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SOUTHWESTERN ASSOCIATION FOR INDIAN ARTS

INDIANMARKET 2018 ARTIST DIRECTORY & BOOTH LOCATOR MAP


Haley Beads

Meet

4th, 5th and 6th

The Haley Family

Handmade Navajo Pearls

During Indian Market

at Ortega’s

Generation

101 W. SAN FRANCISCO ST ● SANTA FE

505-988-1866 ● OPEN 7 DAYS


|

Melanie A.Yazzie “Making New Friends” fabricated aluminum © 2018 45 x 47” edition 8

Melanie A.Yazzie “Summer Walk” 30”x 22” unique monotype © 2018

Melanie A.Yazzie “Salt Water Girl” sterling pendant/enhancer © 2016

MELANIE YAZZIE ARTIST RECEPTION AND NEW WORK Sculpture, Prints + Jewelry Designs at Glenn Green Galleries

Wednesday, August 15, 2018, 4-6 pm

Allan Houser “Thinking of Him” bronze edition 10 19”x 18”x 13”

OPEN NOW: MUSEUM EXHIBITION MEMORY WEAVING: WORKS BY MELANIE YAZZIE Through October 7, 2018 Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM 87505 505-982-4636 | wheelwright.org

© 1989 Estate of Allan Houser/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NewYork

Rare Collection of Navajo Folk Art By Charlie Willeto (1897-1964) Buffalo 17”x 6” painted wood circa 1963

Santa Fe/Tesuque: Gallery and Sculpture Garden 136 Tesuque Village Road, Santa Fe (Tesuque), New Mexico 87506 Scottsdale:The Phoenician Resort 6000 E Camelback Road, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251 glenngreengalleries.com | (505) 820-0008

Glenn Green Galleries + Sculpture Garden Hours: Indian Market 9 am to 5 pm Daily


Scott Diffrient Modern Artifacts

ON THE PLAZA 61 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.983.9241 maloufontheplaza.com 2

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DaviD Riley, young Wishham Woman, oil, 50”

x

40”


IM ad for supplement 2018.pdf

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7/23/18

11:22 AM

2018 Indian Market Shows Saturday Aug.18: 10 am – 5 pm Jennie Vicenti (Zuni) Lynn Quam (Zuni) Jayne Quam (Dine') Kandis Quam(Dine'/Zuni) Elroy Natachu, Jr. (Zuni)

Thursday Aug. 16: 2 pm – 6 pm Salvador Romero (Cochiti)

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Friday Aug. 17: 2 pm – 6 pm Kateri Quandelacy Sanchez (Zuni/Acoma)

Sunday Aug.19: Youth Show 10 am – 5 pm Robert Cachini, Jr. (Zuni) Jaren Cachini (Hopi/Zuni) Joseph Namingha (Zuni/Tewa-Hopi) Joshua Namingha (Zuni/Tewa-Hopi)

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

All proceeds directly to the artists

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Kateri Quandelacy Sanchez: Bear/ Jennie Vicenti: Necklace detail/ Lynn & Jayne Quam/ Bison

Since 1981

fetishes

jewelry

pottery

227 Don Gaspar Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.989.8728 www.keshi.com 8

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P R E S T O N S I N G L E TA R Y Mystic Knowledge, Artist Reception: Friday August 17th from 5 – 8 pm

Blue Rain Gallery’s Annual Celebration of Native American Art During Native Art Week A U G U S T    —       

Visit blueraingallery.com for a complete listing of shows and events

Preston Singletary Untitled (Swan) Blown and sand carved glass 22.75" h x 8.5" w x 2.5" d

544 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505.954.9902 | www.blueraingallery.com 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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Solo Show

Annual Group Show

Native Visions

Rose B. Simpson Table of Contents

Neal Ambrose-Smith Rick Bartow Harry Fonseca Jeff Kahm Emmi Whitehorse

August 17 - September 8 Reception, Friday, August 17, 5-7pm

Caption: Rose B. Simpson, Table of Contents, 2018, ceramic & leather, 32 x 16 x 9. Photo Credit: Addison Doty

c h i a r o s c u r o 558 CANYON ROAD, SANTA FE, NM, 505-992-0711 www.

chiaroscurosantafe .com


Studio Seven Productions

Vest, Meredith Lockhart; guitar/Rockin’ M Guitars.

Custom Vest, Meredith Lockhart Collections

Guitar, Mikey Wright-Rockin’ M Guitars.

Highly Collectable Native American Jewelry by Award Winning Artists, including new work by Philander Begay, Navajo.

Samsville OF SANTA FE gallery

113 East Water Street, Suite 101 (505) 216-7777

plaza

samsvillegallery.com 1 2 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

66 E. San Francisco St, Plaza Galleria #12-13 (505) 999-1029


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dian malouf ON THE PLAZA 61 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-983-9241 maloufontheplaza.com Online Shopping Available


Artie Yellowhorse Navajo

Trunk Show Personal Appearance Thurs 4-7:30pm Fri, Sat, Sun 11-5pm

3 Pendant Necklace, Earrings and Cuffs Spiney Oyster and Sterling Silver â—? Collar, Double Pendant, Cuffs and Link Bracelet Kingman Turquoise and Sterling Silver

ON THE PLAZA 61 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-983-9241 maloufontheplaza.com Online Shopping Available


on

MUSEUM HILL

August 15, 2018, 3–5 pm

Just Bead It! Native Artists Discuss Their Intricate Work Including Charlene Holy Bear (Standing Rock Lakota), Hollis Chitto (Choctaw/Laguna/Isleta), and John Garcia (Santa Clara) In conjunction with Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West at MIAC and Beadwork Adorns the World at MOIFA Free by Museum Admission. New Mexico seniors are Free on Wednesdays Funded by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West through December 30, 2018

What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection through April 7, 2019

Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans through July 7, 2019 Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Ar ts Commission and the 1% Lodgers’ Tax.

5 05 • 476 •1269

indianart sand culture.org


explore the issues iaia museum of contemporary native art

Expanding Horizons: Darren Vigil Gray through February 16, 2019

Every One, by Cannupa Hanska Luger

native treasures collectors sale at the museum of indian arts and culture

A unique sale of Native American art from the homes of top collectors. September 22–23, 2018

museum of international folk art

Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru, through July 14, 2019

ralph t. coe center for the arts

The IMPRINT Exhibition, opens August 14

school for advanced research (sar)

“As an indigenous person in this country, I am a political entity, like it or not. And as an artist I’ve had so many opportunities and have so much privilege; at this point in our political climate, I have an obligation to weaponize that privilege.” -Cannupa Hanska Luger

cannupa hanska luger: every one

On view August 11-September 16, 2018 Museum of International Folk Art, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe

Indian Arts Research Center Collections Tours, Fridays, 2 pm, all year Wednesdays and Fridays, 2 pm, June–September

97th annual santa fe indian market, southwestern association for indian arts

Every One is a work of art and activism about gender violence in indigenous communities. Individuals and organization across North America participated in this social collaboration, creating a monumental portrait of loss comprised of more than 4,000 ceramic beads, each representing a missing or murdered indigenous woman in Canada.

August 18–19, 2018

flex your activism

Memory Weaving and Peshlakai Vision through October 7, 2018

A Gallery talk, featuring Cannupa Hanska Luger and Every One project participants Thursday, August 16, 2pm Museum of International Folk Art, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe By museum admission Learn more at

n mcu lt u r e.org/pro jecti n dige n e

wheelwright museum of the american indian


FAUST GALLERY LA FONDA BOARDROOM WEDNESDAY AUGUST 15TH-19TH, 2018 SPECIAL SHOWING DARRYL DEAN BEGAY REBECCA BEGAY LEE BEGAY GENE BILLIE REBECCA BEGAY

ARTIST DEMONSTRATION: DARRYL DEAN BEGAY WEN-SATURDAY 12PM-3PM

DARRYL BEGAY

LA FONDA ON THE PLAZA IN THE BOARD ROOM | 100 E SAN FRANSISCO ST | SANTA FE | NM | 87501 DARRYL DEAN BEGAY | 505-488-8155 GRAND OPENING FAUST GALLERY AUGUST 16TH, 2018 5PM-8PM FAUSTGALLERY.COM | 114 E PALACE AVE | SANTA FE | NM | 87501 | 480.200.4290 | bill@faustgallery.com 18

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Fritz Scholder (Luiseño, 1937–2005), Snake Dancer, 1967, oil on board, 20 ∞ 30 in. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art. Gift of Mr. John B.L. Goodwin, 1969 (2410.23p) © Fritz Scholder Estate.

On exhibit through November 25. Horizons features works from the museum’s collection that illustrate the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and creative visual expression that took form in the twentieth century—a remarkable period of human history in New Mexico. Also on view: Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking (through September 9); Patrick Nagatani: Invented Realities (through September 9); and Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives (through October 7).

107 w. palace ave., on the plaza in santa fe | 505-476-5072 open daily 10 am– 5 pm, friday evenings until 7 pm | · #NewMexicoArtMuseum

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explore the issues iaia museum of contemporary native art

Expanding Horizons: Darren Vigil Gray through February 16, 2019

native treasures collectors sale at the museum of indian arts and culture

A unique sale of Native American art from the homes of top collectors. September 22–23, 2018

museum of international folk art

Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru, through July 14, 2019

ralph t. coe center for the arts

The IMPRINT Exhibition, opens August 14

school of advanced research (sar)

Indian Arts Research Center Collections Tours, Fridays, 2 pm, all year Wednesdays and Fridays, 2 pm, June–September

Deer Dancer by Mateo Romero

who owns indigenous culture?

What is appropriation? Why does authenticity matter? What role does identity and activism play in the expression of indigenous art forms? Why is the exploration of these topics so fraught? This summer 8 indigenous art institutions and 14 artists will share art, perspectives and stories that explore these controversial and global issues.

participating artists

David Bradley (Minnesota Chippewa), Ashley Browning (Santa Clara), Frank Buffalo Hyde (Nez Perce/Onondaga), Nocona Burgess (Comanche), Aymar Ccopacatty (Aymara), Jason Garcia (Santa Clara), Shan Goshorn (Eastern Band Cherokee), Teri Greeves (Kiowa), Susan Hudson (Navajo), Cannupa Hanska Luger (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian and Norwegian), Nora Naranjo Morse, Quarla Quispe (Aymara), Mateo Romero (Cochiti), Maria Samora (Taos), Charlene Teters (Spokane), and Melanie Yazzie (Navajo). Learn more at

n mc u lt u r e.o rg/pro jecti n dige n e 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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97th annual santa fe indian market, southwestern association for indian arts

August 18–19, 2018

wheelwright museum of the american indian

Memory Weaving and Peshlakai Vision through October 7, 2018


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COVER: Aeronauts search desert battlefields in Revolt 1680/2180, Virgil Ortiz’s ongoing film project. COVER PHOTO: Virgil Ortiz

EDITORIAL

CJ Wells celebrates her 40th Indian Market Show at Windsor Betts “She Runs with the Big Boys” CJ Wells,“Quiver”, 2018, Oil on Canvas 36” X 36

creative director Deborah Villa dvilla@sfnewmexican.com, deborahvilladesign.com magazine editor America Meredith photographer Gene Peach copy editor Peg Goldstein ADVERTISING advertising manager Wendy Ortega classified manager Laura Harding ADVERTISING SALES Chris Alexander Mike Flores Deb Meyers Dana Teton Eileen Richardson Carol Wagner ADVERTISING ART DEPARTMENT designers Elspeth Hilbert, Joan Scholl, Rick Artiaga TECHNOLOGY technology director Michael Campbell PRODUCTION operations director Tim Cramer prepress manager Dan Gomez press coordinator George Gamboa packaging coordinator Brenda Shaffer DISTRIBUTION circulation director Michael Reichard WEB digital enterprise editor Henry Lopez www.santafenewmexican.com ADDRESS office: 202 E. Marcy Street hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday advertising information: 505-995-3852 delivery : 505-986-3010, 800-873-3372 for copies of this magazine, call 505-986-3010 or email circulation@sfnewmexican.com OWNER Robin Martin

FRIDAY, AUG. 17TH. 5-8. MEET AND GREET THE ARTIST

PUBLISHER Tom Cross EDITOR Phill Casaus

Museum art you can own featuring the legendary works of Art by Fritz Scholder, Kevin Red Star, John Nieto, Earl Biss, Paul Pletka, Bruce King, Malcolm Furlow and many others. 143 Lincoln @ Marcy, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, 505.820.1234, artinfo@windsorbetts.com www.windsorbetts.com 26

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ONGOING EXHIBITIONS AT LEWALLEN GALLERIES

TOMPALMORE ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS

ARTIST RECEPTION: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 5:00-7:00 PM

Navajo Cat (detail), 2018, oil and acrylic on panel, 25" x 30"

WOLFKAHN

FRITZSCHOLDER SELECTED WORK

REACHING UP AND BEARING DOWN

Large River Bend, 1984, oil on canvas, 53" x 84"

Indian and Store Front, 1974, acrylic on canvas, 30" x 40"

FRIDAY 10:00-7:00 PM

INDIAN MARKET HOURS: SATURDAY 10:00-5:00 PM

SUNDAY 11:00-4:00 PM

LewAllenGalleries Railyard Arts District 1613 Paseo de Peralta Santa Fe, New Mexico (505) 988.3250 www.lewallengalleries.com 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

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INDIANMARKET

PU BL ISH ED AU GU ST 1 2 , 201 8

2018 ARTIST DIRECTORY & BOOTH LOCATOR MAP

INSIDE

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30 SWAIA STAFF & BOARD MEMBERS 30 WELCOME LETTER

BY IRA WILSON (NORTHERN ARAPAHO/SENECA)

32 MULTIFACETED KALEIDOSCOPE OF EXPERIENCES Ever-changing, the market offers something for everyone

BY AMERICA MEREDITH (CHEROKEE NATION)

36 OFFICIAL SWAIA CALENDAR OF EVENTS 38 PADDLES UP! Live Auction Gala is fundraising cornerstone

BY ROSEMARY DIAZ (SANTA CLARA TEWA)

40 A CLOSER LOOK: JOSHUA TALLAS Graphic designer and painter is SWAIA Design Fellow

BY JEAN MERZ-EDWARDS

42 ON THE COVER Artist Statement

BY VIRGIL ORTIZ (COCHITI PUEBLO)

44 CATWALK

Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo)

SWAIA’s fashion shows make space for Native artists

BY NINA SANDERS (APSÁALOOKE)

48 2017 AWARD WINNERS Meet last year’s Best of Class winners, Best of Show winner Pat Pruitt (Laguna Pueblo) and Katrina Mitten (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma), winner of the Innovation Award.

42, 64

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BY ARIN MCKENNA

58 DREAMING BIG Meet the 2018 SWAIA design fellows

BY STACY PRATT (MVSKOKE)

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Wilmetta Kayquoptewa (Hopi) 28

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42 Kathryn Kooyahoema (Hopi)


104 Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo)

90 Chase Earles (Caddo Nation) outdoor firing

FEATURES 64 CLEOME SERRULATA

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The secret behind southwest pottery’s matte black

Native Art Week at the galleries BY ARIN MCKENNA

BY STACY GOLAR

EXHIBITION HIGHLIGHTS

68 WILDCARD CATEGORY

106

The Diverse Arts classification

Museum shows enhance the market experience

BY MICHLOE ELDRED (CATAWBA/EASTERN BAND CHEROKEE)

90 FIRING CERAMICS OUTDOORS Firing clay the ancient way

BY JEAN MERZ-EDWARDS

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ARTISTS REMEMBER THEIR FIRST SALE BY STACY PRATT (MVSKOKE)

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AT THE MUSEUMS

108 AROUND TOWN What’s happening in Santa Fe

116 ARTIST DIRECTORY BY CLASSIFICATION 128 BOOTH LOCATOR MAP 130 ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY

HOPI BASKETRY

Connecting community and place

BY AMERICA MEREDITH (CHEROKEE NATION)

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Lisa Holt (Cochiti) and Harlan Reano (Kewa)

Victoria Adams (Southern Cheyenne), purse 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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Taryn Tsinnie (Navajo, Diné)


SOUTHWESTERN ASSOCIATION FOR INDIAN ARTS

Greetings and welcome to the 97th Santa Fe Indian Market! SWAIA 2018 Board of Directors Elizabeth M. Kirk (Isleta Pueblo/Navajo) Chair Dominique Toya (Jemez Pueblo) Vice Chair Traci Rabbit (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma) Secretary Lloyd K. “Skip” Sayre Treasurer Mark Bahti Randy Chitto (Choctaw) Dan Crane David McElroy (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) L. Stephine Poston (Sandia Pueblo) Thomas Teegarden Chris Youngblood (Santa Clara Pueblo)

SWAIA 2018 Staff Ira Wilson (Navajo) Executive Director Ann-erika White Bird (Sicangu Lakota) Artist Services Manager Amanda Crocker PR and Marketing Director

This year we’ve worked hard to bring you a unique experience and memories to last a lifetime. My incredible staff members, as well as our volunteers, donors and sponsors, take great pride in supporting Native artists from across the United States and Canada. Indian Market is the premier juried Native American art market and is second to none in terms of artistic excellence. It is the annual event you’ve come to expect. Throughout my many years in the Native American art scene, I have developed strong relationships with artists, curators, scholars and Native art enthusiasts. Each year, their excitement for Indian Market is comparable to anticipation before the Super Bowl. Year after year, our conversations turn to collectively wondering who will bring something incredible to Indian Market and who will take home the coveted Best of Show. Now, as executive director of the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, I get to see and experience the market on a completely different level. The heart my staff and volunteers put into producing Indian Market is truly something to behold. Their enthusiasm for Native art and artists is without measure, and their dedication to Indian Market is part of what makes the event so special. SWAIA is an organization I am very proud of. And as Native American art PHOTO AMANDA CROCKER evolves and takes on new life, I hope to bring new and exciting Ira Wilson events to Indian Market, striving for year 100 and beyond. I’ve said many times that Native art is truly the heartbeat of the Southwest. It is a way for artists to support themselves while sharing and celebrating history, tradition and culture. There is no better way to experience this magic than by participating in our 97th Santa Fe Indian Market. Have a great weekend! Best wishes, Ira Wilson

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Yvonne Gillespie Finance Administration Tammie Touchine (Navajo) Membership and Volunteer Coordinator Brenda Pearson Administrative Assistant

Indian Market 2018 Seasonal Staff Amber-Dawn Bear Robe (Siksika) Fashion Show Producer Loni Bernally (Navajo) Zone Manager, Convention Center Angelica Gallegos Zone Manager, IM: EDGE Gayle Gertler Zone Manager, Merchandise Ronica Hale (Diné, Navajo) Volunteer and Membership Assistant Damien Moore (Navajo) Indian Market Intern Jhane Myers (Comanche/Blackfeet) Native Cinema Showcase Nicholas Quintero Logistics Coordinator Grace Siler PR and Marketing Intern Laura Sippel Zone Manager, Artist Services


S WA I A T H A N K S O U R 2 0 1 8 INDIAN MARKET SPONSORS!

Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

JoAnn & Bob Balzer

In-Kind Sponsors:

I Jeffrey & Darlene Anderson

Patron Level Business Members:

We are grateful to those sponsors who support SWAIA, however acceptance of donations does not constitute endorsement of any said business. 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

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Adrian Standing-Elk Pinnecoose Navajo (DinĂŠ)/Southern Ute A New Beginning, 2017 40 x 27 inches Heavyweight matte photo paper


2018 SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET

Mutifaceted kaleidoscope of experiences

W

BY AMERICA MEREDITH (CHEROKEE NATION) henever I read about Santa Fe Indian Market, I wonder if the author and I were at the same event. Our experiences are so diverse — seeing different artworks, meeting different people and having different conversations — that, despite moving through the same 14-block area in downtown Santa Fe, in many ways we really are not attending the same event. Like images in a kaleidoscope, the colors, sounds and sensations at the market shift and shimmer. Consider the thousands of connections made and conversations held when almost 1,000 artists in 700 booths showcase tens of thousands of individual artworks — each made by hand — which in turn attract more than 100,000 visitors. The swell of dialogue and artistic exchange is beyond any one person’s ability to capture. We each chart our own course (often using this magazine as an essential tool) and plan our path as best we can while embracing the unexpected. Art and artist are inextricably connected at Santa Fe Indian Market. The brief Friday awards preview, IM: EDGE and art on display in the booths heighten a sense of urgency — we want to take in as much as we can, knowing the ultimate impossibility of seeing everything. This reality calls us to return year after year. Perspectives shift and change, and artworks are cast in a different light, depending upon current events and audience perspectives. “We attend Santa Fe Indian Market as an annual opportunity to get a snapshot of the full range of Native American art,” write Jo and Mike Wahlig, art collectors from Minneapolis. “We collect and learn about Native art from many different sources, but Indian Market is the best opportunity every year to reflect on our own view of art and to interact with a great group of artists, collectors and curators with diverse life experiences, skills and interests. When talking to the artists, you gain an understanding that their inspiration may be their distinct 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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Al Qöyawayma (Hopi), Sikyati-style miniature pot with corn motif, 2002. Astronaut John Herrington (Chickasaw) carried the pot on the Space Shuttle Endeavor to the International Space Station.

cultures and heritage, but it also can be the art of artists like James Rosenquist or Henri Rousseau, or Japanese influences on pottery design or the artists’ most recent international travel.” The Wahligs enjoy observing changes in the artists’ styles over time. “We see many of the artists every year and watch their development, meet their families, learn from them and further our own understanding. Today our interests encompass an array of art we didn’t appreciate when we started collecting. We give Indian Market full credit for providing us the opportunity to learn to see differently.”


Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo)

Carla Hemlock (Mohawk), Walking through Time

Inspiring us to see differently is exactly what art does best. Like a prism shattering a single beam of light into a multitude of colors, art gives us the ability to challenge our own entrenched perspectives and to consider the perspectives of other people. Whether you are Native or non-Native, you will see art from a myriad of cultures different than your own. The content of the work might be subtle and take time to comprehend — even particular weaves in basketry or tempers in pottery have their own names and meanings. Native art can carry layers upon layers of metaphorical meanings that reveal themselves only to the most patient and accepting of observers. Contrary to SWAIA’s reputation as an arbiter of what defines Native art — a legacy of the mid-20th century — the organization actually affords artists incredible freedom, especially when compared to shows in which artworks are selected by jurors and exhibitions that require artists to negotiate their visions with those of curators. Instead of reflecting a centralized vision, each Indian Market booth is a space curated by the artist alone. After being juried in, artists choose the work they wish to show, as long as it meets guidelines set by the Indian Market Standards Committee, which has recently been reinstated after a multiyear hiatus. These guidelines require artists to make their own pieces, to avoid duplicitous materials such as stabilized turquoise and to disclose the use of certain other materials — but at no point is subject matter restricted. A decade ago, the rules restricting what artists could exhibit in their booths were opened up to the point where almost anything handmade was welcome. During a brief scare in June, SWAIA announced that artists could bring only artwork fitting the classifications they were juried into — a reversal of the last decade’s policy. So it remains that a thousand artists select the work shown at the market. Even art that does not win awards is displayed at the Friday night awards preview at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. More often 34

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than not, I find non-award-winning work to be the most intriguing and complex. Artists can also display their work at IM: EDGE, an exhibition in the convention center’s lobby, this year with the theme “Art and Activism.” One could argue that being an Indigenous person in the 21st century is activism in and of itself. Another form of activism is to create art based on one’s own community aesthetics and values, as opposed to catering to the demands of Western aesthetics. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Canada and the United States attempted to force Native peoples to assimilate into mainstream Western culture. Indigenous communities have deliberately resisted this assimilation, and the visual arts have been integral facets of the continuance, revival and renewal of tribal cultures. There is no single Native American culture but instead thousands of different tribal cultures, each with its own distinct history and relationship to its homeland. Two hundred of these cultures from the United States and Canada are represented at Indian Market. Carla Hemlock, a Mohawk textile artist who also collaborates with her wood-carver husband, Babe Hemlock, shares why she makes the long trek from Kahnawake Mohawk Territory via Quebec to Santa Fe every August: “The anticipation to see what artists have created. It’s all about the art!” Carla won last year’s Best of Beadwork and Quillwork award. That classification was created in 2000; previously, Native beadwork and quillwork were part of the Diverse


Tammy Garcia (Santa Clara Pueblo), Dragonfly Dream, 2017 Native Santa Clara Pueblo clay and natural turquoise 10 x 8 x 4 inches

America Meredith (Cherokee Nation), Bringing Harmony into the World, 2008 Gouache on paper 21 × 17 inches

Arts classification. Indigenous media such as ceramics, katsinas and basketry are mainstays at the market, but for art that defies the classification system, Diverse Arts provides a wildcard. Allowing artists to drive the evolution of Santa Fe Indian Market has been integral to its viability through the decades. As the market approaches its 100th anniversary, its legacy is being continually reappraised. SWAIA has experienced tumultuous times and a high staff turnover rate in the last two decades (event organizing is ranked as one of the most stressful jobs), but the artists have weathered these and other storms. SWAIA’s decision to hire Ira Wilson (Navajo), formerly of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, is cause for optimism for the organization’s future. Wilson comes from a family of Navajo artists, has years of experience working with artists from local tribes and has event planning experience. He is SWAIA’s fourth Native executive director, following Dallin Maybee (Northern Arapaho/Seneca), John Torres Nez (Navajo), Paul Rainbird Gonzales (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi). Wilson has worked with artists from numerous tribes and can restore the respect they deserve. Promises of increased transparency and stability bode well for the future. The market continues to attract some of the most accomplished artists in Indian Country. Tammy Garcia (Santa Clara Pueblo), ceramic and bronze sculptor, and Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), ceramic

sculptor and fashion designer, both have booths at Indian Market this year. In a world of communication increasingly mediated through social media, here is a face-to-face celebration of community, where any curious art lover can meet some of the leading artists in the Native art world and ask about their work. Many tribes frown upon the self-promotion and bravado demanded to succeed in the mainstream art world, but at Indian Market, artists can share their work and the public can inquire further without the artists breaking cultural proscriptions. Indian Market artists have complex lives beyond the booth. Some have advanced art degrees. Others have apprenticed to learn information not taught in any Western college. Many exhibit nationwide, some exhibit internationally and one, Al Qöyawayma (Hopi), had a piece transported on the International Space Station. The informal nature of the booths can confuse some visitors, but don’t be fooled: the artists are accomplished and talented. The casual, friendly nature of Indian Market — a refreshing alternative to the elitism in mainstream art venues — reflects Indigenous attitudes of humility and hospitality. Long-standing Indian Market artist Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo), whose family members are also market artists, says, “To me, Indian market means community and family. It’s like a reunion that happens every year, this great migration into Santa Fe to reunite with people with a common love of art.” Hailing from multiple locales with diverse perspectives, art lovers of all stripes find common ground here. Dazzling in its diversity, Santa Fe Indian Market is an explosion of creativity that brings artists and art lovers together for unique connections and moments, fleeting or long-lasting. The art itself — changing hands, moving through space and time — will live on, long after the 2018 market is a fading memory, to tell the story. 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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SWAIA CALENDAR OF EVENTS Friday 8.17 Best of Show Ceremony and Luncheon 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. This exclusive, members-only event, sponsored by the Institute of American Indian Arts, brings together awardwinning artists and the Indian Market community to celebrate this year’s best work. The event begins with the awards presentation, followed by a celebratory luncheon for the Best of Show and Best of Classification winners. Award sponsors attend, as well as those who want a first look at the award-winning pieces. Includes a preview of IM: EDGE. Ticketed event: $150. Call 505-983-5220 or visit swaia.org before Aug. 15 to become a member and/ or purchase tickets. Tickets not available at the door.

Sneak Preview of Award-Winning Art Powwow fancy dancer Brad Bearsheart (Standing Rock Lakota/Dakota)

SWAIA (the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts), the organizer of Santa Fe Indian Market, has a jam-packed schedule of official events planned for this year’s shindig, kicking off in the days leading up to the grand exhibition and sale of prize artworks. Here is a comprehensive summary. For details, call 505-983-5220 or visit swaia.org.

Tuesday-Sunday 8.14-8.19 Native Cinema Showcase New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave. In partnership with the National Museum of the American Indian, the 18th annual NCS kicks off an almost weeklong film festival highlighting the contributions of Native films and filmmakers. Free and open to the public. (Films and times listed in sidebar.)

PHOTOS GENE PEACH

Thursday 8.16 Indian Market Kickoff Party 7-10 p.m.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center courtyard 201 W. Marcy St. Sponsored by Jeffrey and Darlene Anderson, this all-ages event includes entertainment by LightningCloud, a DJ and a preview of IM: EDGE. Free and open to the public.

2-4 p.m.

Zuni Pueblo dancer

Saturday 8.18 97th Santa Fe Indian Market on the Plaza 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

Santa Fe Plaza and adjacent streets The 97th Santa Fe Indian Market transforms the city, with nearly 1,000 of the continent’s finest Native American artists showing their work. Booths fill the Plaza and surrounding streets. Indian Market is the largest and most prestigious Native American fine art show in the world. Free and open to the public.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. The Sneak Preview, sponsored by Cherokee Art Market, allows visitors to view phenomenal award-winning artwork before the market opens on Saturday morning and to meet Best of Show artists in an exclusive setting. Includes a special preview of IM: EDGE. Ticketed event: $150. Call 505-983-5220 or visit swaia.org to purchase tickets before Aug. 15. Tickets also available at the door.

IM: EDGE

General Preview of Award-Winning Art

Convention Center Courtyard Market

Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. Sponsored by Cherokee Art Market, the General Preview is your chance to view award-winning artwork before the weekend market begins. Includes a preview of IM: EDGE. Ticketed event: $50. Call 505-983-5220 or visit swaia.org to purchase tickets before Aug. 15. Tickets also available at the door.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center courtyard 201 W. Marcy St. Be sure to visit the nonprofit, co-op and children’s booth’s — RedCloud, creator of the Indigenous Legends coloring book, leads a workshop in the children’s tent at noon. Free and open to the public.

6-8:30 p.m.

Kallestewa dance group (Zuni Pueblo)

9 a.m.-5 p.m. Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy St. Sponsored by JoAnn and Bob Balzer, IM: EDGE is a curated, gallery-type contemporary show and sale, featuring artists who are pushing the boundaries and exploring issues related to activism and identity. Free and open to the public.

7 a.m.-5 p.m.


Native Cinema Showcase

Market Stage Music and Dance Performances

New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave.

9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Plaza Stage Music and performing arts augment the Indian Market experience. Check the Plaza Stage or download the Indian Market app for a full schedule of performances. Free and open to the public.

TUESDAY

Book Signings

WEDNESDAY

8.14

7 p.m. Dawnland (2018, 86 min.) Discussion follows, with Esther Anne (Passamaquoddy), codirector of Maine-Wabanaki REACH, and Tracy Rector (Choctaw/Seminole).

8.15

11 a.m.-noon SWAIA Merchandise Booth on the Plaza Navajo sisters and longtime Indian Market artists Barbara Teller Ornelas and Lynda Teller Pete sign advance copies of their book Spider Woman’s Children: Navajo Weaving Today. Weavers profiled in the book include Florence Riggs, Florence Manygoats, Rena Begay, Gilbert Begay, Jason Harvey, Martha Schultz and Lillie Taylor.

1-2 p.m. Author Ana Pacheco signs her new book Pueblos of New Mexico, which features images of New Mexico’s 19 pueblos from 1866 to 1925. Royalties from the sale of this book benefit the Chamiza Foundation’s Pueblo educational programs. Brian Vallo, author of the foreward, will also be present to sign.

Live Auction, Gala and Fashion Show 6 p.m.

La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E. San Francisco St. Hosted by La Fonda, this fundraiser for SWAIA begins with a silent auction and cocktail reception at the hotel’s La Terraza. The fashion show, new this year, features textile-based art and jewelry. The evening culminates with the exciting gala and dinner in the Lumpkins Ballroom. The special Native American menu includes a bison entrée. Ticketed event: $225; tables available. Call 505-983-5220 or visit swaia. org before Aug. 15 for tickets. Tickets not available at the door.

Native Cinema Showcase Family Night: Coco 8-10:30 p.m.

Railyard Park 740 Cerrillos Road In partnership with the National Museum of the American Indian, Family Night features the 2017 Disney hit Coco. Families are encouraged to bring chairs or blankets and to arrive in time to secure a spot on the lawn. Food is available for purchase from a variety of local food trucks. The movie will begin at sunset. Free and open to the public.

Hoop dancer JaiP’o Makowa P’ing Harvier

Sunday 8.19

for traditional and contemporary Native fashions. Both child and adult participants vie for prizes. Free and open to the public.

97th Santa Fe Indian Market on the Plaza 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

The 97th Santa Fe Indian Market transforms the city, with nearly 1,000 of the continent’s finest Native American artists showing their work. Booths fill the Plaza and surrounding streets. Indian Market is the largest and most prestigious Native American fine art market in the world. Free and open to the public.

Market Stage Music and Dance Performances 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Plaza Stage Music and performing arts augment the Indian Market experience. Check the Plaza Stage or download the Indian Market app for a full schedule of performances. Free and open to the public.

Book Signings

11 a.m.-noon

IM: EDGE

9 a.m.-5 p.m. Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy St. Sponsored by JoAnn and Bob Balzer, IM: EDGE is a curated, gallery-type contemporary show and sale, featuring artists who are pushing the boundaries and exploring issues related to activism and identity. Free and open to the public.

Convention Center Courtyard Market 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center courtyard 201 W. Marcy St. Be sure to visit the nonprofit, co-op and children’s booths. Crystle Lightning leads the workshop “Chasing Your Dreams: How I Went From the Rez to the Big Screen” at noon. Free and open to the public.

Native American Clothing Contest 9 a.m.-noon

Plaza Stage The Native American Clothing Contest is one of the most beloved and anticipated events. The contest includes categories

SWAIA Merchandise Booth Navajo sisters and longtime Indian Market artists Barbara Teller Ornelas and Lynda Teller Pete sign advance copies of their book Spider Woman’s Children: Navajo Weaving Today. Weavers profiled include Florence Riggs, Florence Manygoats, Rena Begay, Gilbert Begay, Jason Harvey, Martha Schultz and Lillie Taylor.

1-2 p.m. Author Ana Pacheco signs her new book Pueblos of New Mexico, which features images of New Mexico’s 19 pueblos from 1866 to 1925. Foreward by Brian Vallo.

Haute Couture Fashion Show 2-3 p.m.

Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy St. A market highlight! This adored and highly attended event features Native designers presenting cutting-edge fashion collections and accessories. The show opens with a performance by Nakotah LaRance, 2018 world champion hoop dancer. Ticketed event: $25. Call 505-9835220 or visit swaia.org to purchase tickets. This event always sells out! If you do not get a seat, there is standing room, but you must arrive early — first come, first served.

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1 p.m. More Than a Word (2017, 70 min.) Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian, offers remarks. 3 p.m. Tribal Justice (2017, 90 min.) 7 p.m. Waru (2017, 86 min.) The film is shown in English and Maori with English subtitles.

THURSDAY

8.16

1 p.m. Family dynamics shorts program (76 min. total) These short films focus on the complexities of what it means to be family. 3 p.m. Reclamation shorts program (78 min. total) These short films are about reclaiming and preserving cultural identity. 7 p.m. Moroni for President (2018, 78 min.) Discussion follows, with Moroni Benally (Navajo).

FRIDAY

8.17

1 p.m. Future-focused shorts program (56 min. total) This program of family-friendly short films is fun for kids of all ages. 3 p.m. Conversation: “State of the Art.” Panelists include Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director, National Museum of the American Indian; David M. Roche, director and CEO, Heard Museum; John Vanausdall, president and CEO, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art; and W. Richard West Jr. (Cheyenne), president and CEO, Autry Museum of the American West. 7 p.m. Indictment: The Crimes of Shelly Chartier (2017, 44 min.) Discussion follows, with directors Shane Belcourt (Métis) and Lisa Jackson (Anishinaabe).

SATURDAY

8.18

1 p.m. Future Voices of New Mexico (90 min. total) This program examines the Future Voices of New Mexico filmmaking project and is introduced by Marcella Ernest (Bad River Band of Ojibwe), project director. 3 p.m. Kayak to Klemtu (2017, 90 min.) 8 p.m. Coco (2017, 105 min.) Screened outdoors at Santa Fe Railyard Park.

SUNDAY

8.19

1 p.m. Rise Above shorts program (87 min.) These short films focus on rising above adversity and learning life’s lessons. 3 p.m. Out of State (2017, 79 min.) All screenings and discussions are subject to change.


LIVE AUCTION AND GALA

Paddles up! SWAIA’s 2018 Live Auction Gala brings splendid treasures to the block

T

BY ROSEMARY DIAZ (SANTA CLARA TEWA)

HE LIVE AUCTION GALA RECEPTION AND DINNER has long been one of Indian Market’s most important and anticipated events. The glamorous affair is also the cornerstone of SWAIA fund-raising endeavors. Auction proceeds benefit the organization’s education and outreach programs and annual fellowship endowments, which support emerging and established Native American artists representing tribes throughout the United States and Canada. This year the gala’s fine-art-filled and fashion-forward fundraiser is once again held at La Fonda on the Plaza, Santa Fe’s historic landmark hotel. Also known as The Inn at the End of the Trail, the hotel is located where the east end of San Francisco Street meets the northern tip of the Old Santa Fe Trail, where many long-ago, Missouri-launched covered-wagon journeys wheeled to a comforting stop. Given their shared history as important destinations and distinguished gathering places, La Fonda seems a natural venue for SWAIA’s most glittery get-together of the year. “Indian Market and La Fonda both opened in 1922, so we’ve been partnering for almost 100 years,” says the hotel’s director of sales, Ed Pulsifer. “Both the market and the hotel have been important gathering places, and it’s been a wonderful partnership. Jenny [Kimball, La Fonda’s owner and CEO/board chair] is very supportive of SWAIA. We try to do whatever we can to support it and the Indian Market community.” As in years past, the Live Auction Gala will commence with a cocktail and hors d’oeuvre reception at La Terraza, La Fonda’s east-facing, third-floor terrace, whose views include the sunlit facade of St. Francis Cathedral. A silent auction follows the bell tower’s announcement of the six o’clock hour, with many one-of-a-kind, handmade art objects up for bid. Next on the evening’s agenda is a Native Americaninspired dinner with a bison entrée, prepared by La Fonda’s own culinary team, a brand-new gala fashion show and the climactic live auction — all in the Lumpkins Ballroom. The event promises a delectable menu, a fabulous fashion show and a once-a-year opportunity to vie for a coveted treasure. Both the silent and live auctions are made possible by generous donations from artists and other friends of Indian Market. The unique items bound for 2018’s auction block include Bear Fetish, a limestone and alabaster sculpture by Matthew Panana and Ryan Panana (both Jemez Pueblo), with an estimated retail value of

DANIEL NADELBACH

$1,200; Cedar Jewelry Box an exquisite if humbly titled feat in stone and wood by Jolene Bird (Kewa Pueblo), estimated at $5,500; Spring Butterfly, a sterling-silver bolo tie inlaid with mother-of-pearl, lapis and Sleeping Beauty turquoise, by Benson Manygoats (Navajo) and valued at $4,800; and Harmony, Evelyn Fredericks’ (Hopi) bronze sculpture that lends antithetical commentary on recent disharmonies and carries the artist’s powerful message of giving and generosity. The figure holds an empty bowl. Is she waiting for it to be filled? Or is it empty because she has given everything away? “Either way, the balance between giving and receiving is harmony,” says the artist. “I’m not on social media but am aware of the controversy that follows the [Indian Market] selection process every year,” says Fredericks. “After reading [an] article in The Santa Fe New Mexican, I realized I have been remiss in my support of SWAIA. I feel that if other artists like myself were aware of the need for donations, they would support SWAIA. Artists are generous, and we all know how much it costs to put on a show of such magnitude. We don’t have to agree with everything SWAIA does, but it is well worth the effort to see that Indian Market reaches its 100th anniversary.” Of course, no auction would hold an ear without an auctioneer who can handle the gavel with both grit and grace, and with an intimate knowledge and appreciation of the artwork cataloged for the block. Enter Maron Hindman, principal auctioneer for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, who comes to the podium from the house’s Mile High City offices to conduct the auction chant. “I was honored to have been invited to conduct the live auction for the first time this year,” says Hindman. SWAIA’s “mission is powerful, and this market, the largest and oldest of its kind, has had a positive impact on the Native American art collector and artist communities as a whole.” Beyond the practical, mission-driven efforts of the event, the Live Auction Gala is a celebration of Native America’s best art, its most beloved (and awarded) artists and the continuation of its creative legacy. It has become a yearly reunion of sorts, a time for the market’s extended family of artists, art patrons and benefactors to reconnect, recollect, catch up and stay in the know about new and exciting things in the Indian art world. So paddles up and auction hammer down. Let the bidding begin!

