched away from health care providers they had been with for years. Along with challenges of recruiting and retaining doctors, and logistical hurdles, the overall health care landscape is a bit rocky — even as Sky Lakes Medical Center and other See ACCESS, page 9

A picture is worth a thousand words. You might not think about this in relation to strokes, but such is the case for neurologists who are able to remotely see stroke patients at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Using the Telestroke Network, a doctor at Providence Portland Medical Center digitally appears on a monitor in Klamath Falls in order to assess whether a stroke has occurred or how a stroke patient’s recovery is going. “A picture is worth a thousand words,” said Dr. Konrad Eppel, an emergency doctor at Sky Lakes. “Having the ultimate specialist eliminates the need to have a doctor here.” Eppel estimates they use the machine, which they call “the robot,” for one or two patients per week. He added that incorrectly prescribed medications can cause bleeding in the heads of stroke victims, so it’s especially nice to get the advice of specialists who have been sent digital copies of CT scans. “We like it because we have someone to collaborate with,” said Eppel. The usage of telemedicine is increasingly common in rural areas, said Sky Lakes spokesman Tom Hottman, where practitioners may not have the level of confidence they would like. “Just because we live in God’s country doesn’t mean we can’t have the best there is,” he said. The robot, called an InTouch Health ControlStation, has been used at the hospital for about a year.


Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

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Sky Lakes Medical Center is recruiting family medicine physicians, another gastroenterologist, a neurologist, a urologist, additional hospitalists, additional internists, an obstetrician/gynecologist and a vascular surgeon.

Access: Jim and Fran Johancen of Klamath Falls head inside for an appointment at Sky Lakes Klamath Medical Clinic. A shortage of health care professionals in Klamath County means it can take weeks for a patient to get an appointment with primary care physicians around Klamath Falls. H&N photo by Devan Schwartz

ACCESS

From page 8

local providers continue seeking to improve and expand their coverage. Doctor shortages Access to physicians and a high continuity of care are hallmarks of quality health care, and providers in Klamath County are working to improve both. In its annual report, the Klamath County Department of Public Health argues “the medically underserved area and evident health care professional shortages have worsened in recent years.” The report specifies “a number of local physicians have announced retirements and relocations, largely attributable to the anticipated

uncompetitive federal reimbursement rate.” In May, the Herald and News ran an article on the departure of Dr. Tzann Fang, a medical oncologist at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Fang took a position at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Massey Cancer Center in Richmond. He said Sky Lakes didn’t offer to extend his contract, though Paul Stewart, president and CEO of Sky Lakes Medical Center, said that was untrue. Running counter to the public health department’s assessment is a study conducted by the University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation that found

Klamath County’s ratio of doctors to patients in Klamath County is 489:1, placing it ninth in Oregon, which has 36 counties.

gist, a neurologist, a urologist, additional hospitalists, additional internists, an obstetrician/gynecologist and a vascular surgeon.

Recruiting efforts Sky Lakes spokesman Tom Hottman said the hospital is undergoing active physician recruitment efforts, including specialists from the mostneeded fields. In the last year, specialists in emergency medicine, medical oncology, internal medicine, general surgery and pulmonology have been recruited by the hospital. Hottman added Sky Lakes is currently recruiting family medicine physicians, another gastroenterolo-

Additionally, Sky Lakes cites success with retaining graduates from Cascades East Rural Family Medicine Residency Program. “Physician recruiting is a team effort involving an assortment of medical center departments as well as community partners,” Hottman said. “It often requires several months to locate qualified candidates who are clinically excellent and good fits for the community.” dschwartz@heraldandnews.com

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Choices for Healthy Living

Happy soles: Members of the Linkville Lopers gather with varying numbers at Asana Yoga and Sole on Wednesday nights to run. They also meet on Mondays at the KU track and Tuesdays for trail running in Moore Park. H&N photo by Steven Silton

By SAMANTHA TIPLER H&N Staff Reporter

A little activity can make a big difference for your health ❛

I

f I had one prescription that I would say could prevent heart disease, hypertension, obesity — would you take it?”asked Kellie Perry, a physical therapist with Sky Lakes Medical Center. “Certainly.”

