Page 1

Index

General Notes 1. These documents are the copyrighted property and intelectual property of the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture Urban Design Build Studio. The documents are not to be reproduced or utilized for any purpose other than originally intended and as stipulated on sheet IN1.00. This restriction and ownership of intellectual property governs all sheets included in the Index IN1.01. Use of the documents for any purpose, specifically stipulated or not, shall be granted only via authorized writing produced on Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture letterhead issued by the director of the Urban Design Build Studio 2. None of the documents included in the drawing index are intended to be considered in isolation of one another. All parties utilizing these documents for bidding, quantity survey, and/or pre-construction analysis shall consult the general notes and information located on this sheet and all “IN” and “CA” series (governing use stipulations and code analysis) sheets for information and conditions governing work described in the documents listed in the drawing index before proceeding with contracts and/or procurement. Governing use stipulations sheets and code analysis (“IN” and “CA” series documents) provide code, procedural, and use guidelines governing all information contained within the documents. Any and all entities referencing content included shall do so only in the context of the entire volume. Neither the owner of the intellectual property not their agents assume responsibility for errors, omissions, or misinterpretations resulting from the use of incomplete documents.

3. Do not scale drawings or utilize scaled dimensions. Use only dimensions/dimensional information provided in the documents. When no dimensional information is provided entities utilizing the documents shall contact the owner of intellectual property in writing. Entities utilizing documents shall not execute relevant work until written response/directive has been provided by the owner of the intellectual property.

4. Use of all construction materials and installation proposed shall conform to the Pittsburgh City Home Rule Charter and Americans with Disabilities Act for Buildings and Facilities as well as all applicable federal codes, state, codes, local codes, trade association standards, and/or manufacturer’s standards as adopted by the City of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County.

Governing Use Stipulations / Index

IN 1.00

Index

IN 1.01

Project Narrative Introduction

PN 1.00

Introduction

PN 1.01

Project Scope

IN1.00

GOVERNING USE STIPULATIONS

Demographics

PS 1.00

Crime Statistics

PS 1.01

Snowfall Data

PS 2.00

Rainfall Data

PS 2.01

Site Drainage Data

PS 2.02

Solar Data

PS 2.03

The Neighborhood

PS 3.00

The Site

PS 3.01

Zoning Map

PS 4.00

Zoning Overview

PS 4.01

Site Utilization

PS 5.00

Site Condition

PS 5.01

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Index

Project Scope

Adaptive Transformation

Land Use / Site Utilization Deviation

PS 6.00

Module Assebly

AT 4.00

Land Use / Site Utilization Deviation

PS 6.01

Module Section Details

AT 4.01

Street Elevations

PS 7.00

Sidewalk Assebly

AT 4.02

Street Elevations

PS 7.01

Sidewalk Section Details

AT 4.03

Existing Materials

PS 8.00

Sidewalk Access Ramp Assebly

AT 4.04

Proposed Materials

PS 8.01

Sidewalk Access Ramp Section Details

AT 4.05

Safety and Lighting

PS 9.00

Planter Assembly

AT 4.06

Lighting Diagram

PS 9.01

Planter Section Details

AT 4.07

Typology Precedent

PS 10.00

Wall Assembly

AT 4.08

Programming Precedent

PS 10.01

Wall Section Details

AT 4.09

Street Sections

AT 5.00

Street Sections

AT 5.00

Code Analysis Pittsburgh Home Rule Charter

CA 1.00

Pittsburgh Home Rule Charter

CA 1.01

Assembly Sequence

ADA Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities CA 1.02

Typical Assembly Sequence Diagram

AS 1.00

ADA Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities CA 1.03

Typical Assembly Sequence Diagram

AS 1.01

Site Context

Specifications

General Site Modification

SC 1.00

CSI Designated Material Annotation Legend

SP 1.00

Specific Elements

SC 1.01

CSI Designated Material Annotation Legend

SP 1.01

Vegitation Specifications

SP 1.02

Vegitation Specifications

SP 1.03

Selective Demolition Demolition Plan

SD 1.00

Site Preparation

SD 1.01

Adaptive Transformation Summer Panoramic View

AT 1.00

Summer Panoramic View

AT 1.01

Autumn Panoramic View

AT 1.02

Autumn Panoramic View

AT 1.03

Axonometric Diagrams S1-S2

AT 2.00

Axonometric Diagrams N1-N2

AT 2.01

Axonometric Diagrams S3-S4

AT 2.02

Axonometric Diagrams N3-N4

AT 2.03

Axonometric Diagrams S5-S6

AT 2.04

Axonometric Diagrams N5-N6

AT 2.05

Table Module

AT 3.00

Single Seat Module

AT 3.01

Double Seat Module

AT 3.02

Bench Module

AT 3.03

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Implementation Documentation Logistics

IMP 1.00

Logistics

IMP 1.01

Critical Path Analysis: Overview

IMP 2.00

Critical Path Analysis: Overview

IMP 2.01

Critical Path Analysis: Phase

IMP 2.02

Critical Path Analysis: Phase

IMP 2.03

Critical Path Analysis: Phase

IMP 2.04

Critical Path Analysis: Financing

IMP 2.05

Hard Cost Analysis

IMP 3.00

Financing Options

IMP 3.01

Recurring Soft Cost Analysis

IMP 4.00

Non-Recurring Soft Cost Analysis

IMP 4.01

TABLE OF CONTENTS

IN1.01


Project Narrative introduction

To empower people to build more secure and self-sufficient lives through the provision of decent, affordable housing, essential supportive services, asset building programs, and educational and employment opportunities. -- from ACTION-Housing, Inc Mission Statement

PN1.00

PROJECT NARRATIVE


introduction

Project Narrative

Revitalizing Streetscapes, Resoslving Urban Issues To foster and develop the community of the Uptown neighborhood, it is imperative to address not only the vacant lots and properties in the area, but also the space in between the structures. It is important to resolve the multitude of challenges found along the Uptown alleyways, such as Watson Street to build a safe, sustainable, and healthy urban community. Watson Street in particular is a space where members of the community interact on a daily basis and holds potential to become an even more engaging space. In order to make sure that Watson Street is developed to its full potential, four key issues must be addressed: crime safety, community engagement, pedestrian safety, and storm water and snow runoff management. Resolving these issues will improve safety, health, and overall quality of life of all residents along the alleyway, and, potentially in broader Uptown District. Watson Street has a rich potential to become an engaging social space for the community. Several issues need to be addressed, however, for this to become reality. These include litter control, repairing or replacing the sidewalks, introducing outdoor attractions, and establishing a social node. The first step towards transforming Watson Street is managing the overgrown vegetation on the fences and sidewalks. The density of the vines that cover the fences and spill onto the sidewalks contributes to the issue of littering along the street. Refuse and waste such as beer cans, cigarette butts, etc., simply gets tossed into the thick vegetation. Trimming back the plants will expose the waste and with addition of several garbage cans along the alley it can address the issue of liter control. In addition to encouraging littering, the rampant vegetation is damaging the sidewalks. In several locations along the alley the sidewalk is completely overgrown and unusable. In other places the plants have worked their way through the cracks in the sidewalk and fractured it. Once the vegetation issue has been addressed, the sidewalks will need to be either repaired or replaced. The property owners are responsible for sidewalk maintenance in front of the property, but these responsibilities have been neglected for years and the sidewalks are in bad state of disrepair. A key step towards engaging the community on Watson Street will be the introduction of outdoor attractions, such as exercise equipment. The alleyway only sees local traffic, consisting primarily of residents parking their cars. The street can thus be engaged for the purpose of providing outdoor recreational space for the local youth. These spaces can be further enhanced with Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

installation of simple outdoor exercise equipment such as pull-up bars and basketball hoops. These low cost improvements to the alleyway have a great potential to not only improve the quality of the space but also raise the overall health of the community. Finally, in order to make Watson Street a destination for the rest of the neighborhood, a social node needs to be created. There are two potential properties for intervention. The first consists of three paved properties (Lots 11K 23-25). Currently the property is used as a parking lot and is controlled by the Williams family. The lot is, however, is underutilized compared to the two neighboring parking lots. If acquiring this property is possible, it could be converted into a pocket park, providing a space for social interaction as well as a direct pedestrian connection from Fifth Avenue to Watson Street. The second potential node is the warehouse fronting Watson Street (Lot 11K-94). The structure is currently privately owned and has no tax delinquency, but seems underutilized. In the case that it can be purchased, it could be converted into a produce store. The conversion would require little to no structural alteration of the existing warehouse, and minimal interior work. The closest grocery store to the neighborhood is a convenience store (Quick Schwartz Super Market) located on Fifth Avenue. Situating a produce/grocery store on Watson Street will greatly improve both the quality of life in the Uptown neighborhood as well as overall health and wellness of the residents. The overall volume of traffic going through Watson Street is low and is limited to residents of the neighborhood. None the less, the issue of traffic and pedestrian safety will need to be addressed. Traffic-calming measures, both graphic and physical can be introduced as well as designation of the alley as a “play street” completely closed off to traffic during certain hours. Traffic-calming systems consist of graphic signs alerting motorists of children playing in the street and speed limits. The physical component can include a variety of measures including speed bumps, rumble strips, and textured pavement surfaces. Installing physical measures such as speed bumps or planters is problematic in the context of Watson Street due to the requirements for snow plowing. An alternative to deploying extensive traffic calming measures is designating the street as a “play street” and making it off limits to traffic on certain days. This practice is widely employed in Philadelphia, PA and New York, NY to provide children in the city with a car-free environment. Roadblocks would be installed at either end of the alleyway and a schedule of when the street is closed to traffic would be compiled and made available to the residents of the neighborhood.

PN1.01

PROJECT NARRATIVE


Project Scope demographics Permanent Residents The census information lists the population of the Bluff at 6600 people. These numbers, however. are skewed by the inclusion of Duquesne University students and the inmates of the Allegheny County Jail. These people account for almost three quarters of the total population. The actual permanent population of Uptown is approximately 1690 people.