Details SWAIA LIVE AUCTION GALA RECEPTION AND DINNER 6:00 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18

La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E. San Francisco St. This is a ticketed event and sells out quickly. For more information, call the SWAIA office: 505-983-5220.

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Anderson Marion (Navajo), Dragonfly Purity, bracelet

David K. John (Navajo), Changing Woman’s Destination

Evelyn Fredericks (Hopi), Harmony

Upton Ethelbah (Santa Clara Pueblo/ White Mountain Apache), sculpture

Rosemary Hill (Tuscarora), beaded necklace and cuff

Glenda McKay (Athabascan), charm basket

Benson Manygoats (Navajo), bolo

Jolene Bird (Kewa Pueblo) 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

Matthew and Ryan Panana (Jemez Pueblo)

Andrew Rodriguez (Laguna Pueblo), Winter Blessing 39


JOSHUA TALLAS IS POSTER/MERCHANDISE ARTIST OF THE YEAR

A closer look SWAIA design fellow Joshua Tallas

Déégo 40

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DESER SON DESERT of santa fe

DAWN WALLACE, JARED CHAVEZ, WADDIE CRAZYHORSE OFFICINE CREATIVE BOOTS, MAJO BAGS

BY JEAN MERZ-EDWARDS Looking around at Santa Fe Indian Market this year, you’ve likely noticed the distinctive image of a hogan being carried up into the blue sky by hundreds of colorful balloons. The image is titled Déégo, which means “up” in Diné. Graphic designer and painter Joshua Tallas created it last year by blending together images of Monument Valley, a sunset, balloons and a hogan using Adobe Photoshop. Drawing inspiration from Pixar Animation’s Up, Tallas recontextualizes imagery surrounding the 2009 film. He shares, “I was inspired to choose the Up theme, as I felt this was a great way to incorporate the idea of taking Diné culture with you anywhere you go. And that is by literally taking the hogan with you, as the hogan represents your foundation of teaching within your home. The balloons are a good supporting element to enhance my message. . . . I want the viewers to imagine themselves on the hogan.” The beautiful surrealism of Déégo captured the attention of more than one SWAIA committee for this year’s market, and Tallas was ultimately awarded the 2018 SWAIA Design Fellowship. This means his graphic art appears on market merchandise, including the commemorative poster, T-shirts and other items. In addition, Tallas receives a complimentary booth at the market this year. As a newcomer to Santa Fe Indian Market, Tallas says, “My favorite thing about being the design fellow is the opportunity to share my work with the world and also being alongside some the greats of Native American art.” Originally from Rough Rock, Arizona, Tallas attended Navajo Preparatory School in Farmington, New Mexico, before settling in Flagstaff, Arizona. There he earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in visual communication from Northern Arizona University. Tallas calls his genre interactive design, which he describes as “having the audience not just appreciate the design but also in some way interact with it as well.” His artist statement expands on the concept of interactive design: “My work takes on various forms intended to draw in the viewer as coauthor and witness, create new and unpredictable cycles of thoughts and associations, providing an experimental change to challenge one’s perceptions, perspectives and assumptions.” Tallas’ main inspiration reaches back in time. “The foundation of my inspiration comes from my father,” Tallas states. “As a kid, I always saw my father create paintings and drawings. I was curious to know why and how he became such a great artist. I wanted to be like him. Curiosity is what drove me to learn more, and with that I have a sincere passion and love for art.” Curiosity continues to drive the young artist. He explains in his artist statement, “As a growing artist I find myself experimenting with a wide range of mixed media. In my work you can find abstract paintings, graphic design, 3D modeling, and web design. I love to experiment with the skills and techniques that I learned in school by mixing them with my Native contemporary lifestyle. . . . I strive to innovate and experiment with the best of my knowledge, to create or stumble upon something incredible that will bring together my community.” With Déégo, Tallas has definitely created something incredible, and Santa Fe Indian Market posters will expose his work to an audience of 100,000. When asked what’s next, Tallas humbly replies, “Continue learning and growing my art.” You’ll find Tallus in booth number 673 PLZ.

725 Canyon Road

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505.982.9499

desertsonofsantafe.com

Visit our Facebook page


VIRGIL ORTIZ (COCHITI PUEBLO)

ARTIST STATEMENT This is a critical moment for the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) and for Native art. Today, many Native artists feel that they are being discouraged, or that there is an attempt to silence their art, much as happened in the past. Even if it is by accident that some of the older artists didn’t get booths at market this year, there is that feeling that their work doesn’t matter. However, the truth is just the opposite: all these Native artists are coming from a similar background. We all use art to tell our stories. For me, it is both a personal and cultural experience. I have been telling the story of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 for the past two decades. It is not just a story of persecution and revolt, but also a story of resilience — one that seems to be more important than ever to talk about in today’s political and cultural climate. Cochiti Pueblo’s figurative art was destroyed in the 17th century by the conquistadors, who associated it with sorcery and witchcraft. After the revolt and the return of the Spanish, clay once again became a means of personal and cultural expression. By the 1880s, the monos — figures historically created by the women of the pueblo — provided a social commentary on what seemed to be a fast-changing world. Today, the speed of change via social media and the internet makes it increasingly important for Native artists to keep our art relevant and to use art as an educational tool. 
The Pueblo Revolt has a strong resonance throughout the Southwest. Since Herman Agoyo began the process of getting the statue of Po’pay into the U.S. Capitol building, Native artists have begun to see how the event speaks to the world today. I have used historic facts to create my own futuristic version of the revolt to help make it relevant and understandable

for both kids and those who have never heard of the event. However, there seems to be a slow awakening about its importance: the Denver Art Museum featured Revolt 1680/2180 — a collection of ceramic figures and photographic pieces — in 2015-2016; the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center will be bringing the story forward with Revolution: Rise against the Invasion, which will open in October 2018. Like the other artists, I am working for Indian Market, but it’s not just about sales: I want to continue to make a statement about my art and culture. I have said for years that I want to give “voice back to the clay,” but I think it’s more important right now to give “voice back to our culture.” I am working on a group of new pieces about the Pueblo Revolt called Prelude: Revolution Is Coming. The work will be in both my Indian Market booth and at King Galleries in Santa Fe — a holistic approach that includes art, culture, clay, photography, my booth at market and the gallery space. It’s time for all of us involved in Native art to work together to keep it from becoming marginalized as just another ethnic art. It’s time for all of us — collectors, galleries, artists and market attendees — to stand together and protect, promote and enjoy this awe-inspiring American Indigenous art in all its forms. Just as the Pueblo Revolt was the First American Revolution, Native art is the First American Art. Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo) — the son and grandson of renowned potters Seferina Ortiz and Laurencita Herrera — won his first Santa Fe Indian Market award at age 14. He is a sculptor, photographer, graphic artist, fashion designer and home decor designer. His work has been exhibited and collected both nationally and internationally. To learn more about Ortiz and his work, visit virgilortiz.com.


ABOUT THE COVER The image of Aeronauts searching desert battlefields is from Revolt 1680/2180, Virgil Ortiz’s ongoing film project. The accompanying narrative:

REVOLUTION IS COMING

It is 2180. The pueblos are in chaos. The invasion of Native land

continues. The scourge of war rages everywhere. The time to act is now. Cuda and Steu, the Aeronaut twins, are the captain and head commander of the Survivorship Armada. They summon their fleet and prepare for extreme warfare against the invading Castilian forces. Translator and the Spirit World Army are transported to earth’s realm to aid Po’pay, Tahu and her army of Blind Archers in preparation for an unprecedented revolt. Desperately, the Aeronauts search for any remaining clay artifacts from the battlefields. They know that challenges and persecution will continue, so it is imperative to preserve and protect their clay, culture, language and traditions from extinction. See the video trailer at the opening of Ortiz’s show, “Prelude: Revolution Is Coming,” from 3 to 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, at King Galleries Santa Fe (130 Lincoln Ave., Suite D). A larger-scale video, introducing more characters from his “Revolt” storyline, will be unveiled at Ortiz’s “Revolution: Rise against the Invasion” exhibit at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center in October 2018.

PHOTO COURTESY VIRGIL ORTIZ


Orlando Dugi (Navajo) fashion designer

Patricia Michaels (Taos Pueblo) fashion designer

Amber-Dawn Bear Robe (Siksika)

Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo) fashion designer 44

Pamela Baker (Kwaguilth/Tlingit/Haida/ Squamish) fashion designer

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Violet Dawn Ahmie (Laguna Pueblo) fashion designer


CATWALK BY NINA SANDERS (APSÁALOOKE)

One of the most magnificent spectacles of beauty and art can be witnessed at SWAIA’s Indian Market Fashion Show, organized and nurtured by the fabulously intense curator of art and IAIA visiting professor Amber-Dawn Bear Robe (Siksika). The show is one of the most popular events at Indian Market, and attendance has only grown since Bear Robe took over the catwalk in 2014. Her catwalk is not that different than those at New York’s world-famous Fashion Week, and her designers are equally talented. This catwalk dazzles a diverse audience with high fashion in the form of magnificent works of couture, as well as more reasonably priced ready-to-wear pieces. I met Bear Robe for the first time at a fundraiser/ fashion show in downtown Santa Fe. I arrived late to a huge contemporary museum space reimagined as a fashion show venue. The audience boasted some of Santa Fe’s most influential individuals; the movers and shakers of art, fashion, film and academia stood side by side, facing a parade of models swathed in spectacular garments and striding by to ultra-sexy, fast-paced house music. Amid the excitement, Bear Robe commanded the magnificently dressed room. The music, the venue, the timing — she had everything on point. In addition to her organizational wins, she swept across the room effortlessly in stunning black high-heel sandals and a little black dress covered in black beads. Bear Robe and I had several chats, twice over drinks

and once at an art opening. What I learned from her is that fashion shows demand months of intensive volunteer work, skill in navigating political spaces and collaboration with many other passionate people and to ensure that the end result will dazzle the most discerning fashionistas, curators, taste makers, collectors and celebrities. The success of a new designer often hinges on the Indian Market Fashion Show. As Bear Robe explained to me over a drink at La Posada’s Staab House, “It is up to us as Native people to make space for ourselves. If we want to be taken seriously as mainstream artists, designers, models and photographers, we have to work extra hard, speak up for what we want and create new paradigms in every realm. Native fashion is art; it’s history; it’s narrative. We’ve been creating couture for centuries. We’ve been wearing art since the beginning.” Bear Robe is thrilled to share that some of Native art and fashion’s best and brightest will be gracing the runway this year. Artists such as Jamie Okuma, Cody Sanderson and Maya Stewart will show new collections that include everything from prêt-àporter and street fashion to couture. The lineup this year will bring in new artists and many fan favorites. The show will once again inspire the audience to think big, create, collect and look fabulous. This is where you’ll see what the cool kids will be wearing next year and, more importantly, where history is being made.

Paytyn Rae Growing Thunder (Assiniboine/Sioux) Cash Nelson (Kiowa/Taos Pueblo)

Taryn Tsinnie (Navajo, Diné)

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8.19

Sunday

Native American Clothing Contest 9 a.m.-noon Main stage on the Plaza Free and open to the public

Indian Market Fashion Show 2-3 p.m. Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy St. General seating $25; VIP all-access pass $100 (tickets available through swaia.org)

Bree Black Horse (Seminole of Oklahoma)


JaiP’o Makowa P’ing Harvier (Pojoaque/Santa Clara Pueblos)

Jessa Rae Growing Thunder (Assiniboine/Sioux)

Holly Yuzicapi (Lakota/Dakota) & Melinda Good Will (Lakota/Dakota) wearing Juanita Growing Thunder Jingle Dance regalia 46

Taylor Lente (Isleta Pueblo)

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AUGUST 14 - 17, 2018 LOCATION | EL MUSEO CULTURAL DE SANTA FE, NM View and purchase basketry, jewelry, textiles, kachinas, sculptures, pottery and more, from over 65 renowned exhibitors. When the world comes to Santa Fe for the finest in American Indian art - its heritage will be found at this flagship show.

2018 SHOW DATES

Wednesday - Friday August 15 - 17 | 11AM - 5PM

TICKET PRICES

$15 / day $25 / run-of-show $5 discount with this ad

OPENING NIGHT PARTY Tues. | August 14 | 6-9PM

OPENING TICKETS $50 / per person

100% of the Opening Night ticket profits benefit New Mexico PBS

August 12th Don’t miss the last day of OBJECTS OF ART SANTA FE located in the same venue!

OFFICIAL PARTNER

NATIVE ART WEEK

BENEFITING

WINE DONATED BY


2017 BEST OF CLASSIFICATION

AWARDS

BY ARIN MCKENNA

One thing that unites the Best of Class winners — whether they are in the process of building their careers or already have a string of prestigious awards — is a commitment to excellence. Other than that, the winning pieces are as distinctive as the artists themselves. Best of Show winner Pat Pruitt is an advocate for the right of Native artists to express creative ideas using nontraditional media. His tribute to Laguna Pueblo pottery was created in zirconium with computer numerical control (CNC) technology. Photographer Cara Romero and filmmaker Steven Paul Judd also express their heritage through cutting-edge technology. At the other end of the spectrum, Arthur Holmes carves traditional katsinas based on his personal experiences as a Hopi farmer, and Lola Cody has been perfecting her Two Grey Hills weaving since she was a child. Many award winners fall somewhere in between. Angie Yazzie won with a replica of a classic pottery design but is best known for creating contemporary pieces with centuries-old pottery techniques. Carla Hemlock honors the women who developed the distinctive raised beadwork style she works in by applying it to both traditional and contemporary designs. Donald Johnston pushes the boundaries with his baleen (whalebone) basketry, and Wesley Willie’s Navajo jewelry designs are sometimes inspired by cityscapes. See all the works submitted for judging — as well as the 2018 Best of Classification winners — at Friday’s preview events.

THE WINNERS

CLASSIFICATION I

CLASSIFICATION II CLASSIFICATION III CLASSIFICATION IV CLASSIFICATION V CLASSIFICATION VI

JEWELRY

POTTERY

(Navajo)

(Taos Pueblo)

WESLEY WILLIE

ANGIE YAZZIE

PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, GRAPHICS AND PHOTOGRAPHY

CARA ROMERO (Chemehuevi)

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WOODEN PUEBLO FIGURATIVE CARVINGS AND SCULPTURE

ARTHUR HOLMES JR. (Hopi)

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SCULPTURE

TEXTILES

(Laguna Pueblo)

(Navajo)

PAT PRUITT

LOLA CODY


MEET THE BOSS

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION V SCULPTURE

PAT PRUITT (Laguna Pueblo) PHOTOS GENE PEACH

CLASSIFICATION VII CLASSIFICATION VIII CLASSIFICATION IX CLASSIFICATION X CLASSIFICATION XI INNOVATION AWARD DIVERSE ARTS

JAMIE OKUMA

(Shoshone-Bannock/ Luiseño)

BEADWORK & QUILLWORK

YOUTH (17 YEARS AND UNDER)

MOVING IMAGES

(Mohawk)

(Navajo)

Choctaw)

CARLA HEMLOCK

RAIN SCOTT

STEVEN PAUL JUDD (Kiowa/

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BASKETRY

MIXED MEDIA

(Qagan Tayagungin)

(Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)

DONALD JOHNSTON

KATRINA MITTEN


TOP HONORS BEST OF SHOW 2017

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION V Sculpture

PAT PRUITT (LAGUNA PUEBLO)

Proving his mettle BY ARIN MCKENNA In 2017 Pat Pruitt wanted to mark his 10-year anniversary of showing at Indian Market by revisiting an award-winning piece he created his first year: a vessel sculpted in stainless steel. Pruitt applied all the knowledge he had gained in the previous decade, as well as new tools and new materials, to create Sentinel v1.0. His zirconium rendition of a Laguna Pueblo-style pot was awarded Best of Show. “It was really kind of a reflection back and seeing, What can I do now?” Pruitt says. “I think with any artist, as you progress through life, you attain new skill sets, new design elements and everything else.” Zirconium was one of the major innovations in updating the earlier vessel. Zirconium oxidizes when heat is applied; a ceramic-like, abrasive-resistant surface forms on the metal. But for Pruitt, the really “supercool thing” is the metallic black color the oxidation creates. Pruitt’s other metals of choice — stainless steel and titanium — resist staining, so achieving a black surface has been challenging. “I don’t stray too far from black in my color palette. So for me it was like, Wow, this is it,” Pruitt says. Pruitt had also invested in a three-dimensional software platform that helped him plan his vision virtually. With the computer numerical control (CNC) program, Pruitt could map out the components in a three-dimensional environment. “I could see the piece — quite literally — in a virtual environment, which allowed me to add a greater level of complexity,” Pruitt says. Pruitt’s earlier vessel had fewer than 100 components, including the tiny screws used to meld the pieces together. Last year’s vessel had more than 850 components. The result was an elegant pottery-shaped sculpture comprised of 18 “arms” defined by geometric details and a metallic black sheen. Pruitt was 15 when he began working with metal, apprenticing to silversmith Greg Lewis (Laguna/Acoma). During that period, he also studied with jeweler Charlie Bird (Laguna/Kewa). While pursuing a mechanical engineering degree at Southern Methodist University, he earned money for college costs and learned the machining trade by working in a machine shop. He applied his skills to creating bodypiercing jewelry, so he could afford that luxury on a “starving college student’s budget.” His stainless-steel creations attracted the attention of both friends and commercial enterprises, and soon he had a business

producing jewelry for the body-piercing industry. When that market began to dwindle, Pruitt wanted to return to the type of jewelry making he had learned as a youth. He decided to apply his knowledge of working with stainless steel and titanium to his jewelry practice. According to Pruitt, his metals of choice expand his design capacities, since they are more affordable than silver and gold and have fewer limitations. His works range in size from earrings to 10-foot sculpture. “What I can do with those [metals], given my skill set, is a pretty expansive design field,” Pruitt says. Pruitt’s Best of Show award reanimated controversy about using technology to create artwork, a debate that has persisted since he began showing at Indian Market. Critics argue that art should be handmade by the artist from start to finish. “They think that because you use CNC technology, all you do is push a button and it’s done for you. That’s the furthest thing from the truth. It takes a very specialized skill set, knowledge base and tools to be able to do what I do,” Pruitt says. Pruitt believes the resistance to his art form is rooted in consumers’ “romance” about Native art: “This is Indian-made, and it should have a story, and it should mean this, and it should mean that, like pounding on your jewelry with a railroad tie with stamps you made by hand. That’s the vision. That’s the romance. And we’re now four or five generations removed from that reality.” Although Pruitt manufactures the major components for his pieces himself, he points out the absurdity of having to handcraft 300 screws or 200 thread shafts. “Why should there be a definition for what an artist’s vision is?” Pruitt asks. “If I have this idea, and I realize I need someone in Germany to print a part, someone in China to fabricate something, someone in Canada to make something so that all the components come together to achieve my vision, why should there be a restriction on that? Because it’s my vision, and how I choose to make it is up to me, not the consumer.” With major awards from Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, and with pieces in prestigious collections such as the British Museum, Pruitt is learning to accept his role as a champion for this art form. He feels a responsibility to engage with and educate others, smoothing the way for the next generation of artists. “Maybe I am that leader to lead that charge on the education to help others not go through the resistance,” Pruitt says. Pruitt anticipates that as technology evolves, becoming more accessible and more affordable, the way artists use it will evolve as well. He notes how it has opened doors for artists with physical disabilities that prevent them from creating handmade art. He contends that other artists could benefit from technology’s efficiencies. A jeweler, for example, could create a digital 3D design and have someone with CNC equipment make the carved wax for casting. Pruitt looks forward to seeing what he calls “the next iteration of Native art.” “I’m dying to see what’s next. I’m dying to see who’s going to ride that wave. Who’s going to be ahead of the curve, be way up there in front? Because to me, that’s the excitement. That’s how Native art progresses.” 50

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TOP HONORS BEST OF CLASSIFICATION

WESLEY WILLIE (NAVAJO)

CARLA HEMLOCK (MOHAWK)

PHOTOS NADELBACHPHOTO.COM©/SWAIA

JAMIE OKUMA (SHOSHONE-BANNOCK/LUISENO)

ARTHUR HOLMES JR. (HOPI)

CARA ROMERO (CHEMEHUEVI)

STEVEN PAUL JUDD (KIOWA/CHOCTAW)

LOLA CODY (DINÉ)

DONALD JOHNSTON (QAGAN TAYAGUNGIN) 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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ANGIE YAZZIE (TAOS PUEBLO)


TOP HONORS BEST OF CLASSIFICATION

WESLEY WILLIE (NAVAJO, DINÉ)

ANGIE YAZZIE (TAOS PUEBLO)

CLASSIFICATION I Jewelry

substitute with those characteristics. The inspiration for Willie’s designs can come from the stone, the mood he is in or his surroundings. “Sometimes I’ll be in a mountainous area, or I’ll be in a certain part of the country where something clicks, and I just have to jot it down — find a piece of paper and a pen,” Willie says. “Or I go to a city, and I’ll see the landscape of the city and the architectural designs, and I take that and work it.” No two pieces are exactly the same. Even as a novice back in 1995, Willie wanted to create distinctive pieces. He says, “To me, to make the same piece over and over — that’s not fun. That’s work.”

WESLEY WILLIE (NAVAJO, DINÉ) Wesley Willie did not plan to create a bolo tie in the style of renowned Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma. His focus — as always — was on revealing what he calls “nature’s art,” the natural beauty of stones. Willie’s inspiration was some rare Morenci turquoise cut unusually thick. Reluctant to thin the stone, Willie decided to design a “high-rise” inlay. “It just happened because of the thickness of the Morenci. So I feel like it’s not really like I went out there and created an amazing piece out of metal,” Willie says. “It was the stone, nature’s art, that I presented to the public that actually won the award.” The design incorporated 18-karat gold, coral and lapis lazuli. As he worked on the piece, Willie realized that the inlay resembled Loloma’s style. He named the piece Tribute in honor of the late jeweler. Willie works mostly with silver, turquoise, coral and lapis, but his favorite materials are fossilized mammoth and walrus ivory. “The fossilized is more interesting than fresh, because it has various colors, from olive almost to black, depending on how old it is. And the texture on it changes as it gets older,” Willie says. Since some states ban the sale of ivory — with no distinction between fresh and fossilized — Willie is searching for an alternative, but he has yet to find a

CLASSIFICATION II Pottery

ANGIE YAZZIE (TAOS PUEBLO) According to Angie Yazzie, winner of Best of Classification II: Pottery, “We accommodate our passions.” Making pottery is definitely Yazzie’s passion. She says, “It deserves all the attention I can give it. It desires it. And most of the time it behaves, as I like to say.” Yazzie began working with clay as a child, learning from her mother, Mary Archuleta, and grandmother Isabel Archuleta, who told her, “You can make a living from Mother Earth. That’s what it’s there for.” Both women provided encouragement. 52

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“Even the ugliest [pots] in the beginning — they were held up like they were beautiful,” Yazzie says. That was 40 years ago. Yazzie began making pottery in earnest at 19, but her true inspiration came in 1994 when the School for Advanced Research invited her and nine other potters to a gathering. That meeting led to the book All That Glitters: The Emergence of Native American Micaceous Art Pottery in Northern New Mexico by Duane Anderson. Being included among pottery greats such as Lonnie Vigil (Nambe Pueblo) and Christine Nofchissey McHorse (Diné) was a turning point for Yazzie. “That was super-encouraging for me and made me just want to say, This is it. This is what I want to do forever.” Yazzie is known for her incredibly thin pottery and her innovative designs. She chose a more customary pattern for her Best of Classification piece, modeled upon a 19th-century “prayer bowl” she discovered in a book on southwestern pottery. The elegant black micaceous pot displays Yazzie’s signature thinness, with a Pueblo stair-step pattern around the top. She speaks proudly of how her 12-yearold grandson, Dillon, helped her finish the pot, cutting a fragile channel between each of the stair-step patterns. “He had to be precise and focused on it, and he did it,” Yazzie says. Through prayer and meditation, Yazzie recently discovered a new clay deposit to replace the exhausted clay pits she had been using. The high quality of the


PHOTOS GENE PEACH

CARA ROMERO (CHEMEHUEVI)

new clay is opening exciting new avenues for her. “It’s allowing me to be more challenging and more daring,” she says. “I’m doing some more daring pieces — almost sculptural.”

CLASSIFICATION III Paintings, Drawings, Graphics and Photography

CARA ROMERO (CHEMEHUEVI) Photographer Cara Romero is never content with simple documentary or fashion photography. She asks, “What more can I bring to the conversation?” That philosophy imbues Ty, which won the award for Best of Classification: Photography. Like many of her photos, this one is named for the model — in this case Ty Harris (Diné), signifying that it is as much about the individual as about universal themes. The image also reflects Romero’s maternal approach to photographing women. “P h o tog ra p hy i s a wh i te -m a l e dominated field. . . . It’s a subtle but powerful shift to put a Native woman behind the camera,” Romero says. “And what happens is you begin to learn much more about the person that’s being photographed than just outside looking in. It becomes very much a collaborative conversation about how the person wants

ARTHUR HOLMES JR. (HOPI)

to be seen.” Romero’s “synergistic collaboration” begins with sketching out her ideas and then interviewing her model to learn which ones resonate with her. In the resulting image, Romero fuses her knowledge of the model’s culture with what she brings from her own heritage. Romero wanted this photograph to depict a vernacular important to the Diné people. She borrowed an antique Diné rug for the background and created a multistrand white shell necklace for Ty. The necklace is significant for Romero on two levels. White Shell Woman is a prominent figure in Diné stories. The necklace symbolizes how White Shell Woman’s “strength and ideologies were passed down into this modern generation.” Also, the Diné traded with California’s indigenous people for white shells. Romero, whose Chemehuevi Tribe resides in California’s Mojave Desert, brought white shells from California and strung them with her cousin. “It became a beautiful process for us to string the shells together as California women and continue this ancient practice of bringing them to the Diné women,” Romero says. By Romero’s standards, the piece was a success. “I think a successful piece for me is when they want to take it home to their grandma, or they want to put it into their homes, which has happened with most of my female pieces … which is awesome.” 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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CLASSIFICATION IV Wooden Pueblo Figurative Carvings and Sculpture ARTHUR HOLMES JR. (HOPI) Arthur Holmes comes from a long line of Hopi farmers, carrying on the centuriesold custom of relying on the land. His carvings grow out of that personal experience. He says that any Hopi farmer or rancher looking at his Best of Classification winner, Cold Bringing Woman, would understand it. “Most of my dolls relate to what the living conditions are and what we always ask for,” Holmes says. “We are taught to live off the land, with the help of our messengers, the katsinas. They’re the messengers to the heavens.” Holmes describes Cold Bringing Woman as a rarely seen katsina. During Soyal, the Hopi winter solstice ceremony, the people leave prayer feathers for her and ask her to bring much-needed moisture to their highdesert environment. “She rarely comes to the villages, but it’s known that she’s one of the ones that bring moisture for the Hopis. … Mostly the folks do a lot of dry farming, so any amount of rain, moisture — snow during the winter season — we ask for,” Holmes says. Cold Bringing Woman has a personal connection for Holmes as well. As with all his katsinas, he carved it when “the


TOP HONORS BEST OF CLASSIFICATION

LOLA CODY (NAVAJO, DINÉ)

JAMIE OKUMA (SHOSHONE-BANNOCK/ LUISEÑO)

CARLA HEMLOCK (MOHAWK)

[cottonwood] root itself would make its transformation to me, what it wants to be.” This particular piece revealed itself to him after his wife, Irene, was successfully treated for breast cancer. He sees a connection between asking the katsina for moisture and asking for a better future, for new life. Holmes’ sculpture is carved from cottonwood root and painted with a mixture of oil paints and natural pigments, including white sand. The carving strides across the mesa, her hair and cape tossed by a moisture-laden wind in her wake. She carries life-giving snow in one arm and prayer feathers in the other hand, “accepting our prayers and in return bringing us the moisture for the upcoming spring season and prepar[ing] our cornplanting areas, not only for our cornplanting areas but for all living things that feed off the earth: animals, birds, rabbits, deer, wild game — pretty much all living things that depend on the earth — the fruits, the trees, everything. Like they say, water is life.”

Classification winner may represent her greatest triumph over adversity. When Cody was spinning wool for another large piece soon after the 2014 market ended, her progress was hindered by her own health issues and her husband’s advancing Parkinson’s disease. Previously, her husband, Alfred, took on many of the household chores when she wove major pieces. But now Lola is his primary caretaker. So instead of pacing herself, completing a certain number of inches each day, she wore herself out in a five-month push to finish before the 2017 market. Cody also lost some of the sheep that provided her with naturally colored wool. (One was a family pet that died of old age.) So she had to search for color matches to complete the rug. Even under ideal circumstances, using only natural sheep wool requires planning and adaptability. Cody changes rams every two years to breed for the colors she uses, but natural wool will never have the uniformity of a dyed product. “Every year, even though I use one color one year from the sheep, the next year the shade will be a little different,” Cody says. “But it all fits in. It gives variations throughout the rug.” Despite the challenges, Cody created another masterpiece. She credits Alfred and her son Kevin for making that possible. They built the wall-size reinforced-pipe metal loom that could withstand “the magnitude of the tension” the rug required and a mechanism for maintaining tension as finished portions of

the rug were moved off the upright loom. For Cody, who has been weaving since she was 5 years old, the process can be both a challenge and a respite. “Weaving was always a part of our home life. It was always there, and if I don’t have anything on the loom, I don’t feel complete.”

CLASSIFICATION VI Textiles LOLA CODY (NAVAJO, DINÉ) Lola Cody faced many challenges creating the 7½-by-9-foot Two Grey Hills rug that won Best of Classification in 2012 and even more when she wove an 8 x 14 ft. piece that earned Best of Show in 2014. But Cody’s 8 x 14 ft. 2017 Best of

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CLASSIFICATION VII Diverse Arts JAMIE OKUMA

(SHOSHONE-BANNOCK/LUISEÑO)

Fashion artist Jamie Okuma has been beading and making clothing so long that it is as natural to her as breathing. So when she creates a piece like the backpack and athletic ensemble that won Best of Classification in 2017, she does not sit down and sketch or plan. She just does. “I’ve been doing this since I was 5 years old, so I don’t know anything else. It’s hard for me to talk about process and explain things, because it’s an everyday thing for me,” Okuma says. “Pretty close to 24 hours I’m thinking about it. . . . It’s literally always on my mind, so I don’t necessarily need to have that type of preparation where I’m drawing something down and figuring out what I need.” Okuma always has a wide range of materials on hand. When she sees a fabric she likes, she picks it up, knowing it will get used down the road. And with the internet, what she does not have on hand is “just a click away.” When Okuma began her career at


5, she made outfits for her powwow dancing. She began making beaded dolls at age 15 and racked up many awards for that discipline before making the move to fashion about six years ago. Now she introduces new lines three to four times a year — everything from beaded highheeled shoes and handbags to richly patterned dresses and jackets. Her award-winning piece includes silk shorts and a matching athletic jacket, accompanied by a beaded backpack. Okuma accented the jacket with beadwork and appliqué and had the fabric for the shorts printed with a digital photo of the beadwork on the backpack. The round backpack is fully beaded with a floral design framed by Italian leather. Spikes radiate around the rim like the sun’s rays. The clothing and backpack went to separate private collectors, who are both using them.

CLASSIFICATION VIII Beadwork & Quillwork CARLA HEMLOCK (MOHAWK) Walking through Time, Carla Hemlock’s Best of Classification beadwork ensemble, embodies her commitment to carrying an art form created by early generations of Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) women into the future. A cco rd i n g to He m l o c k , b e fo re the European introduction of glass trade beads, Haudenosaunee women embellished moccasins and other objects with spectacular moose hair embroidery and porcupine quills. After glass beads were introduced, Mohawk women created a very distinctive style of raised beadwork. “They created an incredible body of work,” Hemlock says. “I don’t want to keep replicating what they did because that was theirs. So I will honor that style but create new work.” Hemlock’s coat, hat and purse ensemble incorporates that raised beadwork but with her own designs. The hat was the inspiration. When Hemlock first laid eyes it, it reminded her of the felted beaver-fur top hats that the women (never the men) of her tribe wore during the fur trade era. She purchased it immediately. The hat sat in her work area for years. Hemlock would look at it and envision the coat that would go with it. “It took me years before I finally said, Okay, I’m ready to do it.” For the coat, Hemlock used wool stroud, a heavy trade cloth that dates to the 18th century. She drove eight hours to

CAMRYN GROWING THUNDER (ASSINIBOINE/SIOUX)

STEVEN PAUL JUDD (KIOWA/CHOCTAW)

Brantford, Ontario, to purchase the cloth. Most of the coat is hand-sewn, with panels of raised beadwork along the front opening and the cuffs and a panel hung with wampum on the back. The beadwork on the purse “absolutely” follows the earlier Six Nations style. The hat incorporates new design elements. Hemlock created appliqué designs, sewed them on and then beaded on top of those panels. The finished ensemble exemplifies Hemlock’s overriding philosophy: to breathe new life into an art form created by ancestral women. “It honors those women. You’ve heard the stories of the hardships they had just to keep the beadwork going,” Hemlock says. “It honors the past, but it also forges our way into the future, and I think that’s really important.”

beadwork, silk ribbons and a turtle amulet. Growing Thunder’s mother, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty, and her grandmother Joyce Growing Thunder Fogarty — both renowned beadworkers — helped Camryn acquire the skills she needed to create the piece. It was Juanita who urged Camryn to make the cradleboard as a way to learn about her culture’s traditional art forms. Camryn was not that interested in traditional pieces, preferring to hone her painting skills. She said, “I’m not really a big beader, and I’m not as interested in the traditional arts as I am drawing and painting.” She admitted that she was disappointed to learn that the Best of Class award was for the cradleboard rather than a painting she had submitted for judging. “I thought that [the painting] was the thing that won, and I was so excited. And then I realized it was the cradleboard and I was like, ‘Ah, dang.’” Despite her initial hesitancy, Growing Thunder took pride in her award-winning creation. “During the process it was like, ‘Oh my God, this is tiring. This is too much,’” she said. “But after I got it done, it was like, ‘Yeah, this is kind of cool.’ It felt pretty good.” One of Growing Thunder’s favorite parts of the project was working with the dentalium shells. After sorting the shells according to size, she used a small drill to trim them to matching lengths. She also liked learning about turtle shell amulets. “The turtle amulets were used to [hold] umbilical cords of little babies, like a good

CLASSIFICATION IX Youth (17 and under)

CAMRYN GROWING THUNDER (ASSINIBOINE/SIOUX) Camryn Growing Thunder was just 12 years old in 2015 when she received her first Best of Class award for a parfleche handbag. In 2017 she won the award again for a traditional Sioux-style toy cradleboard. Growing Thunder worked on the piece for two years, shaping the wooden backboard and forming the carrier with saved-edge trade wool and brain-tanned buckskin. She adorned the cradleboard with dentalium shells, size 16 micro-seed 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

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TOP HONORS BEST OF CLASSIFICATION

2017 INNOVATION AWARD

luck charm. So they would put [the cord] in there and give [the amulet] to the baby,” Growing Thunder said. “There’s no umbilical cord in ours though, but I learned what that was about.”

CLASSIFICATION X Moving Images STEVEN PAUL JUDD (KIOWA/CHOCTAW)

Steven Paul Judd was in college around 2004 when he and a friend decided to shoot a feature-length film. “And then that was it. I’ve been making them ever since,” Judd says. Despite never taking a filmmaking class of any kind, the self-taught artist has won numerous awards, including Classification X awards for a music video and a short film. Judd’s Best of Classification winner, Nan Isht Akokpachi (The Gift), is about a grandfather’s gift to a little boy. He receives the gift on the day of the grandfather’s funeral. Inside a box, he finds a photo album filled with vintage American Indian photos and a mason jar. When the boy leaves the room, Choctaw Little People emerge from the jar and fly around making mischief. They discover the photo album and bring the photos to life. When the boy returns and sees the photos transformed, he places the program from his grandfather’s funeral inside the album. His grandfather is able to leap into the photos and live with his forefathers. “The idea is that people live on. They’re never really gone as long as you’re thinking of them,” Judd says. The animated film, which was heavily driven by special effects, took several months to edit. Judd, who calls himself a jack-of-alltrades and master of none, is not tied to a particular genre. His films range from satire to an antihero movie, Ronnie BoDean starring Wes Studi (Cherokee Nation). Judd was a staff writer for the Disney XD sitcom Zeke and Luther. “I like to make things that I like, and I love movies. I go to movies at least once a week, sometimes twice. I love seeing movies. And just personally, I like seeing cool things on the screen and cool characters — magical worlds,” Judd says. “And I would like to see Native people doing things that I would consider cool.”

DONALD JOHNSTON (QAGAN TAYAGUNGIN)

Judd’s newest project is a horror film released earlier this year. He also plans to make a short film based either on The Last Pow-Wow, a novel he authored with That Native Thomas (Thomas M. Yeahpau; Kiowa), or a story about a half-human/halftrickster character who is called upon to do different jobs by modern Native people.

CLASSIFICATION XI Basketry DONALD JOHNSTON (QAGAN TAYAGUNGIN)

Donald Johnston was struggling to find work he could do with a ruptured disk when saw the man who would become his mentor. James Omnik Sr. was sitting outside an Anchorage hotel room shaving baleen threads. “It was such an odd motion. I sat down next to him and he handed me a knife and thread, and I’ve been doing it ever since,” Johnston says. Baleen baskets are made from the flexible filters in certain kinds of whales’ mouths. Making them is a demanding process of trimming, splitting and shaving the baleen to form the support rods and threads for weaving. Johnston spent 500 hours on his award-winning piece, Aixakuqing (Travel on the Sea) — most of that time spent preparing materials. The lidded basket is meticulously woven and topped with a finial carved from walrus ivory and fossilized bone. The image of an Aleut man in traditional clothes paddling a 56

baidarka (Aleut kayak) is Johnston’s tribute to his own Aleut heritage. Baleen basketry is an Inuit art form. Johnston was thrilled to win Best of Classification his first year at the market, but the freedom that art markets afford him may be even more important. After years of being pressured by shop owners to produce more and to lower his prices, he can now be more creative and carve the intricate finials he envisions. “When I’m able to make baskets like this one in particular, it means everything,” Johnston says. “It does my whole being — my heart and my everything — good.” Johnston currently has one major goal: to find an apprentice. Only about 35 individuals are practicing this art, and Johnston wants to make sure that some of the singular techniques he has developed — such as weaving counterclockwise and running a spiral strip the length of the basket — are passed on. Finding an apprentice has been challenging since he now resides in Oregon and the Endangered Species Act allows only Alaska Natives to work with baleen “I’ve pushed the boundaries on a lot of the baleen baskets. I do things that no one else does,” Johnston says. “There are other weavers that are sharing it, but I think I have things that I definitely need to share. That makes me sad sometimes.” Aixakuqing was purchased by a collector, who donated it to the Denver Art Museum. Visit Johnston’s booth to see him demonstrate how to prepare the baleen.

