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SOCIAL SINGULARITY

A thesis presented to the undergraduate faculty of The NewSchool of Architecture & Design

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture

by Henry K. Chi June 2014 San Diego, CA

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

© 2014 Henry K. Chi All Rights Reserved. 001


the abstract Proposed to challenge the traditional programmatic study and organization that we undertake conventionally. Through this examination, the intent is to change how society tend to move from the city to live in the suburbs. This thesis explores the idea of designing in the fourth dimension to tolerate families to continue to grow in the same residential unit while carrying the same, if not a more enhanced quality of growth that the suburban environment offers. Through this proposal, these units are able to expand spaces vertically or horizontal to add livable square footage to their unit. In addition to this expansion, the expandable space will partake the characteristics of the occupants as the added material will be defined by the users, not of a covenant whole. The end goal is to visualize and conceptualize this thesis idea in comparison to the life stages of how 002 people grow in relation to building life cycle.


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION SOCIAL SINGULARITY

A thesis presented to the undergraduate faculty of The NewSchool of Architecture & Design. by Henry K. Chi

Approved by: Undergraduate Chair: Leonard Zegarski Date

Studio Instructor: Gilbert Cooke Date

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dedication This thesis is dedicated to my mom who has supported me through this venture since September 1986 - that is a very long time. Through the happiness and sadness we have strived to succeed. She not only provided me with financial support, but also with emotional discourse. Whether it be an investment or true generosity, she gave and believed in my success. Once again, I dedicate this life event and all future success to my mom. What was given, must be returned.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

SOCIAL SINGULARITY: designing for the fourth dimension 9

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INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND, EXPLANATION, CRITICAL POSITION, THESIS STATEMENT

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RESEARCH METHODS

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DESIGN PROPOSAL

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CONCLUSION

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REFERENCE

CASE STUDIES, SITE ANALYSIS, PROGRAMMING, CONCEPTUAL

PROCESS AND EVALUATION

FINAL DESIGN AND FINAL STATEMENT

CREDITS


AWKWARD ELEVATOR RIDE

dog up! shut that wed!! no pets allo

f! woof! woo

UNKNOWN NEIGHBORS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

INTRODUCTION the background

The world population is projected to grow by a billion within 2025 to reach 8.1 billion people, 9.6 billion by 2050, and by 2100, it is expected to exceed 10.9 billion [6]. This growth is resulting in even denser urban areas to turn many of them into more metropolitan cities. High-rises and skyscrapers allow people to inhabit vertical space, but with this ability, the lack of social interaction with neighbors and the community increase [3]. It has already gotten to the point of not knowing who is on the other side of the wall. We lose the personality of individual homes as the hallways and exterior doors resemble a typical hotel and the floor plans are repetitive.

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Community spaces are defined as amenities. The infrastructure of the building is no different than the neighboring one. The character of the building is defined by the architect who is influenced by the developer/client. The individual occupants fill the space as programmed with very little personality.


PROGRAMMATIC ADAPTATION

the ability to identify the community’s needs and adapt to future changes.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

EXPLANATION Can the infrastructure of a building be redesigned/reconfigured to promote social interaction and fill the needs of the tenants that occupy the space, instead of the presumed desires that architects and developers program it for? We live in a society where we like to interpret what others’ desires and needs are. Architects design to fill the programmatic needs of the client. The client decides the program based on the economy and presumption of what the market needs are. Majority of the time, the community dictates what actually gets built, but what if the community can define their own needs to benefit the developer and architect? Not to take away the developers’ and architects’ design and ownership authorities, but to enhance them by designing to suit individual tenant needs. The tenants will have the ability to identify the community’s (building’s) needs and adapt to future changes. Initially, only the barebones of the building will be designed by the architect and as buyers/tenants purchase “lots,” and the building continues to change. Spaces are filled to the tenant needs and program is defined by the community.