73.2% Students

1.2% Allegheny County Inmates

2.8% Group Home Residents

25.6% Permanent Residents

Employment and Income The population of Uptown is employed in a variety of sectors, but nearly half of the 12% Wholesale and Retail Services people with jobs are working in the education 16% Financial Services and healthcare sectors. Uptown is located in direct proximity to UPMC facilities in Oakland. 6% Manufacturing and Construction Employees of the UPMC system could provide a good new target population for the Bluff and Watson Street specifically. The median household income in Uptown 17% Arts and Entertainment is estimated at $12,200 with median male earning $9,508 and female earning $9,599 49% Health and Education

Bluff Neighborhood Demographics

Data from U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

Watson St b/w Seneca St & Jumonville St Demographics

68% African American

Race and Ethnicity The racial breakdown of Uptown is dramatically different than that of the city of Pittsburgh as a whole. The racial makeup of the city is 68% caucasian and 27% African American, where as in Uptown it is the opposite. However, it should be noted that these statistics of the neighborhood are skewed due to the inclusion of the people residing in the Allegheny County Jail.

25.8% Caucasian

4.1% Hispanic 1% Native American 1.1% Other

PS1.00

Data from censusmapmaker.com

PROJECT SCOPE: BROAD DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


crime statistics

Project Scope 67.3% Property Crime

42.0% Drug Violations

10.5% Drug Violations

19.4% Assault

2.8% Robbery

Allegheny County Crime Data

12.5% Assault 61.1% Property Crime

8.1% Drug Violations

13.6% Robbery 26.4% Assault

31.8% Property Crime 4.3% Robbery

Bluff Neighborhood Crime Data

Pittsburgh Crime Data

Crime Prevention The overall disinvested condition of the Uptown neighborhood, particularly the abundance of abandoned and vacant lots facilitates an unsafe, crime-prone environment. The first challenge on the way to improving the quality of life along Watson Street and in Uptown in general is creating a crime-averse safe environment. The requirements for a safe environment will include secure lighting, visual connections to the properties along the alleyway, and possibly the installation of surveillance cameras.

Lighting Sufficient street lighting has been known to greatly reduce the levels of night-time street crime. One key requirement for lighting systems in areas such as Watson Street will be physical security. While the current traditional street light network can potentially provide sufficient light levels, the street lamps can be easily disabled to plunge stretches of the street into darkness to cover illicit activities. The new system will have to be recessed and consist of a multitude of fixtures to deter attempts to temper with the lighting.

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Surveillance

Eyes on the Street

A less desired though effective technique of crime deterrence is installation of surveillance cameras. This method has been implemented around the 5th Avenue Lofts project. This method carries with its effectiveness a host of negative connotations, and could be seen by many as an invasion of their privacy. Overt video surveillance is therefore not recommended. If surveillance is deemed necessary for the purpose of investigating crime that does occur, the devices should be minimal and not obviously present to the residents.

A key aspect to deterring street crime is providing visual connection to the street from adjacent properties. Providing views of the street to the tenants as they sit on their porches or stoops keeps eyes on the street, deterring ill-wishers and miscreants. Beyond eliminating the fences and trimming down the overgrown vegetation, however, this element of crime prevention can only be suggested as a design guideline for other ACTION Uptown projects.

PROJECT SCOPE: BROAD DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

PS1.01


Project Scope precipitation data

26”

Record Depth

12.3”

Average JAN

8.5”

Average FEB

0” 7.9”

Average MAR

6.9”

Average DEC Road Surface

Pittsburgh Snowfall Average and Record Depths

Data from erh.noaa.gov

SNOWFALL DATA Snowfall Data

PITTSBURGH AVERAGES AND RECORD DEPTH DATA FROM ERH.NOAA.GOV

The street pavement of the alleyway is in relatively good condition and replacing the road surface entirely is unreasonable at this time. Instead pervious pavement materials should be used selectively along the southern edge. Additionally, sidewalks that will require major renovations and repair should be considered as implementation sites for pervious materials. When Watson Street does require re-pavement, textured road surfaces should be considered to help combat ice accumulation. These measures could also be combined with the traffic-calming measures described above, such as rumble strips.

12”

SNOWFALL DATA

PITTSBURGH AVERAGES BY MONTH Pittsburgh Snowfall Average by Month

PS2.00

DATA FROM ERH.NOAA.GOV

PROJECT SCOPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEP

AUG

JUL

JUN

MAY

APR

MAR

FEB

JAN

6”

Data from erh.noaa.gov

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


precipitation data

Pittsburgh Rainfall Average and Record Depths

Project Scope

Data from erh.noaa.gov

Rainfall Data In its present condition Watson Street presents a completely impervious surface. The site is sloping down from the Hill district to the South and storm water runoff from Watson Street presents an issue to the properties located along the southern edge. In the winter snow accumulation also becomes an issue, because the alleyway is classified as a tertiary street and receives little to no plowing. Both of the issues can be mitigated with pervious roadway and sidewalk materials as well as textured pavement.

4”

RAINFALL DATA

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEP

AUG

JUL

JUN

PITTSBURGH AVERAGES BY MONTH DATA FROM ERH.NOAA.GOV

Pittsburgh Rainfall Average by Month

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

MAY

APR

MAR

FEB

JAN

2”

Data from erh.noaa.gov

PROJECT SCOPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

PS2.01


Project Scope site drainage data

Parking lots

Seneca Street

Jumonville Street

Fifth Avenue

Ideal stormwater interception Existing storm drain

Forbes Avenue

Stormwater Runoff Like many industrial cities, Pittsburgh has a combined sewer system that is over 100 years old. This integrates stormwater overflow from high-volume rain events with municipal waste and causes a number of issues. The two contaminated sources mix, and stormwater flushes waste into the rivers as well as to already burdened treatment plants. In the absence of a complete and costly overhaul of the network, best practice is to limit the load on the municipal system and increase stormwater infiltration back into the ground. Permeable surfaces (such as permeable paving or plantings) are ideal for this, and plants offer the added advantage of beginning to filter the contaminated stormwater in addition to their associated benefits. Watson Street offers a good opportunity for stormwater management due to its location and grade. This section of street slopes from a high point in the west to a low point in the east and cuts across the prevailing slope of Hill to the north. Stormwater from Fifth Avenue will flow onto our site from two large parking lots at the middle and east end of the block. Currently, our site has only one storm drain at the southeast corner of the street, not nearly enough to handle a sizable rain event. The proposal will utilize permeable unit pavers on the sidewalks as well as a series of planters on the south side of the street. These are constructed at street grade to allow stormwater to flow directly into them from the street. The planters will improve infiltration during average rain events but will be overwhelmed in more extreme storms. Thus, an overflow drain is provided to feed water into the combined sewer to prevent flooding of the street and adjacent properties.

PS2.02

PROJECT SCOPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

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solar data

Project Scope

Solar exposure: Winter Solstice

Solar exposure: 75% year-round exposure

Areas of Exposure

Solar exposure: Spring Equinox

By overlaying areas that recieve direct sunlight for more than 75% of the time the sun is in the sky, the patterns of shadows across the site during the four seasons were identified. This helped to inform the decision regarding where to locate planters and seating. The darkest areas on the diagram recieve sun for the largest amount of time throughout the year and therefore are most suitable for seating as well as vegetation.

Solar exposure: Summer Solstice

Sunlight and Shading During the summer months there is an abundance of sunlight on the street, even in spite of the lush greenery that exists along the street’s edge. In the winter months however, shadows from the buildings and the withering trees cover the street and sidewalk.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

PROJECT SCOPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

PS2.03


Project Scope the neighborhood

The Bluff

yB ert Lib

Action Uptown/2000 Block

Watson Street

Seneca Street

Fifth Avenue

Jumonville Street

The area of focus for ACTION Uptown is located in the 2000 blocks of Fifth Avenue and Forbes Avenue and stretches from Jumonville Street to Seneca Street. The properties in this area have been largely consolidated and are characterized by more preserved historic facades. Seven sites have been identified for gut renovation or new construction projects as well as two streetscape projects, located on Watson and Tustin streets.

gham

er

ahela Riv

Monong

Birmin

rid

ge

Bridge

The district of Uptown, also known as the Bluff, is located east of the Pittsburgh Point. The neighborhood is accessed primaraly by Forbes Avenue and Fifth Avenue and a network of one-way and two-way streets. The Birmingham Bridge and the Liberty Bridge define the easterm and western boundaries of the neighborhood and connect it to the southern parts of the city across the Monongahela river.

Forbes Avenue

Tustin Street

rd of the

Bouleva

Allies

Data from www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/cp/maps

PS3.00

PROJECT SCOPE: LOCATION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


the site

Project Scope

Watson Street

Seneca Street

Jumonville Street

Fifth Avenue

Forbes Avenue

Parking lots

ACTION Uptown project sites

Data from www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/cp/maps

Watson Street Watson Street is a one-way (West to East) tertiary street providing access to a few housing units as well as parking for units facing Fifth Avenue and Forbes Avenue. Residents of Watson Street treat it as a space shared by pedestrians and automobiles, gathering on either side to chat or allowing their children to play in the street. These social activities should be supported by providing more well-designed features and drawing visitors from the broader community. Currently there are few outdoor spaces in Uptown for people to meet and gather, a vital aspect of successful neighborhoods which encourages new residents to move to the area. Watson Street runs the full length of Uptown, maintaining its general character throughout. It is therefore proposed to extend the Watson Top intervention to the full length of Watson Street making it the first shared street in Pittsburgh. The intervention between Seneca and Jumonville streets is intended to serve as a pilot for the larger scale project.