BERNARD EWELL INNOVATION AWARD KATRINA MITTEN

(MIAMI TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA)

Beadwork artist Katrina Mitten calls herself a 3D storyteller. “With my work, I want to draw people in visually. I want them to see something and be pulled in so that I then can tell the story,” Mitten says. The beaded mobile This My Mother Told Me, for which Mitten won the Bernard Ewell Innovation Award, depicts the creation of Turtle Island (North America), the first land on earth, surrounded by oceans. In the Miami Tribe’s oral history, Sky Woman fell from the sky. Swans held her aloft while the ocean animals held council about how to help her. Turtle volunteered

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KATRINA MITTEN (MIAMI TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA)

to let her land on his back. Turtle’s shell was slick, so Otter brought mud from the ocean floor to provide traction. When Sky Woman landed, she opened her robes and seeds fell out. From these sprouted all of North America’s plant life. Forty-five years ago, when Mitten was 12 years old, she taught herself to bead. Her grandchildren often inspire her. She created the mobile for her newest granddaughter, Wren. Mitten did not want to depict animals stereotypically associated with American Indians, such as wolves or bears, “because we believe that all animals are sacred, not just a few.” So she fashioned a narwhal, manta ray and seahorses from deer and elk hide and seed beads. Then she “went on an adventure” to figure out how to hang them. The animals sagged with only stuffing in them, so she crafted wire armatures for each. Mitten has beaded everything from vintage handbags to deer skulls. Her daughter used to joke that if something sat still long enough, Mitten would bead it. She has repurposed her mother’s 80-year-old doll buggy frame and told the story of the constant sparring match between Water Panther and Thunderbird through her father’s college fencing equipment. She used a vintage red handbag shaped like a stop sign to call attention to “the murdered and missing indigenous women of Turtle Island, and that it needs to stop. “I like to be inspired by the piece,” Mitten says. “Looking at the piece and saying, What story does this tell?”


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2018 SWAIA FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS

Lisa Leflore (Fort Sill Apache)

DREAMING BIG

Meet the 2018 SWAIA artist fellows Alex Lewis (Cheyenne River Sioux/Navajo)

BY STACY PRATT (MVSKOKE) Since its inception, SWAIA has supported the continuance and development of Native art. The SWAIA fellowship program provides monetary support to artists who participate in Indian Market to help them pursue their personal goals.

DISCOVERY FELLOWS The Discovery Fellowship was created to “assist Native artists in the exploration of their artistic process and push the boundaries of their respective art form.” The $3,500 fellowship “rewards innovation and encourages applicants to expand their work into undefined areas.” The 2018 Discovery Fellowship winners are Alex Lewis (Cheyenne River Sioux/Navajo) and Lisa Leflore (Fort Sill Apache). Lewis is an IAIA graduate who works in a variety of media. The artist, who lives in California, is best known for wood and bronze sculpture, but recently he has focused on jewelry. That is the area in which he will use his fellowship award, collaborating with his 7-year-old son, Wakinyannagi Lewis. He calls his son a “master LEGO builder” and says he is also an enthusiastic 3D designer in the Minecraft video game. Together they will design and build a “jewelry art sculpture” on the theme “little critters.” The process will be filmed, along with both father’s and son’s commentary on the completed piece. That video will become part of its display. Leflore is an artist, lawyer and chair of the Fort Sill Apache Gaming Commission. She will use her fellowship money to create replicas of four pieces from the ChiricahuaFort Sill Apache Tribe’s museum. “Currently, almost all the items in the tribe’s museum collection are extremely fragile and too delicate for public viewing,” she writes. “There are no publications or documented research concerning most of the tribe’s cultural artifacts. Without elders or knowledgeable people continuing to teach and create items such as beaded or painted bags, brain-tanned buckskins, bow and arrows, dresses, moccasins and so on, these skills and their cultural relevance may be lost forever.” 58

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Leflore hopes that creating items people can see and touch will help. “By creating a replica of each item for tribal members to view and handle, I hope to open dialogue and spark interest in cultural preservation and creative methods of cultural exploration in the future,” Leflore shares.

YOUTH FELLOWS The $500 Youth Fellowship is awarded to young market artists for the purchase of supplies or to undertake research projects. The 2018 Youth Fellowship winners are Raven Naranjo (San Ildefonso Pueblo/Navajo), GeorgeAnne Growing Thunder (Nakoda/Dakota/Kiowa/Seminole) and Niska Kempenich (Turtle Mountain Chippewa). Naranjo, 11, plans to use his fellowship award to create a work space in his home. He hopes to expand his artwork into acrylics, and the home studio will allow for that. Naranjo enjoys drawing superheroes freehand, and he also designs in 3D using the Minecraft video game. He lives at San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico. Growing Thunder, 6, works in several media, including beadwork, shellwork and scrimshaw, jewelry and videography. She has worked as an actress and has shown work in several youth art shows, including Indian Market. She lives in Oklahoma City, and she plans to use her fellowship money for beading supplies. Growing Thunder


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Raven Naranjo (San Ildefonso Pueblo/Navajo)

Photo ©Wendy McEahern

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www.tinyurl.com/SantaFeParadeOfHomes2018 or visit www.sfahba.com for more details Niska Kempenich (Turtle Mountain Chippewa)

GeorgeAnne Growing Thunder (Nakoda/ Dakota/Kiowa/Seminole)

says her youth is an asset to her work: “My fingers and hands are small enough to get the artwork to do what I want,” she writes in her artist statement. She says that her grandmother, beadwork artist Joyce Growing Thunder Fogarty, is a mentor and inspiration, but she wants to forge her own identity as an artist. “The future of my art will keep growing with me,” she says. “I will always want to create my art. I want to continue my experiences going to interesting places to sell my artwork and look for supplies that are different from what I used before. I want to have my own work space, so I don’t have to share the kitchen table at my grandma’s house.” Kempenich, 10, lives in Grand Forks, North Dakota, where she is a competitive powwow dancer as well as an artist in several media, including birch bark. In her artist statement, she writes that last year she went on her first birch bark harvest and learned to peel the bark herself. She has begun to learn her tribe’s art of “birch bark biting,” but “my teeth are not set all the way, so I will do scratch art with my birch bark. I will continue to practice the bitings, and hopefully soon I will be able to actually use the proper teeth to bite.” Kempenich will use her fellowship money for art supplies for painting, moccasin-making and beadwork, but she will also use some for travel to gather birch bark. “I’m 10, and I want to show that I’m an artist and other kids are too,” she writes. “We’re just the same as you but younger, and we can make a difference.”

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explore the issues iaia museum of contemporary native art

Expanding Horizons: Darren Vigil Gray through February 16, 2019

native treasures collectors sale at the museum of indian arts and culture

A unique sale of Native American art from the homes of top collectors. September 22–23, 2018

museum of international folk art

Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru, through July 14, 2019

ralph t. coe center for the arts

The IMPRINT Exhibition, opens August 14

school of advanced research (sar)

Paper Doll by Ashley Browning

“The theft of identity is not something to be brushed off. I strive to use my artwork as a way to highlight the culture, identity and power that a Native American holds.” —Ashley Browning

who owns indigenous culture?

What is appropriation? Why does authenticity matter? What role does identity and activism play in the expression of indigenous art forms? Why is the exploration of these topics so fraught? This summer 8 indigenous art institutions and 14 artists will share art, perspectives and stories that explore these controversial and global issues.

participating artists

David Bradley (Minnesota Chippewa), Ashley Browning (Santa Clara), Frank Buffalo Hyde (Nez Perce/Onondaga), Nocona Burgess (Comanche), Aymar Ccopacatty (Aymara), Jason Garcia (Santa Clara), Shan Goshorn (Eastern Band Cherokee), Teri Greeves (Kiowa), Susan Hudson (Navajo), Cannupa Hanska Luger (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian and Norwegian), Nora Naranjo Morse, Quarla Quispe (Aymara), Mateo Romero (Cochiti), Maria Samora (Taos), Charlene Teters (Spokane), and Melanie Yazzie (Navajo). Learn more at

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Indian Arts Research Center Collections Tours, Fridays, 2 pm, all year Wednesdays and Fridays, 2 pm, June–September

97th annual santa fe indian market, southwestern association for indian arts

August 18–19, 2018

wheelwright museum of the american indian

Memory Weaving and Peshlakai Vision through October 7, 2018


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I CREATED A PERSONAL, STYLIZED VERSION OF WILD SPINACH BASED ON THOSE PAINTED ON HISTORIC COCHITI CERAMICS. VIRGIL ORTIZ

Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo) Wild Spinach, ceramic jar 64

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Cleome serrulata

THE SECRET BEHIND SOUTHWEST POTTERY’S MATTE BLACK BY STACI GOLAR Reddish-purple and pink petals and green ternate leaves add a welcome pop of color to the sandy soil wherever Cleome serrulata grows. Known by a variety of common names, including Rocky Mountain beeplant or beeweed (bees are known to flock to its flowers), wild spinach and guaco, this annual plant is native to North America, growing from the southern part of British Columbia, east to Minnesota and Illinois, and south to New Mexico and Arizona. The plant has several Indigenous names as well, such as tumi in Hopi, a’pilalul or ado:we in Zuni and waa’ in Diné, and is as inextricably linked to Southwest Indigenous peoples as it is to the art that it so often helps embellish. According to “Pottery Paint and Other Uses of Rocky Mountain Beeweed (Cleome serrulata Pursh) in the Southwestern United States,” published in the archaeological journal Kiva in 2002, some of the earliest documented beeweed paint on pottery comes from the Four Corners area, made by Ancestral Pueblo people between 900 and 1300 CE. The authors note that “decorated wares such as serving bowls, mugs, and seed storage jars were painted with black paint (mineral and/or carbon-based) on a white to gray slipped or unslipped background.” The plant has been used in a variety of other ways for millennia, being harvested for medicine, food and dye. “It grew in abundance in Jemez Pueblo when I was growing up there,” remembers painter George Toya (Jemez), farm manager for Nambe Pueblo. “Usually it was boiled and then boiled again, prepared with onions or wild celery or chile. We also had it cooked with crushed deer or elk jerky.” Roy Kady, a Navajo weaver from Teec Nos Pos, Arizona, has used beeweed to dye wool for his rugs. However, he points out that it’s not used much, since other, more easily accessed plants produce similar colors. “Not many weavers use their own processed and dyed wool yarns anymore, in general.” But, he continues, “I like using all plants that I am familiar with for slight variations in my weavings, so I still use [beeweed]. Lately we haven’t had enough rainfall in the area for me to harvest them locally, so I have gone to other places where they still thrive. It makes a muted yellowish-green, and a darker green if you add a different mordant,” a substance that fixes a Cleome serrulata

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Robert Tenorio (Kewa)

Rainy Naha (Hopi)

natural dye to material. The vessels and whimsical bobble-head figures of Walatowa/Cochiti artist Jonathan Loretto get their deep, earthy brown-black coloring from the plant, which he calls wild spinach. He plans to exhibit in the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts courtyard during Indian Market. Loretto remembers his mother picking the plant and boiling it down to a paste to prep it for painting pottery. “Some people add sugar to it, but I’m not sure if everyone does. When you finally boil it down to paste, you put it on a dried cornhusk to dry.” The boiling usually lasts for several days. The mixture is strained and boiled again at various stages until a syrupy paste is left to dry on the cornhusks. Months or years later, the pigment can be crushed, rehydrated and painted onto a bone-dry pottery piece before being fired outdoors. “You really have to know how to control the fire when you’re using

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wild spinach” when firing pottery, Loretto explains, “because you can burn it off, or make the heat too high or too long and it will turn white. It will burn off in a commercial kiln, since the burning times are usually too long, so you have to do it outside. It takes years and years to finally lock into the right technique and skill. But once you get it, you get it.” Charles King, owner of King Galleries in Santa Fe and Scottsdale, Arizona, honors this expertise from a collector perspective. He believes that the use of beeweed on the surface of pottery is “less about the visual component and more about the cultural connection and history. Understanding the time it takes to prepare the beeweed and then the skill it takes to use it proficiently is part of why it should continue to be encouraged among artists,” King adds. “The color variation each time it is mixed — black to brown — is more dynamic and organic. It’s certainly part of the excitement of seeing how a piece will look

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Lisa Holt (Cochiti) and Harlan Reano (Kewa)

Calvin Analla Jr (Laguna)

after it is fired. In years to come, it may well be that as fewer potters use beeweed, it will become even more highly prized as a medium for painting by collectors.” Potters who are highly esteemed for their masterful use of wild spinach include Robert Tenorio (Kewa), whose polychrome pots typically feature a red base and interior with striking black geometric and nature designs; Lisa Holt (Cochiti) and Harlan Reano (Kewa) for their undulating designs and sculpted forms; Dorothy Torivio and Sandra Victorino (both Acoma), known for their dazzling, optical illusion-like patterns; Helen Naha (Hopi), recognized for her Awatovi revival vessels; Dextra Quotskuyva (Hopi/Tewa), one of the most influential Hopi potters in the last 50 years; and Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti), who first made a name for himself with a daring take on Cochiti monos, or figurines.

While Ortiz, who has a booth in Santa Fe Indian Market, uses wild spinach paint on his pottery, he also places an abstract symbol of the plant on his pottery, jewelry and clothing creations. “I created a personal, stylized version of wild spinach based on those painted on historic Cochiti ceramics. I paint it onto my clay pieces and incorporate it into other mediums I work in. It naturally developed into a signature design that I use as a family insignia — a recognizable element.” Like other Native potters, Ortiz learned how to use wild spinach from uninterrupted, multigenerational sharing. “Our mother, Seferina Ortiz, taught us, and she learned from her mother, Laurencita Herrera,” he notes. “This process has been unchanged for as long as anyone can remember.” It seems highly likely that the ancestors, whose beautiful white-andblack dishes have been found all around the Southwest, would agree.

PHOTOS COURTESY VIRGIL ORTIZ

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Tim Blueflint Ramel (Bad River Chippewa/Comanche), Beauty before Me

Kevin Pourier (Oglala Lakota), buffalo horn spoon

DIVERSE ARTS CLASSIFICATION

Wild card category BY MICHOLE ELDRED (CATAWBA/EASTERN BAND CHEROKEE) Santa Fe Indian Market designates 11 art classifications, and each work is submitted into one of these categories. This system streamlines the judging process by grouping similar works of art together. This grouping also allows collectors and admirers to locate a favorite artist or style in a convenient manner. That’s how it usually works, but then there’s a wild card. The most varied types of art at Indian Market can be found in the Diverse Arts classification. Included in this category are objects that defy classification, and the category itself is split in two. Traditional works are those derived from historical tribal practices and made using customary materials, many locally sourced or gathered by hand. Contemporary works are those that utilize innovations from conception through fabrication. Some of the objects included in the Diverse Arts classification are utilitarian items, such as musical instruments or weapons. Artists enter pipes, drums, rattles, flutes, whistles, fans, bows and arrows, engravings, bags, boxes, dolls, knives and even wood furniture in this classification. Each Indian Market artist holds tribal citizenship or is designated as a tribal artisan. Tribes historically have used materials that reflect their surroundings to create art. A tribe’s culture and history are often represented within an object. Victoria Adams (Southern Cheyenne) explains how Cheyenne culture reveals itself through each piece she creates. “My more intricate and larger pieces most often tell or relate a story, often from Cheyenne tribal history or mythology. Sometimes the story is a more contemporary one, involving myself, relatives or friends,” she says. “With a piece of this type, the person who purchases it will receive the story that it’s based upon.

They must memorize the story then pass it on verbally, just as in Cheyenne oral history. I paint the story in precious metals and gemstones; it becomes a piece of jewelry.” Leah Mata (yak tityu tityu Northern Chumash) says, “It is difficult to explain what I do. There are few good words in English to describe my work. So often I fall into the trap of just saying traditional art.” She describes the importance of the environment to the work she creates: “My community calls me saqwua cpete, which translates to ‘maker of red shell or red abalone,’ which tells you exactly what I do. I am a maker of shellwork, maker of featherwork, a maker of baskets, etc.” Mata, who originally hails from the central California coast, continues, “It is difficult to apply Western terms to my work because the term artist tells you nothing about what I do. Additionally, my work is not just about processing raw materials. The real art of what I do is rooted in traditional ecological knowledge. My relationship to my homeland and materials are what allow me to be a maker. I have to know how to gather, when to gather, what material is in good condition and how to process these materials. In my language, it is understood if I am a maker of these things, then I have deep knowledge about my environment.” Flute maker Tim Blueflint Ramel (Bad River Chippewa/Comanche) expresses the importance of the use of specific materials in the creation of his flutes. “Each one of my flutes begins its journey from the finest of old-growth domestic and exotic woods, handpicked for their tonal qualities and beauty. The highest quality of materials are gathered from private sources. Precious and semiprecious stones, bronze, silver and gold are combined to create my artistic expression of the Native American flute.” The visual aesthetics of Ramel’s flutes are only part of his art form. Jurors and collectors are encouraged to consider the acoustic quality of his flutes as well. He elaborates, “[At] the beginning of my journey, I wanted to intimately understand every aspect of sound and design. As my skill set developed over the years, I aspired to create flutes that were not only acoustically recognized as world-class instruments but also as collectible fine art. I relearned some of the techniques that my grandmother taught me in her silver studio and acquired the proper equipment and tools to create my one-of-a-kind flutes.” Another artist who uses wood in the creation of his work is Dennis Esquivel (Grand Traverse Chippewa and Ottawa/Mestizo). He explains that his objects are contemporary in style yet historical in technique and medium: “I create contemporary wood objects infused with a Native perspective, using established woodworking techniques, as well 68

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Tyra Shackleford (Chickasaw), The Lady

Dennis Esquivel (Grand Traverse Chippewa and Ottawa/ Mestizo), Out of the Woods cabinet

Victoria Adams (Southern Cheyenne), purse

Mary Jacobs (Seneca, Turtle Clan), picture frame

as traditional Native techniques. Though my work appears modern, it is informed by a long history of woodcraft among my people, the Ottawa, who are woodland people of the Great Lakes.” Kevin Pourier (Oglala Lakota), from South Dakota, creates objects such as spoons, cups, eyeglasses, jewelry, boxes, thimbles and “anything else that comes to my mind” from buffalo horn. He takes an individualized approach to his art. “When I was first accepted into Indian Market, no one had ever seen buffalo horn art before. Everyone was scratching their heads about what to do with me. Making an art form that no one 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

has ever seen before has its pluses and its minuses. First, it’s good to be original. On the other hand, no one knows what I’m doing or how to compare it to other art forms.” While Pourier’s art is unique to Indian Market, he does use materials that have long been used by the Plains people. “My art is an old art form using a material that has been available to Plains peoples for eons, buffalo horn.” He continues, “I use the larger 69


2018 FREE BUS2018 SERVICE Saturday, August 18 & Sunday, August 19th SYSTEM WIDE TO THE

2018 Indian Market Downtown Transit Center will be relocated to West Alameda between Sandoval and Guadalupe Streets Thursday, August 16 thru Sunday August 19, 2018. TRANSIT CENTER WILL BE TEMPORARILY RELOCATED TO FREE FARES FOR ALAMEDA BETWEEN SANDOVAL AND GUADUALUPE STREET SATURDAY & EFFECTIVE JULY 26th AT 6:00 A.M. SUNDAY ONLY AND RESUMING ON SHERIDAN ON AUGUST 18 -19 MONDAY, JULY 30, 2018 BE TRANSIT CENTER WILL

horns to create spoons that have a larger canvas to carve my ideas and issues I want to address through my art. I challenge all ideas, prejudices, identity issues and injustices that we may all — mostly Natives — encounter. I love most to point out behaviors that we have — good and bad.” Some artists, such as Mary Jacobs (Seneca, Turtle Clan), draw their inspiration from the natural world that surrounds them. “I consider myself a Native bead worker who create things from cloth, stones, glass beads and leather,” says Jacobs. “My creations are inspired by nature, the things I see — birds, flowers, leaves, trees and our people. Jacobs explains how her art fits into the utilitarian component within the Diverse Arts classification. “I create items which I hope the buyer will use every day and find useful. A picture frame to hang your favorite photo or a purse to use for a special occasion or give as a gift.” She continues, “I like to think most of my creations are practical items, things which may be used on a daily basis. I consider my work pieces of art that are embellished to give the user some style or uniqueness to their objects. “Since man first started creating items to help him in his daily activities, he made items to help or assist in his daily life. Over time, items were embellished with carvings or artwork to identify the items as one’s own. These simple carvings over time have emerged into art we value today.” Tyra Shackleford (Chickasaw) of Oklahoma says, “I am Leah Mata (yak tityu tityu Northern Chumash), necklace a textiles artist, but I am knowledgeable in many traditional art forms. I specialize in three ancient weaving techniques: finger weaving, twining and sprang. At the beginning of my artistic journey, I focused on perfecting these techniques. Now I strive to bring these techniques into the modern day by creating contemporary and conceptual art with them.” Shackleford continues, “I create both wearable art (utilitarian) and fine art. I believe, when discussing Native art, you cannot separate the two (fine art, and craft or functional art). The idea that visual art should have no utilitarian purpose was introduced in 1790 into a non-Native world by a non-Native. It cannot be applied to what we create. We, Native peoples, have never separated aesthetics from function. I feel like that old-school, narrow-minded view is changing because we are defining what art is for Native peoples.” Clearly, as seen from each artist’s description, the Diverse Arts classification is difficult to precisely define. Each artist values something different. The best way to get a full sense of what Diverse Arts is at Indian Market is to view the art for yourself. Plan to attend the Friday awards preview at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, which is open to SWAIA members, artists and those who buy tickets. Stop by the artists’ booths. Speak with each artist for yourself and learn about the art by seeing it firsthand.

TRANSIT CENTER WILL BE FREE BUS SERVICE TEMPORARILY RELOCATED TO ALAMEDA BETWEEN SANDOVAL AND GUADUALUPE STREET WWW.TAKETHETRAILS.COM FREE BUS SERVICE EFFECTIVE JULY 26th AT 6:00 A.M. SATURDAY, JULY 28 ALL DAY AND RESUMING ON SHERIDAN ON For more information 505-955-2001 SUNDAY, JULY 29 ALL DAY MONDAY, JULY 30, 2018 TEMPORARILY RELOCATED TO ALAMEDA BETWEEN SANDOVAL AND GUADUALUPE STREET SATURDAY, JULY 28 ALL DAY EFFECTIVE JULY 26th AT 6:00 A.M. AND RESUMING ON SHERIDAN ON ALL DAY SUNDAY, JULY 29 MONDAY, JULY 30, 2018

www.TakeTheTrails.com WWW .TAKETHETRAILS.COM

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This free transit service is funded by the North Central Regional Transit District through the Regional Transit Gross Receipts Tax.

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NEW PRICE

STELLAR CONTEMPORARY STYLE | 1710 West Alameda, #1 | sothebyshomes.com/0566162 | $675,000 This contemporary home will captivate modern design enthusiasts. Adjacent to the River Walk and an easy stroll from downtown, it is LEED Platinum certified and features an open-plan living area, three bedrooms, concrete and hardwood floors, a kitchen with high-end appliances and quartz counters, and mountain views. The detached studio would make a wonderful guesthouse or work space.

DAVI D FR I E S ASS O C I AT E B RO K E R | 50 5. 3 10. 3 919 d avi d . f r i e s @ s o t h e bys h o m e s.co m SANTA FE BROKERAGE | 326 GRANT AVENUE, SANTA FE, NM 87501 | 505.988.2533 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/SANTAFE Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

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ViVi of Santa Fe presents

“Magical Artistry” Bead work by Kate Boyan and ViVi

Showing at Eldorado Hotel Concourse August 16th, 17th, 18th & 19th, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Email: viviknits@yahoo.com • 505-603-5550 72

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INDIAN MARKET EVENTS 2018 Thursday, August 16 3 to 5 p.m.

Friday, August 17 3 to 5 p.m.

Saturday, August 18

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POTTERY DEMONSTRATIONS

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Les Namingha Susan Folwell Juan de la Cruz

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Directions: Centrally located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Exit 259 , look for our signs

ALBUQUERQUE

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FREE ADMISSION & PARKING FREE ADMISSION & PARKING Directions: Centrally located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Exit 259 , look for our signs

Directions: Centrally located between Albuquerqueand andSanta SantaFe. Fe.Exit Exit 259 259 ,, look look for Directions: Centrally located between Albuquerque for our our signs signs

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Santo Domingo Pueblo Santo Domingo Santo Pueblo Domingo Pueblo

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SantoDomingo DomingoPueblo PuebloArts Arts && Crafts Crafts Market Market Santo P.O.Box Box369 369 P.O. Santo Domingo Pueblo Arts & Crafts Market SantoDomingo DomingoPueblo, Pueblo, Arts NM 87052 87052 Santo Santo Domingo & Crafts Market P.O. Box 369 PuebloNM 505.465.0406 505.465.0406 P.O. BoxDomingo 369 Pueblo, NM 87052 Santo Santo Domingo Pueblo, NM&87052 505.465.0406 FREE ADMISSION FREE ADMISSION & PARKING 505.465.0406

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SANTA FE

I-40 ALBUQUERQUE

I-40


WILL WILSON

CLARK & CALABAZA

Photosynthesis

Walking in Beauty

© 2018 WILL WILSON, COURTESY PETERS PROJECTS

© 2018 CLARK & CALABAZA, COURTESY PETERS PROJECTS

AUGUST 17 – SEPTEMBER 22, 2018

AUGUST 17 – SEPTEMBER 22, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17 FROM 5–7PM

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17 FROM 5–7PM

1011 PASEO DE PERA LTA , S A N TA FE, N M | 5 0 5 . 9 5 4 . 5 8 0 0 | PET E R S PROJE C T S .COM FOR I NQ UI R I ES: MARK D EL V EC C H I O | MA RK@ PE T ERS PROJE C T S .COM | ( 505) 954- 5748


TOM FORD/TADAOANDO RANCH CERRO PELON RANCH 20,000 ACRES IN SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO [LARGER THAN MANHATTAN] TADAO ANDO DESIGNED COMPOUND MAIN HOUSE | GUEST HOUSES | STAFF HOUSES | EQUESTRIAN FACILITIES WORKING RANCH WITH WESTERN FILM SET, CATTLE AND HORSES

KEVINBOBOLSKYGROUP.COM 505.470.6263 USA

Kevin@KevinBobolskyGroup.com

All inquiries held strictly conямБdential


ECHOES OF INFLUENCE Datus Myers and the Pueblo Painters

Tonita Peña (1893-1949) Single Figure Male Buffalo Dancer opaque watercolor, 9 3/4 x 5 3/4 inches

Datus E. Myers (1879-1960) Deer Dance, circa 1930s gouache on fabric, 13 1/4 x 18 inches

Julian Martinez (1885-1943) Pocano • Coming of the Spirits Tewa Ram Dancer, gouache, 8 7/8 x 6 1/4 inches

ON VIEW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 29, 2018 VIEW ADDITIONAL WORKS AT GPGALLERY.COM FOR INQUIRIES CONTAC T EVAN FELDMAN, (505) 954-5738

1005 PASEO DE PERALTA, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO Images © 2018 courtesy Gerald Peters Gallery and Adobe Gallery

Gerald Peters Gallery Bookstore AT P E T E R S P R O J E C T S Featuring

FRITZ SCHOLDER PAINTINGS AND MONOTYPES Alltadena, CA: Twin Palms, 1988 First Edition Hardcover in dust jacket. Essays by John Wilmerding, Jeremy Strick and Richard Newlin, $35 1011 PA S E O D E P E R A LTA , S A N TA F E , N M O P E N M O N DAY – S AT U R DAY, 10 A M – 5 P M CALL (505) 954-5757 OR VISIT US ONLINE W W W. G P GA L L E RY. C O M / P U B L I C AT I O N S

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photo: Rebecca Lowndes

SHAWN

ALBERT LEE TOMMY JACKSON

BLUEJACKET

Meet the Artists at Ortega’s During Indian Market 101 W. SAN FRANCISCO ST ● SANTA FE

505-988-1866 ● OPEN 7 DAYS


photo: Rebecca Lowndes

DON LUCAS

GLORIA SAWIN JOHN HULL

Meet the Artists at Ortega’s During Indian Market 101 W. SAN FRANCISCO ST ● SANTA FE

505-988-1866 ● OPEN 7 DAYS


Website

Bronze Ed/30 22” H x 63” L x 13” W

Go With The Flow

Eat at the Coyote Cafe & Cantina. Call 505-983-1615!

Private Collector’s Party Thursday 16: 4-8pm. Contact us at 361-688-7766 or joshuatobeystudios@yahoo.com www.joshuatobeystudios.com

Location at the Coyote Den below the Coyote Cafe 132 W. Water Street Thursday 16: 3-8pm, Friday 17 thru Sunday 19: 11am-9pm

Meet Josh and Jojo at Santa Fe Indian Market August 16-19, 2018

Josh Tobey


211 Old Santa Fe Trail

Zuni Ballroom Tuesday, August 14th thru Sunday, August 19th 10am - 6pm daily

Special Showing Thursday, August 16th 4pm - 6pm

480.755.8080

waddellgallery.com


FREE INDIAN MARKET EVENTS Native American Showcase

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will present the 18th annual Native Cinema Showcase, the museum’s premier film event, Aug. 14–19. The showcase will screen more than 50 feature length and short films representing nine countries and more than 33 Native Nations. Admission to the showcase’s events is free.

Portal Artists in the Courtyard Members of the Palace of the Governors’ Native American Artisans Program will be selling and discussing their artwork in the Palace of the Governors Courtyard, August 18–19.

Photography and Navajo, Past and Present Panel discussion of the disposition of photographs of Navajo in museum archives and the relationship of historic photographs of Navajo to contemporary Navajo life, as well as considering the photography of contemporary Navajo photographers. August 18, 2 p.m. Meem Community Room.

Native American Flute Performance Artist, educator, and performer, Marlon Magdalena is a Native American flute player and maker from Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. Magdalena works as an educator at the Jemez Historic Site. History Museum lobby, August 18–19. All events are free to the public.

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTURE

A UNIQUE SALE OF NATIVE AMERICAN ART FROM PRIVATE COLLECTIONS pottery, jewelry, textiles, paintings, baskets, carvings— vintage and contemporary. whether you are a new or a seasonedcollector, come find your own treasure! Saturday & Sunday • September 22–23, 2018 Museum of Indian Arts and Culture Museum Hill • Santa Fe

Early Birds • Saturday, 9–10 am • $25 Saturday and Sunday, 10 am–5 pm • Free Admission Save the date:

may 25–27, 2019 www.nativetreasures.org

Photos by Carol Franco

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CHEROKEE ART MARKET OCTOBER 1 3 & 1 4

Bill Glass Jr. “The Discussion Revolves” (sculpture) Best of Class

Sequoyah Convention Center at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa CherokeeArtMarket.com | (877) 779-6977 © 2018 Cherokee Nation Businesses. All Rights Reserved.

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FIRING

THE SCIENCE OF

ceramics outdoors

KITTY LEAKEN

BY JEAN MERZ-EDWARDS “Those of fire move about the earth with inspiration and purpose.” — Joy Harjo The sacred element of fire came to people soon after they entered this world. Its mesmerizing dance of flickering orange and red entranced them while its scorching hot flames kept them at a safe distance. With respect and awe, people observed the mighty power of fire to purify and transform earth through a symbiotic relationship. More than 25,000 years ago, artists first encountered an offspring of fire and earth when they realized that sticky, impermeable, shapeable clay could be transformed into solid, permanent objects if left in fire. This process 90

ignited the imagination with its unlimited possibilities. Anything could be created, and fired clay is the only material from earth that does not change with time. This permanence explains why pottery and potsherds — broken pieces of ceramic materials — often surface when archaeologists survey and excavate sites. In fact, potsherds remain the most common artifacts that archaeologists find during excavations. One does not need to look to archaeology, however, for a glimpse of ceramics made using original creative

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Jody Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo) with her outdoorfired ceramics


Naranjo uses a metal enclosure to control the fire.

PHOTOS KITTY LEAKEN

insulator during firing. Mica facilitates an methods. In the world of Native arts even temperature and keeps pots from today, the earliest-known process exploding in the high heat of the of firing clay remains in the red-hot fire. The sodium bentonite practice of outdoor firing. in volcanic ash acts as a binder In the Southwest, the between the red and micaceous technology of outdoor clays, as well as a sealant firing — firing ceramics against moisture escaping in using an open or exposed destructive ways. flame as opposed to a After Naranjo combines the kiln — has been handed red clay, micaceous clay and down from one generation volcanic ash into a chemical to the next. Jody Naranjo, balance that she calls a “good a Tewa potter from Santa consistency,” she “makes the Clara Pueblo, learned timepottery shapes using a coil method, honed methods of firing never a wheel.” This practice connects pottery from her mother and potters through the ages, back to the first grandmother. According to Naranjo, potter, who more than 25,000 years ago rolled “I do the traditional firing because I find malleable, soft clay into a ropelike coil with the palm it fascinating. It is such an ancient art form. Chase Earles (Caddo Nation) of her hand before spinning it through her fingertips to There is something so magical about it. It is probably make the form of a vessel. After coiling, the walls of the object may be my favorite part of the pottery-making process.” scraped and smoothed. Like the first potter who stood in wafting clouds of smoke with the Before firing, the pots dry over a period of time, after which Naranjo smell of burning wood in her nostrils as she fired her clay, Naranjo sands and polishes them using the same stone her grandmother used. begins her creative process long before the magical moment of firing. The polishing process, known as burnishing, involves a wet stone She starts by sinking her hands into the warm earth to dig red clay, moving quickly over the surface of clay, which becomes foamy in the micaceous clay and volcanic ash from residual deposits formed in the process. A slip of fine watery clay is then applied, and the pot is polished hillside of her ancestral lands more than a million years ago. again with the wet stone. This step is repeated over and over again until After collection, the clays are separately soaked, strained, cleaned the slip has come to the right depth. and then mixed into a viable medium — that is, workable clay. TwentyBurnishing, the original method of ensuring that a pot becomes first-century science explains what the earliest potters intuitively impermeable to water once fired, takes many hours and careful skill. knew: chemistry literally makes or breaks the vessel. Red clay, with its To the untrained eye, an outdoor-fired burnished pot resembles one wealth of iron oxide, provides not only red pigment but also a stable with a ceramic glaze because of its glossy, shiny surface. To a trained base for other mineral-packed clays because iron oxide burns at high eye, however, glazed vessels pale in comparison. Through the glazing temperatures. So firing temperatures can reach 1,500 to 2,000 degrees process, a millimeter or more of glass covers the original surface of the Fahrenheit safely. In other words, without the stable base of red clay, object, acting as a barrier against water. But glaze simply coats the piece. Naranjo would have a melted pile of boiling, earthy mush rather than a It does not transform it. By contrast, with burnishing, the potter coaxes vibrant, glistening ceramic vessel. the clay into a metamorphosis. Dull, lusterless clay takes on a glossy Mica, a word closely related to the Latin micare, which means “to warm glow that glazed pottery can never possess. glitter,” is a lustrous mineral with a reflective quality. It acts as an

AT INDIAN MARKET THIS YEAR, EARLES GIVES VISITORS THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE EXTRAORDINARY CREATIONS THAT ARE LIKE NONE OTHER IN THE CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ART WORLD. A VISIT WITH THIS ARTIST IS LIKE A VISIT WITH A FAVORITE STORYTELLER 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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Chase Earles (Caddo Nation) pottery in the fire

Opening Aug. 14, 5 - 7 pm

Coe Center coeartscenter.org

1590 B Pacheco Street Santa Fe, NM 87505 505.983.6372

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Come visit us in our new location! The Santa Fe Flea Market at BuffaloThunder

Discover a unique collection of Native American Jewelry & art, antiques & collectibles, local crafts, clothing, rugs, textiles, global arts, yard sale items & household goods, food and much more!

“The Market” is located across from Buffalo Thunder exit 177 on Highway 285, just north of Santa Fe!

9 am – 4 pm every Friday, Saturday and Sunday! FREE PARKING! FREE ADMISSION! PETS ALLOWED! The Santa Fe Flea Market at Buffalo Thunder

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If desired, the potter paints or carves the clay vessel in harmony with the burnishing. Carving generally takes place before firing, when the piece is fully dry or leather-hard (almost fully dry). Naranjo uses an X-Acto knife, although other sharpened instruments work equally well. For Naranjo, deep carving takes place before firing, while incising takes place, very delicately, after firing. The actual firing occurs on Naranjo’s ancestral lands, where her deep roots connect to potters throughout the centuries who stood on the same land and collected tree limbs and cow manure to build the perfect fires for the magic of their process. In the open, fresh Santa Clara air, she seasons her pots by slowly increasing degrees of heat. When the fire reaches just the right temperature, it is enclosed by scrap metal. In the final step of firing, the artist encircles the metal enclosure with wood, at which point the fire dances around the clay in an act of magic that transforms wet earth into beautiful works of art that will be here long after we are gone. Outdoor-fired pottery also continues in places beyond the Southwest. In the Southeast, for example, Chase Kahwinhut Earles (Caddo Nation) is at the center of a revival of original methods of producing Caddo pottery. Earles finds alluvial clay (clay that has been deposited by running water) by walking in the footsteps of his ancestors along the banks of the Red River near the present-day border of Oklahoma, Texas and Arkansas. He gathers clay that “has collected everything [including mussel shells] from where it eroded down the rivers for millennium,” according to Earles. The coiled clay must be scraped and paddled to create almost “eggshell thin” walls, burnished inside and out for waterproofing and fired at lower temperatures than nonalluvial clays. To create the fire, Earles uses pecan and oak wood — materials native in Caddo ancestral lands. His finished creations, like the garfish effigy pot that won first place at the Artesian Arts Festival in Sulphur, Oklahoma, earlier this year, maintain a rugged and bumpy surface from the texture of the clay. This distinctive characteristic places southeastern pottery in a classification unto itself. “It’s been part of my existence just explaining that there’s this whole region of culture in the Southeast of the United States that existed, and we have our own pottery tradition,” explains Earles. “Our tribal pottery, Caddo, is very distinct, very unique, but it’s also very prolific. There are literally tens of thousands of Caddo pots in museums all over this country, but most of the time they are in back rooms, so people don’t get to see them.” At Indian Market this year, Earles gives visitors the opportunity to see extraordinary creations that are like none other in the contemporary Native art world. A visit with this artist is like a visit with a favorite storyteller. Earles shapes the imagination with his passion for transforming clay through fire, which might just put you in closer touch with your own inspiration and purpose.

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24 Years Importing Treasures for Your Home from Southern Europe, North Africa and Spanish Colonial America

Photo credit: Wendy McEahern for Parasol Productions

MEDITERRÁNIA

REPRODUCTIONS • ACCESSORIES • ANTIQUES • FABRICS 222 Galisteo Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505) 989-7948 • www.MediterraniaAntiques.com 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

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Karin Walkingstick (Cherokee Nation)

Mavasta Honyouti (Hopi)

Leah Mata-Fragua (Chumash)

Jesse Monongye (Navajo)

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ARTISTS REMEMBER their first sales

BY STACY PRATT (MVSKOKE) Artists create for many reasons: to satisfy the creative impulse; as a spiritual practice; to express ideas, feelings or a historical moment. So art sales are more than just financial transactions. When artists sell pieces, whether to museums or individuals, they are sending time, energy and talent out into the world. That’s why the first sale an artist makes is such an important milestone. Sometimes it happens early and sometimes later in an artist’s career, but it’s always memorable. We’ve collected stories of first sales from a few of the artists participating in this year’s Indian Market. All of them reveal the special connection formed between artist and buyer.