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INTERACTION to create a closer community and to create more social and interactive neighbors through the redevelopment and organization of spatial disbursement.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

CRITICAL POSITION My position is to establish a new form of architectural typology that is not on a specific programmatic basis, but rather flexible in usage that is determined by the direct community as a whole. The theory behind this thesis is the potential to create a closer community and to create more social and interactive neighbors through the redevelopment and organization of spatial disbursement. First, I must examine the issues of dense urban living and how it may correlate to social dysfunction. Furthermore, how to make this theory become a more sustainable form of living and give back to the contextual environment. The end goal is to reinterpret a series of typologies and reorganize them to generate a better environment that will promote social interaction, become more economical to both the inhabitants and developer, sustainable through the utilization of current and new technologies, efficient through phased out planning, and the aesthetics are the characters of the community and tenants, not of what is presumed to be “appealing.�

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INTRODUCTION: THESIS STATEMENT

THESIStatement 14

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

This thesis aims to explore the reorganization and reinterpretation of programmatic studies through the restructuring of a building’s infrastructure to advocate more social interaction and community involvement. 001

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RESEARCH METHODS: CASE STUDY

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

CASE STUDY 001

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RESEARCH METHODS: CASE STUDY

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

TORRE DAVID the architect Enrique Gómez location Caracas , Venezuela latitude 10° 30’ 17.72” N climate zone Tropical: Hot and Humid year completed 90% Completed but remains incomplete project size 620 ft tall (190m), 45 floors, 121.7m2 floor area project site size unknown project cost US$82 Million 001

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SELF-DEFINED SPACE creating their own spaces in an abandoned building to form a community.

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VERTICAL SLUMS

SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

RATIONALE Torre David is a prime study of a building’s original programmatic failure due to the economy and community needs. It may be a failed project to many but opened windows to unprecedented methodologies. BACKGROUND Projected to be the new financial center of Caracas’s downtown area, Torre David, hit by unexpected dilemmas ranging from financial stalls to the death of David Brillembourg (investor and owner) led to the project’s uncompleted status. Squatters soon took over the building in what became the first vertical slum. SUCCESS Destined at the time of construction to be the tallest building in Caracas. Though failed to be completed, it became a successful form of self-governed social housing. ISSUES Besides construction issues, Torre David was a stir in controversy because of the uncontrolled form of housing that opposed to standards of living and may be a concern in safety and well being. 001

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CIRCULATION central and exterior stairs only; elevator parts scavenged and sold during construction abandonment. 22

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

apartments shops

main water tank

textile workshops

water pumps apartment water tanks

recreations

level 28 - max pump level

religious administration

level 16 - main tank

city water main

main trash dump

WATER DISTRIBUTION water is distributed through a series of water pumps and rationed weekly, then stored in individual apartment water tanks.

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PROGRAM designed to be a luxury hotel and office building was adopted as a true mixed use program that filled the community’s needs. 23


RESEARCH METHODS: CASE STUDY

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

MOMA TOWER the architect Axis Mundi Design location New York, New York latitude 40° 45’ 41” N climate zone Continental: Warm Summers, Cold Winters year completed Conceptual project size 600 ft tall, 52 floors,17,000 ft2 floor area project site size 17,000 ft2 floor area project cost unknown 001

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IDENTITY

distinctive characteristic defined by the tenants to create sole identity.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

MODULAR CUSTOMIZATION RATIONALE Ths project has similar characteristics and goals to my research but depicted in a much simpler fashion and deals with modulation instead of entitled customization in whole. BACKGROUND The MOMA Tower incorporates the idea of modular customization by allowing the tenants to decide on the exterior material and the size of unit desired. It is the response to the synonymous identity the riddle New York. SUCCESS The tower succcessfully establishes a unique aesthetic and spatial development. It allows tenants a sense of character and uniqueness that lacks in typical residential building. ISSUES A unifying identity of the building is lost due to the variations in material, mass, and voids. Unpredictable formations of units can affect the context and the building’s preemptive measures. 001

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COMMON GROUNDS community spaces and unforseen outdoor terraces formulate a bond and connection in social interaction through common elements.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION 800 FT2

1200 FT2

1600 FT2

2000 FT2

UNIT OPTION various flexible modular units can be selected and expanded in size and even in vertical formation to fit the needs of the occupants.