Pilot intervention

Proposed extents of Watson Top project

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

PROJECT SCOPE: LOCATION

PS3.01


Project Scope zoning map

Watson Street

Seneca Street

Jumonville Street

Fifth Avenue

Forbes Avenue

Tustin Street

rd Bouleva

PS4.00

PROJECT SCOPE: LAND USE AND ZONING

llies

of the A

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


zoning overview

Project Scope

Fifth Avenue as seen through the lot on the corner of Watson and Seneca streets.

Convergence Three major zoning codes coverge within Uptown, reflecting the intertwining of industrial, commercial, and residential neighborhoods into one during the heyday of Pittsburgh’s past in heavy production. The residential zone features many row houses while the industrial zone is beginning to fade into the other two categories, reinforcing the changing nature of Pittsburgh from production to other enterprises.

R1-A Two Unit Residential Buildings : Structures are limited to two-family houses, often in a multifloor row-house style of low density construction.

LNC Local Neighborhood Commercial: Small businesses, a.k.a. “Mom and Pop” shops and specialty stores. Drive thru’s are allowed only by permission of an exception, with further stipulation. Any shop may feature a residence for shop owner on the premises if half of the property is available for parking of clients. IND: Industrial Zone. A leftover from the rush of manufacturing in the old days of Pittsburgh, these areas are still earmarked as industrial zones, suitable for warehouses, storage, and other uses. The commercial application of the code becomes apparent when the zone begins to face Forbes Avenue. There are no actual production complexes in the neighbor hood despite the industrial zoning.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

Primary Streets: include all roads and streets that serve as the main distributing arteries for all traffic originating from within or outside of the area. These roads carry the greatest traffic volumes and provide the means by which most people see the visual image of the neighborhood. Secondary Streets: roadways generally provide traffic movement between primary and tertiary roads and typically connect primary roads with individual use areas. The smaller volumes of traffic carried by these roads permit slower design speeds to accommodate for stop-and-go traffic. Tertiary Streets: Tertiary roadways or residential roadways handle lower volumes of more localized traffic and on-street parking when necessary. Their main function is to provide vehicular access to individual facilities, parking areas, and service areas.

PROJECT SCOPE: LAND USE AND ZONING

PS4.01


Project Scope site utilization

Seneca Street

Jumonville Street

Fifth Avenue

Watson Street

Forbes Avenue

Site Use The buildings adjacent to Watson Street encompass a variety of uses including residences and Womanspace East, a family support center. A significant number of the units are vacant including the majority of those facing Forbes Ave. In addition, two large parking lots sit uphill from Watson and will contribute stormwater runoff to the street.

PS5.00

PROJECT SCOPE: SITE UTILIZATION

Single-Family Residential

Storage

Institutional

Vacant

Multi-Family Residential

Tax Delinquent (at least 1 year)

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


site conditions

Project Scope

4

1

Watson Street

5

2

6

3

Seneca Street

Jumonville Street

Fifth Avenue

Forbes Avenue

Land Use Deviation Structures

Neglected Lawn Care

Paved Areas

Vacant Lot, Dumping

Sidewalk, Poor Condition

Sidewalk Damaged, Unusable

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

Many backyards (some unmaintained) face onto Watson St, providing a surprisingly lush environment. However, this lack of maintenance has also left many of the sidewalks unsafe or inaccessible. The parking lot in the center of the block currently provides access to Fifth Ave, a characteristic which will be limited to increase pedestrian safety.

PROJECT SCOPE: SITE UTILIZATION

PS5.01


Project Scope land use / site utilization deviation Paved Parking Area

1

Current commercial endeavors in Uptown so far have been to pave parcels of land for the purpose of parking and land retention should values ever rise. While this could help the lack of parking spaces in the city, the problems of open gaps in the urban fabric and the water run-off from precepitation only add to the issues at hand. The large parking lot at the center of the block provide a vehicular short cut and contribute to an unsafe pedestrian environment on Watson Street. This proposal will limit access to the parking lot from Watson, improving pedestrian safety.

Vacant Infill Parcel

2

Where buildings have been removed or were never built, the lots are left to nature and fill with vegetation. Intended for structures, the overgrowth does not invite new development. The streetscape interventions will provide well maintained vegetation, integrating the improvements with their surroundings. The increased quality of public street infrastructure will help to bring development to the area, especially as ACTION Uptown projects bring new residents to the area. The proposal encourages future residential development on the street and leaves room for driveway construction on all parcels facing Watson Street.

Sidewalk, Settling/Erosion

3

Sidewalks on the site have largely been left to decay and are unusable in many places. Overgrowth from unmaintained lots and erosion stemming from improper subsurface construction have created an unsafe pedestrian environment, forcing most users onto the street. The proposal will provide new pedestrian infrastructure in the form of a continuous accessible sidewalk on the north side of the street. Better construction and stormwater management will ensure the new construction remains stable and usable for years.

PS6.00

PROJECT SCOPE: LAND USE / SITE UTILIZATION DEVIATION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


land use / site utilization deviation

4

Project Scope

Vacant Lot, Litter & Trash Dumping Vacant lots are often recepticals for trash and general waste. Such dumping is indicative of a lack of investment in the urban landscape and decreases nearby property values. Simply introducing quality public space where residents can gather will reinvigorate people to improve their neighborhood. Vacant lots such as this one are potential sites for future residential development directly related to the new street infrastructure.

5

Sidewalk, Untamed Vegetation Although the city has repaved portions of the road, the sidewalks have been left to be overrun by vegetation from vacant lots. This vegetation does provide a lush street experience, and a significant portion of the south side of the street will be maintained as planted. However, the existing fences and plants will be removed and replaced with more sustainable vegetation as well as street furniture, situating Watson Street as a public space for residents of Uptown.

6

Commercial Garage in R1-A Zone Garages like this one are typically found in commercial and industrial zones but this is actually located in the R1-A Residential zoning district. It is unclear if the property was zoned differently at the time of construction but this garage offers an opportunity for some type of commercial space on Watson Street. The proposal will improve the experience of being on the street and potentially draw more people off Fifth and Forbes Avenues.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

PROJECT SCOPE: LAND USE / SITE UTILIZATION DEVIATION

PS6.01


Project Scope street elevations

Social Environment There was only a few people that were inhabiting the site, but the ones that were appeared to be mainly located down towards the newer end of the site, siting either on their porch or along side the alleyway. After talking with them, it became clear that both themselves and their families have a lot of history here and they were not happy about the new development that has been occurring in the area because they fear an increase in rent. Children were only seen for a brief moment as they zipped up and down the alley on their bikes. It appears that the site is creeping slowly towards redevelopment, however it still has a very long way to go and has many obstacles to overcome

0’

20’

40’

0’

20’

40’

Built Environment Currently, the site is displaying very clear evidence of decay. The lots that are not vacant and overgrown with weeds and shrubs, contain buildings that are slowly falling apart. Many of the buildings lining that alleyway have been around for 30 years, some as many as 40 years. There are several instances where a section of a townhouse has been removed to open up an area for parking or another building type. It is very simple to understand where chunks of buildings have been removed along the alley by the exposed interior walls that face the alley. Moving Westward down the street, the condition and height of the buildings slowly begin to increase, as well as the feeling of security. Towards the Jumonville Street, there are two recently renovated and constructed buildings. The first, on the corner, is a recently repainted apartment complex. The second is a battered woman’s shelter that was constructed only 3 years ago. The two buildings are connected to each other as well as another smaller apartment complex that is approximately 40 years old.

PS7.00

PROJECT SCOPE: CONDITION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


street elevations

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

Project Scope

PROJECT SCOPE: CONDITION

PS7.01


Project Scope existing materials

Existing Material Palette The materials found in the buildings that line the alleyway are typically constructed of wood, brick, and concrete. Most of the buildings over 25 years old are constructed with brick, while the more recent constructions and additions are constructed with wood and utilize timber framing. The newest building along the alleyway, the 3 year old battered woman’s shelter, is constructed almost entirely out of brick and slots comfortably in between to existing brick apartments. There is also another unintentional material that is found on the site, and that is plant growth. It seems that as the buildings decay and crumble, plant life has began to reclaim the site. It can be found growing up the side of nearly every building and completely covering all the vacant lots that are not entirely covered with pavement for parking.

PS8.00

PROJECT SCOPE: MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


proposed materials

Project Scope

Proposed Material Palette

Pedestrian Safety Measures including traffic calming measures and textured crosswalk approaches.

This intervention will utilize materials that will blend naturally into the existing site while simultaneously improving the spatial quality of the alleyway on the whole. Two of the methods that will be used to accomplish this are the use of various paving patterns and the introduction of numerous different plant species. The paving patterns can be used throughout the alleyway to signify paths for different events or methods of transportation. Some can be used to show where cars can pass through and others where pedestrians can sit or walk. The introduction of new plant life to replace the weeds and overgrowth existing on the site will help unveil the potential beauty of the alleyway. Providing areas where people can grow their own fruits and vegetables, as well as other plant types, will help to get community members involved and out onto the street. The innovative use of a small number of correctly placed materials can have a drastic impact on the site. However, the materials used must maintain the integrity of the site. One method of doing this would be to reuse some of the materials on the site, for seating or defining pathways.

Vegetation to provide green spaces for the community.

Permeable Pavement to mitigate runoff.

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PROJECT SCOPE: MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION

PS8.01


Project Scope safety and lighting

Surveillance Cameras Survaillance cameras on the 5th Avenue Lofts remind residents of the dangers.

Street Lighting Standard sodium street lamps provide ample lighting but can be easily disabled to plunge the street into darkness to conceal illegal activities.

Drugs and Gangs Shoes flung onto a telephone wires indicate presence of drug dealers, gangs, and related violence in the area.