KARIN WALKINGSTICK (CHEROKEE NATION) I remember it well! Jane Osti had an open house for me and a few others before the Trail of Tears Art Show in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, my first show. [Cherokee basket maker] Mike Dart bought a piece first. A small piece. Mike was also a new friend, and I thought he did it out of kindness as my new friend, to encourage me. Then [Cherokee-Pawnee artist] Mary HorseChief walked by my table and didn’t say anything. She looked at everything and pointed at a round pot with a pond scene on it and said, “I’ll take that one. Let me eat first and when I’m finished, come get a check from me.” I tried not to watch her like a hawk while she was eating, but I was really excited. In my mind, while waiting for her, I had opened a pottery account at the bank, bought supplies and was going to be able to continue building pottery. We wrapped things up and headed over to the Trail of Tears reception. It was my first show. I came out with third place contemporary pottery, first place emerging artist award and the people’s choice award and a few more sales. Monday morning, I opened that bank account. I bought supplies. And I’m still building pottery.

JESSE MONONGYE (NAVAJO) The very first piece I sold was an Acoma jet bracelet with bursting yei face, sold to the Inn of the Gods gallery in Ruidoso, New Mexico, then purchased by Lois Sherr Dubin a few weeks later. Lois came across it while doing research for North American Indian Jewelry and Adornment [Henry N. Abrams, 1999]. She noticed the bracelet when she was there looking at the beadwork in the shop. This piece is featured in the book [Jesse Monongya:] Opal Bear and Lapis Skies by Lois Sherr Dubin.

LEAH MATA-FRAGUA (CHUMASH) It was one of my full dance dresses. It was the first time I made a dance dress with the intent of [it] going outside my community and having a larger purpose other than being danced in. It was at a time when California was experiencing severe drought and our salmon runs were

at a decline, which they still are due to environmental degradation and other environmental impacts. So I cut salmon out of the abalone and I put it on the dress. I did a mallard belt. It happened to be my first juried show. I had never been to a juried market, and it wasn’t something I ever planned on doing. It was through outreach of the Autry [Museum]. They wanted to have more California Indians present in their shows, and they had kind of cultivated me for a couple of years, and I really didn’t think of myself as an artist because when you do more “folk art”—I don’t know—I always thought of artists being painters or sculptors. I thought of what I did as just natural. . . . It wasn’t art. It is just what we do. So it was a huge leap for me, and I didn’t even know I was supposed to put a price on the piece. I had no idea because I’d never sold a dress. They were only made for my community, and I often bartered for them or we worked it out. So I was like, “How do you price this?” And someone said, “Just put ten grand on it.” So I jokingly put it on, and then surprisingly, it took first. And then someone said, “I want to buy your dress.” And the person who bought it was Marshall McKay, who is California Indian, and his mother is Mabel McKay, who was one of my idols and role models as far as artists go. So I was like, “Oh wow. Not only is it going to sell, but it’s going to someone I know understands the depths of traditional knowledge that went into this.” Because people really aren’t that exposed to California indigenous art, so they really don’t have an understanding that for many California people, we still gather and hunt for most of our materials. Our basketry has stayed relatively traditional, for example. Native Californian basketry is widely considered to be the finest basketry in the world, so it sounds like they aren’t advancing in their art form, which they completely are. We’re very proud of not incorporating nonnatural dyes. So it was nice that they understood the magnitude of how many years it took to make that dress. When I brought it to his house to set it up, I was putting the mallard belt on the dress, and Sharon, his wife, said, “Oh! You know, I love it. It just reminds me so much of Mabel’s work.” And I was like in shock, because for me, that was such a compliment. It was worth more than the sale of the dress.

MAVASTA HONYOUTI (HOPI) I was 15 years old. My dad [carver Ronald Honyouti] had an abundance of unfinished carvings in his workroom and woodpile. I found one that was roughly shaped out. I liked its triangular shape, so I asked him if I could finish it. I fashioned it to be a snow maiden sculpture. My dad entered it into judging at Santa Fe Indian Market, and it won a secondplace award in the youth category. I don’t remember how much it sold for, but I do remember buying clothes for school with the money I made. It was an exciting time.

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Hopi basketry Iva Honyestewa Turtle, 2017 13 inches Yucca and willow branch

CONNECTING COMMUNITY AND PLACE BY AMERICA MEREDITH (Cherokee Nation)

Hopi basketry is intricate and challenging — both to make and to begin to understand and fully appreciate. The beauty of its designs is enhanced by the complex relationships among basket makers, the land and plants, their families and their communities. The baskets carry different meanings within Hopi communities and in the outside art world, becoming deeper and richer as they change hands and travel on their different journeys. Basketry, according to Hopi/Navajo artist Iva Honyestewa, “is still used in most of our ceremonies, from baby namings all the way to weddings,” and in food preparation “as far as sifting, as far as drying, as far as even just carrying the food in it. And our Hopi foods, it’s all corn, so we have to have that sifter basket to make blue cornmeal, to clean our white corn when we’re going to make stew, to hold our blue corn tamales after we boil it . . . or even just to hold it to cool off.” Coiled baskets, Honyestewa continues, are used “to set . . . piki [a thin flatbread made from blue cornmeal] on. That one is more ceremonial,” and “most of them are used in the Basket Dance and then the wedding ceremonies.” Honyestewa is one of three Hopi basket makers participating in this year’s Santa Fe Indian Market. The others are Kathryn Kooyahoema and Wilmetta Kayquoptewa. All three women live on the Hopi Reservation and learned basket making from their relatives. Kooyahoema and Honyestewa both live in Songòopavi on Second Mesa; Kayquoptewa lives on Third Mesa. Each artist has a different focus: Kayquoptewa weaves wicker plaques, Kooyahoema weaves coiled plaques and Honyestewa has invented a new style based on sifter baskets. The three also harvest their own natural materials from the surrounding environment. “When we gather yucca, we still pay for it,” says Honyestewa. “We put out cornmeal and say, ‘Thank you, Creator, for allowing us to live off this land.’” The primary material in sifters and coiled baskets is narrow-leaf yucca, called mooho or mootsoki in Hopi. Galleta grass, or sühü, is also woven into coiled baskets, while rabbitbrush — siváapi or chamisa — is woven into wicker plaques. “And then the piki trays are made with three-leaf sumac we call suuvi,” says Honyestewa. Three-leaf sumac and rods of dunebroom (siwi) form the structure in wicker plaques. Thoughtful combinations of soft natural dyes and vivid commercial dyes create the palettes that satisfy the artistic vision of the basket makers. The boldness of the overall design juxtaposes with the subtle variations in colors and values in the fine weft fibers. Valerie Verzuh, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture curator, notes in Woven Identities: Basketry Art of Western North America that different natural colors can come from the same undyed yucca leaves through harvesting in different seasons: yellow in spring, white in summer and green in winter. Natural dyes produce radiant reds, oranges, yellows and blacks. Honyestewa says she uses “commercial dyes to bring out the bright colors: the turquoise, teal, blues. . . . The red and the oranges are dyed with the wild teas like hohoisi. And then some people are starting to use coffee grounds for a brown.” Within the rich history and protocols of Hopi baskets, each basket maker adds her own mark. 98

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Iva Honyestewa shows a basket with her unique pootsaya style of weaving.


Kathryn Kooyahoema Hopi Saa’la’ko (Shalako), 2017 1.5 x 14.25 inches Yucca and galleta grass

Kathryn Kooyahoema Butterfly, 2017 1.5 x 9.5 inches Yucca and galleta grass

Iva Honyestewa

the future of our children — all the drug problems, the alcohol problems, even the political issues that are happening, sexual abuse, everything that’s bad, that’s being so corrupt in our community. We want that fixed. So the story behind why I created that was to bring us back together as one so it would be a better place for our kids in the future.” Honyestewa named this new basket form pootsaya, a neologism created from the Hopi words for sifter basket (poota) and coiled basket (tutsaya). She experimented on the design for four years, and she says, “I’ve taught six women so far, and my niece Reba Lomayestewa — she’s the only other one weaving it right now.” In addition to making baskets, Honyestewa owns Iskasokpu Gallery & Silver Supplies on Second Mesa, which has been open since 1992. “I carry a lot of the local art, jewelry, katsinas, baskets and pottery,” she says. She also teaches classes on tufacast jewelry making and Hopi cooking; caters; and is compiling a cookbook with the Hopi Putavi Project.

For Iva Honyestewa, basket making is part of a larger commitment to cultivating and sharing Hopi foodways, language and culture. Born in Gallup, New Mexico, Honyestewa belongs to the Hopi Sun Clan. Her grandmother Esther Honanie taught her to weave when she was 10 years old, but she didn’t take basket making seriously until later in life. It was 1996, and her mother, a member of the Basket Society, was sponsoring a “throwing” and needed large quantities of sifter baskets to give away. Beth Dawahongnewa, Honyestewa’s first cousin, taught her to weave sifters so the two could assist her mother. Even seemingly abstract designs have deeper meanings in Hopi aesthetics. The first sifter basket Honyestewa wove had a cumulus cloud symbol. At the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis, Honyestewa saw a basket made by her grandmother with that same symbol. When Honyestewa entered the Basket Society, she began weaving baskets in earnest. “And then that’s when I got that artist in residency at the School for Advanced Research [SAR], where I created the new Hopi basket,” she says. In 2014 SAR named Honyestewa its Dobkin Fellow. The fellowship gave her time and space to develop a completely new form of basketry firmly rooted in Hopi aesthetics. “It’s a combination of the coil and the sifter. The yucca sifter basket on the outside and the coil in the center of it. I’ve had that thought for a few years of combining the two, but I never really pursued it because I was always so busy. I’m so involved with cultural stuff, community, just all kinds of things,” Honyestewa recounts. “And I just never had the time to do it until I got accepted for that residency. I had to spend three months there. “I told [my uncle] what I was planning on doing. And he said, ‘You can’t just do that. . . . You have to have a reason or a purpose for why you’re creating something new.’ And so he told me to think about it some more. “When I went to SAR, just sitting there weaving, I worked in the studio all by myself, with nobody there to help me.” During this uninterrupted time to weave and reflect, Honyestewa saw that her life needed to slow down. “And then, just weaving, thinking about all the stuff going on in our community and nothing’s being done about it, that’s where this purpose came to me. I started looking at the weaving I started. I said, this coil is going to be the foundation of our community. And when I start tying in each strand of yucca, I want our people to come back together as one, and I’m tying us together. We want to come back as one and fix these things for 100

Wilmetta Kayquoptewa

From Hotevilla, Wilmetta Kayquoptewa specializes in wicker basketry plaques known as yungyapngölökpu, which have a center of parallel rods that fan out into spokes and are woven to form a circle. She uses dune broom, rabbitbrush, yucca and sometimes sumac. She is a master of optical illusion, creating a sense of spinning motion through the wicker form and carefully constructed checkered patterns of alternating lights and darks. Kayquoptewa speaks Hopi as a first language, so her son Eric translates for her. “She didn’t go to school; she was homeschooled,” he says. “When she was around 12 or 13 years old, she learned to make baskets from her mother.” As a young child, she would play with basketry scraps while the adult women wove baskets. “Around 16 years of age is when she started perfecting her baskets,” her son says. She made baskets for her community. “Each mesa does different things. First Mesa is known for its pottery. Second Mesa does coiled. Third Mesa is known for its wicker plaques and sifter.” On Third Mesa, baskets are used for “ceremonial purposes, social dances and weddings, and gifts as well,” Eric explains. “There is one race during the Basket Dance. During a certain part of the dance, runners will compete among each other, and the winner gets one of the baskets.” Kayquoptewa harvests her own materials by hand and uses some bright commercial dyes because natural dye plants are scarce. “The plant life isn’t as prosperous this year due to the dry season,” says Eric. “Most of the designs of most

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Wilmetta Kayquoptewa Evergreen, 2017 1 x 12 inches Rabbitbrush, dune broom, yucca, commercial dyes

Wilmetta Kayquoptewa Comanche Dancer, 2017 1 x 12 inches Rabbitbrush, dune broom, yucca, commercial dyes

of the baskets are handed down through the ages. The coloration of the items changes each time.” After Eric began showing his carved sculptures in art markets, he asked his mother if she would like to share his booth to show her baskets at Santa Fe Indian Market. “This is going to be our third year. The first time she applied, she got in right away. She got first place that first year.” Kayquoptewa has also exhibited at art markets at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles, Cherokee Art Market near Tulsa and the Museum of Northern Arizona’s Hopi Festival in Flagstaff. Eric Kayquoptewa reflects on the pride his mother takes in her artwork: “She weaves her baskets really tight. She works really hard. She puts her mind and body into each basket. It reflects her life. It’s like everything she learned from her mother, she’s passing down to her daughters and granddaughters.” At last year’s Indian Market, Kayquoptewa won best of the plaited/wicker category, while Kathryn Kooyahoema won best of the coiled basket category.

“I went in 2009. It was exciting, because first of all, I got in, and then I got a blue ribbon.” Since then she’s won awards almost every year. “I received an award for the best of class in basketry in 2012. Little did I know that my plaque would be sitting up at that center, the area where all the classification winners were sitting with the show, and it was an honor.” Some collectors at Indian Market are familiar with Hopi baskets, while some are new to the genre. “I just share whatever I have — my knowledge on how the whole cycle works in making basketry, because it’s not like you get your material one day and you can start working with it. It’s not that kind of process. It takes a lot of preparation in that sense before you actually start weaving your basket. “I have an eight-to-five job, and I come home and that’s what I sit down to do: I work on my baskets. That’s my enjoyment. I get a pleasure thinking, ‘Okay, what do I start next? How is it going to turn out?’” Some basket designs, such as the eagle, are widespread. “I just add my own little details in there,” says Kooyahoema. For instance, she might change “the environment around the eagle. Make it a little bit different than what’s out there. So that’s the uniqueness in my designs.” Kooyahoema has grown daughters with children. “Now they’re saying, ‘Mom, I think we’re ready.’ So I need to sit down when they have the time, to sit down with them and start teaching them so that it’s not lost. In my family, my mom’s gone now and my grandmother was a basket weaver also. Only two of my sisters weave.” The artist sold some of her earliest baskets to a dealer and saw the final asking price, which was six times the price she was paid. “That’s what got me. Well, my baskets can sell for that much out there, I’ll possibly sell it for that price.” At art markets, she can sell directly, with no middleman. “The one I focus on is the Indian Market, the Santa Fe one. I did start out doing Heard [Museum] and also the Pueblo Grande, then Tucson,” says Kooyahoema. “It depends on my inventory. It’s really time-consuming, so I cannot just mass produce.” She needs at least five finished pieces to make a market worthwhile. “I like Santa Fe and their market. You make friends. You become almost like family. So it’s exciting because you go back and you meet these people. You know, ‘I want to go see so-and-so.’ Lot of talent, you know?” Later she adds, “I really like going to Santa Fe. It’s my little vacation there.”

Kathryn Kooyahoema

“It’s just a cultural thing for us, for Hopi. Women are taught how to make good baskets. Second Mesa, where I’m from, we make the coil baskets,” says Kathryn Kooyahoema, whose mother, Martha Kooyahoema, taught her how to make baskets, particularly coiled plaques. When Kooyahoema was a child, “some of the finest basket weavers had kind of like a little party that went from home to home, so we were there with them while they were practicing and making the baskets, and we’d just pick up the scraps and mimic them.” Her serious education began later. “When I reached my young womanhood, the teachings began then from my mother and my godmother. My mother made us go with her when she went to go pick the yucca. I reluctantly went with her in the hot desert, picking yucca for her to use and to prepare. But I’m glad that I learned that, because that’s something that I do myself, and it’s seasonal — like winter and summer. My baskets are all made out of the yucca plant.” The process takes months. “This summer I’ll pick my yucca, and I’ll prepare that for next year’s use.” Other materials need to be harvested in winter. “It’s not a oneday, two-day thing,” she says. “It takes time.” In addition to harvesting, Kooyahoema also learned to dye with local vegetation from her mother. “We dye the red and the black” using natural dyes. At first Kooyahoema made baskets for ceremonial use, “and I also bartered with them.” Then a non-Native acquaintance encouraged her to enter Indian Market.

See Iva Honyestewa at booth 307 FR N See Wilmetta Kayquoptewa at booth 338 FR S See Kathryn Kooyahoema at booth 336 FR N

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2019 HEARD MUSEUM GUILD

INDIAN FAIR & MARKET PHOENIX, ARIZONA BEST OF SHOW RECEPTION MARCH 1, 2019 INDIAN FAIR & MARKET MARCH 2 & 3, 2019 TICKETS AT HEARD.ORG/FAIR

Protect, Honor, Cherish by Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/Shoshone/Bannock) 2018 Best of Show winner Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

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FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL ROSA JUAREZ

GHOST RANCH

Discover O Keeffe 6

Set out on a new path and explore the sights, sounds, and tastes of O’Keeffe’s experience in New Mexico. Plan a road trip, walk the block, take a hike, and have an adventure! For more ideas and information, visit gokm.org/explore.

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ABIQUIÚ

1. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. 2. Eloisa’s O’Keeffe Table dinner. 3. Georgia O’Keeffe Home and Studio. 4. Visit the new O’Keeffe Welcome Center in Abiquiú. 5. The White Place. 6–7. Ghost Ranch.

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3 SANTA FE Central image: Maria Chabot. Georgia O’Keeffe Hitching a Ride to Abiquiu, 1944. Photographic Print. Gift of the Maria Chabot Literary Trust. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Image 2: Eloisa’s O’Keeffe Table dinner. Image 3: Georgia O’Keeffe. Patio Door with Green Leaf, 1956. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation and The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation. Image 7: Georgia O’Keeffe. Untitled (Red and Yellow Cliffs), 1940. Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 inches. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Gift of The Burnett Foundation.

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HOME AND STUDIO

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MUSEUM STORE

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Native Art Week at the galleries

Patrick Dean Hubbell (Diné) The Season of New Life Oil, natural earth pigment on canvas 24 x 24 inches Peters Projects

Lisa Holt (Cochiti Pueblo), Harlan Reano (Kewa Pueblo) Natural clay & pigments 20.25 x 11 x 13 inches Blue Rain Gallery

BY ARIN MCKENNA Sometimes it feels as though most of the nearly 1,000 artists showing at Indian Market have dozens of followers wanting to speak to them. If the booths are too crowded, you can meet with many Indian Market artists at gallery receptions and demonstrations during Native Art Week. Gallery exhibitions showcase indigenous works in every genre and material, and featured artists may already have international reputations or may be emerging stars. QUADRIVIUM: Four Native Painters, showing at Peters Projects (1011 Paseo de Peralta, petersprojects.com, 505954-5800), offers four distinct views of the southwestern landscape that Tony Abeyta (Navajo), Darren Vigil Gray (Jicarilla Apache), Patrick Dean Hubbell (Navajo) and Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo) all call home. “Looking at the show, I realized, these are also people who love their land,” said Peters Projects director Mark Del Vecchio. Abeyta’s pieces range from one reflective of early-20thcentury Santa Fe art colony works to a riotous combination of flowers, buzzing bees and grenades. Vigil Gray’s images hint at mysteries that draw the viewer in. Hubbell’s affinity for Diné weaving is reflected in his textured brushwork and patterns that echo a tapestry’s warp and weft. Romero’s dynamic landscapes, which Del Vecchio calls “muscular and

sensuous,” seem to leap off the canvas. Peters Projects’ EVERYWHEN: Indigenous Photoscapes showcases photographer Cara Romero (Chemehuevi), whose themes range from thought-provoking social issues to female empowerment. The works include dreamlike images of subjects in tribal clothing floating in bodies of water and one contrasting Pueblo people to The TV Indians. White Shell Woman, a 2017 Indian Market Best of Classification winner, is on display. In Photosynthesis, also at Peters Projects, Will Wilson (Diné) captures the feeling of 19th-century photographs with his wet-plate colloidal process and digital printing. Wilson collaborates with his subjects, who decide exactly how they want to dress and what objects they will be depicted with. Smartphone technology brings the static images to life with brief videos of subjects talking about their culture. Walking in Beauty, featuring Jimmy Calabaza’s (Kewa) bold jewelry creations and the micro inlay work of Carl and Irene Clark (Navajo), rounds out Peters Projects offerings for Native Art Week. Imprint, showing at the Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts (1590-B Pacheco St., coeartscenter.org, 505-983-6372), is a collaboration between printmakers Eliza Naranjo Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo), Jamison Chas Banks (Seneca-Cayuga/Cherokee), Jason Garcia (Santa Clara Tewa), Terran Last Gun (Piikani), Dakota Mace (Diné) and Jacob Meders (Mechoopda Maidu) and co-curators Bess Murphy and Nina Sanders (Apsáalooke). The project began a year ago with discussions about art making and art sharing. “It’s been a really exciting, fluid process that’s been driven by the artists, more than us as curators . . . allowing for the artists to guide what they want to do, how they want to reach the public, how they want to be presented. How they want their voices to be shared has really been the guiding structure,” Murphy says. The exhibition includes both art giveaways and public art. Free reproductions of original works will be available in repurposed newspaper boxes, with times and locations announced via social media. Those attending the Aug. 14 opening can watch Naranjo Morse applying posters with wheat paste and can participate in a family-oriented artmaking activity sponsored by Meow Wolf. Artists’ contributions range from Last Gun’s screen-printed paper bags to Meders’ exploration of historic representations of Native people. Meders uses an antique 1 04

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Dakota Mace (Diné) Untitled, 2018 Cyanotypes Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts

PETER KAHN PHOTOGRAPHY

Kateri Quandelacy Sanchez (Zuni/Acoma Pueblo) Cuprite Corn Maidens Keshi, the Zuni Connection

printing press, antique fonts and historic imagery. Banks raises the issue of species extinction with colorful handmade kites depicting a parrot that may once have resided in the Santa Fe area. The Coe Center is planning “pop-up iterations” of the show at various locations, including a printmaking demonstration by Banks at Meow Wolf in September. Check the Coe’s social media sites for event updates. A collaborative extension of the exhibit shows in Axle Contemporary (axleart.com) through Aug. 26. Bronwyn Fox, “chief steward” of Keshi, the Zuni Connection (227 Don Gaspar Ave., keshi.com, 505-989-8728), described Native Art Week as “old home week.” “There’s no denying the incredible energy of market time and all of those incredibly creative individuals and all of that inspired creation in one concentrated place,” Fox says. “I think all of that energy is so contagious, and everybody is in a good mood and excited.” Salvador Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), known for his old-style, found-stone fetishes, will also be displaying bronzes that the gallery helped him create. Fetish carver Kateri Quandelacy Sanchez (Zuni/Acoma Pueblo) carves her Corn Maidens from unusual stones, such as labradorite and a Ganges River stone called Shiva’s lingam. Zuni jeweler Jennie Vicenti’s lapidary skills “are just off the charts,” according to Fox. Vicenti often uses unusual materials in her cluster work jewelry. Husband-and-wife fetish carvers Lynn Quam (Zuni) and Jayne Quam (Diné) are known for carving pairs of animals and families of creatures. The Quams’ daughter Candace Quam and her partner, Elroy Natachu Jr. (Zuni), will show their twodimensional art. Sunday highlights youth artists. Katsina carver Robert Cachini Jr. (Zuni) will be on-site with his son Jaren Cachini (Hopi/Zuni), who also carves fetishes. Brothers Joseph and Joshua Namingha (Zuni/Hopi-Tewa) could bring anything from pottery effigy figures to carved stones or painting. Blue Rain Gallery (544 South Guadalupe St., blueraingallery.com, 505-954-9902) will host its annual group show, Celebration of Native American Art, and a solo exhibition, Mystic Knowledge, featuring glass artist Preston Singletary (Tlingit). “It feels like every year, every batch of work is like a progression for the artist and what it is they do,” executive director Denise Phetteplace says. “So everything to me feels new and feels fresh, and I can always see the subtle changes and shifts in the work.” Hyrum Joe (Navajo) — recognized in both the Native art market and the western 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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heritage market for his depictions of Navajo daily life — demonstrates his representational portrait painting techniques during Thursday’s reception for Celebration. Taos jeweler Maria Samora’s elegant pieces in gold and silver are designed for comfortable wear. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture named Samora its 2018 Living Treasure. Potter Jody Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo) received a New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts this year. Her work stands out for its detailed sgraffito and chocolate to brown finishes. Muscogee Creek painter Starr Hardridge’s unique style of pointillism — created by squeezing paint through a needle — produces pictorial, beadwork-like images with a texture that feels like braille, based on pre-removal southeastern Woodlands beadwork. Celebration also features the vibrant paintings of Yatika Fields (Osage/Cherokee/Creek), glass creations from Dan Friday (Lummi), graphic designs from Thomas Breeze Marcus (Tohono O’odham), Chris Pappan’s (Osage/Kaw/ Cheyenne River Lakota) evocative images based on ledger drawings, Lisa Holt’s (Cochiti Pueblo) and Harlan Reano’s (Kewa Pueblo) edgy Cochiti-style clay figures and Les Namingha’s (Hopi/Zuni) sinuous biomorphic designs on pottery and paintings. Phetteplace calls Preston Singletary “a star of the glass world and of our gallery.” His designs are strongly influenced by his Tlingit culture. In recent years, Singletary has added architectural pieces, such as cast-lead crystal sculptures, to his blown-glass depictions of wildlife, utilitarian pieces and ceremonial objects. Visitors can gain insights into the glassblowing process when Singletary and Friday demonstrate from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. For more of the many gallery events taking place during Indian Market, check out “Around Town.”


AT THE MUSEUMS

3-5 p.m.

Wednesday 8.15

Contemporary Indigenous Discourse Series

“Native Arts and Policy: Resilience and Rights” explores how tribal archives, libraries, museums and artists can help in implementing international human rights standards delineated in the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Panelists include Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), author and attorney; Laura Harris (Comanche), executive director, Americans for Indian Opportunity; and Robert “Tim” Coulter (Potawatomi), founding director, American Indian Law Resource Center. Moderated by W. Richard West (Southern Cheyenne), president and CEO, Autry National Center of the American West.

10 a.m.-1 p.m. From the Sketchbook of T.C. Cannon, Part 2 A rare opportunity to obtain artwork from the estate of Kiowa/Caddo master painter T.C. Cannon, including previously unexhibited pieces. Free

Case Trading Post, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

12:30-1:15 p.m. Artist talk: People to People — Michael Namingha

Curator Katherine Ware talks with multidisciplinary Hopi-Tewa artist Michael Namingha about landscape photography and issues of land use in the NMMA exhibition Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives. Free with museum admission.

New Mexico Museum of Art

3-5 p.m. Just Bead It!

MIAC and the Museum of International Folk Art present Charlene Holy Bear (Standing Rock Lakota), Hollis Chitto (Choctaw/ Laguna/Isleta Pueblo) and John Garcia (Santa Clara Pueblo) discussing their artistic techniques. Free with museum admission.

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Thursday 8.16 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Native jewelry sale and show

Includes pieces by Richard I. Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo), Denise Wallace (Chugach Sugpiaq), Raymond Sequaptewa (Hopi), Roy Talahaftewa (Hopi) and others. Free

Case Trading Post, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

11 a.m.-1 p.m. First Times

Meet katsina carver Randy Brokeshoulder (Hopi/Navajo/Shawnee) and see the first miniature katsina he ever carved. Free

Case Trading Post, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

3-5 p.m. 43rd annual benefit auction

Silent auction featuring contemporary and historic American Indian and Southwest art, including jewelry, pottery, textiles, baskets, katsinam and more. Last table closes at 4:30 p.m. Free

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

Melanie Yazzie Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

5-7 p.m. Reception for fall exhibitions IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

Hyde (Navajo/Belizean descent). Moderated by Blackhorse Lowe (Navajo). Free

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

5:30-7:30 p.m. Opening reception for Dancing Colors: Contemporary Pueblo Embroidery and Soular Power Pueblo dancers and refreshments.

Poeh Cultural Center and Museum

Friday 8.17

6-7 p.m. Spanish guitar music by Roberto Capocchi

NMMA and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival present a free concert in celebration of Santa Fe Indian Market.

New Mexico Museum of Art, St. Francis Auditorium

107 W. Palace Ave. 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org

9 a.m.-noon Old Friends, New Faces

Exceptional Native artists demonstrate how they create their works. On the Wheelwright Museum plaza. Free

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

10 a.m.-3 p.m. 43rd annual Wheelwright benefit auction

Featuring new and historic American Indian and Southwest art, including jewelry, pottery, textiles, baskets, katsinam and folk art. Preview from 10 a.m. to noon. Live auction from noon to 3 p.m. Free

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

3-6 p.m.

Artist workshop for Native youth Poeh Cultural Center and Museum

5-6:15 p.m. Panel: CineDoom: Narratives of Native Film and Beyond

Filmmakers explore the current state of Native film in the Southwest. Panelists include Sally Kwayosh (Walpole Island Anishinaabe), Jason Asenap (Comanche), Nanobah Becker (Diné) and Daniel Edward 106

Saturday 8.18 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Live radio

Join Santa Fe’s KSFR 101.1 FM for a live feed and giveaways. Radio personality Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) of Indigenous Foundation broadcasts live from the booth from 2 to 5 p.m.

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

9-11:30 a.m. Gallery tour and panel

Join Terrol Dew Johnson (Tohono O’odham), Holly Wilson (Delaware Nation/ Cherokee) and Darren Vigil Gray (Jicarilla Apache/Kiowa Apache) as they discuss their current exhibitions. Gallery tour from 9 to 10 a.m. Panel discussion on their respective art practices from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Introductions by MoCNA chief curator Manuela Well-Off-Man.

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

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Saturday-Sunday 8.18-19 8 a.m.-5 p.m. IAIA student and recent graduate art market

The market includes full-time enrolled IAIA students and those who have graduated within the past five years. Held under the MoCNA portal.

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Portal Artisans’ Celebration

This annual two-day event features handcrafted art, music, traditional Indian dances, food and beverages. Enter through the blue gate, just south of the New Mexico History Museum. Free

New Mexico History Museum, Palace of the Governors

105 W. Palace Ave. 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org

Sunday 8.19 11 a.m.-noon Book reading and dialogue: Sea of Grass

Join author Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee) and Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian, in a lively discussion on Echo-Hawk’s historical novel The Sea of Grass: A Family Tale from the American Heartland. Book signing follows. Free

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts


Exhibits GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St. 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org

The Black Place: Georgia O’Keeffe and Michael Namingha. Through photographic and video installations, Hopi-Tewa artist Michael Namingha responds to Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings and drawings of the western New Mexico landscape she called the Black Place. From 1936 to 1949, O’Keeffe created more than a dozen images of this location.

IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place 505-983-8900, iaia.edu/museum

Rolande Souliere: Form and Content. Souliere’s (Michopicoten) mural exhibition combines a variety of art forms and cross-cultural influences. Through Jan. 27, 2019. Action Abstraction Redefined. In the 1960s and 1970s, Native artists challenged stereotypical expectations of Indian art, experimenting with modern art styles combined with art influences from their own cultural heritage. Through July 28, 2019. Holly Wilson: On Turtle’s Back. Wilson (Delaware Nation/Cherokee) presents new narrative works created in a variety of media, including bronze, wood and encaustic. Aug. 16-Jan. 27, 2019. Expanding Horizons: Darren Vigil Gray. New abstract landscapes by Vigil Gray (Jicarilla Apache/Kiowa Apache). Aug. 16-Feb. 16, 2019. Meeting the Clouds Halfway: Terrol Dew Johnson and Aranda\Lasch. Tohono O’odham basket maker and indigenous food activist Johnson partners with the Manhattan-based architectural firm to create experimental sculptures, featuring elements from the Sonoran Desert paired with commercial construction materials. Aug. 16-Feb. 16, 2019.

Norbert Peshlaki, Peshlakai Vision Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

artist. Her jewelry is known for the simplicity of its design and its textured metals. Through Feb. 28, 2019.

MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

706 Camino Lejo, Museum Hill 505-476-1200, internationalfolkart.org Beadwork Adorns the World. Delicate glass beads, historically crafted in Murano and Bohemia, have spread across the globe, sparking artistic creations in Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. Through Feb. 3, 2019.

POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM

78 Cities of Gold Road 505-455-5041, poehcenter.org/museum Dancing Colors: Contemporary Pueblo Embroidery. An exhibition of kilts, sashes and Pueblo dance regalia created under the direction of Shawn Tafoya (Santa Clara Pueblo).

SITE SANTA FE

1606 Paseo de Peralta 505-989-1199, sitesantafe.org SITElines.2018: Casa tomada. The third edition of SITE’s art of the Americas biennial, featuring numerous indigenous artists. This radical rethinking of art of the Americas is curated by José Luis Blondet, Candice Hopkins (Carcross/Tagish) and Ruba Katrib. Through Jan. 6, 2019.

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS AND CULTURE

WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

710 Camino Lejo 505-476-1269, indianartsandculture.org

704 Camino Lejo 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West. Footwear ranging from millennial-old sandals to beautifully beaded and quilled moccasins and high-fashion shoes. Through Sept. 3, 2018.

Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie. More than 60 monotypes, bronze sculptures and acrylic paintings, plus a selection of linoleum blocks, wood blocks, tools and other materials that illuminate the artist’s practice. Through Oct. 7.

Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. The lifeways of New Mexico’s and Arizona’s Apache and Navajo groups are shown through more than 100 cultural objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Through Dec. 31, 2018. Maria Samora: Master of Elegance. Samora (Taos Pueblo) is this year’s MIAC Living Treasure and Native Treasures featured

Peshlakai Vision. The first solo museum exhibition to honor master Navajo silversmith Norbert Peshlakai, whose career spans more than 40 years. The exhibition features more than 100 pieces, including jewelry, vessels and small sculptural works, some inlaid with precious materials and marked with Peshlakai’s signature stamp work. Through Oct. 7, 2018. 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

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AROUND TOWN

5-9 p.m.

COMPILED BY ARIN MCKENNA

IAIA scholarship dinner and auction Bid on artwork and other valuable offerings to support IAIA student scholarships. Keri Ataumbi (Kiowa) and Lorraince Gala Lewis (Laguna/Taos/Hopi) are auction co-chairs. General admission $200. Information and tickets available at iaia.edu/philanthropy/iaia-2018scholarship-dinner-auction. La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E. San Francisco St.

Sunday 8.12 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Pueblo Independence Day The 15th annual celebration commemorates the successful Pueblo Revolt against the Spanish in 1680. 7 a.m.: a 13-mile pilgrimage run from Jemez Pueblo to Jemez Historic Site (general public welcome; water stations and shuttle service provided). 10 a.m.: Guest speakers welcome runners. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.: Jemez dances, Native American flute music, indigenous food and Native arts and crafts. Free Jemez Historic Site NM 4, 43 miles north of Bernalillo nmhistoricsites.org/jemez, 575-829-3530

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Objects of Art Santa Fe More than 70 exhibitors of current and historical artwork from throughout the world show paintings, sculpture, furniture, books, fashion, jewelry, textiles and tribal, folk, American Indian, African and Asian art. $15. El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia objectsofartsantafe.com, 505-570-3220

1-3 p.m. Revival Rising: Ohkay Owingeh Pottery Reception for exhibition of more than 50 pieces of Ohkay Owingeh pottery from the 1930s to the 1950s. King Galleries 130 Lincoln Ave., Suite D kinggalleries.com, 480-440-3912

Sunday-Monday 8.12-8.13 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 40th annual Whitehawk Antique Indian & Ethnographic Art Show Admission $15; $25 for a run-of-show pass. Tickets available at the door; cash or check only. Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy St. whitehawkshows.com, 505-988-9544

Wednesday-Thursday 8.15-8.16 4-8 p.m. Juan de la Cruz (Santa Clara Pueblo), Mountain Lion storage jar, 2018 Native clay, native clay slips King Galleries

Tuesday 8.14 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Painting demonstration with Hyrum Joe (Navajo) Blue Rain Gallery 544 S. Guadalupe St. blueraingallery.com, 505-954-9902

Native American flute concert with Ronald Roybal General admission $25. El Flamenco, 135 W. Palace Ave. entreflamenco.com, 505-209-1302

5-7 p.m.

Wednesday 8.15

Imprint Opening reception for Imprint, a multilayered, collaborative exhibition of Native printmaking practices, including works by Eliza Naranjo Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo), Jamison Chas Banks (SenecaCayuga/Cherokee), Jason Garcia (Santa Clara Tewa), Terran Last Gun (Piikani), Dakota Mace (Diné) and Jacob Meders (Mechoopda Maidu). On view at the Ralph T. Coe Center, Axle Contemporary (through Aug. 26) and public spaces. Through March 15, 2019. Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts 1590-B Pacheco St. coeartscenter.org, 505-983-6372 Axle Contemporary axleart.com, 505-983-6372

6-9 p.m. Antique American Indian Art Show Opening night gala ($50). All gala ticket proceeds benefit KNME, New Mexico PBS. Show runs 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 15-17. Tickets $15; $25 for run-of-show pass. El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia antiqueindianartshow.com, 505-660-4701 1 08

4–6 p.m.

Grand opening receptions Grand opening for Kenny’s on the Plaza (formerly Tsali Nez Gallery), featuring new works by Michael Roanhorse (Diné) and local artists. Refreshments served. Kenny’s on the Plaza 84 E. San Francisco St. kennysontheplaza.com, 505-986-5015

Thursday 8.16 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Native American cooking class Lois Ellen Frank (Kiowa), a James Beard Award-winning author and a PhD in culinary culture, takes a fascinating look into Native American food and culture in this demonstration class. $85 per person. Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N. Guadalupe St., 505-983-4511 santafeschoolofcooking.com

Art Reception for New Works by Melanie Yazzie Works on paper and bronze sculptors by the beloved Navajo artist and professor from Boulder, Colorado. Spontaneous and colorful, Yazzie explores interactions between animals, plants, and humans. Glen Green Galleries 136 Tesuque Village Road glengreengalleries.com, 505-820-0008

5-7 p.m. Celebration of Robert Nichols Join the gallery for a celebration of the life and legacy of dealer and art lover Robert Nichols (1937–2018). Nichols was a Santa Fe original and a dedicated advocate for innovative Native ceramic arts and artists. Robert Nichols Gallery 419 Canyon Road robertnicholsgallery.com, 505-982-2145

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Chris Youngblood, Lidded Pot Lyn A. Fox Fine Pueblo Pottery


2-4 p.m.

Thursday-Friday 8.16-8.17

Reception for Sonwai (Hopi) and Ken Williams Jr. (Arapaho/Seneca) Sonwai is Verma Nequatewa’s nom d’arte. She will showcase her later jewelry, alongside Williams’ latest offerings in beadwork. Show runs Aug. 12–19. Shiprock Santa Fe 53 Old Santa Fe Trail shiprocksantafe.com, 505-982-8478

WE ARE THE SEEDS An event highlighting Indigenous visual art, music, dance, fashion, literary arts and Native foods. Free Santa Fe Railyard, Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, wearetheseeds.org.

2-6 p.m.

10 a.m.-6 p.m. Art show and sale. Works by approximately 60 artists, representing a diversity of cultures and regions. Includes artist demonstrations.

Fetish carver Salvador Romero (Cochiti Pueblo) A preeminent carver at Cochiti, Romero demonstrates how he carved his abstracted fetishes from basalt and other local stones. Keshi, the Zuni Connection 227 Don Gaspar Ave. keshi.com, 505-989-8728

10 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m. Youth art workshop/screen printing with Damian Charette (Crow). Thursday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Master of Ceremonies Sherenté Harris (Narragansett) with performances by singer-songwriter Zachariah Julian (Jicarilla Apache), DJ Celeste Worl (Tlingit) and Randy Kemp (Choctaw/ Euchee/Muscogee), with modern flute music and the Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers.