That prescription? Exercise. Exercise can be cost-effective and help prevent or treat diseases. Perry said people don’t have to go for a run, or slog it out at the gym. They can work exercise into their daily routine, even if they have a busy daily routine. Perry recommended increasing walking, whether it’s parking farther away from the entrance to the grocery store, walking with your children to school, or spending 10

minutes of a lunch break walking around the block. During the winter, indoor activities might be easier. Exercise break TV time doesn’t have to be lazy time. The average half-hour show has eight to 10 minutes of commercials. TV watchers can lift soup cans for weight, or ride a stationary bicycle or run on a treadmill instead of sitting on the couch,

Perry said. Jumping rope is another great exercise, with or without the rope. Ten minutes of jump rope burns 70 to 110 calories, Perry said. The easiest way to get exercise? Find an activity you enjoy. “Exercise doesn’t have to be something difficult,” Perry said. “It can be a fun activity. Just get See ACTIVITY, page 11


Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Exercise by the numbers

EXERCISE CLOSE TO HOME: Getting exercise can be as simple as going for a walk in your neighborhood, or visiting a nearby park. Klamath Falls has 22 parks managed by the city, according to Ken Hay, programs and development superintendent for the city. Though there are places in Klamath Falls without sidewalks, City Planning Manager Erik Nobel said that shouldn’t stop people from getting out in their neighborhoods. “I live in a neighborhood without sidewalks,” he said. “When I choose to run I can get out there very easily.” Hay and Nobel referenced the miles and miles of trails in town and near town. That includes the mile and a half Link River trail and more than eight miles of trails in Moore Park. Another favorite is the OC&E trail that stretches for 100 miles starting in Klamath Falls. In the wintertime when sidewalks are covered in snow and ice, downtown Klamath Falls’ geothermally heated sidewalks provide a half-mile stretch for people to walk or run. Now that it’s warming up, Nobel said he likes to run a loop from downtown, following 11th Street around until it turns into Oregon Avenue, then turn on Siskiyou Street and California Avenue to come back to downtown. “It’s a nice loop from downtown, out and around and back down; good elevation changes, nothing too traumatic, a nice little run,” he said. “The streets aren’t too busy and I’m on sidewalks the whole way.”

150 MINUTES OF EXERCISE PER WEEK Recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and the American Heart Association

EXERCISE OPTIONS: Three 10-minute workouts, five days a week 10 minutes of jumping rope burns 70 to 110 calories 10 minutes of dancing burns about 65 calories Building a snowman can burn 285 calories A 10-minute snowball fight burns 130 calories

Winter exercise & activities

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ACTIVITY

From page 10

your heart rate up and get moving.” Exercise can help prevent diseases and help depression. Perry said it stimulates chemicals in the brain that help people feel more relaxed and happier. It also can help people sleep at night. “People often feel they don’t have enough energy, but exercise can boost energy levels,” Perry said. “It increases oxygen and nutrients to muscles and makes the cardiovascular system more efficient.”

11

ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOOD: As the old saying goes, you are what you eat. “Everything we put into our body is what we use to live,” said Jennifer Lehman, registered dietitian with Sky Lakes Medical Center. “The thought process is: junk in, junk out. The more nutritious foods we can put in our body the healthier we can be.” Healthy eating can reduce the risk of chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some types of cancer, she said. Making the right food choices can be hard. Often we go for what is most convenient, not necessarily what is best for our health. “We have busy lives,” Lehman said. “We look for how we can feed our families as quick as possible. Fast food, restaurant food, it tastes good and is cheap but does not translate to good health.” Making meals as a family can take time. Having access to that food can be another barrier. There are parts of Klamath Falls and surrounding areas where convenience stores are closer or easier to reach than a full grocery store. “The smaller mom and pop corner store may not have access to fruits or vegetables,” Lehman said. “It’s definitely a barrier for some people.” In the summer, Klamath Falls is lucky to have a farmers market, a great opportunity to get fresh food. Lehman said community supported agriculture, or CSAs, are another good way to get fresh fruit and vegetables delivered on a weekly basis when they’re in season. She urged people not to forget they can grow their own fresh food, too. “Even somebody living in an apartment can have a pot and grow some herbs or some vegetables,” she said.

stipler@heraldandnews.com @TiplerHN

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Getting Support & Being Accountable Rafael Hernandez and Hollie Streed want to challenge Klamath County to be healthier. With the statewide Wellness at Work partnership at their back, the two are working with Klamath County Public Health to model themselves as a pilot program for a county-wide wellness program.