PS9.00

PROJECT SCOPE: SAFETY AND LIGHTING

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


lighting diagram

Project Scope

ue

ven sA

e orb

F

e

nu

ve hA

t

Se

Fif

ne

ca

St

re

et

Light Placement The placement of lights to illuminate the street are spaced far enough so that if one were to be disabled, a portion of the street can be left in the dark. The sodium orange glow makes the place feel no where near as safe in night as it does in the day. Implementation of new lighting would make the street seem more secure and certainly safer for pedestrians in view of traffic.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

PROJECT SCOPE: SAFETY AND LIGHTING

PS9.01


Project Scope typology precedent

Linden Living Alley San Francisco, CA Located in the Mission District of San Francisco, Linden was once an untended alley serving light industrial, office, and residential uses. To create the new public space, three parking spaces were removed and the roadway was narrowed and repaved to the level of the sidewalk, blurring the distinction between vehicular and pedestrian traffic zones. The former parking spaces were replaced with benches (made from recycled granite curbstones) and planted areas that simultaneously define new gathering spaces and act as safety barriers from street traffic. The space now fills the role of a small park as a social outlet and spillover space from Blue Bottle Coffee that opens onto the alley. The project was implemented by an interdisciplanary team led by the Department of Public Works and including local architects and engineers (some who offered work pro bono) and with the help of a $97,000 grant from the city of San Francisco.

PS10.00

PROJECT SCOPE: TYPOLOGY CASE STUDY AND PRECEDENT

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programming precedent

Project Scope

Play Streets Various Cities A play street is one that is closed to car traffic and parking during business hours so that children can have a place to play. Children playing in the street has been a common aspect of city life throughout history, and codified play street systems have existed in New York City as early as 1914. Such systems are relatively common and have recently been successfully implemented in Philadelphia and Bristol (UK) among others. Play streets vary in quality and type of intervention; some are simply a closed street providing a place for ball or other games while some are managed and include portable equipment such as basketball hoops, volleyball nets, or table games. They are most commonly implemented in neighborhoods without ready access to city parks and open space and provide communities with new places to gather without the cost of creating new infrastructure.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

PROJECT SCOPE: TYPOLOGY CASE STUDY AND PRECEDENT

PS10.01


Code Analysis pittsburgh home rule charter

Compliance with Pittsburgh City Home Rule Charter In order for this inetrvention for ACTION to perform as a shared space for the residents of Uptown, ther have to be several changes to the classification of Watson Street. These signs each denote the conditions which will exist on Watson Street after ACTION has launched an appeal with the Director of Public Works in accordance with the Pittsburgh Home Rule Charter. The biggest change to the use of the street will be to prohibit through traffic during the day, to allow residents, especially children, to play in the street without worrying about traffic. The one way system must remain unchanged to allow neighborhood traffic patterns to work during peak hours.

The effect of building regulation is somewhat limited given the scope of this project. The regulations which were important to this design directly affect the use of the street surfaces and seating units and were dictated at both a city and federal level. The City of Pittsburgh regulations which dictated the use and management of city streets were under Title 5 Article 1 of the Home Rule Charter. Occupancy design was considered in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act provisions in Article 4, which described the maxima and minima measurements for sidewalks, curbs, and public furniture.

§ 413.01 - STREET BOND AND PERMIT REQUIRED PLAN APPROVAL. (a) The Director is hereby authorized to have placed and maintained, in conformance with the most recent edition of the Manual Traffic Control Devices and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Regulations, official traffic control devices to regulate, warn, guide or control ––traffic. (b) All official traffic control devices except pavement markings shall bear the City insignia or an abbreviation thereof.

§ 483.06 - OPEN SPACE AROUND BASE.

The speed limit must be set at 15 MPH, to ensure the safety of pedestrians when the street is open to cars.

On street parking should be made illegal during the day, because of the safety risk to pedestrians, neighborhood security, and the limiting of open street. To address the lack of onstreet parking, this proposal design includes on driveway for each marked property.

Children at play signs must be placed at the ends of the street to warn vehicles that the area may be used by children.

CA1.00

There shall be maintained about the base of the trunk of each tree in City rights of way thirty (30) square feet of open ground, with no one (1) dimension of that open space being less than three (3) feet. The Department of Public Works shall have the discretion to allow for an open space of less that thirty (30) square feet of open ground in instances where a sidewalk is less than seventy-four (74) inches wide and mitigating measures to assure the health of the tree, including but not limited to irrigation and pervious surfaces, are in place. Where any tree in or upon any public place is surrounded at the base of its trunk by ground which is not open, or by open ground of less quantity or measurement than required by this section, it shall be the duty of the Department of Public Works to notify the owner of the property on or in front of which any tree may be, to remove within a time fixed in the notice, so much of the cement, brick or other covering as may be necessary to give the space of open ground required herein. If the person notified fails to remove the covering by the time fixed, the Department may perform the work and charge the person notified for the work done.

§ 503.04 - TRAFFIC CONTROL (a) The Director is hereby authorized to have placed and maintained, in conformance with the most recent edition of the Manual Traffic Control Devices and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Regulations, official traffic control devices to regulate, warn, guide or control ––traffic. (b) All official traffic control devices except pavement markings shall bear the City insignia or an abbreviation thereof.

§ 503.09 - SAFETY ZONES (a) The Director is hereby authorized to have placed and maintained, in conformance with the most recent edition of the Manual Traffic Control Devices and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Regulations, official traffic control devices to regulate, warn, guide or control ––traffic. (b) All official traffic control devices except pavement markings shall bear the City insignia or an abbreviation thereof.

CODE ANALYSIS: LAND USE AND ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION

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pittsburgh home rule charter

§ 413.01

§ 503.04

§ 483.06

§ 503.09

Code Analysis

§ 541.01

§ 541.01 - PROHIBITIONS IN SPECIFIED PLACES Except when necessary to avoid conflict with other traffic or to protect the safety of any person or vehicle or in compliance with law or the directions of a police officer or official traffic control device, no operator of a vehicle shall, and no owner of a vehicle shall allow the vehicle to: Stop, stand or park a vehicle: (1) On the roadway side of any vehicle stopped or parked at the edge or curb of a street except that a pedalcycle may be parked as provided in Vehicle Code 3509(b) (2) On a sidewalk except that a pedalcycle may be parked as provided in Vehicle Code 3509(b) (3)Within an intersection. (4)On a crosswalk (5) Between a safety zone and the adjacent curb within thirty (30) feet of points on the curb immediately opposite the ends of a safety zone, unless a different length is indicated by official traffic control devices.

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CODE ANALYSIS: LAND USE AND ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION

CA1.01


Code Analysis ADA accessibility guidelines for buildings and facilities

Compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act for Buildings and Facilities 4.5 Ground and Floor Surfaces.

Site Condition 1: Street-side sidewalk access

4.5.1* General. Ground and floor surfaces along accessible routes and in accessible rooms and spaces including floors, walks, ramps, stairs, and curb ramps, shall be stable, firm, slip-resistant, and shall comply with 4.5. Appendix Note 4.5.2 Changes in Level. Changes in level up to 1/4 in (6 mm) may be vertical and without edge treatment (see Fig. 7(c) ). Changes in level between 1/4 in and 1/2 in (6 mm and 13 mm) shall be beveled with a slope no greater than 1:2 (seeFig. 7(d) ). Changes in level greater than 1/2 in (13 mm) shall be accomplished by means of a ramp that complies with 4.7 or 4.8.

48” 4”

10

4.7.3 Width. The minimum width of a curb ramp shall be 36 in (915 mm), exclusive of flared sides. 4.7.4 Surface. Surfaces of curb ramps shall comply with 4.5.

36

” 36

48

4.7.2 Slope. Slopes of curb ramps shall comply with 4.8.2. The slope shall be measured as shown in Fig. 11. Transitions from ramps to walks, gutters, or streets shall be flush and free of abrupt changes. Maximum slopes of adjoining gutters, road surface immediately adjacent to the curb ramp, or accessible route shall not exceed 1:20.

4”

1

4.7.1 Location. Curb ramps complying with 4.7 shall be provided wherever an accessible route crosses a curb.

76

36”

4.7.3

4.7 Curb Ramps.

” 28

4 8”

8”

4.7.4 4.5.1

8” 16

4.5.2

4.7.2 4.7.5 4.29.1 4.7.7

” 48

4.7.6 4.7.1

Site Condition 2: Street-side sidewalk and street furniture access

4.7.5 Sides of Curb Ramps. If a curb ramp is located where pedestrians must walk 4 8” 8” across the ramp, or where it is not protected 36” by handrails or4” guardrails, it shall have flared sides; the maximum slope of the flare shall be 1:10 (see Fig. 12(a)). Curb ramps with returned curbs may be used where pedestrians would not normally walk across the ramp ”

4.32.3

6” 27”

37”

4”

36

4.7.6 Built-up Curb Ramps. Built-up curb ” ramps36shall be located so that they do not project into vehicular traffic lanes (see Fig. 13). ”

” 36

4”

4.7.9 Location at Marked Crossings. Curb ramps at marked crossings shall be wholly contained within the markings, excluding any flared sides (see Fig. 15).

CA1.02

4.32.5

” 36

36

” 48

4.7.7 Detectable Warnings. A curb ramp shall have a detectable warning complying 8” with 4.29.2. The detectable warning shall 16 extend the full width and depth of the curb ramp.

1

8”

48

10

CODE ANALYSIS: LAND USE AND ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION

” 48

0 12

4.32.2

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ADA accessibility guidelines for buildings and facilities

Site Condition 3: Street-side sidewalk access at intersections with Seneca and Jumonville.

8”

48” 3 6”

48”

8”

” 36 4”

4”

Code Analysis

4.7 Curb Ramps (CTD) 4.7.10 Diagonal Curb Ramps. If diagonal (or corner type) curb ramps have returned curbs or other well-defined edges, such edges shall be parallel to the direction of pedestrian flow. The bottom of diagonal curb ramps shall have 48 in (1220 mm) minimum clear space as shown in Fig. 15(c) and (d). If diagonal curb ramps are provided at marked crossings, the 48 in (1220 mm) clear space shall be within the markings (see Fig. 15(c) and (d)). If diagonal curb ramps have flared sides, they shall also have at least a 24 in (610 mm) long segment of straight curb located on each side of the curb ramp and within the marked crossing (see Fig. 15(c)).