SMART BLOCKS combined vertically and horizontally to create block formations; a hollow center to adapt to the core.

THE CORE smart blocks are wrapped around a fixed structural core.

THE BUILDING as occupancy fills, the building takes form.

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RESEARCH METHODS: CASE STUDY

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

HABITAT 67 the architect Moshe Safdie location Montreal, Canada latitude 45° 29’ 59” N climate zone Cold Temperate year completed 1967 project size 146 residential units @ 225-1000 ft2 project site size 238,000 ft2 project cost C$17 Million 001

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SUB-URBAN substituting the suburban habitat into an urban setting.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

SUBURBAN ALTERNATIVE RATIONALE Habitat 67 was designed as an alternative to suburban homes. It allowed each unit to have their own garden, terrace, and fresh air while maintaining individual privacy. BACKGROUND The conceptual design originated from Safdie’s thesis project. He chose to present the project at Expo 67 before it was commissioned. Known also as Lego architecture because of the stacking of modular units and because Safdie originally used Legos to develop his concept. SUCCESS The demand for units led to believe that this form of architecture was the future answer to dense urban living. ISSUES The cost per unit rose and the project no longer included affordable housing. The project was originally phased into different stages to allow more units, but the idea was abandoned due to cost. 001

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

FORMATION the use of prefabrication and modular design allowed the units to stack and connect with ease.

SPACE each unit has their own terrace or garden and commonwalls and floors/ceilings are shared, but privacy was still allotted. 001

CIRCULATION the elimination of a single central form of circulation made occupants take a series of stairs and walkways that made the community interact with each other. 35


RESEARCH METHODS: SITE ANALYSIS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

SITE ANALYSIS 001

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RESEARCH METHODS: SITE ANALYSIS

CONTEXTUAL RELATION SAN FRANCISCO

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION San Francisco is rich in history, economy, and ecology. One of the

older western cities to establish an urban establishment. The city is diverse in culture as many migrates inhabit the distinct areas of cultural manifestation. Museums fill the blocks to provide historical remembrance and artistic identity. An assortment of schools provide the local and foreign exchange students with knowledge. Though not as diverse in race as many bordering cities, the enriching culture generated a variety of restaurants that serve dishes that attract foodies everywhere. The city is old but the inhabitants are younger than the average city in California. Jobs are comfortably available and the average home value is double the state median. Surrounded by the bay and the Pacific Ocean, water is readily available with the addition of above average rainfall. The city’s infrastructure is well developed and offers the population many forms of transportation that connects with other cities around. San Francisco is well balanced with parks that line the ports and parks that fill the inner city.

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RESEARCH METHODS: SITE ANALYSIS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

TREASURE ISLAND GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE BAY BRIDGE SITE

GOLDEN GATE PARK

46.87 sq mi of land 825,111 city population

K

ET

ST

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

M

AR

SITE 0

I-8

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

LS

O

M

I-8 0

ST

BA Y

BR

ID

GE

ST

O

ER

AD

E AL BE

RC

BA

EM

RINCON PARK

FO

81,000 SF LOT RC-4 HIGH DENSITY

SOUTH BEACH

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RESEARCH METHODS: SITE ANALYSIS $355,600 73 rainy days

SF

24�

$ avg income 57,287

$719,800

$

avg annual rainfall

SD

10�

41 rainy days

SF CA

69,894

avg income

45.6 YEARS ca median age

MALE

51% 49% FEMALE

38.5 YEARS

median resident age

The growth and economic strength of San Francisco (SF) has made it a home for people with above average means of income. The average home in SF cost over two times the amount of the CA average and those who reside in SF are younger as well. Rainfall in SF is 140% greater than San Diego, therefore sustainable approaches to capture moisture and rainfall is favored. 42

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

15.4%

41.6%

HISPANIC

WHITE

BLACK

5.6%

The history of San Francisco led to it’s current diversity in race and culture. The migration of Asians during the railroad construction, as well as the Hispanics when the goldrush hit. Though still predominately white.