H&N photo by Dave Martinez

Challenged: Rafael Hernandez and Hollie Streed have helped their office get healthy by setting up an eight-week challenge.

Inspiring wellness, lifestyle changes in the workplace By Dave Martinez H&N Staff Reporter

W

hen Hollie Streed saw coworker Rafael Hernandez eating a bag of chips at work, she was tempted to slap the bag out of his hands. Instead, she looked at him and said, “That’s not good.” That kind of support and accountability for a healthy lifestyle is what a few employees of the Klamath County Assessor’s Office hope to bring to others in the area. With the help of the county public health

department, the two have made healthy eating and activity an office challenge. Using pedometers donated by Sky Lakes Medical Center, participants track their weekly steps. They also track their lunch meals and snacks, giving themselves points for good choices. At the end of their eightweek challenge, the person with the most points wins. Sometimes, during breaks, a few employees will walk outside their office to “get their numbers up,” Streed said. It’s not uncommon for her to walk around the office, asking “What’s your number?” Streed also carries around a blood pressure tester, in case anyone wants that number for the day. But the challenge isn’t just a competition. It’s a way to support health-

ier habits with the people you spend the majority of your waking hours with, Streed said. “We have a vending machine just down the hallway, so it’s really easy to go there if you didn’t bring a snack from home,” Streed said. The idea for the office challenge came when she was talking about an Ironman triathlon Hernandez had entered. The competition, in Tempe, Ariz., is an all-day, long-distance race composed of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and a 26.2-mile run. Hernandez is participating to raise funds for Smile Train, a charity that performs cleft lip surgeries. Streed and Hernandez discussed the difficulties of staying healthy at work when it dawned on them. Why not get everyone to support each other by creating a health challenge?

“Being healthy is a lifestyle. We figured it would carry over into other aspects of our lives,” Hernandez said. In the future, the two hope to give fellow employees a few more snack options. If they can establish an honor system to pay for fruits and vegetables, the system can be self sustaining. But the two also want to challenge Klamath County to be healthier. With the statewide Wellness at Work partnership at their back, the two are working with Klamath County Public Health to model themselves as a pilot program for a county-wide wellness program. As Hernandez can attest, the competition is working for him. He’s down 7 pounds from the start. dmartinez@heraldandnews.com; @HandNMartinez


Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

13

Teaching Healthy Habits

Building good habits: Preparing children for for a lifetime of good health By Dave Martinez H&N Staff Reporter

Y

ou can bring a child a carrot, but you can’t make him eat it.

H&N photo by Dave Martinez

Healthy choices: Renea Wood sets the table for health before children involved in the Y of Klamath Falls’ day care program come in for an afternoon meal.

Digital resources

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s “Eat Smart. Play Hard” website is designed to encourage families to be more active and eat healthier foods. The website provides recipes, progress trackers, fitness ideas and other tools to help keep track of health.

Visit the website at fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardhealthylifestyle. Apps available for iOS and Android platforms provide tools to count calories, save workouts and reduce stress. Try “Endomondo,” “Calorie Counter — My FitnessPal” or “Relax Melodies P.”

That’s why the local YMCA brings in role models to exhibit healthy eating habits and active lifestyles. The hope is to set kids up for a lifetime of good health. After overcoming her own obesity challenges, Renea Wood has helped the Y of Klamath Falls oversee its food and youth departments. She’s worked with kids for 10 years and has worked with the Klamath Falls Y for three. “It’s not a diet,” Wood said. “It’s a long-term lifestyle.” Fresh fruits and vegetables are provided with every meal or snack in the Y’s day care and after school program. To inspire the kids to commit to these healthy choices, the program brings in role models to demonstrate activities like kayaking and snorkeling. During Christmas break, one group was taken to Crater Lake National Park for a snowshoeing trip. “We try to take what we teach them here and apply it to their lives,” Wood said. Nationally, the YMCA is supporting healthy programs in conjunction with the Partnership for a Healthier Amer-