” 28

” 76

4.7.10 4.7.9

ADA 4.7 Fig. 15(c)

4.29.1 General 4.29.2* Detectable Warnings on Walking Surfaces. Detectable warnings shall consist of raised truncated domes with a diameter of nominal 0.9 in (23 mm), a height of nominal 0.2 in (5 mm) and a center-to-center spacing of nominal 2.35 in (60 mm) and shall contrast visually with adjoining surfaces, either light-ondark, or dark-on-light. Appendix Note The material used to provide contrast shall be an integral part of the walking surface. Detectable warnings used on interior surfaces shall differ from adjoining walking surfaces in resiliency or sound-on-cane contact.

4.32 Fixed or Built-in Seating and Tables. 4.32.1 Minimum Number. Fixed or built-in seating or tables required to be accessible by 4.1 shall comply with 4.32.2 through 4.32.4. 4.32.2 Seating. If seating spaces for people in wheelchairs are provided at fixed tables or counters, clear floor space complying with 4.2.4 shall be provided. Such clear floor space shall not overlap knee space by more than 19 in (485 mm) (seeFig. 45). 4.32.3 Knee Clearances. If seating for people in wheelchairs is provided at tables or counters, knee spaces at least 27 in (685 mm) high, 30 in (760 mm) wide, and 19 in (485 mm) deep shall be provided (see Fig. 45). 4.32.5 Children’s Fixed or Built-in Seating and Tables. Fixed or built-in seating or tables used primarily by children ages 12 and younger shall comply with 4.32.5 as permitted by 4.32.1.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

CODE ANALYSIS: LAND USE AND ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION

CA1.03


Site Context general site modifications

Seating Units A primary service our proposal provides is to retain storm water runoff and increase the amount of water that naturally infiltrates into the ground, thereby reducing the load on Pittsburgh’s combined sewer system. To accomplish this, storm water planters were placed in areas where they receive significant solar exposure and to maximize their total area and access to curb drains of the road surface. Seating and gathering areas were placed adjacent to planters or homes, the former to provide shade and attractive spaces and the latter to codify the already common practice of sitting outside one’s home to chat with neighbors. These rules were balanced with the need to create a 4 ft wide walking path on at least one side of the street at all times so that pedestrians can still travel comfortably when Watson St is open to vehicular traffic. At points where this clear path crosses the street, new crosswalks are marked with similar paving bricks to those used on the sidewalk. These crosswalks add visual interest and provide marked spaces for various activities during daytime hours. The closest crosswalk to the West End of the street is raised to act as a speed bump and slow vehicles, reminding drivers that Watson is a shared street environment. One of the best locations for solar exposure and thus both planting and seating is adjacent to the large parking lot near the center of the block. Currently, there is an extended curb cut to access this lot from Watson providing an easy route for drivers travelling to or from Fifth Ave. By blocking this off, we eliminate this unnecessary and unsafe practice and improve the pedestrian quality of the street. Seating was also placed adjacent to privatelyowned green space along the street, so that the interior of the 2000 block becomes a more integrated semi-public pedestrian zone.

SC1.00

GENERAL SITE MODIFICATIONS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


specific elements

N

1

2

S

3

4

5

Site Context

6

Light Placement The placement of lights to illuminate the street are spaced far enough so that if one were to be disabled, a portion of the street can be left in the dark. The sodium orange glow makes the place feel no where near as safe in night as it does in the day. Implementation of new lighting would make the street seem more secure and certainly safer for pedestrians in view of traffic.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

GENERAL SITE MODIFICATIONS

SC1.01


Selective Demolition demolition plan

Some telephone poles are currently located on the curb and are too close to the roadway. These will need to be moved back towards property lines, and stabilized with guy lines during excavation. The majority of existing sidewalks and curbs have subsided into the ground and will need to be removed. The subsidence points to subsurface issues, a significant amount of earth will need to be excavated and replaced with gravel or engineered fill. The central parking lot on this block has a long curb cut, encouraging its use as a vehicular shortcut. Some portions of the sidewalk are currently impassable due to thick plants and vines growing on chain-link fences. The first step in demolition will be clearing these areas to provide access for laborers and machinery. Chain-link fences should be removed to improve aesthetics and visual connections from adjacent properties onto the street. A retaining wall of precast concrete units exists here. The wall should be replaced to improve soil stability and aesthetic quality. In addition, the sidewalk is extremely overgrown and will need to be cleared.

Minor sidewalk demolition Major sidewalk demolition Chain-link fence demolition

SD1.00

SELECTIVE DEMOLITION

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site preparation

Selective Demolition

Adjacent unused parcels will likely need to be utilized during construction as support space for the storage of materials and equipment. Easements for access to these parcels should be acquired before any material arrives on site.

The primary aspect of site preparation will involve removing existing sidewalks as well as preparing the below grade condition for new infrastructure and to support new sidewalks and planters.

The primary combined sewer line runs down the center of the street. The stormwater planters will increase the amount of infiltration on site, but the new system will need to be tied into the municipal system at key points. These connections should be provided early in the process to maintain the road surface for construction access.

Because Watson St is so narrow, the amount of storage and staging area for construction is extremely limited. The street will need to be closed for the majority of construction, requiring planning to maintain resident access to property and traffic flow.

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SELECTIVE DEMOLITION

SD1.01


Adaptive Transformation spring view

AT1.00

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: PERSPECTIVE VIEW

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Adaptive Tranformation

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: PERSPECTIVE VIEW

AT1.01


Adaptive Transformation autumn panoramic view

AT1.02

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: PERSPECTIVE VIEW

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Adaptive Tranformation

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: PERSPECTIVE VIEW

AT1.03


Adaptive Transformation axonometric diagrams S1-S2

Table module. See AT 3.00 Single seat module. See AT 3.01

Amur maple. See SP 1.02

Wall section. See AT 4.08 Planter. See AT 4.06

Crosswalk Access. See CA 1.03

Clover; sweet pepper bush. See SP 1.02

0’-0

4

9’4

’11

28’-8

0

8’-

S1

46’-8

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Sidewalk. See AT 4.02

S2

67’-6

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Star Magnolia. See SP 1.02

67’-6

Amur maple. See SP 1.02

76’-10

S1

Planter. See AT 4.06 Wall section. See AT 4.08 Ryegrass; swamp azelia. See SP 1.02

100’-10

’-0

S2

22

S3

147’-8

AT2.00

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


axonometric diagrams N1-N2

Adaptive Tranformation

Crosswalk Access. See CA 1.03 Sidewalk. See AT 4.02 0’-0

22

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

’-1

0

1

N 67’-6

2

N Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

67’-6

Sidewalk. See AT 4.02

1

N

88’-2

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 26

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AT 4.08

’-4

132’-6

Sidewalk. See AT 4.02 Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

2

N 7’-

5

147’-6

S3

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ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

AT2.01


Adaptive Transformation axonometric diagrams S3-S4

Amur maple. See SP 1.02 Double seat module. See AT 3.01 Planter. See AS X.XX Wall section. See AS X.XX Ryegrass; swamp azelia. See SP 1.02

147’-8

Double seat module. See AT 3.01

156’-11

Star Magnolia. See SP 1.02

S2

Crimson Cloud. See SP 1.02 6

7’-

Crimson Cloud. See SP 1.02

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

4

’11

Planter. See AS X.XX

6

7’-

Wall section. See AS X.XX 197’-6

S3

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

’-2

24 227’-9

S4

Clover; sweet pepper bush. See SP 1.02

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Planter. See AS X.XX Kentucky bluegrass; swamp azelia. See SP 1.02

227’-9

S3

236’-0

’-4

15

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

’-4

S4

32

298’-9 307’-9

S2

Planter. See AS X.XX

AT2.02

Clover; sweet pepper bush. See SP 1.02

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

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axonometric diagrams N3-N4

Adaptive Tranformation

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AS X.XX

147’-6

Sidewalk. See AS X.XX Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

N

168’-0

2 15

’-2

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX

N 3

218’-10 227’-8

4

N Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

227’-8

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AS X.XX

3

N

Sidewalk. See AS X.XX Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

256’-0

14

’-8

4 N

298’-8 307’-9

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

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S5

Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

AT2.03


Adaptive Transformation axonometric diagrams S5-S6

Sidewalk. See AS X.XX

Crimson Cloud. See SP 1.02 Table module. See AT 3.00 Single seat module. See AT 3.01 Star Magnolia. See SP 1.02 Planter. See AS X.XX

307’-9

S4

314’-5

Wall section. See AS X.XX 347’-4

’-6

S5

10

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

387’-9

S6

Clover; sweet pepper bush. See SP 1.02

Star Magnolia. See SP 1.02 Planter. See AS X.XX Ryegrass; swamp azelia. See SP 1.02 387’-9

Sidewalk. See AS X.XX Planter. See AS X.XX Kentucky bluegrass; swamp azelia. See SP 1.02

8

6’-

S5

393’-6

0

9’’-0

’-0

S6

18

18 453’-10

0

9’-

Crosswalk Access. See CA 1.03

AT2.04

STREET SECTIONS

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axonometric diagrams N5-N6

Adaptive Tranformation

Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02

307’-9 313’-0

N 4

Sidewalk access. See CA 1.02 Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX

331’-0

8’-

4

357’-4

5

N 387’-9

6

N

387’-9

Wall section. See AS X.XX Sidewalk. See AS X.XX

5

N 6

N 453’-9

Crosswalk Access. See CA 1.03

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

STREET SECTIONS

AT2.05


Adaptive Transformation table module

24”

57”

27”

6”

24”

24”

Table Larger of the two table units. Installed perpendicular to street. Equipped with two single seat units Cost Per Unit: $499.23 Number of Units:5 For a detailed breakdown of per unit cost see SP 1.00

AT2.00

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


single seat module

Adaptive Tranformation

18”

36”

12”

6”

18”

18”

Single Seat Single seating unit. Implemented singularly or in combination with table modules. Cost Per Unit: $300.21 Number of Units: 9 For a detailed breakdown of per unit cost see SP 1.00

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ADAPTIVE TRANSFORMATION: MODULE CONSTRUCTION

AT2.01


Adaptive Transformation double seat module

18”

36”

12”

6”

18”

36”

Double Seat Double-seated bench. Implemented in combination with planter units parallel to street. Cost Per Unit: $323.67 Number of Units:6 For a detailed breakdown of per unit cost see SP 1.00

AT3.02

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

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bench module

Adaptive Tranformation

18”

36”

12”

6”

18”

53”

Triple Bench Triple-seated bench anchored at two points. Implemented in combination with planter units parallel to street. Cost Per Unit: $462.25 Number of Units: 4 For a detailed breakdown of per unit cost see SP 1.00

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ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT3.03


Adaptive Transformation

module assembly

Seating Assembly The seating elements are made of reinforced concrete with performative elements inset into the units during casting. Each seating and table unit is interchangeable, because they are attached to their foundations by bolting to a steel pipe through which the electrical conduit also runs.