3-5 p.m. Paper, Canvas, Bronze New paintings by Jarrod Da (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and Marla Allison (Laguna). Bronze sculptures by Tammy Garcia (Santa Clara Tewa) and Autumn Borts (Santa Clara Tewa). King Galleries 130 Lincoln Ave., Suite D kinggalleries.com, 480-440-3912

3-7 p.m. Opening of Youngblood: Chris and Nancy Youngblood’s New Works The Santa Clara Pueblo artists will be present from 3 to 5 p.m. Lyn A. Fox Fine Pueblo Pottery 838 Paseo de Peralta foxpueblopottery.com, 505-577-0835

5-7 p.m. Opening reception for Richard Zane Smith: New Works Wyandotte potter Smith showcases his latest intricate ceramics. Show runs Aug. 16-20. Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery 100 W. San Francisco St. andreafisherpottery.com, 505-986-1234 Opening reception Reception for show of works by Cochiti potter Diego Romero and Chemehuevi photographer Cara Romero. Robert Nichols Gallery 419 Canyon Road robertnicholsgallery.com, 505-982-2145

5-7:30 p.m. Native American Group Show Featuring artists who have received distinctions from some of the most prestigious institutions, such as the Smithsonian, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Heard Museum.

David Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo) Tsay Puu Pho/Eagle Tail Feather Hand-painted coat NATIVE VOICES, Hand-painted coats by native artists Marla Allison, Anthony Gchachu, Lorne Honyumptewa, David Naranjo, Shelley Patrick and others. Opening Friday August 17, 3 to 6 pm Singular Couture, On the Plaza 66 E. San Francisco St. 505-699-0339, info@singularcouture.com

Artists include Kevin Red Star (Crow), Ben Nighthorse (Northern Cheyenne) and Ray Tracey (Navajo). Through August. Sorrel Sky Gallery 125 W. Palace Ave. sorrelsky.com, 505-501-6555

5-8 p.m. Celebration of Native American Art Artist reception for the annual Celebration of Native American Art, featuring artwork by Jody Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo), Starr Hardridge (Muscogee Creek), Lisa Holt (Cochiti Pueblo), Harlan Reano (Kewa Pueblo), Yatika Fields (Osage/ Cherokee/Creek), Dan Friday (Lummi), Thomas Breeze Marcus (Tohono O’odham), Chris Pappan (Osage/Kaw/ Cheyenne River Lakota), Maria Samora (Taos Pueblo), Les Namingha (Hopi/Zuni) and Hyrum Joe (Navajo). Blue Rain Gallery 544 South Guadalupe St. blueraingallery.com, 505-954-9902

KITTY LEAKEN

Thursday

Friday 8.17

5:30 p.m. Dance (free) and benefit dinner ($20) by Jambo Café. Order tickets at eventbrite.com/e/seedspicnic-dinner-tickets-47223507783 or purchase them at the door.

9 a.m.-7 p.m.

Friday

Opening reception for exhibit of new works Featured artists include Michael Horse (Yaqui descent) and David K. John (Navajo). Show opens Aug. 12. Little Bird at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail littlebirdatloretto.com, 505-820-7413

11:30 a.m. Rise to Our Voices, spokenword poetry workshop for indigenous women with Nicole Kahbah Johnny (Navajo). 2 p.m. ACONAV fashion event; aconav.com

10 a.m.-3 p.m. Richard Zane Smith pottery demonstration Wyandotte ceramic artist demonstrates how he sculpts his intricate pottery. Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery 100 W. San Francisco St. andreafisherpottery.com, 505-986-1234

2-6 p.m. Fetish carver Kateri Quandelacy Sanchez (Zuni/Acoma) Emerging lapidary artist Sanchez, known for her corn maidens, explores animal carvings. Keshi, the Zuni Connection 227 Don Gaspar Ave. keshi.com, 505-989-8728

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3-5 p.m. Meet Defined: Refined artists Defined: Refined features new works in clay by Nathan Youngblood (Santa Clara), Tammy Garcia (Santa Clara), Les Namingha (Hopi-Tewa/Zuni), Susan Folwell (Santa Clara), Juan de la Cruz (Santa Clara), Al Qöyawyama (Hopi), Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti), Steve Lucas (Hopi-Tewa) and Daniel Begay (Santa Clara/Diné). King Galleries 130 Lincoln Ave., Suite D kinggalleries.com, 480-440-3912


AROUND TOWN

5 p.m.

11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Parade of the Artists The best of the best. The gallery’s finest ceramic artists present their best works. Show runs Aug. 17-20. Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery 100 W. San Francisco St. andreafisherpottery.com, 505-986-1234

Glass-blowing demonstrations Demonstrations with glass artists Dan Friday (Lummi) and Preston Singletary (Tlingit). Blue Rain Gallery 544 South Guadalupe St. blueraingallery.com, 505-954-9902

5-7 p.m. Contemporary Native Exhibition Opening reception for a group exhibit featuring Neal Ambrose-Smith (Flathead Salish/ Métis descent), Rick Bartow (Wiyot/Yurok, 1946–2016), Harry Fonseca (Nisenan Maidu, 1946–2006), Jeff Kahm (Plains Cree) and Emmi Whitehorse (Navajo). Through Sept. 8. Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 558 Canyon Road chiaroscurosantafe.com, 505-992-0711 Opening reception for Music for the Sky New works by Tony Abeyta (Navajo). Show runs through Sept. 22. Owings Gallery, 100 E. Palace Ave. owingsgallery.com, 505-982-6244 Opening reception for potter Glen Nipshank (Big Stone Cree) One of the preeminent First Nations ceramic artists from Canada, Nipshank creates vessels and masklike forms with micaceous clay. Robert Nichols Gallery 419 Canyon Road robertnicholsgallery.com, 505-982-2145 Soul of Nations and Flying Blue Buffalo opening receptions Soul of Nations, a nonprofit based in Washington, DC, and Arizona, works to uplift indigenous communities throughout the Americas. This juried exhibition by Native teens from Southwest reservations offers boundary-pushing aesthetic statements on the theme “Honor the Earth.” Through Sept. 15. Flying Blue Buffalo is a monumental installation of 75 hand-painted, cast-resin sculptures by Armond Lara. The works tell the centuries-long story of enslaved Native American children. Through Nov. 17. form & concept 435 S. Guadalupe St. formandconcept.center, 505-982-8111 Opening reception for four exhibitions QUADRIVIUM, featuring Tony Abeyta (Navajo), Darren Vigil Gray (Jicarilla Apache), Patrick Dean Hubbell (Diné) and Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo), showcases works incorporating the highest level of the liberal arts, consisting of arithmetic, geometry, astronomy and music. Cara Romero’s (Chemehuevi) Indigenous photoscapes are the subject of EVERYWHEN. Will Wilson (Diné)

5-8:30 p.m.

Darren Vigil Gray, The Screech of Birds, 2018 Acrylic on paper on board 22.5 x 30 x 1.75 inches Peters Projects

presents Photosynthesis and jewelry by Jimmy Calabaza (Kewa Pueblo) and Carl and Irene Clark (Diné) will showcase their exquisite inlay jewelry of Walking In Beauty. Aug. 17–Aug. 22. Peters Projects 1011 Paseo De Peralta petersprojects.com, 505-954-5800 Reception for Raymond Nordwall New mixed media and oils by Raymond Nordwall (Pawnee/Ojibwe/Cherokee). Nordwall Gallery & Studio 618 Canyon Road nordwallart.com, 505-988-5057

5-7:30 p.m. All-inclusive group show Works from the gallery’s entire cadre of distinguished artists, including Kevin Red Star (Crow), Ben Nighthorse (Northern Cheyenne) and Ray Tracey (Navajo). Many artists will be on hand to discuss their work, process and artistry. Through August. Sorrel Sky Gallery 125 W. Palace Ave. sorrelsky.com, 505-501-6555 Namingha family exhibition New works by Dan, Arlo and Michael Namingha (Hopi-Tewa). Niman Fine Art 125 Lincoln Ave. namingha.com, 505-988-5091

5-8 p.m. Special reception Reception for exhibition of recent acquisitions and masterworks. Allan Houser Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., Suite 112 allanhouser.com, 505-982-4705

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Allan Houser: Rare and Unseen Works Opening reception for an exhibition of Houser’s works from the Allan Houser Archives. Allan Houser Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., 505-982-4705 Opening reception for Nocona Burgess Burgess (Comanche) will share his latest portraits and other paintings. True West Gallery 130 Lincoln Ave., Suite F truewestgallery.com, 505-982-0055 Artist reception for Mystic Knowledge Meet artist Preston Singletary (Tlingit), a leading Native American glass sculptor who works in the formline design of the Northwest Coast. Blue Rain Gallery 544 South Guadalupe St. blueraingallery.com, 505-954-9902

6–7 pm Spanish guitar music of Roberto Capocchi The New Mexico Museum of Art and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival present a free concert by Roberto Capocchi in celebration of Indian Market. New Mexico Museum of Art, St. Francis Auditorium 107 W. Palace Avenue nmartmuseum.org, 505-476-5072

7-9 p.m. Native American flute and Spanish guitar Six-time Native American Music Award nominee Ronald Roybal performs on Native American flute and classical Spanish guitar every Friday and Saturday. Free Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta hotelsantafe.com, 505-955-7805

Saturday 8.18 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Meet the artists Artists Jennie Vicenti (Zuni), Lynn Quam (Zuni), Jayne Quam (Diné), Kandis Quam (Diné/Zuni) and Elroy Natachu Jr. (Zuni) will be on site. Keshi, the Zuni Connection 227 Don Gaspar Ave. keshi.com, 505-989-8728

Friday-Saturday 8.17-8.18 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Indian Market show Featuring 44 Indian Market founding families, including the families of Maria Martinez, Margaret Tafoya, Lucy Lewis and Robert Tenorio. The event includes 60 master artists, elders and top prize winners. Silent auctions (which close at 3 p.m. both days) include turquoise jewelry and works by Allan Houser (Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994) and Dan Namingha (Hopi-Tewa). Free Scottish Rite Temple Paseo de Peralta and Washington Avenue Indians@nets.com, 505-670-5918

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Preston Singletary, Grease Dish Blown and sand-carved glass 8 x 14 x 6.5 inches Blue Rain Gallery


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AROUND TOWN 1 p.m. Blues music with Stanlie Kee & Step In No cover charge. Cowgirl BBQ 319 S. Guadalupe St. cowgirlsantafe.com, 505-982-2565

1-4 p.m. Pottery demonstrations Artist demonstrations in the gallery with Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti), Al Qöyawayma (Hopi) and Nathan Youngblood (Santa Clara). King Galleries 130 Lincoln Ave, Suite D kinggalleries.com, 480-440-3912

Nathan Youngblood (Santa Clara) making pottery at King Galleries

Aug 12-Sept. 8

2-3 p.m.

Rose B. Simpson (Santa Clara Tewa), Table of Contents Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 558 Canyon Road chiaroscurosantafe.com, 505-992-0711

Educational event Flying Blue Buffalo artist Armond Lara convenes professional and amateur historians to discuss the story of enslaved American Indian children behind the project. form & concept, 435 S. Guadalupe St. formandconcept.center, 505-982-8111

8:30 p.m. Blues, rock, R&B, and soul with Gary Farmer and the Troublemakers No cover charge Cowgirl BBQ 319 S. Guadalupe St. cowgirlsantafe.com, 505-982-2565

Sunday 8.19 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Artist reception and demonstration Featuring a collaborative work and demonstration by Hopi artist Spencer Nutima and non-Indian artist Mary Hunt. Little Bird at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail littlebirdatloretto.com, 505-820-7413

Aug. 13-18 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Annual Indian Market open house Eighty outdoor sculptures by Allan Houser are on display. Allan Houser Studio and Sculpture Gardens, 20 miles south of Santa Fe, just off the Turquoise Trail allanhouser.com/contact/sculpturegarden, 505-982-4705

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Meet the artists and youth show In conjunction with the gallery’s youth show, artist Robert Cachini Jr. (Zuni Pueblo) will be on site with his son Jaren Cachini (Hopi/Zuni Pueblo). Youth artists Joseph Namingha (Zuni/Tewa-Hopi Pueblo) and Joshua Namingha (Zuni/ Tewa-Hopi Pueblo) will also be on hand. Keshi, the Zuni Connection 227 Don Gaspar Ave. keshi.com, 505-989-8728

Les Namingha, (Hopi-Tewa/Zuni) Carnival, 2018 Native clay, acrylic King Galleries

ONGOING Passport to Pueblo Country

Explore the history of San Ildefonso Pueblo guided by an elder, followed by a demonstration of pottery techniques passed down through generations and a meal typically served on Pueblo feast days. Next visit Than Povi Fine Art Gallery, featuring American Indian art from New Mexico’s 22 tribes. Tours for groups of all sizes are available daily with a 48-hour notice. The gallery is also open by appointment. Call 505301-3956 to book a tour or gallery visit; passporttopueblocountry.com or thanpovi.com

Through Sept. 29 Enormous Forms and Noteworthy Works by Seven Pueblo Painters Enormous Forms shows 20 massive coilbuilt ceramic vessels from the late 19th and early 20th century. The Noteworthy Works by Seven Pueblo Painters exhibit includes studio-style paintings alongside interesting anomalies, providing the viewer with an intriguing look at the variety of styles used by pioneering Pueblo artists. Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon Road adobegallery.com, 505-955-1550 Chris Pappan, Welcoming the New Dawn Graphite, gold leaf, ink, and colored pencil on Evanston municipal ledger dated 1928 Blue Rain Gallery 112

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Native American Art Exhibit Featuring paintings, prints and drawings by Rance Hood (Comanche), Allen Bahe (Navajo), William “Willie” Murphy (Navajo), Joseph Maktima (Hopi/ Laguna), Buffalo Gouge (Muscogee/ Cherokee) and other artists. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday and by appointment Sunday. Free Art Exchange Gallery 60 E. San Francisco St., Suite 210 505-603-4485, aegallery.com

Aug. 13-31 Maria Martinez: Exceptional Works Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery 100 W. San Francisco St. 505-986-1234, andreafisherpottery.com

Aug. 15–19 Dwayne Wilcox in gallery Renowned Oglala Lakota ledger artist Dwayne Wilcox will be on site Aug. 15–19 with his ledger work and unique papiermâché sculptures. On view through August. Morning Star Gallery 513 Canyon Road morningstargallery.com, 505-982-8187

Aug. 16-20 Hopi Bronze Sculpture Hopi artist Kim Seyesnem Obrzut presents SEYESNEM: Sculptural Images of a Matriarchal Society, a bronze perspective on identity, history and social interaction in a prehistoric culture, with a special reveal of Obrzut’s next direction in precast. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 16-19 and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 20. La Fonda on the Plaza Exchange Room, 100 E. San Francisco St. kimobrzut.com, 928-226-0690


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2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

ABEYTA, HARVEY

BEGAY, ABRAHAM

BEN, ARLAND

A note about tribal affiliations Native American tribes are known by many different names. Often, the most well-known name is not what a tribe calls itself. For example, while Navajo Nation is the tribe’s official name, its autonym is Diné, and artists might opt for either term. Some tribes have changed their legal names to reflect the names used in their own languages. For instance, Kewa Pueblo was formerly the Pueblo of Santo Domingo, and Ohkay Owingeh was the Pueblo of San Juan. Some artists prefer the more commonly used name, while others do not. While Jemez Pueblo has not changed its legal name, some of its members use its autonym, Walatowa. Tewa is a linguistic, ethnic and cultural group that includes Nambé, Pojoaque, San Ildefonso, Ohkay Owingeh, Santa Clara and Tesuque Pueblos. The Hopi-Tewa, who descend from Pueblo warriors, helped defend the Hopi against raiders. Through historical relocation, many tribes were split between their homelands and Indian Territory, so some members clarify which group they belong to by designations such as Northern Arapaho or Southern Cheyenne. Some large groups include many different tribes. For instance, the Ojibwe, also known as the Chippewa, span southern Canada and the northern United States. The name Sioux comes from the Ojibwe language and includes the Dakota, Lakota and Nakota (or Assiniboine and Stoney people). Some reservations, such as Fort Peck Indian Reservation, include all three of these groups. Native artists carefully choose how they wish their tribal affiliations to be listed to reflect history, geography, culture and other important aspects of their identities.

I Jewelry

Aragon, Allen Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E

Abeyta, Harvey Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Aragon, Loren Acoma Pueblo 210 PAL N 272 PAL Abeyta, Lester Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Aragon, Sarah Navajo (Diné) 532 SFT P 712 LIN W Abeyta, Richard Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Arviso, J.P. Navajo (Diné) 533 SFT P 921 SHE Abeyta, Sharon Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Arviso, Steven Navajo (Diné) 533 SFT P 766 LIN E Adams, Victoria Ataumbi, Keri Southern Cheyenne and Kiowa Arapaho 125 POG 236 PAL N Bahe, Fidel Aguilar, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 602 PLZ 526 SFT W Aguilar, Richard Choctaw Nation 332 FR S

Becenti, Alexander Navajo (Diné) 657 PLZ

Beck, Nanibaa Aguilar, Wayne Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 258 PAL N 248 PAL N

Beck, Victor Navajo (Diné) 258 PAL N Bedonie, Pat Navajo (Diné) 304 FR P Begay, Abraham Navajo (Diné) 300 FR N Begay, Eddie Navajo (Diné) 708 LIN W Begay, Erick Navajo (Diné) 633 PLZ Begay, Leroy Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN E Begay, Lyla Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN E Begay, Nelson Navajo (Diné) 300 FR P Begay, Philbert Navajo (Diné) 244 PAL N

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BRILLON, JESSE Belin, Esther Navajo (Diné) 276 PAL

Brown, Jason Penobscot 409 WA E

Cate, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 703 LIN E

Ben, Arland Navajo (Diné) 729 LIN W

Cajero, Althea Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo)/Acoma Pueblo 521 SFT

Caté, Barbara Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 703 LIN E

Charley, Matthew Navajo (Diné) Calabaza, Gerard Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 315 FR S 123 POG Charlie, Ric Benally, Mel Navajo (Diné) Calabaza, Jimmy Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 681 PLZ 204 PAL N 310 FR P Chavez, Clarita Benally, Veronica Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calabaza, Marie Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 802 MAR 324 FR N 701 LIN P Chavez, Dorothy Bennett, Donna Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calabaza, Mary Ann Acoma Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 319 FR N 718 LIN E 304 FR N Chavez, Edward Bennett, George Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calabaza, Mary Loretta Hualapai Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 900 SHE 718 LIN E 123 POG Chavez, Franklin Betoney Sr., Billy Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calabaza, Mitchell Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 319 FR N 738 LIN W 701 LIN P Chavez, James Bia, Norman Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calabaza, Valerie Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 716 LIN E 760 LIN W 304 FR N Chavez, Jared Bird, Gail San Felipe Pueblo Calladitto, Mark Laguna Pueblo/Kewa Pueblo 306 FR N Navajo (Diné) 261 PAL N 530 SFT W Chavez, Joseph D. Bird, Jolene Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Calladitto, Myles 655 PLZ Navajo (Diné) 649 PLZ 528 SFT W Chavez, Richard Bird-Romero, Mike San Felipe Pueblo Campbell, Terrence Ohkay Owingeh/ 306 FR N Tahltan Taos Pueblo 641 PLZ 259 PAL S Chavez, Trinnie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Carrillo, Franklin Boivin, Wendy 716 LIN E Laguna Pueblo/ Choctaw/ Menominee Mescalero Apache 208 PAL N Chee, Frank 726 LIN W Navajo (Diné) Box Anderson, Karen 318 FR N Casuse, Fritz Southern Ute Navajo (Diné) 737 LIN W Chicharello, Thompson 519 SFT Navajo (Diné) Brillon, Jesse 111 POG Cate, Irma Haida/Cree Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 727 LIN E Claw, Monty 308 FR N Navajo (Diné) Brokeshoulder, Aaron 706 LIN W Absentee Shawnee/Choctaw/ Cate, Lorraine Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Coochwikvia, Marcus 308 FR N 734 LIN E Hopi 764 LIN W Benally, Ernest Navajo (Diné) 324 FR N

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2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

CATE, IRMA

COOCHWIKVIA, MARCUS

Coonsis, Phyllis Zuni Pueblo 324 FR S

Draper Jr., Teddy Navajo (Diné) 128 POG

CORIZ, RUDY

KOHLMEYER, ROYCE

Gasper, Duran Zuni Pueblo 208 PAL S

Hunter-Pine, Wilma Navajo (Diné) 240 PAL S

Coriz, Joseph Dukepoo, Causandra Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Taos Pueblo 332 FR N 254 PAL N

Gaussoin, Connie Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo 261 PAL S

Huntinghorse, Dina Wichita 418 WA E

Coriz, Juanita Dukepoo, Michael Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Hopi 305 FR S 254 PAL N

Gaussoin, David Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo 261 PAL S

Huntinghorse, Fortune Wichita 648 PLZ

Coriz, Rodney Edaakie, Raylan Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Zuni Pueblo 211 PAL N 230 PAL N

Gaussoin, Jerry Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo 261 PAL S

Jackson, Gene Navajo (Diné) 920 SHE

Coriz, Rudy Edenshaw, Gwaai Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Haida 325 FR S 703 LIN P

Gaussoin, Wayne Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo 261 PAL S

Jamon, Carlton Zuni Pueblo 216 PAL S

Crawford, Mark Navajo (Diné) 762 LIN E

Gene, Leonard Navajo (Diné) 736 LIN E

Joe, Alfred Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT W

Grant, Antonio Eastern Band Cherokee 751 LIN W

Joe, Bruce Navajo (Diné) 334 FR N

Harrison, Jimmie Navajo (Diné) 707 LIN P

Joe, Bryan Navajo (Diné) 623 PLZ

Haskie, Vernon Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P

Joe Jr., Oreland Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN E

Hendren, Shane Navajo (Diné) 712 LIN E

Joe-Chandler, Amelia Navajo (Diné) 339 FR S

Henry, Ronnie Navajo (Diné) 814 MAR

Johnson, Jesse Zuni Pueblo 528 SFT E

Herrera, Tim Cochiti Pueblo 761 LIN E

Johnson, Kenneth Muscogee (Creek)/Seminole 237 PAL N

Honanie, Aaron Hopi 404 WA W

Johnson, Pete Navajo (Diné) 301 FR S

Honanie, Watson Hopi 714 LIN E

Johnson, Peter Navajo (Diné) 334 FR S

Honhongva, Marlin Hopi 327 FR S

Johnson, Yazzie Navajo (Diné) 261 PAL N

Howard, Ivan Navajo (Diné) 704 LIN W

Julian, Rainey Jicarilla Apache 602 PLZ

CrazyHorse, Cippy Cochiti Pueblo 257 PAL N CrazyHorse, Waddie Cochiti Pueblo 257 PAL N

Emery Jr., Terrance St. Croix Chippewa/Jemez Pueblo 905 SHE Fender, Erik San Ildefonso Pueblo 702 LIN P Francis, Florence Navajo (Diné) 760 LIN W

Crispin, Osavio Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Garcia, Aaron 337 FR N Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 923 SHE Cummings, Edison Navajo (Diné) Garcia, Emily 207 PAL S Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 405 WA W Curtis, Jennifer Navajo (Diné) Garcia, Inez 735 LIN W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 317 FR N Custer, Gary Navajo (Diné) Garcia, Kevin 221 PAL S Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo)/Jemez Pueblo Custer, Ira 511 SFT Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN E Garcia, Lorencita Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Dalangyawma, Ramon 317 FR N Hopi 716 LIN W Garcia, Michael (Na Na Ping) Pascua Yaqui DeMent, Jeff 506 SFT Navajo (Diné) 661 PLZ Garcia, Nelson Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Dial, Isaac 730 LIN E Navajo (Diné) 615 PLZ Garcia, Ray D. San Felipe Pueblo Dougi, Carlos 746 LIN W Navajo (Diné) 526 SFT E

Hunter, Cody Navajo (Diné) 240 PAL S 201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

117

LEE-ANDERSON, TRENT

Jumbo, Darrell, AKA Elephant Man Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT E Kemp, Rykelle Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw/ Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN E Kirk, Elizabeth Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN E Kirk, Michael Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN E Kohlmeyer, Royce Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N Koinva, Anderson Hopi 768 LIN W Kulberg, Dawn Eyak 240 PAL N Kuticka, David Isleta Pueblo 270 PAL Kuwanhongva, Darrin Hopi 336 FR N Laconsello, Nancy Zuni Pueblo 668 PLZ Laconsello, Ruddell Zuni Pueblo 668 PLZ LaFountain, Samuel Navajo (Diné)/ Turtle Mountain Chippewa 763 LIN E LaRance, Steve Hopi/Assiniboine 326 FR S Latone, Christie Zuni Pueblo 113 POG Lee, Albert Navajo (Diné) 631 PLZ Lee, Allison Navajo (Diné) 415 WA E

Lee, Erik Ermineskin Cree Nation 257 PAL S Lee, Russell Navajo (Diné) 254 PAL S Lee-Anderson, Kyle Navajo (Diné) 414 WA E Lee-Anderson, Trent Navajo (Diné) 414 WA E Lee-Anderson, Wyatt Navajo (Diné) 415 WA E LeFlore, Lisa Fort Sill Apache 633F PLZ Lister, Ernie Navajo (Diné) 256 PAL S Little, James Navajo (Diné) 664 PLZ Livingston, Ceejaye Navajo (Diné) 321 FR N Livingston, Irene Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Livingston, Jake Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Livingston, Jay Jacob Navajo (Diné) 321 FR N Livingston, Jaysen Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Lomaventema, Gerald Hopi 662 PLZ Loretto, Glenda Jemez Pueblo 726 LIN W Lovato, Andrew Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 243 PAL N Lovato, Anthony Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 658 PLZ


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

BIRD, HELEN

ARAGON, WANDA

FOLWELL, SUSAN

MADALENA, REYES

ROMERO, DIEGO

Lovato, Calvin Naveek Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 234 PAL S 242 PAL S

Padilla, Ellouise Reano, Denise Secatero, Lyle Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 766 LIN W 250 PAL S 252 PAL S

Taylor, Tsosie Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT W

Lovato, Maria Nells, Albert Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 678 PLZ 205 PAL S

Perry, Michael Navajo (Diné) 216 PAL N

Reano, Dwayne Sequaptewa Sr., Raymond Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Hopi 252 PAL N 218 PAL S

Lovato, Martine Nelson, L. Eugene Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 246 PAL S 214 PAL N

Peshlakai, Norbert Navajo (Diné) 242 PAL N

Reano, Frank Shirley, Lorenzo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 527 SFT W 769 LIN E

Tenorio, Broderick Navajo (Diné)/Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 417 WA E

Lovato, Mary Nelson, Peter Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 310 FR S 705 LIN W

Peshlakai-Haley, Natasha Navajo (Diné) 110 POG

Reano, Janie Shorty, Perry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 253 PAL N 210 PAL S

Lovato, Pilar Nequatewa, Verma Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Hopi 234 PAL S 601 PLZ

Piaso, Thompson Navajo (Diné) 663 PLZ

Reano, Joe Bautista Sice, Howard Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 703 LIN W 258 PAL S

Lovato, Ray Nez, Henry Plummer, Earl Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 243 PAL N 817 MAR 321 FR S Maktima, Duane Laguna Pueblo 751 LIN E

Nez, Leonard Navajo (Diné) 340 FR N

Manygoats, Benson Navajo (Diné) 226 PAL N

Nez, Marian Navajo (Diné) 340 FR N

McKinney, Jonathan Acoma Pueblo 718 LIN W

Nez Jr., Sidney Navajo (Diné) 810 MAR

Medina, Jennifer Nieto, Christopher Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 513 SFT 711 LIN E Medina, Stephanie Ortiz, Isaiah Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) San Felipe Pueblo 513 SFT 672 PLZ Mitchell, Toney Navajo (Diné) 232 PAL N

Othole, Eric Zuni Pueblo 227 PAL S

Monongye, Jesse Navajo (Diné) 603 PLZ

Owen, Angie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 249 PAL S

Monte, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 202 PAL S

Owen, Dean Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 248 PAL S

Morgan, Jacob Navajo (Diné) 306 FR P

Owen, Rena Navajo (Diné) 248 PAL S

Muskett, Morris Navajo (Diné) 312 FR N

Pacheco, Farrell Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 246 PAL S

Navakuku, Emmett Hopi 762 LIN W

Pacheco, Reyes Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 246 PAL S

Reano, Joe L. Slim, Marcus Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) San Felipe Pueblo/ 249 PAL N Navajo (Diné) 312 FR S Poblano, Veronica Reano, Rose Zuni Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Slim, Marvin 612 PLZ 253 PAL N Navajo (Diné) 720 LIN E Polacca III, Starlie Reeves, Daniel Sunshine Colorado River Hopi Navajo (Diné) Slim, Michael 674 PLZ 402 WA E Navajo (Diné) 720 LIN E Pourier, Kevin Robbins, Jesse Oglala Lakota Muscogee (Creek) Smith, Patrick 322 FR N 688 PLZ Navajo (Diné) 670 PLZ Pruitt, Christopher Rogers, Michael R. Laguna Pueblo Bishop Paiute Tribe Sorensen, Matagi 314 FR S 744 LIN W Yavapai-Apache 632 PLZ Pruitt, Pat Romero, Ken Laguna Pueblo Laguna Pueblo/Taos Pueblo Spry Misquadace, Wanesia 686 PLZ 504 SFT Chippewa 630 PLZ Rafael, Tonya June Rosetta, Jeremy Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Stanaland, Nicklaus 643 PLZ 524 SFT P Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E Ratt, Christal Samora, Maria Kitiganik Anishnabe Taos Pueblo Stevens, Mark 108 POG 313 FR N Laguna Pueblo 722 LIN E Reano, Angie Sanchez, Alex Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) Tafoya, Lorenzo 249 PAL N 403 WA E Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 730 LIN W Reano, Arnold Sanchez Reano, Charlene Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) San Felipe Pueblo Tafoya, Mary 522 SFT P 527 SFT W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 730 LIN W Reano, Charlotte Sandoval, Lester San Felipe Pueblo Navajo (Diné) Talahaftewa, Roy 250 PAL S 342 FR S Hopi 650 PLZ Reano, Debra Scott-Tá’iitsohii, Raynard Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 522 SFT P 711 LIN W 118

201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

Tenorio, Feliciano Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 239 PAL S Tenorio, Leslie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 239 PAL S Thompson, Veronica Navajo (Diné) 121 POG Tom, Bryan Navajo (Diné) 247 PAL N Tom, Jack Navajo (Diné) 635 PLZ Tom, Mary L. Navajo (Diné) 220 PAL N Tsabetsaye, Edith H. Zuni Pueblo 251 PAL N Tsingine, Olin Navajo (Diné) 647 PLZ Tsosie, Lyndon Navajo (Diné) 627 PLZ Tsosie, Richard Navajo (Diné) 300 FR S Tutt, Travis Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN P Vandever, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 306 FR S Wadsworth, Piki Hopi 338 FR N Wall, Adrian Jemez Pueblo 743 LIN E


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

LEARNED, BRENT

DAVIS, RAUL

KOYAWENA, DUANE

Wallace, Denise Sugpiaq 746 LIN E

Antonio, Melissa Acoma Pueblo 301 FR P

Candelario, Hubert San Felipe Pueblo 217 PAL S

Ebelacker, Jerome Santa Clara Pueblo 758 LIN W

Garcia, Jason D. Santa Clara Pueblo 126 POG

Juanico, Marietta Acoma Pueblo 331 FR N

Wallace, Liz Navajo (Diné)/Nisenan/ Washoe 333 FR N

Aragon, Allen Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E

Carpio, Caroline Isleta Pueblo 505 SFT

Ebelacker, Sarena Santa Clara Pueblo 600 PLZ

Garcia, Sharon Santa Clara Pueblo 606 PLZ

Juanico, Melvin Acoma Pueblo 331 FR N

Aragon, Grace Acoma Pueblo 217 PAL N

Carr, Stacey E. Laguna Pueblo/ Hopi 526 SFT P

Fender, Erik San Ildefonso Pueblo 702 LIN P

Garcia, Tammy Santa Clara Pueblo 669 PLZ

Lewis, Joyce Cochiti Pueblo 745 LIN W

Fender, Martha San Ildefonso Pueblo 702 LIN P

Goldtooth, Larson Hopi-Tewa 319 FR S

Lewis, Judy Acoma Pueblo 767 LIN E

Foley, Benina Jemez Pueblo 523 SFT W

Gonzales, Cavan San Ildefonso Pueblo 516 SFT

Lewis, Sharon Acoma Pueblo 636 PLZ

Folwell, Jody Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ

Gutierrez, Rose Santa Clara Pueblo 309 FR P

Lewis Garcia, Mary Dolores Acoma Pueblo 127 POG

Folwell, Kaa Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ

Gutierrez, Tony Santa Clara Pueblo 700 LIN W

Lewis-Garcia, Diane Acoma Pueblo 530 SFT P

Folwell, Susan Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ

Gutierrez-Naranjo, Kathy San Ildefonso Pueblo/ Santa Clara Pueblo 309 FR P

Loretto-Tosa, Laverne Jemez Pueblo 244 PAL S

Waynee, Robin Saginaw Chippewa 250 PAL N Weahkee, Sharon Navajo (Diné) 503 SFT

Aragon, Wanda Acoma Pueblo 253 PAL S

Charley, Karen K. Hopi 736 LIN W

Yazzie Jr., Kee Navajo (Diné) 401 WA W

Atencio, Ambrose Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Clashin, Deborah 302 FR P Hopi 404 WA E Atencio, Jordyn Ohkay Owingeh Concho, Carolyn 606 PLZ Acoma Pueblo 530 SFT P Baca, David Santa Clara Pueblo Concho, George 202 PAL N Acoma Pueblo 531 SFT P Begay, Daniel Navajo (Diné)/ Cornshucker, Melvin Santa Clara Pueblo Keetoowah Cherokee 245 PAL S 768 LIN E

Yellowhorse, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 629 PLZ

Begay, Romaine Navajo (Diné) 118 POG

Correa, Prudy Acoma Pueblo 238 PAL N

Begay Jr., Harrison Navajo (Diné) 245 PAL S

Curran, Dolores Santa Clara Pueblo 260 PAL N

Whagado, Jerry Yavapai-Apache 340 FR S Willie, Wesley Navajo (Diné) 102 POG Worl, Rico Tlingit 779 LIN E

II Pottery Abeita, Karen Isleta Pueblo 751 LIN E Aguino, Karen Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT E Aguino, Kayleen Ohkay Owingeh 534 SFT E Aguino, Maia Ohkay Owingeh 534 SFT E Ami, Dorothy Hopi 705 LIN P Analla Jr., Calvin Laguna Pueblo 214 PAL S Antonio, Frederica Acoma Pueblo 302 FR N

Bird, Helen Duwyenie, Debra Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Santa Clara Pueblo 259 PAL N 410 WA W

Fragua, Cindy Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N Fragua, Glendora Jemez Pueblo 665 PLZ Fragua, Juanita Jemez Pueblo 665 PLZ Fragua-Johnson, Bonnie Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N

Borts-Medlock, Autumn Santa Clara Pueblo 669 PLZ

Duwyenie, Preston Santa Clara Pueblo 410 WA W

Brauker, Shirley M. Little River Band of Ottawa 109 POG

Earles, Chase Kahwinhut Caddo Nation 405 WA E

Cajero, Aaron Jemez Pueblo 313 FR S

Early, Max Laguna Pueblo 243 PAL S

Gala-Lewis, Lorraine Laguna Pueblo/ Taos Pueblo/Hopi 203 PAL N

Cajero, Esther Jemez Pueblo 318 FR S

Ebelacker, James Santa Clara Pueblo 600 PLZ

Garcia, Effie Santa Clara Pueblo 713 LIN W

Cajero Jr., Aaron Jemez Pueblo 313 FR S

Ebelacker, Jason Santa Clara Pueblo 758 LIN W

Garcia, Gloria Pojoaque Pueblo 126 POG

Gachupin, Laura Jemez Pueblo 523 SFT W

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

119

LOMAKEMA, WALLACE

Hanna, Crystal Cherokee Nation 513 SFT Harrison, Rowan Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 717 LIN W Herder, Adrian Navajo (Diné) 771 LIN E Holt, Lisa Cochiti Pueblo 228 PAL N Johnson, Norvin Navajo (Diné) 243 PAL S Jojola, Deborah Isleta Pueblo/Jemez Pueblo 330 FR N Juanico, Delores Acoma Pueblo 217 PAL N

Louis, Corrine Acoma Pueblo 231 PAL N Louis, Reycita Acoma Pueblo 518 SFT Lucario, Amanda Acoma Pueblo 323 FR N Lucario, Daniel Acoma Pueblo 323 FR N Lucario, Rebecca Acoma Pueblo 767 LIN E Lucero, Diana P. Zia Pueblo 412 WA E Lucero Fragua, Linda Jemez Pueblo 412 WA E Madalena, Reyes Jemez Pueblo 646 PLZ Maho, Garrett Hopi 303 FR S


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

SINGER, RYAN

TSOSIE SISNEROS, MICHELLE

PINNECOOSE, ADRIAN STANDING ELK

Manymules, Samuel Navajo (Diné) 704 LIN P

Naranjo, Joseph G. Santa Clara Pueblo 316 FR N

Pahponee, Kickapoo 611 PLZ

Roller, Jeff Santa Clara Pueblo 533 SFT W

McKelvey, Lucy Cecelia Navajo (Diné) 530 SFT E

Naranjo, Kevin Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S

Paloma, Gabriel Zuni Pueblo 644 PLZ

Roller, Ryan Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W

Medina, Elizabeth Zia Pueblo 684 PLZ

Naranjo, Madeline Santa Clara Pueblo 262 PAL N

Panana, Rufina Zia Pueblo 717 LIN E

Roller, Toni Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W

Medina, Marcellus Zia Pueblo 684 PLZ

Naranjo, Monica Santa Clara Pueblo 260 PAL N

Patricio, Felisha Acoma Pueblo 756 LIN E

Romero, Diego Cochiti Pueblo 509 SFT

Melchor, Crucita Naranjo, Stephanie C. Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Santa Clara Pueblo 705 LIN E 247 PAL S

Patricio, Robert Acoma Pueblo 756 LIN E

Romero, Martha Nambe Pueblo 230 PAL S

Mighell, Edwin Point Hope Iñupiaq 303 FR P

Pecos, Irwin Jemez Pueblo 531 SFT W

Samora, John Taos Pueblo 305 FR N

Moquino, Lee Nipshank, Glenn Zia Pueblo/Santa Clara Pueblo Northern Cree 310 FR N 238 PAL S

Pecos, Jeanette Jemez Pueblo 531 SFT W

Sanchez, Alisha Acoma Pueblo 326 FR N

Naha, Rainy Hopi 676 PLZ

Nuñez-Velarde, Shelden Jicarilla Apache 765 LIN E

Peters, Franklin Acoma Pueblo 413 WA E

Sanchez, Gerti “Mapoo” Isleta Pueblo 330 FR S

Namoki, Valerie Hopi 224 PAL N

Ortiz, Dominick Cochiti Pueblo 745 LIN W

Peynetsa, Agnes Zuni Pueblo 619 PLZ

Sanchez, Russell San Ildefonso Pueblo 701 LIN W

Naranjo, Angela Carol Santa Clara Pueblo/ San Ildefonso Pueblo 309 FR P

Ortiz, Evelyn Acoma Pueblo 704 LIN E

Peynetsa, Anderson Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W

Sangre, Tony Isleta Pueblo 270 PAL

Ortiz, Kyle Cochiti Pueblo 745 LIN W

Peynetsa, Anderson Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W

Setalla, Dee Hopi 613 PLZ

Ortiz, Mary J. Cochiti Pueblo 235 PAL N

Polacca, Delmar Hopi 404 WA W

Seymour, Mary A. Acoma Pueblo 517 SFT

Ortiz, Virgil Cochiti Pueblo 745 LIN W

Qöyawayma, Al Hopi 529 SFT E

Shutiva-Montano, Jacqueline Acoma Pueblo 207 PAL N

Osti, Jane Cherokee Nation 527 SFT P

Ray, Marilyn Acoma Pueblo 236 PAL S

Simplicio, Noreen Zuni Pueblo 239 PAL N

Padilla, Andrew Laguna Pueblo 309 FR S

Reano, Harlan Suazo-Naranjo, Bernice Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Taos Pueblo 228 PAL N 317 FR S