ica. Updated standards in line with the Healthy Eating and Physical Activities initiative should benefit 700,000 children in the Y’s programs across the country, Wood said. Kids also are being encouraged by their schools to be healthy. Late last year, children in the both the Klamath County and Klamath Falls City school districts learned about jicama, a root vegetable similar to a potato. Students at Shasta Elementary School were taught how to prepare the vegetable, a Herald and News article reported. Several community stalwarts offer programs to learn and practice good health for adults. Sky Lakes Medical Center offers several public events each month, some of them are free. The hospital will sometimes organize community health fairs, offering visitors an opportunity to screen their blood glucose, cholesterol, lung function and eyesight. Typically, staff is available to explain the meaning of the test results. Lutheran Community Services Northwest provides alcohol, drug and tobacco counseling programs. The care provider’s “Project Changes” provides a specialist to steer kids in sixth to 12th grade away from substance abuse. The program also provides leadership and resiliency training for high school teens. dmartinez@heraldandnews.com; @ HandNMartinez


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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Cooking for Nutrition & Health By Dave Martinez H&N Staff Reporter

Kale Chips

Avocado and Lime

Ingredients: Kale Garlic Olive Oil Salt and Pepper

Ingredients: Avocado Lime Salt to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Wash leaves of kale and pat dry with a paper towel. Put in a large bowl with a lid. Mince garlic and toss in bowl. Drizzle with olive oil. Put in salt and pepper to taste. Cover the bowl and shake the mixture so additions are evenly distributed. Put leaves on a baking sheet and put in the oven for 5 minutes. Remove from oven, mix and put back into oven for another 5 minutes. Remove when crispy.

Cut an avocado in half and remove pit. Being careful to not pierce the skin, make vertical slices in the avocado. Drizzle with fresh-squeezed lime juice and salt to taste. For more flavor, drizzle with your favorite hot sauce. I recommend Sriracha.

For tips on healthy living in the Klamath community, visit healthyklamath.org

Hummus Ingredients: 1 15-ounce can of chickpeas 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1 lemon 1/4 cup tahini (sesame seed paste) 1/4 cup water 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Salt This recipe requires a food processor. Throw in the garlic, juice of the lemon, lemon zest, and tahini. Process until smooth. Add the chickpeas and water, then process again. As the mixture is spinning, slowly add olive oil. Continue adding oil and water until the desired consistency is reached. Optionally, add jalapeno, sun-dried tomatoes, or any other ingredient to give the hummus a different flavor.


Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

Ants on a Log Tomato & Lemon Salad Ingredients: Spinach or lettuce of choice Lemon Cherry tomatoes Kalamata olives Wash and dry spinach and put into bowl. Cut cherry tomatoes in half and chop kalamata olives, then put into bowl. Drizzle with generous amount of lemon juice. Salt to taste.

Ingredients: Celery Peanut butter Raisins Remove stalks of celery, wash and allow to dry. Using a butter knife, put peanut butter inside the “U� of the celery stalk. Dot raisins along the peanut butter.

Fresh Salsa

Ingredients: 1 pound of tomatoes, seeded and chopped 1 jalapeno 1/2 white onion 1/4 cup cilantro 1 lime Salt and pepper

Dice the tomatoes and onion to a quarter inch in size. Mince the jalapeno and cilantro. Combine in a bowl with the juice of the lime, salt and pepper.

Routine, urgent and consultative gynecologic care Minimally-invasive surgery and hysterectomy alternatives Specialty obstetrical care including management of high-risk pregnancies, cesarean sections No-incision female sterilization Management of abnormal bleeding Urgent and same-day appointments available five days a week Our physicians are board certified and participate in annual maintenance of certification

Now accepting new patients! Call 541.205.6890 to schedule an appointment

2640 Biehn Street, Suite 1, Klamath Falls www.heartfeltobgyn.com

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Saturday, March 16, 2013, Herald and News

THE

HEALTH & WELLNESS IN KLAMATH

BEST

way to

lose

YOUR

health is

TO IGNORE IT. When it comes to diagnosing and successfully treating a health condition, we have only one ironclad rule: Earlier is better. That’s why we offer an ongoing series of seminars, support groups, and educational and community events to help educate and empower the people in our community to take control of their own health.

To find out more go to SkyLakes.org and click on the Classes & Events button.

Health and Wellness in Klamath  

Health factors Economics, lifestyle choices affect Basin residents' health.

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