AT400

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

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planter assembly

Adaptive Tranformation

Puck light, replaceable, screws into socket on underside of unit

No. 2 Rebar structure Mounting bolt Steel pipe, contains electrical conduit, and secures seating unit to foundation by bolts

Electrical conduit, supplies all module units with energy for underlighting

Module foundation, cast in place

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ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT4.01


Adaptive Transformation Sidewalk Assembly Concrete Curb 3216-13.13 Wall Foundation 0182-13 Brick Pavers 0421-13

1/A?

1/A?

3212-43 Asphalt

0182-13 Curb Foundation 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil Gravel 2214-13 Drainage Pipe

AT4.02

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


wall assembly

Adaptive Tranformation

Ground 0182-13 Wall Foundation 0421-13 Brick Pavers Gravel 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil 3216-13.13 Concrete Curb 0182-13 Curb Foundation

2214-13 Drainage Pipe

9”

6”

31”

4”

4”

14”

12”

4”

3212-43 Asphalt

Scale: 1” = 1’

Gravel

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ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT4.03


Adaptive Transformation Concrete Curb 3216-13.13 Wall Foundation 0182-13 Brick Pavers 0421-13

ADA Tactile Mat

Paved Concrete Driveway 3212-43

1/A?

1/A?

3212-43 Asphalt

0182-13 Curb Foundation 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil Gravel 2214-13 Drainage Pipe

AT4.04

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Adaptive Tranformation Ground 0182-13 Wall Foundation ADA Tactile Mat Gravel 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil 3216-13.13 Concrete Curb 0182-13 Curb Foundation

9”

6”

25”

14”

3212-43 Asphalt

Scale: 1” = 1’ 2214-13 Drainage Pipe Gravel

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT4.05


Adaptive Transformation Concrete Curb 3216-13.13 Drainagae Pipe 2214-26.19 Wall Foundation 0182-13 Topsoil 3290-00

Brick Pavers 0421-13

1/A?

1/A?

3212-43 Asphalt

0182-13 Curb Foundation 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil Gravel 2214-13 Drainage Pipe

AT4.06

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Adaptive Tranformation Ground 0182-13 Wall Foundation 2214-26.19 Drainage Pipe 3290-00 Topsoil 3291-13 Prepared Subsoil 3216-13.13 Concrete Curb 0182-13 Curb Foundation

9”

6”

24”

12”

14”

3212-43 Asphalt

Scale: 1” = 1’ 2214-13 Drainage Pipe Gravel

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT5.07


Adaptive Transformation

Galvanized Welded Wire Fabric 0322-13

Brick Pavers 0421-13

Galvanized Reinforcement Steel Bars 0321-13

Brick Pavers 0421-13

Wall Foundation 0182-13

AT4.08

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Adaptive Tranformation

0322-13 Galvanized Welded Wire Fabric

0421-13 Brick Pavers

22.5”

0321-13 Galvanized Reinforcement Steel Bars

Ground 0182-13 Wall Foundation

2214-26.19 Drainage Pipe

3290-00 Topsoil

Scale: 1” = 1’

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ASSEMBLY DETAILS

AT4.09


Adaptive Transformation

street sections

Transverse Street Section A Section taken through planter modules

AT5.00

STREET SECTIONS

0’

10’

20’

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street sections

Adaptive Tranformation

Transverse Street Section B Section taken through table and seating module

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

STREET SECTIONS

AT5.01


Assembly Sequence

1

Foundation Trench

Once the trench on either side of Watson Street is excavated, the ground work is laid, with the storm water management system and the conduits for the seating system lighting positioned into place. The foundations for the gabion wall are laid at the same time as modularized sections of concrete, which maintain the outside edges of the intervention.

6

4 Module Foundation

2

2

The foundation units for the seating modules and tables are laid into the ground next, making certain that the correct spacing is preserved between these elements and the wall within the unitized paving system.

3 3

Curb Installation

Once the foundation work is in place, the paving units can be laid into place. The curbs and planters are all precast and modularized concrete slabs which are mortared into place before paving and planting soil are added.

AS1.00

ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


comprehensive assembly

4

Assembly Sequence

Sidewalk Paving

Once the foundation work is in place, the paving units can be laid into place. The curbs and planters are all precast and modularized concrete slabs which are mortared into place before paving and planting soil are added.

5

Planter Work

The topsoil for the planters is added inside the planters once the connections between the planter modules are ready.

6

5

Module Installation

The final step is securing the seating units and tables to their foundations, by sliding down the exposed unit over its steel rod, and securing with bolts.

1

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE

AS1.01


Specifications General Construction 00 62 33 00 62 34 00 62 39 00 62 73 00 62 76 00 62 79 00 62 83 00 62 86 00 62 89 00 65 16 00 65 19 01 52 00 01 52 13 01 52 16 01 52 19 01 55 00 01 55 13 01 55 16 01 55 19 01 55 23 01 55 26 01 55 29 01 56 00 01 56 13 01 56 16 01 56 19 01 56 23 01 56 26 01 56 29 01 56 33 01 56 36 01 56 39 01 58 00 01 58 13 01 58 16 02 40 00 02 41 00 02 41 13 02 41 13.13 02 41 13.23 02 41 16 02 41 19 02 42 00 02 42 13 02 42 13.13 02 42 91

Roadway 32 12 43 32 16 13.13 22 14 00 22 14 13 22 14 16 22 14 19 22 14 23 22 14 26 22 14 26.16 22 14 26.19 22 14 29.19 22 14 53

SP1.00

Products Form Recycled Content of Materials Form Minority Business Enterprise Certification Form Schedule of Values Form Application for Payment Form Stored Material Form Construction Schedule Form Work Plan Schedule Form Construction Equipment Form Certificate of Substantial Completion Form Certificate of Completion Form Construction Facilities Field Offices and Sheds First Aid Facilities Sanitary Facilities Vehicular Access and Parking Temporary Access Roads Haul Routes Temporary Parking Areas Temporary Roads Traffic Control Staging Areas Temporary Barriers and Enclosures Temporary Air Barriers Temporary Dust Barriers Temporary Noise Barriers Temporary Barricades Temporary Fencing Temporary Protective Walkways Temporary Security Barriers Temporary Security Enclosures Temporary Tree and Plant Protection Project Identification Temporary Project Signage Temporary Interior Signage Demolition and Structure Moving Demolition Selective Site Demolition Paving Removal Utility Line Removal Structure Demolition Selective Demolition Removal and Salvage of Construction Materials Deconstruction of Structures Deconstruction of Buildings Removal and Salvage of Historic Construction Materials

Porous Flexible Paving Cast-In-Place Concrete Curbs and Gutters Facility Storm Drainage Facility Storm Drainage Piping Rainwater Leaders Sump Pump Discharge Piping Storm Drainage Piping Specialties Facility Storm Drains Facility Area Drains Facility Trench Drains Sump-Pump Basins and Pits Rainwater Storage Tanks

SPECIFICATIONS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


CSI Designations

Sidewalk 4 21 13

Gabion Wall 4 21 13 03 21 11 03 22 13 03 21 13 03 33 13 03 11 13 03 11 16 03 15 19 01 82 00 01 82 13

Specifications

Brick Masonry

Brick Masonry Plain Steel Reinforcement Bars Galvanized Welded Wire Fabric Reinforcing Galvanized Reinforcement Steel Bars Heavyweight Architectural Concrete Structural Cast-in-Place Concrete Forming Architectural Cast-in Place Concrete Forming Cast-In Concrete Anchors Facility Substructure Performance Requirements Foundation Performance Requirements

Seating Modules 01 82 13 03 31 23 03 21 11 26 05 19 26 05 19.23 26 05 26 26 05 33.13 26 05 33.16 26 05 73 26 05 83 26 06 50 03 11 13 03 11 16 03 15 19

Planting

32 90 00 32 91 00 32 91 13 32 91 13.16 32 91 13.19 32 91 13.26 32 91 16 32 91 16.13 32 91 19 32 91 19.13 32 92 00 32 92 13 32 92 23 32 93 00 32 93 13 32 93 23 32 93 33 32 93 43

Foundation Performance Requirements High-Performance Structural Concrete Plain Steel Reinforcement Bars Low-Voltage Electrical Power Conductors and Cables Manufactured Wiring Assemblies Grounding and Bonding for Electrical Systems Conduit for Electrical Systems Boxes for Electrical Systems Overcurrent Protective Device Coordination Study Wiring Connections Schedules for Lighting Structural Cast-in-Place Concrete Forming Architectural Cast-in Place Concrete Forming Cast-In Concrete Anchors

Planting Planting Preparation Soil Preparation Mulching Planting Soil Mixing Planting Beds Planting Soil Stabilization Blanket Planting Soil Stabilization Landscape Grading Topsoil Placement and Grading Turf and Grasses Hydro-Mulching Sodding Plants Ground Covers Plants and Bulbs Shrubs Trees

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SPECIFICATIONS

SP1.01


Specifications Plant Selection and Maintenance

Tree Species

Trees The selection of trees will provide a wonderful display of foliage for residents during the autumn months and an equally show of flowers in the spring, while still be suitable for the Pittsburgh climate. The range of trees was limited by the code restriction concerning areas with power lines limiting trees to twentyfive feet tall and the intended seasonal visual factors. Shrubbery Swamp Azeleas are native to Pittsburgh and offer fragrant flowers and ample coverage. The Sweet Pepper Bush does the same, but also attracts native bees and other insects in conjuction with the trees.