Padilla, Tony Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT E

Rodriguez, D. Andrew Laguna Pueblo 223 PAL

Suina, Dena San Felipe Pueblo 616 PLZ

Paguin-Sanchez, Gladys Laguna Pueblo 309 FR S

Roller, Cliff Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W

Tafoya, Harriet Santa Clara Pueblo 311 FR S

Naranjo, Dusty Santa Clara Pueblo 707 LIN E Naranjo, Eunice Navajo (Diné) 314 FR N Naranjo, Frances Santa Clara Pueblo 262 PAL N Naranjo, Geraldine Santa Clara Pueblo 260 PAL N Naranjo, Jody Santa Clara Pueblo 402 WA W Naranjo, Johnathan Santa Clara Pueblo 317 FR S

Natseway, Thomas G. Laguna Pueblo 312 FR P

1 20

201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

Tafoya, Lu Ann Santa Clara Pueblo/ Pojoaque Pueblo 251 PAL S Tafoya-Moquino, Jennifer Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL S Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda Santa Clara Pueblo 241 PAL N Tapia, Terry Tesuque Pueblo 117 POG Tapia, Thomas Tesuque Pueblo 117 POG Teller, Lynette Isleta Pueblo 532 SFT W Teller, Stella Isleta Pueblo 532 SFT W

Valarde-Brewer, Carol Santa Clara Pueblo 700 LIN W Victorino, Sandra Acoma Pueblo 124 POG Walkingstick, Karin Cherokee Nation 729 LIN E Wall, Kathleen Jemez Pueblo 222 PAL Wall, Marcus Jemez Pueblo 708 LIN E Wesaw, Jason Potawatomi 411 WA E Westika, Gaylon Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W

Whitegeese, Daryl Tenorio, Thomas Santa Clara Pueblo/ Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Pojoaque Pueblo 728 LIN E 251 PAL S Toya, Camilla Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N

Whiterock, John Navajo (Diné) 339 FR N

Toya, Dominique Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N

Yazzie, Angie Taos Pueblo 618 PLZ

Toya, Judy Jemez Pueblo 604 PLZ

Yepa, Alvina Jemez Pueblo 659 PLZ

Toya, Maxine Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N

Yepa, Dena Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 246 PAL N

Tso, Jared Navajo (Diné) 315 FR P

Yepa, Elston Jemez Pueblo 246 PAL N

Tsosie, Darrick Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P

Yepa, Marcella Chickasaw Nation/ Jemez Pueblo 659 PLZ

Tsosie, Emily F. Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P Tsosie, Leonard Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P

Youngblood, Nancy Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL N Youngblood Cutler, Christopher Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL N


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

ALLISON, ROBERT

III Paintings, Drawings, Graphics, Photography Adams, Tiffany Chemehuevi Indian Tribe 507 SFT

GEORGE, ROS Blaze, Randall Oglala Lakota 231 PAL S

Clark, Donn Navajo (Diné) 120 POG

Boome, Peter Upper Skagit 625 PLZ

Clarkson, Karen Choctaw Nation 800 MAR

Bowers, Lee Chickasaw Nation 907 SHE

Coons, Gordon Chippewa/Ottawa 727 LIN W

Brauker, Shirley M. Little River Band of Ottawa 109 POG

Curfman, Del Crow 909 SHE

Aguilar, Joseph Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Bread, Jade 526 SFT W Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Aguilar, Martin San Ildefonso Pueblo Bread, Paris 408 WA E Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Allison, Marla Laguna Pueblo Broer, Roger 686 PLZ Oglala Lakota 106 POG Allison, Orlando Hopi/Salt River Pima-Maricopa Brown, Derek No-Sun 758 LIN E Shoshone-Bannock 908 SHE Balloue, John Cherokee Nation Brown, Jerry 637 PLZ Navajo (Diné) 918 SHE Begay, Tedra Navajo (Diné) Browning, Ashley 779 LIN W Santa Clara Pueblo/ Pojoaque Pueblo Begaye, Marwin 251 PAL S Navajo (Diné) 206 PAL S Burgess, Nocona Comanche Nation/Kiowa Begaye, Roberta 728 LIN W Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN W Cavin, J. Dylan Choctaw Nation Ben, Arland 761 LIN W Navajo (Diné) 729 LIN W Charley, Avis “Spirit Lake Tribe”/ Benally, Giovanni Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) 752 LIN W 780 LIN E Bigwater, Christian Navajo (Diné) 645 PLZ Billie, Michael Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN W Biss-Grayson, Dante Osage 801 MAR

HONYOUTI, RONALD

Chee, Carlis M. Navajo (Diné) 343 FR S Chee, Norris Navajo (Diné) 776 LIN E Chee, Ronald Navajo (Diné) 781 LIN W

FRAGUA, CLIFF

Dalasohya Jr., David Hopi 819 MAR Dark Mountain, Dawn Oneida 777 LIN E Davis, Raul Mescalero Apache 750 LIN W Demientieff, Michael Holikachuk Athabascan 771 LIN W Dexel, Andrew Nlakapamux 412 WA W Dougi, Ishkoten Navajo (Diné)/Jicarilla Apache 683 PLZ Dragonfly, David Blackfeet Tribe 308 FR S Draper, Jr., Teddy Navajo (Diné) 128 POG DuBoise, Amber Navajo (Diné)/Sac and Fox/ Prairie Band Potawatomi 911 SHE Edd, Sierra Navajo (Diné) 754 LIN W Emerson, Anthony Navajo (Diné) 104 POG Etsitty, Garrett Navajo (Diné) 808 MAR

Everson, Andy K’omoks/Kwakwakwak’w/ Tlingit 727 LIN E Farris, Tom Otoe-Missouria/Cherokee 245 PAL N Fife, Jimmie Muscogee (Creek) 720 LIN W Gabaldon, Felicia Choctaw Nation 710 LIN E Garcia, Jason D. Santa Clara Pueblo 126 POG Gendron, Ric Colville Confederated Tribes/ Umatilla 915 SHE Goldtooth, Troy Navajo (Diné) 742 LIN W Good Day, Lauren Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet 327 FR N Growing Thunder, Darryl Assiniboine/Sioux 689 PLZ Guardipee, Terrance Blackfeet Tribe 235 PAL S Harjo Jr., Benjamin Absentee Shawnee/Seminole 103 POG Harrison, Rowan Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 717 LIN W Hatfield, Jayden Nicole Comanche Nation/Kiowa 336 FR S Haukaas, Linda Rosebud Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ Haukaas, Thomas F. Rosebud Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ Hensley, Billy Chickasaw Nation 804 MAR

201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

121

PANAMA, MATTHEW

SICE, GABRIEL

Honyumptewa, Akema Hopi 229 PAL N

Jones, Micqaela Shoshone/Paiute 735 LIN E

Horace, Kevin Hopi/Navajo (Diné) 767 LIN W

Kemp, Randy Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw/ Euchee 732 LIN E

Howard, Norma Choctaw Nation/Chickasaw 206 PAL N Howell, Jesse “Sonny” Pawnee 702 LIN W IronShell, Sun Rose Sicangu Lakota/Oglala Lakota 753 LIN W Jackson, Dawn Saginaw Chippewa 510 SFT Jackson, Ron Toahani Navajo (Diné) 806 MAR James, Duhon Navajo (Diné) 341 FR N Jensen, Brent Navajo (Diné) 233 PAL S Jhane, Wakeah Comanche Nation/ Blackfeet Tribe/Kiowa 721 LIN E Jim, Damian Navajo (Diné) 224 PAL S Jim, Karl Navajo (Diné) 112 POG Joe, Hyrum Navajo (Diné) 233 PAL N John, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 273 PAL John, David Navajo (Diné) 274 PAL Johnson, Parker Navajo (Diné) 228 PAL S

Kempenich, Hillary Turtle Mountain Chippewa 741 LIN W King, James Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W Kolakowski, Leah Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa/Little Traverse Bay Odawa 215 PAL N Kothman, Julie Yurok Tribe/Bishop Paiute Tribe 744 LIN W Koyawena, Duane Hopi 520 SFT LaFountain, Eve Turtle Mountain Chippewa 803 MAR LaRoche, Galen Sicangu Lakota 262 PAL S Learned, Brent Cheyenne and Arapaho 723 LIN E Levi, George Cheyenne and Arapaho 723 LIN E Little, Monty Navajo (Diné) 739 LIN W Little Thunder, Merlin Southern Cheyenne 344 FR N Logan, Linley B. Seneca 406 WA W Lomakema, Wallace Hopi 757 LIN W Loncassion, Levon Zuni Pueblo 779 LIN E


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

ASPAAS, KEVIN

BALLENGER, VIRGINIA

BEGAY, BERDINE

LAUGHING, MILTON

IV Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Loretto, Estella Jemez Pueblo 760 LIN E

Murphy, William Navajo (Diné) 717 LIN E

Reed, Lauren Choctaw Nation 607 PLZ

Stewart, Isaiah Oglala Lakota/Mohawk 342 FR N

Urness, Zoe Tlingit/Cherokee 902 SHE

Lowden, Michelle Acoma Pueblo 411 WA W

Neidhardt, Nicole Navajo (Diné) 901 SHE

Richards, Rueben Navajo (Diné) 781 LIN E

Suazo, David Taos Pueblo 807 MAR

Vicenti, Carson Jicarilla Apache 812 MAR

Lujan, Deborah Taos Pueblo 764 LIN E

Nelson, Ben Kiowa/Taos Pueblo 532 SFT E

Romero, Cara Chemehuevi Indian Tribe 509 SFT

Suazo, DeAnna Taos Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 807 MAR

Vigil, Felix Jicarilla Apache 508 SFT

Albert, Robert Hopi 205 PAL N

MacKnight, Sheridan Chippewa/Lakota 418 WA W

Nelson, Jonathan Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN E

Romero, Mateo Cochiti Pueblo 734 LIN W

Suazo, Dexter Taos Pueblo 772 LIN W

Walters, Daniel A. Navajo (Diné) 328 FR N

Allison, Robert Hopi/Salt River Pima-Maricopa 758 LIN E

Martin, Bobby C. Muscogee (Creek) 721 LIN W

Nelson, Yellowman Navajo (Diné) 532 SFT E

Salcido, Frank Navajo (Diné) 329 FR S

Tacheney, Priscilla Navajo (Diné) 107 POG

Walters, Gertrude Navajo (Diné) 328 FR N

Martinez, Robert Arapaho 753 LIN E

Nordwall, Raymond Pawnee/Chippewa 114 POG

Sangre, Tony Isleta Pueblo 270 PAL

Tallas, Joshua Navajo (Diné) 673 PLZ

Walters, Shondinii Navajo (Diné) 743 LIN E

Brokeshoulder, Randall Navajo (Diné)/Hopi/ Absentee Shawnee 234 PAL N

Mater, Dustin Chickasaw Nation 710 LIN W

Parrish, Jason Navajo (Diné) 910 SHE

Sevier, Chessney Northern Arapaho 237 PAL S

Tapahe, Eugene Navajo (Diné) 763 LIN W

Waytula, Bryan Cherokee Nation 770 LIN E

McCullough, Michael Choctaw Nation 119 POG

Paschall, Sallyann Cherokee Nation 101 POG

Sevier, Jackie Northern Arapaho 715 LIN W

Tapia, Thomas Tesuque Pueblo 117 POG

Whitethorne, Troy Navajo (Diné) 122 POG

McCullough, Stephen Choctaw Nation 119 POG

Patrick, Shelley Muscogee (Creek) 723 LIN W

Shakespeare, Lindsey Mescalero Apache 501 SFT

Tate, Brad Chickasaw Nation 225 PAL S

Wilson, Holly Delaware Nation/Cherokee 719 LIN E

Medina, Marcellus Zia Pueblo 684 PLZ

Patton, Wade Oglala Lakota 100 POG

Short, Cathy Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ

Tippeconnic, Eric Comanche Nation 304 FR S

Winder, Kwani Santa Clara Pueblo 713 LIN E

Melero-Moose, Melissa Northern Paiute/Modoc 765 LIN W

Pease, Ben Crow/Northern Cheyenne 512 SFT

Short, Chris Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ

Toledo, Joe Jemez Pueblo 115 POG

Yazzie, Charletta Navajo (Diné) 341 FR N

Menchego, Arthur Santa Ana Pueblo 780 LIN W

Pinnecoose, Adrian Standing Elk Navajo (Diné)/Southern Ute 904 SHE

Singer, Ryan Navajo (Diné) 628 PLZ

Toya Jr., Michael Jemez Pueblo 737 LIN E

Yazzie, Lance T. Navajo (Diné) 105 POG

Slivers, Nando Navajo (Diné) 417 WA W

Tsoodle, James Kiowa 605 PLZ

Yazzie, Peterson Navajo (Diné) 750 LIN E

Smith Jr., Keith W. Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN W

Tsosie, Nelson Navajo (Diné) 610 PLZ

Soule, Jay Chippewas of the Thames First Nation 906 SHE

Tsosie Sisneros, Michelle Santa Clara Pueblo/ Navajo (Diné) 301 FR N

Yellow Bird Sr., Monte, AKA Black Pinto Horse Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 777 LIN W

Stevens, Shannon Laguna Pueblo Hopi 722 LIN E

Two Bulls, Micheal Oglala Lakota 744 LIN E

Minkler, Sam Navajo (Diné) 776 LIN W Montoya, Paul Sandia Pueblo 116 POG Montoya, Robert Sandia Pueblo 116 POG Morrison, Andrew San Carlos Apache 811 MAR Mose, Allen Navajo (Diné) 212 PAL S

Pochoema, Melissa Hopi 614 PLZ Purdy, Dolores Caddo/Winnebago 731 LIN W Rabbit, Traci Cherokee Nation 726 LIN E Raymond-Overstreet, Darby Navajo (Diné) 215 PAL S

122

201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

Yellowhair, Rosie Navajo (Diné) 805 MAR Yellowhawk, Jim Cheyenne River Lakota 335 FR N

Chavarria, Manuel Hopi 736 LIN W Chimerica, Darance Makwesa Hopi 613 PLZ Gashweseoma, Ryan Hopi 914 SHE Gasper, Bart Zuni Pueblo 251 PAL N George, Ros Hopi 667 PLZ Holmes Jr., Arthur Hopi 219 PAL N Honanie, Aaron Hopi 404 WA W Honanie, Kara Hopi 714 LIN E Honyouti, Kevin Hopi 201 PAL N Honyouti, Mavasta Hopi 201 PAL N Honyouti, Ronald Hopi 201 PAL N


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWAIA

WARRINGTON, DANA Honyumptewa, Aaron Hopi/Picuris Pueblo 500 SFT Honyumptewa, Ron Hopi 529 SFT P Honyumptewa, Stetson Hopi 500 SFT Horace, Kevin Hopi/Navajo (Diné) 767 LIN W Kaye, Wilfred Hopi 818 MAR Kaye, Wilmer Hopi 403 WA W Kayquoptewa, Brendan Hopi 414 WA W Kayquoptewa, Eric Hopi 338 FR S Nasafotie, Adrian Hopi 764 LIN W

GOEMAN, STONEHORSE AND RONNIE LEIGH

V Sculpture Begay Jr., Frederick Navajo (Diné) 604 PLZ Blaze, Randall Oglala Lakota 231 PAL S Boome, Peter Upper Skagit 625 PLZ Borts-Medlock, Autumn Santa Clara Pueblo 669 PLZ Bread, Nathan Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Cajero Jr., Joe Jemez Pueblo 521 SFT Carpio, Caroline Isleta Pueblo 505 SFT Chitto, Randy Mississippi Band Choctaw 724 LIN E

NEPTUNE, GEO

Fragua, Cliff Jemez Pueblo 752 LIN E Fredericks, Evelyn Hopi 200 PAL S Glass, Demos Cherokee Nation 755 LIN W Glass Jr., Bill Cherokee Nation 755 LIN W Goeman, Stonehorse Tonawanda Band of Seneca 749 LIN E Goodman, James Navajo (Diné) 715 LIN E Jackson, Norman G. Yakutat Tlingit 522 SFT E Jacobs, Margaret Saint Regis Mohawk 922 SHE Joe Sr., Oreland Southern Ute 700 LIN E

Patterson, Earl Hopi 769 LIN E

DeCelles, John Fort Belknap Gros Ventre/ Assiniboine 750 LIN W

John, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 273 PAL

Phillips, Loren Hopi 660 PLZ

Edd, Don Navajo (Diné) 276 PAL

John, Hadiibah Navajo (Diné) 274 PAL

Pochoema, Julius Hopi 614 PLZ

Edenshaw, Gwaai Haida 703 LIN P

John, Tulane Navajo (Diné) 273 PAL

Pochoema, Kevin Hopi 614 PLZ

Ethelbah, Upton Greyshoes Santa Clara Pueblo/ White Mountain Apache 666 PLZ

Jojola, Anthony Isleta Pueblo 534 SFT P

Polequaptewa, Tayron Hopi 407 WA W Seechoma, Ed Hopi 307 FR P Taylor, Eli Hopi 771 LIN E Tsabetsaye, Tiffany Zuni Pueblo 533 SFT E

Fields, Anita Osage/Muscogee 212 PAL N Fischer, Mark Oneida Nation 815 MAR Flanagan, Sean Rising Sun Taos Pueblo 778 LIN W

Laahty, Ricky Zuni Pueblo 203 PAL S LaFountain, Bruce Turtle Mountain Chippewa 803 MAR LaFountain, Presley Turtle Mountain Chippewa 722 LIN W

TWO BULLS, JACINTHE

LaFountain, Saige Rogers, William Navajo (Diné)/Turtle Mountain Navajo (Diné) Chippewa 772 LIN E 763 LIN E Samora, John Lewis, Alex Taos Pueblo Cheyenne River Sioux 305 FR N 632F PLZ Scott, Rain J. Tá’iitsohii Lomatewama, Ramson Acoma Pueblo Hopi 711 LIN W 209 PAL S Sice, Gabriel Loretto, Estella Zuni Pueblo Jemez Pueblo 773 LIN E 760 LIN E Sice, Troy Lujan, Carol Zuni Pueblo Navajo (Diné) 305 FR P 919 SHE Tsalabutie, Loren Lujan, Ira Zuni Pueblo Taos Pueblo 208 PAL S 707 LIN W Tsalate, Raymond Marcus, Robert Zuni Pueblo Ohkay Owingeh 305 FR P 651 PLZ Tsosie, Nelson Nelson, L. Eugene Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) 610 PLZ 214 PAL N Tsosie, Robert Nez, Rickie Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) 656 PLZ 745 LIN E Two Bulls, Micheal Obrzut, Kim Oglala Lakota Hopi 744 LIN E 515 SFT Wall, Adrian Oliver, Marvin Jemez Pueblo Quinault/Isleta Pueblo 743 LIN E 755 LIN E Walters, Shondinii Panana, Matthew Navajo (Diné) Jemez Pueblo 743 LIN E 757 LIN E Walters Jr., Roy Panana, Ryan Navajo (Diné) Jemez Pueblo 739 LIN W 757 LIN E Washburn, Tim Patterson, Earl Navajo (Diné) Hopi 754 LIN E 769 LIN E Weahkee, Daniel Robbins, Blair Navajo (Diné)/Zuni Pueblo Osage Nation 503 SFT 275 PAL Weahkee, Manuel Rodriguez, D. Andrew Zuni Pueblo Laguna Pueblo 503 SFT 223 PAL White, Terresa McGrath Yup’ik 323 FR S

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

123

Whitman-Elk Woman, Kathy Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E Wilson, Holly Delaware Nation/Cherokee 719 LIN E Wilson, William Delaware Nation 322 FR S Yazzie, Donovan Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN W Yazzie, Larry Navajo (Diné) 773 LIN W Yazzie, Peterson Navajo (Diné) 750 LIN E Young, Carolyn Bernard Choctaw Nation 774 LIN E

VI Textiles Aragon, Joan Zia Pueblo 522 SFT W Aragon, Loren Acoma Pueblo 272 PAL Aragon, Nanabah Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E Aragon, Venancio Navajo (Diné) 523 SFT E Aragón, Irveta Navajo (Diné) 523 SFT E Aspaas, Kevin Navajo (Diné) 724 LIN W Ballenger, Virginia Navajo (Diné) 913 SHE Begay, Berdine Navajo (Diné) 701 LIN E Begay, D.Y. Navajo (Diné) 701 LIN E


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY

CHAVARRIA, DAVE

HERRERA, CARLOS

Begay, Gerard Navajo (Diné) 204 PAL S

Grant, Dorothy Haida 747 LIN E

Schultz, Marilou Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN W

Aragon, Ralph Zia Pueblo 522 SFT W

Flanagan, Sean Rising Sun Taos Pueblo 778 LIN W

Begay, Gloria Navajo (Diné) 311 FR P

Harvey, Jason Navajo (Diné) 654 PLZ

Schultz, Martha Gorman Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN W

Barnes, Melissa Navajo (Diné) 770 LIN W

Garcia, John Santa Clara Pueblo 126 POG

Begay, Nellie Navajo (Diné) 687 PLZ

Henderson, Alberta Navajo (Diné) 617 PLZ

Shabi, Geneva Navajo (Diné) 211 PAL S

Boome, Peter Upper Skagit 625 PLZ

Grant, Antonio Eastern Band Cherokee 751 LIN W

Begay, Rena Navajo (Diné) 337 FR S

Honyumptewa, Akema Hopi 229 PAL N

Shackleford, Tyra Chickasaw Nation 746 LIN W

Box, Debra Southern Ute 737 LIN W

Hamilton-Youngbird, Dyanni Navajo (Diné) 226 PAL S

Begaye, Brittany Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN W

Honyumptewa, Stetson Hopi 500 SFT

Short, Cathy Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ

Cajero Sr., Joe Jemez Pueblo 318 FR S

Harris, Charles Comanche Nation 527 SFT E

Bia, Leona Navajo (Diné) 229 PAL S

Humetewa Kaye, Donna Hopi 818 MAR

Short, Chris Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ

Campbell, Dale Tahltan/Tlingit 641 PLZ

Hemlock, Carla Kahnawake Mohawk 743 LIN W

Black Horse, Catherine Seminole 235 PAL S

Katoney, Marlowe Navajo (Diné) 622 PLZ

Singer, Penny Navajo (Diné) 740 LIN E

Charley, Darius Navajo (Diné) 523 SFT P

Hemlock, Donald “Babe” Kahnawake Mohawk 743 LIN W

Charley, Berdina Navajo (Diné) 701 LIN E

Laughing, Charlene Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N

Smith, Timothy Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 344 FR S

Chavez-Thomas, Lisa Isleta Pueblo 407 WA E

Herrera, Carlos Cochiti Pueblo 761 LIN E

Cody, Lola Navajo (Diné) 733 LIN W

Laughing, Milton Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N

Taylor, Rosie Navajo (Diné) 736 LIN E

Herrera, Eagle Cochiti Pueblo 917 SHE

Cody, Melissa Navajo (Diné) 733 LIN W

Laughing, Mona Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N

Teller Pete, Lynda Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W

Church, Kelly Pottawatomi/Ottawa / Chippewa 738 LIN E

Cook, Calandra Navajo (Diné) 645 PLZ

Manygoats, Florence Navajo (Diné) 325 FR N

Tsosie, Pauline Navajo (Diné) 401 WA E

Deer, Leslie Muscogee (Creek) 747 LIN W

Muskett, Morris Navajo (Diné) 312 FR N

Williams, Toni Northern Arapaho 733 LIN E

Duwyenie, Mary Lynn Hopi 303 FR N

Naataanii, TahNibaa Navajo (Diné) 642 PLZ

Zefren-M Navajo (Diné) 514 SFT

Esquiro, Sho Sho Kaska Dene/Cree 740 LIN W

Ornelas, Barbara Teller Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W

Fain, Gloria Navajo (Diné) 308 FR P

Ornelas, Michael Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W

Fallon, Ruth Cherokee Nation 415 WA W

Riggs, Florence Navajo (Diné) 328 FR S

Gonzales, Isabel Jemez Pueblo 201 PAL S

Ruby, Christy Ketchikan Tlingit 315 FR N

JENSEN, LANE

MITTEN, KATRINA

Claw, Kareen San Carlos Apache 706 LIN W Claw, Monty Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN W Duwyenie, Mary Lynn Hopi 303 FR N

VII Diverse Arts

Emery, Dorothy L. Jemez Pueblo 905 SHE

Esquivel, Dennis Grand Traverse Ottawa and Abeyta, Harvey Chippewa Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 731 LIN E 210 PAL N Farris, Tom Adams, Victoria Otoe-Missouria/Cherokee Southern Cheyenne and 245 PAL N Arapaho 236 PAL N Fife, Jimmie Muscogee (Creek) Allen, Renee 720 LIN W Hopi/Choctaw/Navajo (Diné) 719 LIN W 1 24

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

Herrera, Arnold Cochiti Pueblo 675 PLZ Herrera, Thomas Metlakatla Tsimshian 675 PLZ Holland, Steve Cherokee Nation 916 SHE Honyouti, Richard Hopi 741 LIN E Ingram, Jerry Choctaw Nation 685 PLZ Jacobs, Mary Seneca 816 MAR Jacobson, Cole Prairie Island Dakota 409 WA W James, Peter Ray Navajo (Diné) 677 PLZ

PRINTUP, BRYAN Jensen, Lane Navajo (Diné)/ Salt River Pima-Maricopa 679 PLZ John, David Navajo (Diné) 274 PAL Kee, Randall Navajo (Diné) 343 FR N Kirstine, Arlene Navajo (Diné) 213 PAL N Loretto , Fannie Jemez Pueblo 708 LIN E Mata, Leah Santa Ynez Chumash 241 PAL S McKay, Glenda Ingalik Athabascan 221 PAL N Mitchell, Lydell Navajo (Diné) 232 PAL S Mitten, Katrina Miami 311 FR N Moran, Beverly Bear King Standing Rock Lakota 502 SFT Myers, Jhane Comanche Nation/Blackfeet 721 LIN E Nequatewa, Bryson Hopi 601 PLZ Otero, Joseph Navajo (Diné) 406 WA E Owens, Alfred Navajo (Diné) 314 FR P Pourier, Kevin Oglala Lakota 322 FR N Pruitt, Pat Laguna Pueblo 686 PLZ


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY

ESQUIVEL, DENNIS

JACOBS, MARY

Ramel, Tim Blueflint Bad River Chippewa/ Comanche 608 PLZ

Tsoodle-Nelson, Malachi Navajo (Diné)/Kiowa/ Taos Pueblo 532 SFT E

Day, Alexa Rae Odawa/Ojibwe/Potawatomi/ Ho-Chunk/Lakota 709 LIN W

Ratt, Christal Kitiganik Anishnabe 108 POG

Wall, Kathleen Jemez Pueblo 222 PAL

Ruby, Christy Ketchikan Tlingit 315 FR N

White, Delina Leech Lake Ojibwe 609 PLZ

Gala, Carol Laguna Pueblo/Taos Pueblo/ Hopi 709 LIN E

Rutherford, Lisa Cherokee Nation 626 PLZ

Willie, JT Navajo (Diné) 302 FR S

Schrupp, Nelda Pheasant Rump Nakota First Nation 219 PAL S

Wilson, Sandy Fife Muscogee (Creek) 723 LIN W

Shaax’ Saani, Tlingit 213 PAL S Shackleford, Tyra Chickasaw Nation 746 LIN W Shakespeare-Cummings, Donna Northern Arapaho 624 PLZ Skeets, Ray Navajo (Diné) 735 LIN W Skenandore, Olivia Oglala Lakota 408 WA W Spry Misquadace, Wanesia Chippewa 630 PLZ Stewart, Maya Chickasaw Nation/Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw 720 LIN W Tapia-Browning, Michele Santa Clara Pueblo/ Pojoaque Pueblo 251 PAL S Tenoso, Paul FourHorns Cheyenne River Lakota 778 LIN E Trudeau, Sharon Odawa 809 MAR

Worcester, Daniel Chickasaw Nation 329 FR N Yazzie, Venaya Navajo (Diné) 225 PAL N

VIII Beadwork/ Quillwork Aitson, Richard Kiowa/Kiowa Apache 652 PLZ Berryhill, Lester Creek 329 FR N Boivin, Wendy Menominee 208 PAL N Bread, Jackie Blackfeet Tribe 638 PLZ Chavarria, Dave Santa Clara Pueblo 410 WA W

SHACKLEFORD, TYRA

Greeves, Teri Kiowa 731 LIN E Growing Thunder, Jessa Rae Assiniboine/Sioux 416 WA W Growing Thunder, Joyce Assiniboine/Sioux 417 WA W Growing Thunder, Ramey Assiniboine/Sioux 689 PLZ Growing Thunder Fogarty, Juanita Assiniboine/Sioux 416 WA W Haukaas, Thomas F. Rosebud Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ Her Many Horses, Emil Oglala Lakota 608 PLZ Hill, Rosemary Tuscarora 739 LIN E Ingram, Jerry Choctaw Nation 685 PLZ Jacobs, Mary Seneca 816 MAR Jacobs, Samantha Seneca 816 MAR

Chavez, LeJeune Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Jennings, Vanessa Paukeigope Gila River Pima/Kiowa/Apache 655 PLZ 756 LIN W Chitto, Hollis Jonathan, Grant Mississippi Choctaw/Laguna Tuscarora Pueblo/Isleta Pueblo 769 LIN W 724 LIN E Darden, Steven Navajo (Diné)/Cheyenne 316 FR S

Larsson, Tania Gwich’in 714 LIN W

ADAMS, VICTORIA

Maybee, Dallin Northern Arapaho/Seneca 733 LIN E

Tsosie, JShen Navajo (Diné) 709 LIN W

Maybee, Sage Northern Arapaho 733 LIN E

Warrington, Dana Prairie Band Potawatomi/ Menominee 682 PLZ

Mitten, Katrina Miami 311 FR N Moran, Beverly Bear King Standing Rock Lakota 502 SFT Morgan, Summer Kiowa/Gila River Pima/Apache 756 LIN W Mountainflower, Sage Ohkay Owingeh/Taos Pueblo/ Navajo (Diné) 413 WA W Not Afraid, Elias Crow Tribe 335 FR S Okuma, Jamie Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock 218 PAL N Okuma, Sandra Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock 218 PAL N Parker, Molina Oglala Lakota 410 WA E Peters, Summer Saginaw Chippewa 740 LIN W

White, Delina Leech Lake Ojibwe 609 PLZ Young, Holly Standing Rock Lakota 220 PAL S

IX Youth (17 & Under) Abeyta, Luciano Jemez Pueblo 523 SFT W

Chavez, Miya San Felipe Pueblo 306 FR N Chinana, Tyra Jemez Pueblo 222 PAL Claw, Elle Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN W

Claw, Rayne Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN W

Ahhaitty Growing Thunder, Camryn Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa/ Comanche 416 WA W

Coriz, Theron Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 325 FR S

Barnes, Tehya Navajo (Diné) 770 LIN W

Printup, Bryan Tuscarora 416 WA E

Benally, Apaolo Navajo (Diné) 780 LIN E

Quetawki, Farlan Zuni Pueblo 203 PAL S

Bia, Austin Navajo (Diné) 760 LIN W

Raphael, Monica Ottawa/Chippewa/ Pottawatomi/Sicangu Lakota 307 FR S

Brown, Mary Helen Navajo (Diné) 918 SHE

125

Chavez, Edward Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 900 SHE

Aguino, Lea Ohkay Owingeh 534 SFT E

Bebo-Maybee, Persephone Northern Arapaho/Seneca/ Menominee/Ho-Chunk 733 LIN E

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

Casuse, Mosgaadace Navajo (Diné)/Ojibwe 519 SFT 630 PLZ

Claw, Gwendolyn Abeyta, Temuujin Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN W 532 SFT P

Poblano, Jovanna Zuni Pueblo 612 PLZ

Simplicio, Margia Zuni Pueblo 239 PAL N

Calabaza, William M. (Kweyatewa) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 771 LIN W

Burgess, Quahada Comanche Nation 728 LIN W

Curtis, Keithen Navajo (Diné) 735 LIN W Davis, Tehya Acoma Pueblo 636 PLZ Edd, Santana Navajo (Diné) 754 LIN W Folwell, Tonka Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ Fragua, Brayden Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N Gadd, Ethan Aleut 240 PAL N Garcia, Jewel Pascua Yaqui/Nambe Pueblo 506 SFT


2018 INDIAN MARKET ARTIST DIRECTORY

GROWING THUNDER, GEORGEANNE

WHITE, DELINA

KEMPENICH, NISKA

NARANJO, RAVEN

Glass, Gregg Cherokee Nation 755 LIN W

Hoskie, Winter Rose Navajo (Diné) 642 PLZ

Naranjo, Dillan Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S

Rosetta, Devonne Weahkee, Gabriel Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT P 503 SFT

Kayquoptewa, Wilmetta Hopi 338 FR S

Growing Thunder, Cetan Fort Peck Dakota/Nakoda 689 PLZ

John, Terion Navajo (Diné) 273 PAL

Naranjo, Eli Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S

Rosetta, Kelsey Weahkee, Manuel Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT P 503 SFT

Kooyahoema, Kathryn Hopi 336 FR N

Growing Thunder, GeorgeAnne Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa 416 WA W

Johnson, Fanithya Navajo (Diné) 243 PAL S

Naranjo, Makayla Santa Clara Pueblo 317 FR S

Sabaquie, Chelsea Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N

LeCornu, Jacinthe Hydaburg Haida 410 WA E

Johnson, Seneca Muscogee/Seminole 237 PAL N

Naranjo, Natasha San Ildefonso Pueblo 341 FR S

Shakespeare-Largo, Lillian Mescalero Apache 501 SFT

Johnson, Skye Muscogee/Seminole 237 PAL N

Naranjo, Raven San Illdefonso Pueblo 112 POG

Shakespeare-Morgan, Emily Mescalero Apache 501 SFT

Kee, Silas Navajo (Diné) 343 FR N

Neck-Haukaas, Alexis Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ

Kempenich, Niska Turtle Mountain Chippewa 741 LIN W

Nelson, Olin Navajo (Diné)/Laguna Pueblo 759 LIN E

Shaw, Kahlia Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E

King, James Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W

Nequatewa, Lorene Navajo (Diné) 601 PLZ

King, Raven Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W

Nieto, Dale Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 711 LIN E Suazo III, Charles Santa Clara Pueblo Nordwall, Miles 309 FR P Pawnee 114 POG Taliman, Iris Navajo (Diné) Pajarito, Triston 524 SFT W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 658 PLZ Taliman, Taylor Navajo (Diné) Patricio, Juanita 524 SFT W Acoma Pueblo 756 LIN E Toledo, Neola Navajo (Diné) Peters, Waabigwan 342 FR S Saginaw Chippewa 740 LIN W Tosa, Jayden Jemez Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) Plummer, Dallen 244 PAL S Navajo (Diné) 321 FR S Wall, Hunter Acoma Pueblo Plummer, Lance 743 LIN E Navajo (Diné) 321 FR S Wall, Vivian Jemez Pueblo Reano, Trinity 708 LIN E Cochiti Pueblo 228 PAL N Wallace, Oriyah Navajo (Diné) Reeves, Kiyaannii 410 WA W Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N

Growing Thunder, GraceLynn Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa 417 WA W Growing Thunder, Wanbdi Fort Peck Dakota/Nakoda 689 PLZ Growing Thunder Fogarty, Paytyn Assiniboine/Sioux 417 WA W Haley, Luke Navajo (Diné) 110 POG Hamilton, Jailee Cochiti Pueblo 235 PAL N Haskie, Albert Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P Haskie, Ben Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P Hattie, Brion Zuni Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 619 PLZ Hendren, Casey Navajo (Diné)/Kewa Pueblo 712 LIN E Hendren, Kyra Navajo (Diné) 712 LIN E Herrera, Raylynn Metlakatla 761 LIN E Herrera, Thomas Metlakatla Tsimshian 761 LIN E Honyestewa, Richard Hopi 307 FR N

Kohlmeyer, Alyssa Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N Kohlmeyer, Isaak Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N Laughing, Ethan Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N Lujan-Baker, Tara Taos Pueblo 919 SHE Maktima, Tyler San Felipe Pueblo 751 LIN E Medlock, Rochelle Santa Clara Pueblo 669 PLZ Moquino, Ty Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL S Morgan Jr., Danny Mescalero Apache 501 SFT

1 26

Shaw, Kahmari Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E Stanaland, Spencer Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

White Eagle, A Nimkee Wa Grand Traverse Ottawa and Chippewa 731 LIN E White Eagle, Ahbedoh Grand Traverse Ottawa and Chippewa 731 LIN E Yazzie, Aurora Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN W

XI Basketry Aitson, Mary Cherokee Nation 333 FR S Black, Sally Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN W Church, Kelly Pottawatomi/Ottawa/ Chippewa 738 LIN E Cottrell, Vivian Cherokee Nation 260 PAL S Emarthle-Douglas, Carol Northern Arapaho/Seminole 525 SFT P Frey, Ganessa Penobscot 271 PAL Frey, Jeremy Passamaquoddy 271 PAL Goeman, Ronni-Leigh Onondaga 749 LIN E Honyestewa, Iva Hopi 307 FR N Johnston, Don Qagan Tayagungin 639 PLZ

Mitchell, Ann Saint Regis Mohawk 813 MAR Neptune, Geo Passamaquoddy 922 SHE Parrish, Cherish Pottawatomi 738 LIN E Ryan, Loa Metlakatla Tsimshian 903 SHE Secord, Theresa Penobscot 525 SFT P Sockbeson, Sarah Penobscot 331 FR S Telford, Lisa Ketchikan Haida 528 SFT P Tsosie, Honeebah Navajo (Diné) 531 SFT E Wong-Whitebear, Laura Colville Confederated Tribes 405 WA W


Traditional Contemporary 14k Gold and Silver 1970’s- 2000’s Best of Show Winner Booth LIN P 703 Haida Carver

Heard Museum | SF Indian Market Museum of Northern Arizona | Eight Northern Pueblos

778-828-9165 | haidafella@gmail.com | www.gwaai.com

Booth 635 Plaza

August 14–19 See more than 50 featurelength and short films screened at the New Mexico History Museum & Santa Fe Railyard Park. Admission is free to all events.

SPECIAL SCREENING:

Saturday, August 18 8 p.m. | Railyard Park

Full schedule online at AmericanIndian.si.edu/ncs In association with the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian presents the 18th annual Native Cinema Showcase during the Santa Fe Indian Market, featuring films from many of today’s most celebrated Native filmmakers.