33.2%

OTHER

4.2%

SE

] D .0% E [ 5 OW D I W

ASIAN

] [ 8.0% ED C R O DIV

PA R [ 1 ATE .7% D ]

SINGLE [ 46.1% ]

Like most urban areas, the inhabitants consist mostly of single and younger people. But because San Francisco is relatively small, the urban core is surround with houses that allow families to grow while staying close to the city. 001

MARRIED [ 39.2% ]

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RESEARCH METHODS: SITE ANALYSIS

SITE

15 nearby restaurants art galleries schools att park nearby parking

The culturally diverse financial district allots to a variety of interests. Restaurants lines the streets and art museums are all within walking distance to each other. 44

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

FERRY TERMINAL

BART - TROLLEY

GREYHOUND

MUNI - BUS

bay transportation great for tours

fast transportation multiple city connections

huge network connection affordable long distance

inner city connection numerous bus stops and connections

FERRY TERMINAL sacramen

to st

o st

sacrament

sp ea rs t

n

ai st

m

e

al

st

be

ain

pine st

st t

on

ts

on

m

st

bush st

m

fre

bush st

fre

ale

be

pine st

HARBOR

m

HARBOR

t

BART

rs

st

ea

sp

california

st california

ts t

TRANSBAY TERMINAL

m

ar

ke t

SITE

TRANSPORTATION

GREEN SPACES 001

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the embarcadero

n na an

br

ya

nt

st

st

i-8

0

rri ha

br

br

an

na n

st

st nt ya br

the embarcadero

0 i-8

ha r

ris

so

on

n

st

st

fo

fo ls

ls o

om

m

st

st

ho

w

ho

w

ar d

ar d

st

st

m

is

m

is

sio

n

si

st

on

st

m

sutter st

st

GREYHOUND SITE

BART

ar

ke ts

t

sutter st


waterfront

NORTH BEACH treasure islan

union square golden gate bridge

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

BAY BR

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002 SOUTH SF att park


WATERBAR

THE EMBARCADERO

GOOGLE SF

SPEAR ST

INFINITY TOWERS

MAIN ST

SITE

BEALE ST

KOSHLAND PHARM

FREMONT ST

PG&E

SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

ADJACENCIES site height restriction: 400 FT 400’ - 0” 300’ - 0” 200’ - 0” 100’ - 0”

HEIGHT LIMIT

CONTEXTUAL MATERIALS

K

L

47 RETE

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RESEARCH METHODS: PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

PROGRAMMATIC

ANALYSIS 001

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INTERACTIVE CIRCULATION No matter where we live, we have a routine to our daily circulation. Familiarity in travel has been so embedded into our routine that it is second nature. The bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, garage, down a familiar street, and to work; or vice-versa. Is the same as going from your unit to the elevator, down to the parking garage to work. The path we travel is a path we defined through habit. Sometimes, it is a good thing, sometimes it is not. What if we can break this habitual process and interact with more than the norm. The question remains: what are the benefits of interacting with different environments? The point is that we feel safe and comfortable with normal conditions. The human nature wants to interact and experience new occurrences, but we are living in a society where we are afraid of new forms of social interaction. 50

[ ] 002

PUBLIC REALM

[ ]

NETWORKING COMMUNITY

RESEARCH METHODS: PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

L 08

L 09

L 10

L 11

FLEXIBILITY: SPACE

FLEXIBILITY: VOLUME

SINGLE

COUPLE

MARRIED

FAMILY

FLEXIBILITY: TIME 001

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RESEARCH METHODS: PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS

THE

UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY

STUDENTS

smaller spaces, a ffordability, and active.

COUPLES

onsite activities, e xpandable spaces, and social events.

SMALL FAMILIES

expandable spaces, safe environment,security, and close amenities.

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS live/work units, busy lifestyle, and desires close social activities.