Amur Maple (Acer ginnala) Height: 15’ - 20’ Growing Conditions: Full sun, any soil

Grass Clover is the first choice for areas suspect of soil errosion, a tactic used before in highway developments. Ryegrass is intended for areas that need immediate coverage while Kentucky Blue Grass is reserved as the longterm coverage solution. Medium degree of maintainance is required, but the results would be long-lasting.

Star Magnolia (Magnolia stellata) Height: 10’-20’ Growing Conditions: Full to partial sun, moist but well-drained soil

Crimson Cloud Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) Height: 15’-25’ Growing Conditions: Full sun, any soil

SP2.00

SPECIFICATIONS

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Specifications Shrubbery Species

Grass Species

Swamp Azelea (Rhododendron viscosum) Height: 3’ Growing Conditions: Partial shade, moist soil

White Clover (Trifolium repens) Height: 3” Growing Conditions: Full sun, moist to dry soil

Sweet Pepper Bush (Clethra alnifolia) Height: 3’ Growing Conditions: Full to partial sun, moist but well-drained soil

Ryegrass (Lolium) Height: 3” Growing Conditions: Full sun, moist soil

Kentucky Blue Grass (Poa Pratensis) Height: 3” Growing Conditions: Full sun, any soil

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

SPECIFICATIONS

SP2.01


Implementation Documentation

Material Delivery and Storage This diagram displays the complete set of materials that would exist on the site if they were all present on the site simultaneously. It was created in order to help give a better sense of the total volume of materials and machinery that will be needed in order to complete this project.

2 excavators in order to remove existing material and move modules, concrete, and other materials into place.

2 excavators in order to remove existing material and move modules, concrete, and other materials into place.

77 sections of 12’ long 12” diameter pipe.

8,589 brick pavers to construct the sidewalks 6,536 building bricks and 204 linear feet of 3’ wire mesh in order to construct the gabion walls

2 portable toilet units 64,000 cubic feet of earth and existing sidewalk rubble to be excavated from the site

IMP1.00

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: LOGISTICS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


Implementation Documentation

2 excavators in order to remove existing mat modules, concrete, and other materials into p

2 excavators in order to remove existing material modules, concrete, and other materials into place 77 sections of 12’ long 12” diameter pipe. 8,589 brick pavers to construct the sidewalks 6,536 building bricks and 204 linear feet of 3’ wire mesh in order to construct the gabion walls 2 portable toilet units 64,000 cubic feet of earth and existing sidewalk rubble to be excavated from the site

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: LOGISTICS

IMP1.01


Implementation Documentation critical path analysis Agency Abbreviations and Contacts PHASE 2 City Planning 200 Ross St 4th Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 301 City-County Building 414 Grant St Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-8850

Watson Top Design Team

ACTION Housing

PHASE 1

Department of Public Works (DPW) 301 City-County Building 414 Grant St Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-8850

Watson St. Residents

Uptown Community City Planning

D.P.W.

City of Pittsburgh

Permits Office 611 Second Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-2370 Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) 1200 Penn Ave Penn Liberty Plaza I Pittsburgh, PA 15222

PHASE 2

P.W.S.A A.C.H.D.

T.I.F.

B.B.I.

Allegheny County Redevelopment Authority

C.I.L.P.

Alternative Funding

IMP2.00

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

C.I.T.F.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


critical path analysis

Implementation Documentation

Phasing and Sequence Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) 3333 Forbes Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (412) 687-2243 Bureau of Building Inspection (BBI) 200 Ross St 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-2175 PHASE 3 Allegheny County Redevelopment Authority 425 Sixth Avenue Suite 800 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 350-1000 Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Capital Infrastructure Loan Program (CILP) Community Infrastructure and Tourism Fund (CITF)

PHASE 4 Construction

PHASE 3

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

Proposing a revitalization of a street can seem daunting when all parties seem to expect a consensus at all stages of development. First, the design of the proposal has to be up to par to be buildable before inquiring the contractors and suppliers for quotes on the hypothetical project. Then meetings with the client and then the community have to involve a presentation with all the facts in place, as though it is ready for construction. If approved or changed to statisfaction, then one can apply for grants and loans from city, county, and state authorities to fund the project. City and County approval can be even more difficulty, as the several divisions have to consistently agree to the same design iteration modified to their specifications for approval. Consequently, this may affect the prior support from the community, either through the delay or unanticipated modifications to the proposal. Securing funding should always be a present activitiy but without approval, it can be difficult to aquire it. Regardless, with a green light from the governing bodies, all funding should be allocated swiftly before any expiration on the approval. The funding through grants is often on the stipulation that is approved by the community and town government affected by it. Funding has even more requirements, primarily that it be within the jurisdiction of the benefactor authority, and that it is not for non-commercial use, if it is a grant. (Loans can be had for commercial enterprises.) At this point, all contracts should be finalized based on the quotes given. The CITF Grant even requires the project to be auctioned to the lowest contract bid, to better serve the local business. Once decided, constrcution can be begin.

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

IMP2.01


Implementation Documentation critical path analysis

Phase I

Phase II

Event

Documents

Location

Approval of Design by Action Uptown and Community in Town Meeting with Residents.

What to prepare:

Where to go:

B212 Standard Form: Urban Planning (Prior to Proposal) Site Plan, Elevations, Perspectives, Landscaping, Stormwater Mangagement Plan, Usage Proposals.

425 6th Ave # 950 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 281-2102

Approval by City of Pittsburgh as a Project for Implementation via the City Planning Commission Meetings

What to prepare:

Where to go:

Development Review Application, Site Plan, Elevations, Landscaping, Stormwater Mangagement Plan

200 Ross St, 4th Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 301 City-County Building 414 Grant St Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-8850 DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION AND REVIEW (ZONING)

City of Pittsburgh

Date Filed:

Office of the Zoning Administrator 200 ROSS STREETŠ THIRD FLOOR Š PITTSBURGH Š PENNSYLVANIA Š 15219

(Zoning Use Only)

DEVELOPMENT REVIEW APPLICATION The Development Review Application can be used for the following: •

New Construction of a Primary Use Structure larger than a 2-Family Dwelling. (Including new Non-Residential Primary Use Structures); Any project or development that requires a Land Operations Permit; Any other types of work not listed under the Walk-Through and Zoning Applications. GENERAL INFORMATION

1. Property Owner Name: Address:

Phone Number: ( City:

State:

City:

State:

2. Applicant/Company Name: Address:

) Zip Code:

Phone Number: (

) Zip Code:

Applicant/Contractor ID:(assigned by the City) 3. Development Name: 4. Development Location: 5. Development Address: 6. If applicant is proposing a change to the Zoning District, the following is required: (Attach Zone Change Petition) Proposed Zoning District: Present Use of Site: (Select from attached list) 7. If a Certificate of Occupancy exists, the following is required: Certificate of Occupancy#: 8. Estimated Construction:

Date Issued: Start Date:

/

/

Existing Use of Property: Occupancy Date:

/

/

Project Cost: $

Use the attached Worksheet to continue answering the questions. For additional reference in answering Items 9-12 go to http://www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/cp/html/land_use_control_and_zoning.html and select the link for the City Zoning Code maintained at the Municode.com website. 9. Proposed Use of Site (Select from attached list): 10. Select the Type of Work: … New Construction, New

… Renovation, Interior

… New Construction,

… Renovation, Exterior

… Change in Use Only

… Renovation, Change in Use

11. Describe the Development:

12. Is a Land Operations Permit needed?

… YES

…NO

(See the Bureau of Building Inspection (BBI) website for activities requiring a Land Operations Permit, http://www.city.pittsburgh.pa.us/bbi/)

VOUCHER #:

(Zoning Use Only)

Page DRA-1

MARCH 2007

WATSON

UDBS/IOP for ACTION Housing Joseph Colarusso Henry Glennon Liam Lowe

TOP

Michael Lynes Dmitriy Yakubov

ACTION

UPTOWN

Proposal Documentation

WATSON TOP: ACTION UPTOWN PROPOSAL

Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority 1200 Penn Ave Penn Liberty Plaza I Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Allegheny County Health Department 3333 Forbes Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (412) 687-2243 Bureau of Building Inspection 200 Ross St 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 255-2175 Redevelopment Authority of Allegheny County 425 Sixth Avenue Suite 800 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 350-1000

• •

Development Review Application

Who approves the applications:

PROPOSAL UDBS/IOP 2012

IMP2.02

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


critical path analysis

Phase III

Implementation Documentation

Event

Documents

Location

CITF Grant Applications for funding up to $250,000 and related grants.

What to prepare:

Where to submit:

Personal Financial Statement CITF Grant Applicaton.