Native Cinema Showcase 2018 Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Stills: Indictment: The Crimes of Shelly Chartier, Courtesy of Frantic Films; Moroni for President, Photo courtesy of Saila Huusko and Jasper Rischen; Waru, Courtesy of the New Zealand Film Commission; Coco, © 2017 Disney Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Indian Haute CO-OP & Market Couture CHILDREN’S Kick-Off FashionBOOTHS NonProfits Party Show COURTYARD

Convention Center SantaBALLROOM Fe Community EDGE Courtyard Market Convention Center Indian Market Merchanise NON-PROFIT,

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August 18 & 19


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Visit our website: swaia.org Find your favorite artist fast with our Market App, “Santa Fe Indian Market,” downloadable on iTunes or Android

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OLD SANTA FE TRAIL


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY

A Abeita, Karen Isleta Pueblo 751 LIN E Pottery

Aguino, Lea Ohkay Owingeh 534 SFT E (Youth) Aguino, Maia Ohkay Owingeh 534 SFT E Pottery

Abeyta, Harvey Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Ahhaitty Growing Thunder, Camryn 210 PAL N Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa/ Diverse Arts, Jewelry Comanche 416 WA W (Youth) Abeyta, Lester Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Aitson, Mary 532 SFT P Cherokee Nation Jewelry 333 FR S Basketry Abeyta, Luciano Jemez Pueblo Aitson, Richard 523 SFT W Kiowa/Kiowa Apache Youth 652 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Abeyta, Richard Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Albert, Robert 533 SFT P Hopi Jewelry 205 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Abeyta, Sharon Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Allen, Renee 533 SFT P Hopi/Choctaw/Navajo (Diné) Jewelry 719 LIN W Diverse Arts Abeyta, Temuujin Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Allison, Marla 532 SFT P (Youth) Laguna Pueblo 686 PLZ Adams, Tiffany Paintings / Drawings / Chemehuevi Indian Tribe Graphics / Photography 507 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Allison, Orlando Graphics / Photography Hopi/Salt River Pima-Maricopa 758 LIN E Adams, Victoria Paintings / Drawings / Southern Cheyenne and Graphics / Photography Arapaho 236 PAL N Allison, Robert Jewelry, Diverse Arts Hopi/Salt River Pima-Maricopa 758 LIN E Aguilar, Joseph Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Pueblo Wooden Carvings 526 SFT W Ami, Dorothy Paintings / Drawings / Hopi Graphics / Photography 705 LIN P Pottery Aguilar, Martin San Ildefonso Pueblo Analla Jr., Calvin 408 WA E Laguna Pueblo Paintings / Drawings / 214 PAL S Graphics / Photography Pottery Aguilar, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Antonio, Frederica Acoma Pueblo 526 SFT W 302 FR N Jewelry Pottery Aguilar, Richard Antonio, Melissa Choctaw Nation Acoma Pueblo 332 FR S 301 FR P Jewelry Pottery Aguilar, Wayne Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Aragon, Allen Navajo (Diné) 248 PAL N 748 LIN E Jewelry Jewelry, Pottery Aguino, Karen Aragon, Grace Santa Clara Pueblo Acoma Pueblo 534 SFT E 217 PAL N Pottery Pottery Aguino, Kayleen Aragon, Joan Ohkay Owingeh Zia Pueblo 534 SFT E 522 SFT W Pottery Textiles

Aragon, Loren Acoma Pueblo 272 PAL Jewelry, Textiles

Barnes, Melissa Navajo (Diné) 770 LIN W Diverse Arts

Begay, Nellie Navajo (Diné) 687 PLZ Textiles

Benally, Veronica Navajo (Diné) 324 FR N Jewelry

Aragon, Nanabah Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E Textiles

Barnes, Tehya Navajo (Diné) 770 LIN W (Youth)

Begay, Nelson Navajo (Diné) 300 FR P Jewelry

Bennett, Donna Acoma Pueblo 718 LIN E Jewelry

Begay, Philbert Navajo (Diné) 244 PAL N Jewelry

Bennett, George Hualapai 718 LIN E Jewelry

Aragon, Ralph Zia Pueblo 522 SFT W Diverse Arts

Bebo-Maybee, Persephone Northern Arapaho/Seneca/ Menominee/Ho-Chunk 733 LIN E Youth

Aragon, Sarah Navajo (Diné) 712 LIN W Jewelry

Becenti, Alexander Navajo (Diné) 657 PLZ Jewelry

Begay, Rena Navajo (Diné) 337 FR S Textiles

Berryhill, Lester Creek 329 FR N Beadwork / Quillwork

Aragon, Venancio Navajo (Diné) 523 SFT E Textiles

Beck, Nanibaa Navajo (Diné) 258 PAL N Jewelry

Begay, Romaine Navajo (Diné) 118 POG Pottery

Betoney Sr., Billy Navajo (Diné) 738 LIN W Jewelry

Aragon, Wanda Acoma Pueblo 253 PAL S Pottery

Beck, Victor Navajo (Diné) 258 PAL N Jewelry

Bia, Austin Navajo (Diné) 760 LIN W Youth

Aragón, Irveta Navajo (Diné) 523 SFT E Textiles

Bedonie, Pat Navajo (Diné) 304 FR P Jewelry

Begay, Tedra Navajo (Diné) 779 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Arviso, J.P. Navajo (Diné) 921 SHE Jewelry

Begay, Abraham Navajo (Diné) 300 FR N Jewelry

Arviso, Steven Navajo (Diné) 766 LIN E Jewelry

Begay, Berdine Navajo (Diné) 701 LIN E Textiles

Aspaas, Kevin Navajo (Diné) 724 LIN W Textiles

Begay, D.Y. Navajo (Diné) 701 LIN E Textiles

Ataumbi, Keri Kiowa 125 POG Jewelry

Begay, Daniel Navajo (Diné)/ Santa Clara Pueblo 245 PAL S Pottery

Atencio, Ambrose Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Begay, Eddie 302 FR P Navajo (Diné) Pottery 708 LIN W Jewelry Atencio, Jordyn Ohkay Owingeh Begay, Erick 606 PLZ Navajo (Diné) Pottery 633 PLZ Jewelry

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Begay, Gerard Navajo (Diné) 204 PAL S Textiles

Baca, David Santa Clara Pueblo 202 PAL N Pottery

Begay, Gloria Navajo (Diné) 311 FR P Textiles

Bahe, Fidel Navajo (Diné) 602 PLZ Jewelry

Begay, Leroy Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN E Jewelry

Ballenger, Virginia Navajo (Diné) 913 SHE Textiles Balloue, John Cherokee Nation 637 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography 130

Begay, Lyla Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN E Jewelry

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Begay Jr., Frederick Navajo (Diné) 604 PLZ Sculpture Begay Jr., Harrison Navajo (Diné) 245 PAL S Pottery

Bia, Leona Navajo (Diné) 229 PAL S Textiles Bia, Norman Navajo (Diné) 760 LIN W Jewelry

Begaye, Brittany Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN W Textiles

Bigwater, Christian Navajo (Diné) 645 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Begaye, Marwin Navajo (Diné) 206 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Billie, Michael Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Begaye, Roberta Navajo (Diné) 775 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Bird, Gail Laguna Pueblo/Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 261 PAL N Jewelry

Belin, Esther Navajo (Diné) 276 PAL Jewelry

Bird, Helen Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 259 PAL N Pottery

Ben, Arland Navajo (Diné) 729 LIN W Jewelry Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Bird, Jolene Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 649 PLZ Jewelry

Benally, Apaolo Navajo (Diné) 780 LIN E (Youth) Benally, Ernest Navajo (Diné) 324 FR N Jewelry Benally, Giovanni Navajo (Diné) 780 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Benally, Mel Navajo (Diné) 204 PAL N Jewelry

Bird-Romero, Mike Ohkay Owingeh/Taos Pueblo 259 PAL S Jewelry Biss-Grayson, Dante Osage 801 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Black, Sally Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN W Basketry Black Horse, Catherine Seminole 235 PAL S Textiles


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Blaze, Randall Oglala Lakota 231 PAL S Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Boivin, Wendy Menominee 208 PAL N Jewelry Beadwork / Quillwork Boome, Peter Upper Skagit 625 PLZ Diverse Arts, Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Borts-Medlock, Autumn Santa Clara Pueblo 669 PLZ Pottery, Sculpture Bowers, Lee Chickasaw Nation 907 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Box, Debra Southern Ute 737 LIN W Diverse Arts Box Anderson, Karen Southern Ute 737 LIN W Jewelry Brauker, Shirley M. Little River Band of Ottawa 109 POG Pottery Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Bread, Jackie Blackfeet Tribe 638 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Bread, Jade Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Bread, Nathan Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Sculpture Bread, Paris Navajo (Diné) 638 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Brillon, Jesse Haida/Cree 727 LIN E Jewelry Broer, Roger Oglala Lakota 106 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Brokeshoulder, Aaron Absentee Shawnee/ Choctaw/Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 734 LIN E Jewelry

Brokeshoulder, Randall Navajo (Diné)/Hopi/ Absentee Shawnee 234 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Brown, Derek No-Sun Shoshone-Bannock 908 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Brown, Jason Penobscot 409 WA E Jewelry Brown, Jerry Navajo (Diné) 918 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Brown, Mary Helen Navajo (Diné) 918 SHE (Youth) Browning, Ashley Santa Clara Pueblo/Pojoaque Pueblo 251 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Burgess, Nocona Comanche Nation/Kiowa 728 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Burgess, Quahada Comanche Nation 728 LIN W (Youth)

C Cajero, Aaron Jemez Pueblo 313 FR S Pottery

Calabaza, Marie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 701 LIN P Jewelry

Cate, Lorraine Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 308 FR N Jewelry

Calabaza, Mary Ann Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 304 FR N Jewelry

Cate, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 703 LIN E Jewelry

Calabaza, Mary Loretta Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 123 POG Jewelry Calabaza, Mitchell Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 701 LIN P Jewelry Calabaza, Valerie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 304 FR N Jewelry Calabaza, William M. (Kweyatewa) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 771 LIN W (Youth) Calladitto, Mark Navajo (Diné) 530 SFT W Jewelry Calladitto, Myles Navajo (Diné) 528 SFT W Jewelry Campbell, Dale Tahltan/Tlingit 641 PLZ Diverse Arts Campbell, Terrence Tahltan 641 PLZ Jewelry

Candelario, Hubert San Felipe Pueblo Cajero, Althea 217 PAL S Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Pottery /Acoma Pueblo 521 SFT Carpio, Caroline Jewelry Isleta Pueblo 505 SFT Cajero, Esther Sculpture, Pottery Jemez Pueblo 318 FR S Carr, Stacey E. Pottery Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 526 SFT P Cajero Jr., Joe Pottery Jemez Pueblo 521 SFT Carrillo, Franklin Sculpture Laguna Pueblo/Choctaw/ Mescalero Apache Cajero Sr., Joe 726 LIN W Jemez Pueblo Jewelry 318 FR S Diverse Arts Casuse, Fritz Navajo (Diné) Cajero Jr., Aaron 519 SFT Jemez Pueblo Jewelry 313 FR S Pottery Casuse, Mosgaadace Navajo (Diné)/Chippewa Calabaza, Gerard 630 PLZ, 519 SFT (Youth) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 123 POG Caté, Barbara Jewelry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 703 LIN E Calabaza, Jimmy Jewelry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 310 FR P Cate, Irma Jewelry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 308 FR N Jewelry

Chavez, Jared San Felipe Pueblo 306 FR N Jewelry

Clark, Donn Navajo (Diné) 120 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Chavez, Joseph D. Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Clarkson, Karen 655 PLZ Choctaw Nation Jewelry 800 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Cavin, J. Dylan Chavez, Le Jeune Graphics / Photography Choctaw Nation Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 761 LIN W 655 PLZ Clashin, Deborah Paintings / Drawings / Beadwork / Quillwork Hopi Graphics / Photography 404 WA E Chavez, Miya Pottery Charley, Avis San Felipe Pueblo Spirit Lake Tribe/Navajo (Diné) 306 FR N Claw, Elle 752 LIN W Youth Navajo (Diné) Paintings / Drawings / 706 LIN W (Youth) Graphics / Photography Chavez, Richard San Felipe Pueblo Claw, Gwendolyn Charley, Berdina 306 FR N Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) Jewelry 706 LIN W (Youth) 701 LIN E Textiles Chavez, Trinnie Claw, Kareen Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) San Carlos Apache Charley, Darius 716 LIN E 706 LIN W Navajo (Diné) Jewelry Diverse Arts 523 SFT P Diverse Arts Chavez-Thomas, Lisa Claw, Monty Isleta Pueblo Navajo (Diné) Charley, Karen K. 407 WA E 706 LIN W Hopi Diverse Arts Diverse Arts, Jewelry 736 LIN W Pottery Chee, Carlis M. Claw, Rayne Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) Charley, Matthew 343 FR S 706 LIN W (Youth) Navajo (Diné) Paintings / Drawings / 315 FR S Graphics / Photography Cody, Lola Jewelry Navajo (Diné) Chee, Frank 733 LIN W Charlie, Ric Navajo (Diné) Textiles Navajo (Diné) 318 FR N 681 PLZ Jewelry Cody, Melissa Jewelry Navajo (Diné) Chee, Norris 733 LIN W Chavarria, Dave Navajo (Diné) Textiles Santa Clara Pueblo 776 LIN E 410 WA W Paintings / Drawings / Concho, Carolyn Beadwork / Quillwork Graphics / Photography Acoma Pueblo 530 SFT P Chavarria, Manuel Chee, Ronald Pottery Hopi Navajo (Diné) 736 LIN W 781 LIN W Concho, George Pueblo Wooden Carvings Paintings / Drawings / Acoma Pueblo Graphics / Photography 531 SFT P Chavez, Clarita Pottery Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Chicharello, Thompson 802 MAR Navajo (Diné) Coochwikvia, Marcus Jewelry 111 POG Hopi Jewelry 764 LIN W Chavez, Dorothy Jewelry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Chimerica, Darance Makwesa 319 FR N Hopi Cook, Calandra Jewelry 613 PLZ Navajo (Diné) Pueblo Wooden Carvings 645 PLZ Chavez, Edward Textiles Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Chinana, Tyra 900 SHE Jemez Pueblo Coons, Gordon Jewelry 222 PAL (Youth) Chippewa/Ottawa 727 LIN W Chavez, Edward Chitto, Hollis Paintings / Drawings / Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Mississippi Choctaw/Laguna Graphics / Photography 900 SHE (Youth) Pueblo/Isleta Pueblo 724 LIN E Coonsis, Phyllis Chavez, Franklin Beadwork / Quillwork Zuni Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 324 FR S 319 FR N Chitto, Randy Jewelry Jewelry Mississippi Band Choctaw 724 LIN E Coriz, Joseph Chavez, James Sculpture Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 332 FR N 716 LIN E Church, Kelly Jewelry Jewelry Pottawatomi/Ottawa/ Chippewa Coriz, Juanita 738 LIN E Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Diverse Arts, Basketry 305 FR S Jewelry

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2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY

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Coriz, Rodney Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 211 PAL N Jewelry Dalangyawma, Ramon Hopi Coriz, Rudy 716 LIN W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Jewelry 325 FR S Jewelry Dalasohya Jr., David Hopi Coriz, Theron 819 MAR Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Paintings / Drawings / 325 FR S (Youth) Graphics / Photography

Dragonfly, David Blackfeet Tribe 308 FR S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Draper Jr., Teddy Navajo (Diné) 128 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Jewelry

Cornshucker, Melvin Keetoowah Cherokee 768 LIN E Pottery

Darden, Steven Navajo (Diné)/Cheyenne 316 FR S Beadwork / Quillwork

Correa, Prudy Acoma Pueblo 238 PAL N Pottery

DuBoise, Amber Navajo (Diné)/Sac and Fox/ Prairie Band Potawatomi 911 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Dark Mountain, Dawn Oneida Nation 777 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Dukepoo, Causandra Taos Pueblo 254 PAL N Jewelry

Cottrell, Vivian Cherokee Nation 260 PAL S Basketry Crawford, Mark Navajo (Diné) 762 LIN E Jewelry CrazyHorse, Cippy Cochiti Pueblo 257 PAL N Jewelry CrazyHorse, Waddie Cochiti Pueblo 257 PAL N Jewelry

Davis, Raul Mescalero Apache 750 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Davis, Tehya Acoma Pueblo 636 PLZ (Youth) Day, Alexa Rae Odawa/Ojibwe/Potawatomi/ Ho-Chunk/Lakota 709 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork

DeCelles, John Fort Belknap Gros Ventre/ Assiniboine Crispin, Osavio 750 LIN W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Sculpture 337 FR N Jewelry Deer, Leslie Muscogee (Creek) Cummings, Edison 747 LIN W Navajo (Diné) Textiles 207 PAL S Jewelry DeMent, Jeff Navajo (Diné) Curfman, Del 661 PLZ Crow Jewelry 909 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Demientieff, Michael Graphics / Photography Holikachuk Athabascan 771 LIN W Curran, Dolores Paintings / Drawings / Santa Clara Pueblo Graphics / Photography 260 PAL N Pottery Dexel, Andrew Nlaka’pamux Curtis, Jennifer 412 WA W Navajo (Diné) Paintings / Drawings / 735 LIN W Graphics / Photography Jewelry Dial, Isaac Curtis, Keithen Navajo (Diné) Navajo (Diné) 615 PLZ 735 LIN W (Youth) Jewelry Custer, Gary Navajo (Diné) 221 PAL S Jewelry

Dougi, Carlos Navajo (Diné) 526 SFT E Jewelry

Custer, Ira Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN E Jewelry

Dougi, Ishkoten Navajo (Diné)/Jicarilla Apache 683 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Duwyenie, Mary Lynn Hopi 303 FR N Diverse Arts, Textiles Duwyenie, Preston Santa Clara Pueblo 410 WA W Pottery

E Earles, Chase Kahwinhut Caddo Nation 405 WA E Pottery

Ebelacker, Jason Santa Clara Pueblo 758 LIN W Pottery Ebelacker, Jerome Santa Clara Pueblo 758 LIN W Pottery Ebelacker, Sarena Santa Clara Pueblo 600 PLZ Pottery Edaakie, Raylan Zuni Pueblo 230 PAL N Jewelry Edd, Don Navajo (Diné) 276 PAL Sculpture

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Fredericks, Evelyn Hopi 200 PAL S Sculpture

Fender, Martha San Ildefonso Pueblo 702 LIN P Pottery

Frey, Ganessa Penobscot 271 PAL Basketry

Edenshaw, Gwaai Haida 703 LIN P Jewelry, Sculpture

Fields, Anita Osage/Muscogee 212 PAL N Sculpture

Frey, Jeremy Passamaquoddy 271 PAL Basketry

Emarthle-Douglas, Carol Northern Arapaho/Seminole 525 SFT P Basketry

Fife, Jimmie Muscogee (Creek) 720 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Diverse Arts

Edd, Sierra Navajo (Diné) 754 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Emery, Dorothy L. Jemez Pueblo 905 SHE Diverse Arts

Duwyenie, Debra Santa Clara Pueblo 410 WA W Pottery

Ebelacker, James Santa Clara Pueblo 600 PLZ Pottery

Fender, Erik San Ildefonso Pueblo 702 LIN P Pottery, Jewelry

Emerson, Anthony Navajo (Diné) 104 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Dukepoo, Michael Hopi 254 PAL N Jewelry

Early, Max Laguna Pueblo 243 PAL S Pottery

Edd, Santana Navajo (Diné) 754 LIN W (Youth)

Emery Jr., Terrance St. Croix Chippewa/ Jemez Pueblo 905 SHE Jewelry

Fischer, Mark Oneida Nation 815 MAR Sculpture Flanagan, Sean Rising Sun Taos Pueblo 778 LIN W Sculpture, Diverse Arts Foley, Benina Jemez Pueblo 523 SFT W Pottery

Esquiro, Sho Sho Kaska Dene/Cree 740 LIN W Textiles

Folwell, Jody Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ Pottery

Esquivel, Dennis Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 731 LIN E Diverse Arts

Folwell, Kaa Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ Pottery

Ethelbah, Upton Greyshoes Santa Clara Pueblo/ White Mountain Apache 666 PLZ Sculpture Etsitty, Garrett Navajo (Diné) 808 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Folwell, Susan Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ Pottery Folwell, Tonka Santa Clara Pueblo 653 PLZ (Youth)

G Gabaldon, Felicia Choctaw Nation 710 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Gachupin, Laura Jemez Pueblo 523 SFT W Pottery Gadd, Ethan Aleut 240 PAL N (Youth) Gala, Carol Laguna Pueblo/Taos Pueblo Hopi 709 LIN E Beadwork / Quillwork Gala-Lewis, Lorraine Laguna Pueblo/Taos Pueblo Hopi 203 PAL N Pottery Garcia, Aaron Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 923 SHE Jewelry Garcia, Effie Santa Clara Pueblo 713 LIN W Pottery

Fragua, Brayden Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N (Youth)

Garcia, Emily Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 405 WA W Jewelry

Fragua, Cindy Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N Pottery

Garcia, Gloria Pojoaque Pueblo 126 POG Pottery

Fragua, Cliff Jemez Pueblo 752 LIN E Sculpture

Garcia, Inez Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 317 FR N Jewelry

Fain, Gloria Navajo (Diné) 308 FR P Textiles

Fragua, Glendora Jemez Pueblo 665 PLZ Pottery

Fallon, Ruth Cherokee Nation 415 WA W Textiles

Fragua, Juanita Jemez Pueblo 665 PLZ Pottery

Garcia, Jason D. Santa Clara Pueblo 126 POG Pottery Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Farris, Tom Otoe-Missouria/Cherokee 245 PAL N Diverse Arts Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Fragua-Johnson, Bonnie Jemez Pueblo 227 PAL N Pottery

Everson, Andy K’omoks/Kwakwaka’wakw/ Tlingit 727 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

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Francis, Florence Navajo (Diné) 760 LIN W Jewelry

Garcia, Jewel Pascua Yaqui/Nambe Pueblo 506 SFT (Youth) Garcia, John Santa Clara Pueblo 126 POG Diverse Arts


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Garcia, Kevin Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo)/Jemez Pueblo 511 SFT Jewelry

Glass, Gregg Cherokee Nation 755 LIN W (Youth)

Glass, Demos Cherokee Nation Garcia, Lorencita 755 LIN W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Sculpture 317 FR N Jewelry Glass Jr., Bill Cherokee Nation Garcia, Michael (Na Na Ping) 755 LIN W Pascua Yaqui Sculpture 506 SFT Jewelry Goeman, Ronni-Leigh Onondaga Garcia, Nelson 749 LIN E Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Basketry 730 LIN E Jewelry Goeman, Stonehorse Tonawanda Band of Seneca Garcia, Ray D. 749 LIN E San Felipe Pueblo Sculpture 746 LIN W Jewelry Goldtooth, Larson Hopi-Tewa Garcia, Sharon 319 FR S Santa Clara Pueblo Pottery 606 PLZ Pottery Goldtooth, Troy Navajo (Diné) Garcia, Tammy 742 LIN W Santa Clara Pueblo Paintings / Drawings / 669 PLZ Graphics / Photography Pottery Gonzales, Cavan Gashweseoma, Ryan San Ildefonso Pueblo Hopi 516 SFT 914 SHE Pottery Pueblo Wooden Carvings Gonzales, Isabel Gasper, Bart Jemez Pueblo Zuni Pueblo 201 PAL S 251 PAL N Textiles Pueblo Wooden Carvings Good Day, Lauren Gasper, Duran Fort Berthold Mandan/ Zuni Pueblo Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet 208 PAL S 327 FR N Jewelry Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Gaussoin, Connie Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo Goodman, James 261 PAL S Navajo (Diné) Jewelry 715 LIN E Sculpture Gaussoin, David Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo Grant, Antonio 261 PAL S Eastern Band Cherokee Jewelry 751 LIN W Diverse Arts, Jewelry Gaussoin, Jerry Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo Grant, Dorothy 261 PAL S Haida Jewelry 747 LIN E Textiles Gaussoin, Wayne Navajo (Diné)/Picuris Pueblo Greeves, Teri 261 PAL S Kiowa Jewelry 731 LIN E Beadwork / Quillwork Gendron, Ric Colville Confederated Tribes/ Growing Thunder, Cetan Umatilla Fort Peck Dakota/Nakoda 915 SHE 689 PLZ (Youth) Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Growing Thunder, Darryl Assiniboine/Sioux Gene, Leonard 689 PLZ Navajo (Diné) Paintings / Drawings / 736 LIN E Graphics / Photography Jewelry Growing Thunder, George, Ros GeorgeAnne Hopi Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa 667 PLZ 416 WA W (Youth) Pueblo Wooden Carvings 2018 SWAIA Youth Fellow

Growing Thunder, GraceLynn Assiniboine/Sioux/Kiowa 417 WA W (Youth) Growing Thunder, Jessa Rae Assiniboine/Sioux 416 WA W Beadwork / Quillwork Growing Thunder, Joyce Assiniboine/Sioux 417 WA W Beadwork / Quillwork Growing Thunder, Ramey Assiniboine/Sioux 689 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Growing Thunder, Wanbdi Fort Peck Dakota/Nakoda 689 PLZ (Youth) Growing Thunder Fogarty, Juanita Assiniboine/Sioux 416 WA W Beadwork / Quillwork Growing Thunder Fogarty, Paytyn Assiniboine/Sioux 417 WA W (Youth) Guardipee, Terrance Blackfeet Tribe 235 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Gutierrez, Rose Santa Clara Pueblo 309 FR P Pottery Gutierrez, Tony Santa Clara Pueblo 700 LIN W Pottery Gutierrez-Naranjo, Kathy San Ildefonso Pueblo/ Santa Clara Pueblo 309 FR P Pottery

H Haley, Luke Navajo (Diné) 110 POG (Youth) Hamilton, Jailee Cochiti Pueblo 235 PAL N (Youth) Hamilton-Youngbird, Dyanni Navajo (Diné) 226 PAL S Diverse Arts Hanna, Crystal Cherokee Nation 513 SFT Pottery Harjo Jr., Benjamin Absentee Shawnee/Seminole 103 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Harris, Charles Comanche Nation 527 SFT E Diverse Arts

Harrison, Jimmie Navajo (Diné) 707 LIN P Jewelry Harrison, Rowan Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 717 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pottery Harvey, Jason Navajo (Diné) 654 PLZ Textiles Haskie, Albert Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P (Youth) Haskie, Ben Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P (Youth) Haskie, Vernon Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN P Jewelry Hatfield, J. Nicole Comanche Nation/Kiowa 336 FR S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Hattie, Brion Zuni Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 619 PLZ (Youth) Haukaas, Linda Rosebud Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Haukaas, Thomas F. Rosebud Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Beadwork / Quillwork Hemlock, Carla Kahnawake Mohawk 743 LIN W Diverse Arts Hemlock, Donald “Babe” Kahnawake Mohawk 743 LIN W Diverse Arts Henderson, Alberta Navajo (Diné) 617 PLZ Textiles Hendren, Casey Navajo (Diné)/Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 712 LIN E (Youth) Hendren, Kyra Navajo (Diné) 712 LIN E (Youth) Hendren, Shane Navajo (Diné) 712 LIN E Jewelry Henry, Ronnie Navajo (Diné) 814 MAR Jewelry

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Hensley, Billy Chickasaw Nation 804 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Her Many Horses, Emil Oglala Lakota 608 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Herder, Adrian Navajo (Diné) 771 LIN E Pottery Herrera, Carlos Cochiti Pueblo 761 LIN E Diverse Arts Herrera, Eagle Cochiti Pueblo 917 SHE Diverse Arts Herrera, Raylynn Metlakatla Tsimshian 761 LIN E (Youth) Herrera, Arnold Cochiti Pueblo 675 PLZ Diverse Arts Herrera, Thomas Cochiti Pueblo 675 PLZ Diverse Arts Herrera, Thomas Metlakatla Tsimshian 761 LIN E (Youth) Herrera, Tim Cochiti Pueblo 761 LIN E Jewelry Hill, Rosemary Tuscarora 739 LIN E Beadwork / Quillwork Holland, Steve Cherokee Nation 916 SHE Diverse Arts Holmes Jr., Arthur Hopi 219 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Holt, Lisa Cochiti Pueblo 228 PAL N Pottery Honanie, Aaron Hopi 404 WA W Pueblo Wooden Carvings Jewelry Honanie, Kara Hopi 714 LIN E Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Honanie, Watson Hopi 714 LIN E Jewelry Honhongva, Marlin Hopi 327 FR S Jewelry Honyestewa, Iva Hopi 307 FR N Basketry Honyestewa, Richard Hopi 307 FR N (Youth) Honyouti, Kevin Hopi 201 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Honyouti, Mavasta Hopi 201 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Honyouti, Richard Hopi 741 LIN E Diverse Arts Honyouti, Ronald Hopi 201 PAL N Pueblo Wooden Carvings Honyumptewa, Aaron Hopi/Picuris Pueblo 500 SFT Pueblo Wooden Carvings Honyumptewa, Akema Hopi 229 PAL N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Textiles Honyumptewa, Ron Hopi 529 SFT P Pueblo Wooden Carvings Honyumptewa, Stetson Hopi 500 SFT Pueblo Wooden Carvings Textiles Horace, Kevin Hopi/Navajo (Diné) 767 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pueblo Wooden Carvings Hoskie, Winter Rose Navajo (Diné) 642 PLZ (Youth) Howard, Ivan Navajo (Diné) 704 LIN W Jewelry Howard, Norma Choctaw Nation/Chickasaw 206 PAL N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Howell, Jesse “Sonny” Pawnee 702 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Jacobson, Cole Prairie Island Dakota 409 WA W Diverse Arts

Joe-Chandler, Amelia Navajo (Diné) 339 FR S Jewelry

Jojola, Anthony Isleta Pueblo 534 SFT P Sculpture

Humetewa Kaye, Donna Hopi 818 MAR Textiles

James, Duhon Navajo (Diné) 341 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Jojola, Deborah Isleta Pueblo/Jemez Pueblo 330 FR N Pottery

Hunter, Cody Navajo (Diné) 240 PAL S Jewelry

James, Peter Ray Navajo (Diné) 677 PLZ Diverse Arts

John, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 273 PAL Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Hunter-Pine, Wilma Navajo (Diné) 240 PAL S Jewelry

Jamon, Carlton Zuni Pueblo 216 PAL S Jewelry

Huntinghorse, Dina Wichita 418 WA E Jewelry Huntinghorse, Fortune Wichita 648 PLZ Jewelry

I Ingram, Jerry Choctaw Nation 685 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Diverse Arts Iron Shell, Sun Rose Sicangu Lakota/Oglala Lakota 753 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

J Jackson, Dawn Saginaw Chippewa 510 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Jackson, Gene Navajo (Diné) 920 SHE Jewelry Jackson, Norman G. Yakutat Tlingit 522 SFT E Sculpture Jackson, Ron Toahani Navajo (Diné) 806 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Jacobs, Margaret Saint Regis Mohawk 922 SHE Sculpture Jacobs, Mary Seneca 816 MAR Beadwork / Quillwork Diverse Arts Jacobs, Samantha Seneca 816 MAR Beadwork / Quillwork

John, David Navajo (Diné) 274 PAL Diverse Arts Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

John, Hadiibah Navajo (Diné) Jennings, Vanessa Paukeigope 274 PAL Gila River Pima/Kiowa/Apache Sculpture 756 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork John, Terion Navajo (Diné) Jensen, Brent 273 PAL (Youth) Navajo (Diné) 233 PAL S John, Tulane Paintings / Drawings / Navajo (Diné) Graphics / Photography 273 PAL Sculpture Jensen, Lane Navajo (Diné)/Salt River Pima- Johnson, Fanithya Maricopa Navajo (Diné) 679 PLZ 243 PAL S (Youth) Diverse Arts Johnson, Jesse Jhane, Wakeah Zuni Pueblo Comanche Nation/Blackfeet 528 SFT E Tribe/Kiowa Jewelry 721 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Johnson, Kenneth Graphics / Photography Muscogee (Creek)/Seminole 237 PAL N Jim, Damian Jewelry Navajo (Diné) 224 PAL S Johnson, Norvin Paintings / Drawings / Navajo (Diné) Graphics / Photography 243 PAL S Pottery Jim, Karl Navajo (Diné) Johnson, Parker 112 POG Navajo (Diné) Paintings / Drawings / 228 PAL S Graphics / Photography Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Joe, Alfred Navajo (Diné) Johnson, Pete 525 SFT W Navajo (Diné) Jewelry 301 FR S Jewelry Joe, Bruce Navajo (Diné) Johnson, Peter 334 FR N Navajo (Diné) Jewelry 334 FR S Jewelry Joe, Bryan Navajo (Diné) Johnson, Seneca 623 PLZ Muscogee/Seminole Jewelry 237 PAL N (Youth) Joe, Hyrum Navajo (Diné) 233 PAL N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Joe Jr., Oreland Navajo (Diné) 700 LIN E Jewelry Joe Sr., Oreland Southern Ute 700 LIN E Sculpture

Johnson, Skye Muscogee/Seminole 237 PAL N (Youth) Johnson, Yazzie Navajo (Diné) 261 PAL N Jewelry Johnston, Don Qagan Tayagungin 639 PLZ Basketry

134

Jonathan, Grant Tuscarora 769 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork Jones, Micqaela Shoshone/Paiute 735 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Juanico, Delores Acoma Pueblo 217 PAL N Pottery Juanico, Marietta Acoma Pueblo 331 FR N Pottery Juanico, Melvin Acoma Pueblo 331 FR N Pottery Julian, Rainey Jicarilla Apache 602 PLZ Jewelry Jumbo, Darrell, AKA Elephant Man Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT E Jewelry

K Katoney, Marlowe Navajo (Diné) 622 PLZ Textiles Kaye, Wilfred Hopi 818 MAR Pueblo Wooden Carvings Kaye, Wilmer Hopi 403 WA W Pueblo Wooden Carvings Kayquoptewa, Brendan Hopi 414 WA W Pueblo Wooden Carvings Kayquoptewa, Eric Hopi 338 FR S Pueblo Wooden Carvings Kayquoptewa, Wilmetta Hopi 338 FR S Basketry Kee, Randall Navajo (Diné) 343 FR N Diverse Arts Kee, Silas Navajo (Diné) 343 FR N (Youth)

201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

Kemp, Randy Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw/ Euchee 732 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Kemp, Rykelle Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw/ Navajo (Diné) 732 LIN E Jewelry Kempenich, Hillary Turtle Mountain Chippewa 741 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Kempenich, Niska Turtle Mountain Chippewa 741 LIN W (Youth) 2018 SWAIA Youth Fellow King, James Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography King, James Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W (Youth) King, Raven Navajo (Diné) 529 SFT W (Youth) Kirk, Elizabeth Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN E Jewelry Kirk, Michael Isleta Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 725 LIN E Jewelry Kirstine, Arlene Navajo (Diné) 213 PAL N Diverse Arts Kohlmeyer, Alyssa Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N (Youth) Kohlmeyer, Isaak Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N (Youth) Kohlmeyer, Royce Jemez Pueblo 309 FR N Jewelry Koinva, Anderson Hopi 768 LIN W Jewelry

Koyawena, Duane Hopi 520 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Kulberg, Dawn Eyak 240 PAL N Jewelry Kuticka, David Isleta Pueblo 270 PAL Jewelry Kuwanhongva, Darrin Hopi 336 FR N Jewelry

L Laahty, Ricky Zuni Pueblo 203 PAL S Sculpture Laconsello, Nancy Zuni Pueblo 668 PLZ Jewelry Laconsello, Ruddell Zuni Pueblo 668 PLZ Jewelry LaFountain, Bruce Turtle Mountain Chippewa 803 MAR Sculpture LaFountain, Eve Turtle Mountain Chippewa 803 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Lafountain, Presley Turtle Mountain Chippewa 722 LIN W Sculpture LaFountain, Saige Navajo (Diné)/Turtle Mountain Chippewa 763 LIN E Sculpture LaFountain, Samuel Navajo (Diné)/Turtle Mountain Chippewa 763 LIN E Jewelry LaRance, Steve Hopi/Assiniboine 326 FR S Jewelry

Kolakowski, Leah Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa/ Little Traverse Bay Odawa 215 PAL N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

LaRoche, Galen Sicangu Lakota 262 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Kooyahoema, Kathryn Hopi 336 FR N Basketry

Larsson, Tania Gwich’in 714 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork

Kothman, Julie Yurok Tribe/Bishop Paiute Tribe 744 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Latone, Christie Zuni Pueblo 113 POG Jewelry


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Laughing, Charlene Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N Textiles

Lewis, Judy Acoma Pueblo 767 LIN E Pottery

Laughing, Ethan Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N (Youth)

Lewis, Sharon Acoma Pueblo 636 PLZ Pottery

Laughing, Milton Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N Textiles Laughing, Mona Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N Textiles Learned, Brent Cheyenne and Arapaho 723 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Lewis Garcia, Mary Dolores Acoma Pueblo 127 POG Pottery Lewis-Garcia, Diane Acoma Pueblo 530 SFT P Pottery Lister, Ernie Navajo (Diné) 256 PAL S Jewelry

LeCornu, Jacinthe Haida 410 WA E Basketry

Little, James Navajo (Diné) 664 PLZ Jewelry

Lee, Albert Navajo (Diné) 631 PLZ Jewelry

Little, Monty Navajo (Diné) 739 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Lee, Allison Navajo (Diné) 415 WA E Jewelry Lee, Erik Ermineskin Cree Nation 257 PAL S Jewelry Lee, Russell Navajo (Diné) 254 PAL S Jewelry Lee-Anderson, Kyle Navajo (Diné) 414 WA E Jewelry Lee-Anderson, Trent Navajo (Diné) 414 WA E Jewelry Lee-Anderson, Wyatt Navajo (Diné) 415 WA E Jewelry LeFlore, Lisa Fort Sill Apache 633F PLZ Jewelry 2018 SWAIA Discovery Fellow Levi, George Cheyenne and Arapaho 723 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Lewis, Alex Cheyenne River Sioux 632F PLZ Sculpture 2018 SWAIA Discovery Fellow Lewis, Joyce Cochiti Pueblo 745 LIN W Pottery

Little Thunder, Merlin Southern Cheyenne 344 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Livingston, CeeJaye Navajo (Diné) 321 FR N Jewelry Livingston, Irene Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Jewelry Livingston, Jake Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Jewelry Livingston, Jay Jacob Navajo (Diné) 321 FR N Jewelry Livingston, Jaysen Navajo (Diné) 525 SFT E Jewelry Logan, Linley B. Seneca 406 WA W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Loncassion, Levon Zuni Pueblo 779 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Loretto, Estella Jemez Pueblo 760 LIN E Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Loretto, Glenda Jemez Pueblo 726 LIN W Jewelry Loretto, Fannie Jemez Pueblo 708 LIN E Diverse Arts Loretto-Tosa, Laverne Jemez Pueblo 244 PAL S Pottery Louis, Corrine Acoma Pueblo 231 PAL N Pottery

Lucario, Daniel Acoma Pueblo 323 FR N Pottery Lucario, Rebecca Acoma Pueblo 767 LIN E Pottery Lucero, Diana P. Zia Pueblo 412 WA E Pottery Lucero Fragua, Linda Jemez Pueblo 412 WA E Pottery Lujan, Carol Navajo (Diné) 919 SHE Sculpture Lujan, Deborah Taos Pueblo 764 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Lujan, Ira Taos Pueblo 707 LIN W Sculpture

Louis, Reycita Acoma Pueblo 518 SFT Pottery Lovato, Andrew Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 243 PAL N Jewelry Lovato, Anthony Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 658 PLZ Jewelry

Lujan-Baker, Tara Taos Pueblo 919 SHE (Youth)

M MacKnight, Sheridan Chippewa/Lakota 418 WA W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Lovato, Calvin Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Madalena, Reyes Jemez Pueblo 234 PAL S 646 PLZ Jewelry Pottery Lovato, Maria Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Maho, Garrett Hopi 678 PLZ 303 FR S Jewelry Pottery Lovato, Martine Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Maktima, Duane Laguna Pueblo 246 PAL S 751 LIN E Jewelry Jewelry Lovato, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Maktima, Tyler San Felipe Pueblo 310 FR S 751 LIN E (Youth) Jewelry Lovato, Pilar Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 234 PAL S Jewelry

Manygoats, Benson Navajo (Diné) 226 PAL N Jewelry

Lovato, Ray Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 243 PAL N Jewelry

Manygoats, Florence Navajo (Diné) 325 FR N Textiles

Lomatewama, Ramson Hopi 209 PAL S Sculpture

Lowden, Michelle Acoma Pueblo 411 WA W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Manymules, Samuel Navajo (Diné) 704 LIN P Pottery