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION playground gym + recreation

SHAREDSPACES

places of social interaction and community growth

library vertical garden shops restaurant

COMMUNITYSPACES

bike share

activities that invoke community interaction

grocery

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RESEARCH METHODS: CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

CONCEPTUAL

ANALYSIS 001

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RESEARCH METHODS: CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

SYSTEMATIC APPROACH Organization through controlled characteristics. 56

DISARRAY IN THOUGHT What is feared and ungoverned, leads to infinite reality. 002


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

Collusion of distinctive entities on similar path. A path to evolutionalize interaction. 001

1 2 3 4 5 PROGRAMMATIC MANIFESTATION (1) Controlled (2) Infested (3) Planar (4) Splice (5) Subtraction The unconstrained analogy of programmatic representation through self defined needs. 57


RESEARCH METHODS: CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

RESILIENCE The flexibility of space and freedom in volume through expansion in time. The concept of designing in the fourth dimension: time. The occupational life stages define the community growth. The growth in the community exhibits the growth of the architecture. 58

PERPETUAL NATURE The ideology of programming buildings in hope it fills to the pretentious needs versus the natural path of programmatic integration by community defined needs. Naturally, a community desires an embracing growth through connection and entitlement. The restriction of privacy and security limits limits this connection and distinction. 002


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

SPATIAL VOIDS What is viewed as a flaw and unwanted can in fact becomevoids of optimistic opportunity for community spaces. 001

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CONCEPTUAL COLLAGE A building that adapts and changes through time. Program defined by the users and for the users. Customization of space and texture reflects 002 within. the community


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

+01

+05

+15

+20

_05 occupancy

_01 infrastructure

_20 natural growth

_15

DESIGNING IN THE 4TH DIMENSION Relation of human life stages to building life cycle and growth. 001

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DESIGN PROPOSAL

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

DESIGN

PROPOSAL 001

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

PROSPERITY IN SELF. The unaware coldness of solidity through mass formation has dwelled the urban environment as society favors security and unwillingness to change. Accented with a wall that not only changes the aesthetics of the undeniable substantial structure, but consorts a contradicting visual and emotion feeling. The softness brings life and changes the ambiance of the environment we occupy. 001

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

MATURITY IN HABITAT. An expected growth in human is not defined by the size but the change in character and intelligence. As we grow, our self definition becomes more delineated. We develop a uniqueness in personality and the environment we reside in grows to be our own. The spaces we occupy are designed to be uniformed for mass production in response to industrialization; nevertheless, we strive for customization. Growth in occupancy should and will lead to a sprouting structure. 001

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DESIGN PROPOSAL: PROCESS

SPATIAL FLEXIBILITY Spatial expansion determined by influences within the structural means. 68

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

PROGRAMMATIC CIRCULATION Using the program to create a more interactive circulation for the community. 001

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DESIGN PROPOSAL: PROCESS

COMMUNITY CHARACTERISTICS We lose the personality of individual homes as the hallways and exterior doors resemble a typical hotel and the floor plans are repetitive. Community spaces are defined as amenities. The infrastructure of the building is no different than the neighboring one. The character of the building is defined by the architect who is influenced by the developer/client. The individual occupants fill the space as programmed with very little personality. 70

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION NIT

E ON

YU OR

ST

TS

RY

O

TW

O ST

F LO

UNITS Units are precisely stacked to allow each unit to have a generous amount of outdoor square footage.

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EXPANSION Units can be expanded to accommodate a change in occupancy. the material used to expand is dependant on the occupants, therefore, will reflect their characteristics. 71


DESIGN PROPOSAL: PROCESS

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southwest

SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

R

Y

FITNESS CENTER

FURNITURE STORE

PROGRAMMATIC CONNECTION Separation of programs on various levels allow the residents to experience floors other than their own and flow from one building to the next through a programmatic bridge. 001