Manager, CITF Redevelopment Authority of Allegheny County 425 Sixth Avenue, Suite 800 Pittsburgh PA 15219

ALLEGHENY COUNTY COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE & TOURISM FUND PERSONAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT Submitted To:

Allegheny County Department of Economic Development

SECTION 1 – Individual Information (type or print) Name Address

SECTION 2- Other Party Information Name Address

City, State & Zip Position or Occupation Business Name Business Address

City, State & Zip Position or Occupation Business Name Business Address

City, State, & Zip Res. Phone Bus. Phone

City, State, & Zip Res. Phone Bus. Phone

SECTION 3 – Statement of Financial Condition as of ______________________ Year___________ ASSETS In Dollars LIABILITIES (Omit cents) (Do Not include assets of doubtful value) Cash on hand and in this bank Notes payable to bank-SEE Schedule E Cash in other Banks Notes payable to other institution- SEE Schedule E U.S. Gov’t &marketable securities-SEE Schedule A Due to Brokers Non-Marketable Securities- SEE Schedule B Amounts payable to others-secured Securities held by broker in margin accounts Amounts payable to others-unsecured Restricted, control, or margin account stocks Accounts and bills due Real Estate equities- SEE Schedule C Unpaid income taxes and interest Accounts, Loans, and note receivable Real Estate mortgages payable-SEE Schedule C &E Automobiles Other debts (car loans, credit cards, etc.)- Itemize Other personal property Cash surrender value-life insurance- SEE Sch D Other assets-itemize-SEE Schedule F if applicable

In Dollars (Omit cents)

Total Liabilities Net Worth Total Liabilities & Net Worth

Total Assets SECTION 4- Annual Income For Year Ended ______ ____ Salary, bonuses, & commissions $______________ Dividends & Interest

Rich Fitzgerald County Executive

(type or print)

_____________

Annual Expenditures Mortgage Rent Payments

Contingent Liabilities

$____________

DO YOU HAVE ANY

Yes

No

Real Estate taxes & assessments

_____________

___

_____________

Contingent liabilities as endorser, Co-maker or guarantor?

___

Taxes- federal, state & local

___ ___

Real Estate Income

_____________

Insurance payments

Other Income

_____________

Other contract payments ____________ (Car payments, credit cards, etc.) ____________ Alimony, child support, Maintenance ____________

Other special debt or circumstances

Other expenses

If “yes” to any question(s) describe:

Herky Pollock Chairman, RAAC

Total Income $

____________

Involvement in pending legal Actions?

____________

Total Expenditures $

Estimated Amounts $ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________

Personal Finance Statement

COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE & TOURISM FUND GRANT APPLICATION

CITF Grant Application

PROPOSAL NO_________________________________

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY

___ ___

Contested income tax liens?

___

___

Prior bankruptcy (10 years)

___

____

Total Contingent Liabilities $

COMPLETE ATTACHED SCHEDULES AND SIGN

Phase IV

Advertisement of Project through Pittsburgh D.P.W. Electronic Construction Management System (ECMS) listings for approved contractors only.

What to prepare:

What to Expect:

City of Pittsburgh Invitation to Bid Form, using their specific format, wording, and procedures for a standard invitation.

Electronic Bid Submissions, cataloged and only from approved contractors.

CITY OF PITTSBURGH

ADVERTISEMENT ACTION UPTOWN WATSON STREET TRAFFIC IMPROVEMENT PROJECT MPMS NO. XXXXX BTE PROJECT NO. XXXXX The City of Pittsburgh, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, will be accepting bids, through the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Electronic Construction Management System (ECMS) for the construction of the Watson Street Traffic Improvement Project. This is in accordance with mandates for publicly funded improvement projects. The work will include debris removal, street resurfacing, sidewalk removal and paver installation, public seating, nonbearing walls, lighting, traffic signals, pavement markings and signage, and planting of trees and other vegetation. The prototype project ranges from Seneca Street to Jumonville Street. If successful, future invitations to bid will be offered to continue the project down the length of Watson Street. The construction plans and specifications can only be viewed on the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s ECMS website: www.dot14.state.pa.us/ecms, ECMS No. XXXX (set time and date). Only electronic bids will be accepted from ECMS prequalified contractors. All bidders on this project must be prequalified by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation for this type of work. The bid opening is scheduled (set time and date). Bidders may view the bid opening at the Department of Public Works, Room 301, City-County Building, 414 Grant Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219.

Standard DPW Project Invitation

ECMS Website for Bidding Submissions

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

INVITATION TO BIDDERS

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

Robert W. Kaczorowski, Director Public Works Scott Kunka, Director Finance

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

IMP2.03


Implementation Documentation critical path analysis

Event

Documents

Location

Phase V

Accepting minimum of three bids as required by state law for CITF funded projects. Bid withdrawl deadline sixty days prior to selection.

Prepared by the City Typically: A305 Prequalifications A310 Bid Security Bond A501 Recommended Guide A701 Bidding Instructions Bid Forms G804 Bid Log (maintained by the City)

https://www.dot14.state.pa.us/ ECMS/

Phase VI

1-5% of Advance Payment prior Determination of winning to A312 Performance Bond. bid by virtue of lowest cost. Recommend by also reputation of said contractor.

Phase VII

Contract between City of Pittsburgh and said Contractor. Contract between Contractor and Suppliers.

Who hosts the selection: Department of Public Works City-County Building Room 301 414 Grant Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

City Clerk of Council Issued Resolution Stating Provision of Contracts, such as the following: A201 General Conditions B108 Standard Agreement Between Architect, City and Contractor for Federally Funded Work A401 Standard Form of Agreement between Contractor and Sub-Contractor.

Phase VIII Construction Begins

IMP2.04

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


financing options

Implementation Documentation

CTIF Grant $250,000

Hard Costs $220,598

Soft Costs $6,903

Surplus $22,499

What is CITF?

When to Apply

Non-Profit Organizations are Eligible

$250,000.00

The Community Infrastructure and Tourism Fund is designed to assist construction projects and sites. The idea is provide economic growth to Allegheny County by helping projects materialize.

As a grant, it is intended for projects that improve the community, not specifically a business. Priority given to projects that can increase land value or services.

Round 1: Projects must be submitted during September 4 th and 28th of this calendar year . Round 2: The date for future project submissions has yet to be decided.

Maxium ammount given to any single development or project. If more than $30,000 is utilized, a formal public bidding of the project must occure to secure a fair contract and labor.

Reason for Eligibility

Water run-off is addressed on site with appropriate drainage tactics. Road surface is improved. The streetscape is improved with modules, systems, and other factors that benefit the community.

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: CRITICAL PATH ANALYSIS

IMP2.05


Implementation Documentation hard cost analysis

IMP3.00

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: HARD COST ANALYSIS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


hard cost analysis Description

Implementation Documentation

Unit Cost

Quantity UM

Total Cost

Sidewalk Demolition

$0.14

3600 sq ft

$504

Fence Demolition

$2.13

280 ln ft

$597

$28.37

900 cu yd

$25,533

$0.10

2500 sq ft

$250

$6.60

3200 sq ft

$21,120

$18.00

80 ln ft

$1,440

$9.00

5414 sq ft

$48,727

$340.00

1 bump

$340

$20.00

1909 sq ft

$38,180

Demolition

Sidewalk Excavation Plant Clearance Site Prep Subsurface Construction Utility Connections Construction Road Surface Road Modifications Sidewalk Construction ADA Ramps

$100.00

15 matts

$1,500

Gabion Walls

$772.09

51 sections (4’)

$39,377

varies

22 units

$8,030

$200.00

25 planters

$5,000

Seating Modules Landscaping (Planting)

$30,000

Contingency Total

$220,598 Demolition Sidewalk Excavation Subsurface Construction Road Surface Sidewalk Construction Gabion Walls Seating Modules Landscaping Contingency Other

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

(includes utility connections, plant clearance, speed bump, and ADA ramps)

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: HARD COST ANALYSIS

IMP3.01


Implementation Documentation recurring soft cost analysis

Item

Cause

Quantity

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Street Sweeping

Sediment suction

2 per year

$20

$40

Module Replacement

Vandalism, failure

2 modules

$500

$1000

Wall Replacement

Damage, above grade

5 ft section

$720

$3600

Sidewalk Replacement

Weathering

30 sq ft

$20

$600

Topsoil Replacement

Water runoff

5 cu yd

$4

$20

Clogged Pipe

Sediment infiltration

3 ln ft

$200

$600

Annual Costs of Operation With any new construction, certain services undoubtedly will require repairs against weather, vandalism, and other factors as it adapts to the nature of the site.

Vandalism The concrete seating modules are designed to be easily replaced if broken or faulty to minimize cost to that of initial installment.

Erosion In the event of severe storm, there is a chance of loss of topsoil or gravel on the site. This can also affect drainage systems with clogs and severe overflow and backup.

IMP4.00

Street Sweeping

Wall Replacement

Module Replacement

Sidewalk Replacement

Topsoil Replacement

Drainage Maintanance

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: SOFT COST ANALYSIS

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550


non-recurring soft cost analysis

Implementation Documentation

Item

Description

Cost

Demolition Permit

Sidewalk demolition

$122

Excavation Permit

Road work

Paving Permit

Road repaving

Transportation - Public Street

Construction vehicles on public street

Three Crew Survey

Site information

$80 $150 $88 $600

Permits Beyond initial construction permits, approval, fees, and estimates, there is a permit for virtually every action of preparing the site and specialized construction.

Surveying For legal and technical purposes, the site must be surveyed to the fullest accurate extent. Factors include slope of site and drainage.

Transportation

Demolition Permit

Transportation Permits

Excavation Permit

Three Crew Survey

The city of Pittsburgh requires permits for construction equipment that navigates on public streets and for the impediment to local traffic it may incure.

Paving Permit

Watson Top ACTION Uptown Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture 48_550

IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENTATION: SOFT COST ANALYSIS

IMP4.01

Watson TOP - Issues of Pratice  

The final book produced for CMU's Issues of Practice by Watson TOP. Created by Joe Colarusso, Henry Glennon, Liam Lowe, Micheal Lynes, and D...

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