Lomaventema, Gerald Hopi 662 PLZ Jewelry

Lucario, Amanda Acoma Pueblo 323 FR N Pottery

Lomakema, Wallace Hopi 757 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Marcus, Robert Ohkay Owingeh 651 PLZ Sculpture

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Martin, Bobby C. Muscogee (Creek) 721 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Martinez, Robert Arapaho 753 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Mata, Leah Santa Ynez Chumash 241 PAL S Diverse Arts Mater, Dustin Chickasaw Nation 710 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Melchor, Crucita Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 705 LIN E Pottery Melero-Moose, Melissa Northern Paiute/Modoc 765 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Menchego, Arthur Santa Ana Pueblo 780 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Mighell, Edwin Point Hope Iñupiaq 303 FR P Pottery

Maybee, Dallin Northern Arapaho/Seneca 733 LIN E Beadwork / Quillwork

Minkler, Sam Navajo (Diné) 776 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Maybee, Sage Northern Arapaho 733 LIN E Beadwork / Quillwork

Mitchell, Ann Saint Regis Mohawk 813 MAR Basketry

McCullough, Michael Choctaw Nation 119 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Mitchell, Lydell Navajo (Diné) 232 PAL S Diverse Arts

McCullough, Stephen Choctaw Nation 119 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography McKay, Glenda Ingalik Athabascan 221 PAL N Diverse Arts McKelvey, Lucy Cecelia Navajo (Diné) 530 SFT E Pottery McKinney, Jonathan Acoma Pueblo 718 LIN W Jewelry Medina, Elizabeth Zia Pueblo 684 PLZ Pottery Medina, Jennifer Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 513 SFT Jewelry Medina, Marcellus Zia Pueblo 684 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pottery

Mitchell, Toney Navajo (Diné) 232 PAL N Jewelry Mitten, Katrina Miami 311 FR N Beadwork / Quillwork Diverse Arts Monongye, Jesse Navajo (Diné) 603 PLZ Jewelry Monte, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 202 PAL S Jewelry Montoya, Paul Sandia Pueblo 116 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Montoya, Robert Sandia Pueblo 116 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Moquino, Lee Zia Pueblo/Santa Clara Pueblo 310 FR N Pottery

Moquino, Ty Medina, Stephanie Santa Clara Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 255 PAL S (Youth) 513 SFT Jewelry Moran, Beverly Bear King Standing Rock Lakota Medlock, Rochelle 502 SFT Santa Clara Pueblo Beadwork / Quillwork 669 PLZ (Youth) Diverse Arts


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Morgan, Jacob Navajo (Diné) 306 FR P Jewelry

Naranjo, Frances Santa Clara Pueblo 262 PAL N Pottery

Nells, Albert Navajo (Diné) 205 PAL S Jewelry

Nipshank, Glenn Northern Cree 238 PAL S Pottery

Osti, Jane Cherokee Nation 527 SFT P Pottery

Panana, Rufina Zia Pueblo 717 LIN E Pottery

Morgan, Summer Kiowa/Gila River Pima/Apache 756 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork

Naranjo, Geraldine Santa Clara Pueblo 260 PAL N Pottery

Nordwall, Miles Pawnee 114 POG (Youth)

Otero, Joseph Navajo (Diné) 406 WA E Diverse Arts

Panana, Ryan Jemez Pueblo 757 LIN E Sculpture

Morgan Jr., Danny Mescalero Apache 501 SFT (Youth)

Naranjo, Jody Santa Clara Pueblo 402 WA W Pottery

Nelson, Ben Kiowa/Taos Pueblo 532 SFT E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Othole, Eric Zuni Pueblo 227 PAL S Jewelry

Parker, Molina Oglala Lakota 410 WA E Beadwork / Quillwork

Not Afraid, Elias Crow Tribe 335 FR S Beadwork / Quillwork

Owen, Angie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 249 PAL S Jewelry

Parrish, Cherish Pottawatomi 738 LIN E Basketry

Nuñez-Velarde, Shelden Jicarilla Apache 765 LIN E Pottery

Owen, Dean Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 248 PAL S Jewelry

Parrish, Jason Navajo (Diné) 910 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Morrison, Andrew San Carlos Apache 811 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Mose, Allen Navajo (Diné) 212 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Mountainflower, Sage Ohkay Owingeh/Taos Pueblo/ Navajo (Diné) 413 WA W Beadwork / Quillwork Murphy, William Navajo (Diné) 717 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Muskett, Morris Navajo (Diné) 312 FR N Textiles, Jewelry Myers, Jhane Comanche Nation/Blackfeet 721 LIN E Diverse Arts

N Naataanii, TahNibaa Navajo (Diné) 642 PLZ Textiles Naha, Rainy Hopi 676 PLZ Pottery Namoki, Valerie Hopi 224 PAL N Pottery Naranjo, Angela Carol Santa Clara Pueblo/ San Ildefonso Pueblo 309 FR P Pottery Naranjo, Dillan Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S (Youth) Naranjo, Dusty Santa Clara Pueblo 707 LIN E Pottery Naranjo, Eli Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S (Youth) Naranjo, Eunice Navajo (Diné) 314 FR N Pottery

Naranjo, Johnathan Santa Clara Pueblo 317 FR S Pottery Naranjo, Joseph G. Santa Clara Pueblo 316 FR N Pottery Naranjo, Kevin Santa Clara Pueblo 341 FR S Pottery Naranjo, Madeline Santa Clara Pueblo 262 PAL N Pottery Naranjo, Makayla Santa Clara Pueblo 317 FR S (Youth) Naranjo, Monica Santa Clara Pueblo 260 PAL N Pottery Naranjo, Natasha San Ildefonso Pueblo 341 FR S (Youth) Naranjo, Raven San Illdefonso Pueblo 112 POG (Youth) 2018 SWAIA Youth Fellow Naranjo, Stephanie C. Santa Clara Pueblo 247 PAL S Pottery Nasafotie, Adrian Hopi 764 LIN W Pueblo Wooden Carvings Natseway, Thomas G. Laguna Pueblo 312 FR P Pottery Navakuku, Emmett Hopi 762 LIN W Jewelry Naveek Navajo (Diné) 242 PAL S Jewelry Neck-Haukaas, Alexis Sicangu Lakota 634 PLZ (Youth) Neidhardt, Nicole Navajo (Diné) 901 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Nelson, Jonathan Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Nelson, L. Eugene Navajo (Diné) 214 PAL N Jewelry, Sculpture Nelson, Olin Navajo (Diné)/Laguna Pueblo 759 LIN E (Youth) Nelson, Peter Navajo (Diné) 705 LIN W Jewelry Nelson, Yellowman Navajo (Diné) 532 SFT E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Neptune, Geo Passamaquoddy 922 SHE Basketry Nequatewa, Bryson Hopi 601 PLZ Diverse Arts Nequatewa, Lorene Navajo (Diné) 601 PLZ (Youth) Nequatewa, Verma Hopi 601 PLZ Jewelry

Nordwall, Raymond Pawnee/Chippewa 114 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

O Obrzut, Kim Hopi 515 SFT Sculpture Okuma, Jamie Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock 218 PAL N Beadwork / Quillwork Okuma, Sandra Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock 218 PAL N Beadwork / Quillwork Oliver, Marvin Quinault/Isleta Pueblo 755 LIN E Sculpture Ornelas, Barbara Teller Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W Textiles Ornelas, Michael Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W Textiles

Nez, Henry Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Ortiz, Dominick 817 MAR Cochiti Pueblo Jewelry 745 LIN W Pottery Nez, Leonard Navajo (Diné) Ortiz, Evelyn 340 FR N Acoma Pueblo Jewelry 704 LIN E Pottery Nez, Marian Navajo (Diné) Ortiz, Isaiah 340 FR N San Felipe Pueblo Jewelry 672 PLZ Jewelry Nez, Rickie Navajo (Diné) Ortiz, Kyle 745 LIN E Cochiti Pueblo Sculpture 745 LIN W Pottery Nez Jr., Sidney Navajo (Diné) Ortiz, Mary J. 810 MAR Cochiti Pueblo Jewelry 235 PAL N Pottery Nieto, Christopher Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Ortiz, Virgil 711 LIN E Cochiti Pueblo Jewelry 745 LIN W Pottery Nieto, Dale Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 711 LIN E (Youth) 136

201 8 I N D I A N M A RK ET

Owen, Rena Navajo (Diné) 248 PAL S Jewelry Owens, Alfred Navajo (Diné) 314 FR P Diverse Arts

P

Paschall, Sallyann Cherokee Nation 101 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Patricio, Felisha Acoma Pueblo 756 LIN E Pottery

Patricio, Juanita Pacheco, Farrell Acoma Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 756 LIN E (Youth) 246 PAL S Jewelry Patricio, Robert Acoma Pueblo Pacheco, Reyes 756 LIN E Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Pottery 246 PAL S Jewelry Patrick, Shelley Muscogee (Creek) Padilla, Andrew 723 LIN W Laguna Pueblo Paintings / Drawings / 309 FR S Graphics / Photography Pottery Patterson, Earl Padilla, Ellouise Hopi Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 769 LIN E 766 LIN W Sculpture Jewelry Pueblo Wooden Carvings Padilla, Tony Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT E Pottery Paguin-Sanchez, Gladys Laguna Pueblo 309 FR S Pottery Pahponee Kickapoo-Citizen Potawatomi 611 PLZ Pottery

Patton, Wade Oglala Lakota 100 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pease, Ben Crow/Northern Cheyenne 512 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pecos, Irwin Jemez Pueblo 531 SFT W Pottery

Pajarito, Triston Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 658 PLZ (Youth) Pecos, Jeanette Jemez Pueblo Paloma, Gabriel 531 SFT W Zuni Pueblo Pottery 644 PLZ Pottery Perry, Michael Navajo (Diné) Panana, Matthew 216 PAL N Jemez Pueblo Jewelry 757 LIN E Sculpture Peshlakai, Norbert Navajo (Diné) 242 PAL N Jewelry


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Peshlakai-Haley, Natasha Navajo (Diné) 110 POG Jewelry Peters, Franklin Acoma Pueblo 413 WA E Pottery Peters, Summer Saginaw Chippewa 740 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork Peters, Waabigwan Saginaw Chippewa 740 LIN W (Youth) Peynetsa, Agnes Zuni Pueblo 619 PLZ Pottery Peynetsa, Anderson Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W Pottery Peynetsa, Anderson Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W Pottery Phillips, Loren Hopi 660 PLZ Pueblo Wooden Carvings Piaso, Thompson Navajo (Diné) 663 PLZ Jewelry Pinnecoose, Adrian Standing Elk Navajo (Diné)/Southern Ute 904 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Pochoema, Melissa Hopi 614 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Polacca, Delmar Hopi 404 WA W Pottery Polacca III, Starlie Colorado River Hopi 674 PLZ Jewelry

Ray, Marilyn Acoma Pueblo 236 PAL S Pottery

Reeves, Kiyaannii Navajo (Diné) 200 PAL N (Youth)

Raymond-Overstreet, Darby Navajo (Diné) 215 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Richards, Rueben Navajo (Diné) 781 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Pruitt, Christopher Laguna Pueblo 314 FR S Jewelry Pruitt, Pat Laguna Pueblo 686 PLZ Diverse Arts, Jewelry

Reano, Denise Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 250 PAL S Jewelry

Rogers, Michael R. Bishop Paiute Tribe 744 LIN W Jewelry

Purdy, Dolores Caddo/Winnebago 731 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Reano, Dwayne Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 252 PAL N Jewelry

Rogers, William Navajo (Diné) 772 LIN E Sculpture

Reano, Frank Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 527 SFT W Jewelry

Roller, Cliff Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W Pottery

Reano, Harlan Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 228 PAL N Pottery

Roller, Jeff Santa Clara Pueblo 533 SFT W Pottery

Reano, Janie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 253 PAL N Jewelry

Roller, Ryan Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W Pottery

Reano, Joe Bautista Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 703 LIN W Jewelry

Roller, Toni Santa Clara Pueblo 534 SFT W Pottery

Reano, Joe L. Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 249 PAL N Jewelry

Romero, Cara Chemehuevi Indian Tribe 509 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Pourier, Kevin Oglala Lakota 322 FR N Jewelry, Diverse Arts Printup, Bryan Tuscarora 416 WA E Beadwork / Quillwork

Q Qöyawayma, Al Hopi 529 SFT E Pottery

Plummer, Earl Navajo (Diné) 321 FR S Jewelry

Quetawki, Farlan Zuni Pueblo 203 PAL S Beadwork / Quillwork

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Poblano, Jovanna Zuni Pueblo 612 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork

Rabbit, Traci Cherokee Nation 726 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Poblano, Veronica Zuni Pueblo 612 PLZ Jewelry

Rafael, Tonya June Navajo (Diné) 643 PLZ Jewelry

Pochoema, Julius Hopi 614 PLZ Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Ramel, Tim Blueflint Bad River Chippewa/ Comanche 608 PLZ Diverse Arts

Pochoema, Kevin Hopi 614 PLZ Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Reeves, Daniel Sunshine Navajo (Diné) 402 WA E Jewelry

Riggs, Florence Reano, Angie Navajo (Diné) Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 328 FR S 249 PAL N Textiles Jewelry Robbins, Blair Reano, Arnold Osage Nation Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 275 PAL 522 SFT P Sculpture Jewelry Robbins, Jesse Reano, Charlotte Muscogee (Creek) San Felipe Pueblo 688 PLZ 250 PAL S Jewelry Jewelry Rodriguez, D. Andrew Reano, Debra Laguna Pueblo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 223 PAL 522 SFT P Pottery Jewelry Sculpture

Polequaptewa, Tayron Hopi 407 WA W Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Plummer, Dallen Navajo (Diné) 321 FR S (Youth)

Plummer, Lance Navajo (Diné) 321 FR S (Youth)

Ratt, Christal Kitiganik Anishnabe 108 POG Diverse Arts, Jewelry

Raphael, Monica Ottawa/Chippewa/ Potawatomi/Sicangu Lakota 307 FR S Beadwork / Quillwork

Reano, Rose Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Romero, Diego 253 PAL N Cochiti Pueblo Jewelry 509 SFT Pottery Reano, Trinity Cochiti Pueblo Romero, Ken 228 PAL N (Youth) Laguna Pueblo/Taos Pueblo 504 SFT Reed, Lauren Jewelry Choctaw Nation 607 PLZ Romero, Martha Paintings / Drawings / Nambe Pueblo Graphics / Photography 230 PAL S Pottery

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Romero, Mateo Cochiti Pueblo 734 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Sangre, Tony Isleta Pueblo 270 PAL Pottery Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Rosetta, Devonne Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Schrupp, Nelda 524 SFT P (Youth) Pheasant Rump Nakota First Nation Rosetta, Jeremy 219 PAL S Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Diverse Arts 524 SFT P Jewelry Schultz, Marilou Navajo (Diné) Rosetta, Kelsey 732 LIN W Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Textiles 524 SFT P (Youth) Schultz, Martha Gorman Ruby, Christy Navajo (Diné) Ketchikan Tlingit 732 LIN W 315 FR N Textiles Diverse Arts, Textiles Scott, Rain Rutherford, Lisa Acoma Pueblo Cherokee Nation 711 LIN W 626 PLZ Sculpture Diverse Arts Scott, Raynard J. Tá’iitsohii Ryan, Loa Navajo (Diné) Metlakatla Tsimshian 711 LIN W 903 SHE Jewelry Basketry Secatero, Lyle Navajo (Diné) 252 PAL S Jewelry Sabaquie, Chelsea Jemez Pueblo Secord, Theresa 227 PAL N (Youth) Penobscot 525 SFT P Salcido, Frank Basketry Navajo (Diné) 329 FR S Seechoma, Ed Paintings / Drawings / Hopi Graphics / Photography 307 FR P Pueblo Wooden Carvings Samora, John Taos Pueblo Sequaptewa Sr., Raymond 305 FR N Hopi Pottery, Sculpture 218 PAL S Jewelry Samora, Maria Taos Pueblo Setalla, Dee 313 FR N Hopi Jewelry 613 PLZ Pottery Sanchez, Alex Navajo (Diné) Sevier, Chessney 403 WA E Northern Arapaho Jewelry 237 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Sanchez, Alisha Graphics / Photography Acoma Pueblo 326 FR N Sevier, Jackie Pottery Northern Arapaho 715 LIN W Sanchez, Gerti “Mapoo” Paintings / Drawings / Isleta Pueblo Graphics / Photography 330 FR S Pottery Seymour, Mary A. Acoma Pueblo Sanchez, Russell 517 SFT San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery 701 LIN W Pottery Shaax’ Saani Tlingit Sanchez Reano, Charlene 213 PAL S San Felipe Pueblo Diverse Arts 527 SFT W Jewelry Shabi, Geneva Navajo (Diné) Sandoval, Lester 211 PAL S Navajo (Diné) Textiles 342 FR S Jewelry

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2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Shackleford, Tyra Chickasaw Nation 746 LIN W Textiles, Diverse Arts

Singer, Penny Navajo (Diné) 740 LIN E Textiles

Stevens, Mark Laguna Pueblo 722 LIN E Jewelry

Tafoya-Moquino, Jennifer Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL S Pottery

Teller, Stella Isleta Pueblo 532 SFT W Pottery

Toya, Judy Jemez Pueblo 604 PLZ Pottery

Shakespeare, Lindsey Mescalero Apache 501 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Singer, Ryan Navajo (Diné) 628 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Stevens, Shannon Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 722 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda Santa Clara Pueblo 241 PAL N Pottery

Teller Pete, Lynda Navajo (Diné) 774 LIN W Textiles

Toya, Maxine Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N Pottery

Shakespeare-Cummings, Donna Northern Arapaho 624 PLZ Diverse Arts

Skeets, Ray Navajo (Diné) 735 LIN W Diverse Arts

Stewart, Isaiah Oglala Lakota/Mohawk 342 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Talahaftewa, Roy Hopi 650 PLZ Jewelry

Tenorio, Broderick Navajo (Diné)/Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 417 WA E Jewelry

Toya Jr., Michael Jemez Pueblo 737 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Tenorio, Feliciano Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 239 PAL S Jewelry

Trudeau, Sharon Odawa 809 MAR Diverse Arts

Tenorio, Leslie Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 239 PAL S Jewelry

Tsabetsaye, Edith H. Zuni Pueblo 251 PAL N Jewelry

Tenorio, Thomas Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 728 LIN E Pottery

Tsabetsaye, Tiffany Zuni Pueblo 533 SFT E Pueblo Wooden Carvings

Tenoso, Paul FourHorns Cheyenne River Lakota 778 LIN E Diverse Arts

Tsalabutie, Loren Zuni Pueblo 208 PAL S Sculpture

Thompson, Veronica Navajo (Diné) 121 POG Jewelry

Tsalate, Raymond Zuni Pueblo 305 FR P Sculpture

Tippeconnic, Eric Comanche Nation 304 FR S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Tsingine, Olin Navajo (Diné) 647 PLZ Jewelry

Shakespeare-Largo, Lillian Mescalero Apache 501 SFT (Youth) Shakespeare-Morgan, Emily Mescalero Apache 501 SFT (Youth) Shaw, Kahlia Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E (Youth) Shaw, Kahmari Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E (Youth) Shirley, Lorenzo Navajo (Diné) 769 LIN E Jewelry Short, Cathy Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Textiles Short, Chris Citizen Potawatomi 680 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Textiles

Skenandore, Olivia Oglala Lakota 408 WA W Diverse Arts Slim, Marcus San Felipe Pueblo/ Navajo (Diné) 312 FR S Jewelry Slim, Marvin Navajo (Diné) 720 LIN E Jewelry Slim, Michael Navajo (Diné) 720 LIN E Jewelry Slivers, Nando Navajo (Diné) 417 WA W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Smith, Patrick Navajo (Diné) 670 PLZ Jewelry Smith, Timothy Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 344 FR S Textiles

Stewart, Maya Chickasaw Nation/ Muscogee (Creek)/Choctaw 720 LIN W Diverse Arts Suazo, David Taos Pueblo 807 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Suazo, DeAnna Taos Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 807 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Suazo, Dexter Taos Pueblo 772 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Suazo III, Charles Santa Clara Pueblo 309 FR P (Youth) Suazo-Naranjo, Bernice Taos Pueblo 317 FR S Pottery Suina, Dena San Felipe Pueblo 616 PLZ Pottery

Taliman, Iris Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT W (Youth) Taliman, Taylor Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT W (Youth) Tallas, Joshua Navajo (Diné) 673 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography 2018 SWAIA Design (Merchandise) Fellow Tapahe, Eugene Navajo (Diné) 763 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Tapia, Terry Tesuque Pueblo 117 POG Pottery Tapia, Thomas Tesuque Pueblo 117 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Pottery Tapia-Browning, Michele Santa Clara Pueblo/Pojoaque Pueblo 251 PAL S Diverse Arts

Shorty, Perry Navajo (Diné) 210 PAL S Jewelry

Smith Jr., Keith W. Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Shutiva-Montano, Jacqueline Acoma Pueblo 207 PAL N Pottery

Sockbeson, Sarah Penobscot 331 FR S Basketry

Tacheney, Priscilla Navajo (Diné) 107 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Sice, Gabriel Zuni Pueblo 773 LIN E Sculpture

Sorensen, Matagi Yavapai-Apache 632 PLZ Jewelry

Tafoya, Harriet Santa Clara Pueblo 311 FR S Pottery

Sice, Howard Laguna Pueblo/Hopi 258 PAL S Jewelry

Soule, Jay Chippewas of the Thames First Nation 906 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Tafoya, Lorenzo Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 730 LIN W Taylor, Tsosie Jewelry Navajo (Diné) 524 SFT W Tafoya, LuAnn Jewelry Santa Clara Pueblo/ Pojoaque Pueblo Telford, Lisa 251 PAL S Ketchikan Haida Pottery 528 SFT P Basketry Tafoya, Mary Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) Teller, Lynette 730 LIN W Isleta Pueblo Jewelry 532 SFT W Pottery

Sice, Troy Zuni Pueblo 305 FR P Sculpture Simplicio, Margia Zuni Pueblo 239 PAL N Beadwork / Quillwork Simplicio, Noreen Zuni Pueblo 239 PAL N Pottery

Spry Misquadace, Wanesia Chippewa 630 PLZ Diverse Arts, Jewelry Stanaland, Nicklaus Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E Jewelry

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Tate, Brad Chickasaw Nation 225 PAL S Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Taylor, Eli Hopi 771 LIN E Pueblo Wooden Carvings Taylor, Rosie Navajo (Diné) 736 LIN E Textiles

Stanaland, Spencer Navajo (Diné) 748 LIN E (Youth) 138

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Toledo, Joe Jemez Pueblo 115 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Toledo, Neola Navajo (Diné) 342 FR S (Youth) Tom, Bryan Navajo (Diné) 247 PAL N Jewelry Tom, Jack Navajo (Diné) 635 PLZ Jewelry Tom, Mary L. Navajo (Diné) 220 PAL N Jewelry Tosa, Jayden Jemez Pueblo/Navajo (Diné) 244 PAL S (Youth) Toya, Camilla Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N Pottery Toya, Dominique Jemez Pueblo 256 PAL N Pottery

Tso, Jared Navajo (Diné) 315 FR P Pottery Tsoodle, James Kiowa 605 PLZ Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Tsoodle-Nelson, Malachi Navajo (Diné)/Kiowa/ Taos Pueblo 532 SFT E Diverse Arts Tsosie, Darrick Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P Pottery Tsosie, Emily F. Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P Pottery Tsosie, Honeebah Navajo (Diné) 531 SFT E Basketry Tsosie, JShen Navajo (Diné) 709 LIN W Beadwork / Quillwork Tsosie, Leonard Jemez Pueblo 313 FR P Pottery


2018 INDIAN MARKET ALPHABETICAL ARTIST DIRECTORY Tsosie, Lyndon Navajo (Diné) 627 PLZ Jewelry Tsosie, Nelson Navajo (Diné) 610 PLZ Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Tsosie, Pauline Navajo (Diné) 401 WA E Textiles Tsosie, Richard Navajo (Diné) 300 FR S Jewelry Tsosie, Robert Navajo (Diné) 656 PLZ Sculpture Tsosie Sisneros, Michelle Santa Clara Pueblo/ Navajo (Diné) 301 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Tutt, Travis Navajo (Diné) 706 LIN P Jewelry Two Bulls, Micheal Oglala Lakota 744 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Sculpture

U Urness, Zoe Tlingit/Cherokee 902 SHE Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

V Valarde-Brewer, Carol Santa Clara Pueblo 700 LIN W Pottery Vandever, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 306 FR S Jewelry Vicenti, Carson Jicarilla Apache 812 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Victorino, Sandra Acoma Pueblo 124 POG Pottery Vigil, Felix Jicarilla Apache 508 SFT Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

W Wadsworth, Piki Hopi 338 FR N Jewelry Walkingstick, Karin Cherokee Nation 729 LIN E Pottery Wall, Adrian Jemez Pueblo 743 LIN E Sculpture Jewelry Wall, Hunter Acoma Pueblo 743 LIN E (Youth) Wall, Kathleen Jemez Pueblo 222 PAL Pottery, Diverse Arts Wall, Marcus Jemez Pueblo 708 LIN E Pottery Wall, Vivian Jemez Pueblo 708 LIN E (Youth) Wallace, Denise Sugpiaq 746 LIN E Jewelry Wallace, Liz Navajo (Diné)/Nisenan/ Washoe 333 FR N Jewelry Wallace, Oriyah Navajo (Diné) 410 WA W (Youth) Walters, Daniel A. Navajo (Diné) 328 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Walters, Gertrude Navajo (Diné) 328 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Walters, Shondinii Navajo (Diné) 743 LIN E Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Walters Jr., Roy Navajo (Diné) 739 LIN W Sculpture

Warrington, Dana Prairie Band Potawatomi/ Menominee 682 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork

Whitegeese, Daryl Santa Clara Pueblo/ Pojoaque Pueblo 251 PAL S Pottery

Washburn, Tim Navajo (Diné) 754 LIN E Sculpture

Whiterock, John Navajo (Diné) 339 FR N Pottery

Waynee, Robin Saginaw Chippewa 250 PAL N Jewelry

Whitethorne, Troy Navajo (Diné) 122 POG Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Waytula, Bryan Cherokee Nation 770 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Weahkee, Daniel Navajo (Diné)/Zuni Pueblo 503 SFT Sculpture Weahkee, Gabriel Navajo (Diné) 503 SFT (Youth) Weahkee, Manuel Navajo (Diné) 503 SFT (Youth) Weahkee, Manuel Zuni Pueblo 503 SFT Sculpture

Whitman-Elk Woman, Kathy Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 742 LIN E Sculpture

Yazzie, Angie Taos Pueblo 618 PLZ Pottery Yazzie, Aurora Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN W (Youth) Yazzie, Charletta Navajo (Diné) 341 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Yazzie, Donovan Navajo (Diné) 759 LIN W Sculpture

Williams, Toni Northern Arapaho 733 LIN E Textiles

Yazzie, Larry Navajo (Diné) 773 LIN W Sculpture

Willie, JT Navajo (Diné) 302 FR S Diverse Arts

Yazzie, Peterson Navajo (Diné) 750 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Sculpture

Willie, Wesley Navajo (Diné) 102 POG Jewelry

Weahkee, Sharon Navajo (Diné) 503 SFT Jewelry

Wilson, Holly Delaware Nation/Cherokee 719 LIN E Sculpture Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

Wesaw, Jason Potawatomi 411 WA E Pottery

Wilson, Sandy Fife Muscogee (Creek) 723 LIN W Diverse Arts

Westika, Gaylon Zuni Pueblo 749 LIN W Pottery

Wilson, William Delaware Nation 322 FR S Sculpture

Whagado, Jerry Yavapai-Apache 340 FR S Jewelry

Winder, Kwani Santa Clara Pueblo 713 LIN E Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography

White, Delina Leech Lake Ojibwe 609 PLZ Beadwork / Quillwork Diverse Arts

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Wong-Whitebear, Laura Colville Confederated Tribes 405 WA W Basketry

White, Terresa McGrath Yup’ik 323 FR S Sculpture

Worcester, Daniel Chickasaw Nation 329 FR N Diverse Arts

White Eagle, A Nimkee Wa Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 731 LIN E (Youth)

Worl, Rico Tlingit 779 LIN E Jewelry

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Yepa, Elston Jemez Pueblo 246 PAL N Pottery Yepa, Marcella Chickasaw Nation/ Jemez Pueblo 659 PLZ Pottery Young, Carolyn Bernard Choctaw Nation 774 LIN E Sculpture Young, Holly Standing Rock Dakota 220 PAL S Beadwork / Quillwork Youngblood, Nancy Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL N Pottery Youngblood Cutler, Christopher Santa Clara Pueblo 255 PAL N Pottery

Yazzie, Venaya Navajo (Diné) 225 PAL N Diverse Arts

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Yazzie Jr., Kee Navajo (Diné) 401 WA W Jewelry

Zefren-M Navajo (Diné) 514 SFT Textiles

Yellow Bird Sr., Monte, AKA Black Pinto Horse Fort Berthold Mandan/ Arikara/Hidatsa 777 LIN W Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Yellowhair, Rosie Navajo (Diné) 805 MAR Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Yellowhawk, Jim Cheyenne River Lakota 335 FR N Paintings / Drawings / Graphics / Photography Yellowhorse, Alvin Navajo (Diné) 629 PLZ Jewelry Yepa, Alvina Jemez Pueblo 659 PLZ Pottery

White Eagle, Ahbedoh Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 731 LIN E (Youth)

Yepa, Dena Kewa Pueblo (Santo Domingo) 246 PAL N Pottery


Extraordinary Gourd Artist Reception and Drawing for Work of Art created by Robert for Indian Market Fri. Aug. 17, 5-7 Artist also present on Sat. Aug. 18, & Sun. Aug. 19, 1-5 Indian Market Hours: Fri. 10-7 Sat. 10-5 Sun. 10-5

Traveler’s Market

102 E. Water St., El Centro Galleries, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-986-8914 • e-mail: thetorresgallery@mail.com

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DeVargas Center, 542 N Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe. NM. 87501 505-989-7667 44 Dealers of Fine Tribal Art & Jewelry, Books, Antiques, Folk Art & Furniture, Textiles, Beads

Mon - Sat 10 am-6 pm Sunday 12 am-5 pm

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Stay at the Only Resort in Downtown Santa Fe LOCATED JUST STEPS FROM THE HISTORIC PLAZA AND CANYON ROAD La Posada de Santa Fe offers the only resort experience in downtown Santa Fe. Come and taste the flavors of the city at Julia, A Spirited Restaurant & Bar, indulge in cocktails at the historic Staab House Bar, tour our Gallery Collection, or find respite with signature Southwestern treatments at Spa Sage.

ENVISION YOUR ADVENTURE AT LAPOSADADESANTAFE.COM OR CALL (505) 986 0000; TOLL FREE (855) 210 7210. ©Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Starpoints, SPG, Preferred Guest, Tribute Portfolio, and their respective logos are the trademarks of Marriott International, Inc., or its affiliates.

330 East Palace Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | T 505 986 0000 | www.laposadadesantafe.com


Calvin analla

Preston duwyenie . Hubert Candelario

Kee yazzie

lisa Holt & Harlan reano . Harrison begay, Jr. . Jody naranJo

Jennifer tafoya moquino . les namingHa . russell sanCHez

russell sanCHez . nanCy youngblood . Jennifer tafoya moquino

JoHnatHan naranJo

Pueblo Pottery . IndIan jewelry . ZunI FetIshes

jillspots@aol.com 303.321.1071 Denver, ColoraDo

nativepots.com


DA N N A M I N G H A

PICTOGRAPH #15

acrylic on canvas

60” X 48”

Dan Namingha © 2018

Dan, Arlo, and Michael Namingha A r t i s t s R e c e p t i o n • F r i d ay, A u g u s t 17 , 2 0 1 8 • 5 – 7 : 3 0 p m

125 Lincoln Avenue • Suite 116 • Santa Fe, NM 87501 Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm 505-988-5091 • nimanfineart@namingha.com • namingha.com •


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August 15 –19, 2018

Wheelwright Museum

Free admission to events and exhibitions

OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

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Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie Klah, Slater, and Friends Galleries Through October 7, 2018 Navajo artist Melanie Yazzie’s exhibit features over 60 works, predominantly monotypes, as well as prints incorporating drawn and painted elements; and also includes bronze sculptures and large acrylic paintings on canvas.

PESHLAKAI VISION Schultz Gallery Through October 7, 2018

Center for the Study of Southwestern Jewelry

Peshlakai Vision is the first solo museum exhibition to honor master Navajo silversmith Norbert Peshlakai, featuring over 150 pieces, including jewelry, vessels, and small sculptural works, some inlaid with precious materials and marked with Peshlakai’s signature stampwork.

Martha Hopkins Struever Gallery Permanent exhibition of the most comprehensive collection of Navajo and Pueblo jewelry in the world.

Support for Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie and Peshlakai Vision is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; New Mexico Arts, a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts; and many other donors. Photos: Addison Doty and Neebinnaukzhik Southall. 14 6

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Case Trading Post Events From the Sketchbooks of T.C. Cannon Part 2

43rd Annual Benefit Auction

Wednesday, August 15 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. The Case Trading Post offers a second, rare opportunity to obtain artwork by master artist Tommy Wayne “T.C.” Cannon from the T.C. Cannon Estate, including previously unseen pieces.

Jewelry Collection Showcase 2018 Thursday, August 16 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. The Case Trading Post presents a sales show of Native jewelry, including work by Richard Chavez, Denise Wallace, Raymond Sequaptewa, Roy Talahaftewa, and others.

The Annual Benefit Auction offers the finest in historic and contemporary Native American and Southwestern art, including jewelry, pottery, textiles, baskets, katsinas, folk art, and more. Your purchases help support the museum’s educational programs and exhibitions!

Silent Auction and Live Auction Preview Thursday, August 16 3 – 5 p.m.

First Timers: Miniature Katsinas by Randy Brokeshoulder

Join us for the Silent Auction! Bid on items or buy them outright. Last table closes at 4:30 p.m.

Thursday, August 16 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Live Auction Preview Friday, August 17 10 a.m. – noon

Come see the first miniature katsinas Randy Brokeshoulder has carved at the request of Case Trading Post manager Ken Williams, Jr., exclusively available at the Case Trading Post.

Preview the Live Auction pieces in the auction tent on site.

11:30 a.m. Brother-and-sister dancers Phillip and Peshawn Bread (Comanche/ Blackfeet/Kiowa) will lead participants to the auction tent.

Old Friends, New Faces: Artist Demonstrations Friday, August 17 9 a.m. – noon Meet exceptional Native American artists and see how they make their work!

Live Auction Funded in Part by a Gift from

Friday, August 17 Noon – 3 p.m. Get ready to bid on quality, high-end Native American art!

Food truck Taqueria Gracias Madre will be on-site on Friday, August 17th from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. PARKING: In addition to parking at the museum, a free shuttle and offsite parking will be available at the First Baptist Church on 1605 Old Pecos Trail as well as St. John’s United Methodist Church at 1200 Old Pecos Trail. Shuttle runs from 8 a.m to 6 p.m. on Thursday and 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday. Additional parking is available on Museum Hill at the Stewart L. Udall Center for Museum Resources and the overflow parking at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Open 10 a.m – 5 p.m. Seven Days a Week • Extended Hours August 17th: 9:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. 704 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM 87505 • 1- 800 -607- 4636 • www.wheelwright.org


ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE Tomas Lasansky, Charlie Lasansky, Diego Lasansky, Rory Lasansky, and Adam Rake

FAUST GALLERY | TOMAS LASANSKY AUGUST 13TH - 20TH, 2018 OPENING RECEPTION AUGUST 16TH 5PM-8PM

FAUSTGALLERY.COM | 114 E PALACE AVE | SANTA FE | NM | 87501 | 480.200.4290 | bill@faustgallery.com


Galerie Züger Gib Singleton (1935-2014)

Introducing Three New Works From the Archival Collection Galerie Züger will be introducing three new works from Gib Singleton’s archival collection with a special presentation from John Goekler, the author of “Opening the Heart - The Life and Art of Gib Singleton”. Please join us at the gallery for our annual “Breakfast for Gib” event on Saturday August 18th at 9am, catered by “The Cowgirl”. (RSVP required)

Earl Biss (1947-1998)

20th Anniversary Memorial Exhibition and Book Release In addition to showcasing Earl Biss’ best works, Galerie Züger will present two new biographical books about his life. Authors John Goekler and Lisa Gerstner will be giving a special presentation followed by a book signing. Saturday 9am-11am at Galerie Zuger and Saturday 3pm-5pm at the Gib SIngleton Museum of Fine Art Please join us to celebrate the life and art of Earl Biss.

120 West San Francisco St | galeriezuger.com | 505-984-5099


HEARD MUSEUM SHOP HEARD MUSEUM SHOP

HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERS GET 10% OFF* ■ 2301 N. CENTRAL PHOENIX, AZ10% 602.842.9085 HEARD MUSEUMAVE. MEMBERS GET OFF*

HEARDSHOPS.COM

2301 N. CENTRAL AVE. PHOENIX, AZ

HEARDSHOPS.COM

*SOME ITEMS DO NOT APPLY

*SOME NOTWoman) APPLY by Arthur Holmes Jr. (Hopi) Soyok ITEMS WuhtiDO (Ogre

Photo: Megan Richmond, Heard Museum. Soyok Wuhti (Ogre Woman) by Arthur Holmes Jr. (Hopi) Photo: Megan Richmond, Heard Museum.

602.842.9085


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Free . y t r a P AYou only need to save the date. live

Music

FREE

dance if you wanna

BOX LUNCH

Drawings for Prizes and Giveaways

TOUR

THE MEDICAL CENTER

FOOD trucks

FREE

flu shot

Bike Valet Service

es i t i v i t c A ’ s d i K like, tons

A free community festival the new Presbyterian Health Park.

facebook.com/preshealth

phs.org/santafe

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Lindsey & Lillian

Lindsey Renea Shakespeare Mescalero Apache, Comanche, KiowaApache & Northern Arapaho

PHOTOGRAPHER & SOFT SCULPTURE ARTIST Lillian Gene Photo courtesy of: Gina Klinekole ShakespeareLargo Navajo, Mescalero Apache, Comanche, Kiowa-Apache & Northern Arapaho

BEAD WORK & DRESSMAKER

Emily ShakespeareMorgan and Danny Morgan, Jr. BEAD WORK & DRAWINGS

Photo Courtesy of: DeAnna Shakespeare

Indian Market Booth #501 SFT lynns_photos @hotmail.com (575) 973-1084 Bring this Ad to Inn of the Mountain Gods and receive $10.00 in Spirit Play. To redeem offers, you must be an Apache Spirit Club member. Membership is FREE. No cash value. Must be 21 years or older to redeem. Management reserves all rights.


Andrea Fisher

Fine Pottery

Richard Zane Smith

August 16th - 20th Opening Reception August 16th, 5-7 PM Demonstration August 17th, 10-3 PM

The Best of the Best

Maria Martinez

Our Handpicked Finest!

EXCEPTIONAL Works

Parade of the Artists August 17th 5PM

August 13 - 31st

100 West San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505) 986-1234 www.andreafisherpottery.com 201 8 I N D I A N M A RKET

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SUNWESTSILVER.COM 1-800-771-3781

SUNWEST

ON THE PLAZA 56-58 Lincoln Ave Santa Fe, NM, 87501 505-984-1364

Info@SunwestonthePlaza.com

Rebecca Begay SunwestHandmade.com /concho-story

You’re Invited

AUGUST 15-19, 2018

CANYON BALLROOM

100 Sandoval Street Santa Fe, NM 87501

Studio Seven Productions

THE HILTON OF SANTA FE


2018 Indian Market Magazine  

The indispensible guide to navigating Indian Market.

2018 Indian Market Magazine  

The indispensible guide to navigating Indian Market.

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