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DESIGN PROPOSAL: PROCESS

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

vertical garden

vertical garden to north tower connection

grocery store

underground parking entrance

live+work lofts commercial storefront

SPATIAL PLANNING 001

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DESIGN PROPOSAL: EVALUATION

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

JURY CRITIC The overall process and building has potential, but need to examine interior spaces and units more closely. Study how spatial expansion can be achieved within the units to create uniqueness in the interior as well as the exterior. SELF EVAULATION Indulging what the juries have said, I refocused my future process to evaluate each unit in more depth. Attempting to creating expansion within through a simple structural addition that allows residences to continue to grow and stay in the same unit. 001

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CONCLUSION

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

DESIGN

CONCLUSION 001

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CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

SITE MAP. MATERIALITY The selective site material enhances the direct proximity while still respecting the contextual materials that surrounds the building. CIRCULATION Cross circulation through the site with an introverted plaza space provides a secure pedestrian pathway that is highly desired in San Francisco. 001

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CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION DOWN

DOWN

ADJACENT UNIT

ADJACENT UNIT PRIVATE TERRACE

unit statistics: 1 bedroom 2 bathroom

terrace level (private terrace)

unit statistics: 3 bedroom 2 bathroom

terrace level (one bedroom)

UP

UP OPEN TO BELOW

DOWN

DOWN

OPEN TO BELOW

unit statistics: 1 bedroom 2 bathroom

mezzanine (bedroom)

unit statistics: 3 bedroom 2 bathroom

mezzanine (two bedrooms) UP

UP

unit statistics: 1 bedroom 2 bathroom

unit statistics: 3 bedroom 2 bathroom

UNITS AS IS 001

UNITS MODIFIED 83


CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

unit as is

mezzanine extension

room addition

top addition

unit statistics: 1 bedroom 2 bathroom

MODIFICATION PROCESS

3

2

1

1 column and beam

PRE-FAB STRUCTURAL ADDITION 001

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CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION 1

2

5

3

N

4

9

7 8

6

20’

40’

80’

ROOF LEVEL 1 City Tower Mechanical Room 2 Restroom 3 Room Access Core 4 Restroom 5 BBQ Area 6 Lodge Area I 7 Pool 8 Lodge Area II 9 Garden Tower Mechanical

1 2 5

N

20’

40’

80’

FITNESS CENTER LEVEL 1 Single Floor Units 2 Loft Units Terrace Level 3 Loft Units 4 Fitness Center 5 Vertical Farm

3 4

3

1

4

3 4 2

N

20’

40’

5

80’

PLAYGROUND LEVEL 1 Loft Units 2 Single Floor Units 3 Playground 4 Vertical Farm

2

1

1

1

N

6

7

2 N

20’

40’

001

4

80’

RECREATIONAL LEVEL 1 Recreational Center 2 Loft Units

3

40’

80’

8 N

2

20’

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL LEVEL 1 Loft Units 2 Single Floor Units 3 Shared Exterior Terrace 4 Private Exterior Terrace 5 Vertical Farm

5

20’

40’

80’

GROUND LEVEL 1 Commercial Space 2 City Tower Lobby 3 Restaurant 4 Live/Work Units w/ Storefront 5 Grocery Store 6 Plaza 7 Garden Tower Lobby 8 Bike/Scooter Rental Center

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88 RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE

002 ROOF TOP


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION 350’ - 0” avg expansion + 400 sf

325’ - 0”

300’ - 0”

275’ - 0”

250’ - 0”

225’ - 0”

integrated pv panels

200’ - 0”

aerogarden planters

175’ - 0”

150’ - 0”

aerogarden system 125’ - 0” ~ 300 sf of farmable space per tenant

100’ - 0”

75’ - 0”

50’ - 0”

25’ - 0”

SECTION 001

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90 PROMENADE

002 BRIDGE DECK


SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

closed panels [ ]

opened panels [ ] playground vertical farm recreational center

commercial space

[ two story lofts ]

offset window openings

INTERACTIVE FACADE 001

CONNECTION 91


CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION greens planter

light source height adjustable mesh cloth

root space mister

water storage tank

AEROGARDEN SECTION The AeroGarden allows residences to grow their own vegetation while utilizing a sustainable technology. The planter boxes can be moved vertically to allow taller plants to grow. Mister feeds nutrients directly to the roots of the vegetation to allow the plants to grow soil-less and minimizing the use of water. 001

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CONCLUSION: FINAL DESIGN

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION // restaurant

// youth

real local food

// newcomer

growing strong

// family

sustainable budget

healthy living

// countryman self-sustainable

// students

agricultural education

// health

appreciation of organics

// hobbyist

artist in agriculture

// natural farmhand an agriculture expert

SOCIAL CURRENCY Vertical living limits our capability to grow our own vegetables and fruits with the lack of a ‘backyard.’ The programmatic integration of a vertical farm allows the community to grow their own food in a sustainable and controlled environment. The community can exchange their products and educate each other through interaction. 001

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CONCLUSION: FINAL STATEMENT

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

FINAL STATEMENT Starting this thesis, my goal was to create a new form of living not through theory, but through practicality and lifestyle. Rather than a change in architectural form, the transformation happens from within the spatial means. Initially, I wanted to reform and reorganized the program increase social interaction, but simply dispensing and introducing new program, it was accomplished. In hopes that this form of living influences future real projects to adopt similar approaches to create an alternative to suburban living while still applying the same characteristics. 001

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REFERENCES

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

CREDITS&

CITATIONS 001


REFERENCES: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

[1] Baan, Iwan. Torre David: informal vertical communities. Zürich: Lars Müller, 2013. Print. The history of Torre David greatly influenced this thesis’s goals and approach to programmatic analysis. How the inhabitants adapted to unknown spaces to make it their own and how they used found material to create finishes. [2] Koolhaas, R. (1994). Delirious New York: A retroactive manifesto for Manhattan. New York: Monacelli Press. Delirious New York was an assigned book back in first year and would never have thought it would reflect this thesis, but it in fact did. The similarity of buildings is not just a statement but a personal experience of mine. 100

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SUBJECT: TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION

[3] Losantos, A., & Canフナzares, A. C. (2007). Highrises: Social living. Barcelona: Loft Publications. The comparison of many highrises and the social effects have more negatives than positives. Privacy is highly desired and as a result, residents in highrises shield themselves from others. Therefore, lowering social interactivity. [4] Maas, W., MVRDV (Rotterdam), & The Why Factory (2012). The vertical village: Individual, informal, intense. Rotterdam: NAi Publishers. The historical study of vertical living before highrises are significant. Before urban highrises as we know it, there were slums that built homes on top of each other as space was limited, in turn, vertical villages was formed. [5] San Francisco, California City Data. (n.d.). Retrieved December 5, 2013, from http://www. city-data.com/city/San-Francisco-California.html [6] UN Press Release. World Population Trend. 2013. 001

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PAGESUBJECT: 10. http://www.urbanrealm.com/blogs/media/blogs/pauls/JAN10/HU/slum.jpg TEXT INFORMATION SUMMARIZATION PAGE 12. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Markham-suburbs_aerial-edit2.jpg PAGE 18. http://www.detail-online.com/uploads/pics/14_03.jpg PAGE 20. http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2012/08/dezeen_Torre-David_Gran-Horizonte_1.jpg PAGE 22. http://blogs.gsd.harvard.edu/loeb-fellows/files/2012/09/Baan-Torre-David-2.jpg PAGE 24. http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/11/momatower_midlevel.jpeg.650x0_q85_ crop-smart.jpg PAGE 26. http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/11/momatower_main.jpeg.650x0_q85_ crop-smart.jpg PAGE 28. http://www.webecoist.momtastic.com/assets/uploads/2009/09/axis-mundi-moma-tower.jpg PAGE 30. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_LAJXBh3IYU8/TNA2UMsk0UI/AAAAAAAAAxQ/cboSzOVqOSE/ s1600/Habitat67_1.jpg PAGE 32. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9f/Montreal_-_QC_-_Habitat67.jpg PAGE 34. http://www.msafdie.com/file/1699.jpg PAGE 40. http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/11/25/33/2447048/5/628x471.jpg 001

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AR503 Thesis Booklet  
AR503 Thesis Booklet  
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