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THE ULOLWE SOUTH AFRICA – SUID-AFRIKA A monthly railway research / historical publication ‘n Maandelikse spoorweg historiese en navorsing publikasie Vol 2 No 6A Police & Railways Un-official / Nie Amptelik A tribute to the former South African Railway Police ’n Huldeblyk aan die Suid-Afrikaanse Spoorweg Polisie

Brig Ronnie Beyl laying a wreath for the old SAR Police Patron - Les Pivnic- Beskermheer Hennie Heymans, Pretoria, South Africa heymanshb@gmail.com May 2011

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Contents / Inhoud Contents / Inhoud ......................................................................................................................................... 2 Front Page ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 Welcome to this special provisional edition ................................................................................................. 5 Editorial ......................................................................................................................................................... 5 Geneaology ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Tribute ........................................................................................................................................................... 6 SAR Police colours ......................................................................................................................................... 6 The First Railway Police................................................................................................................................. 6 The Railways Police of Natal ......................................................................................................................... 7 History of the Natal Railway Police – Supt DJ Sherrell, Railway Police ......................................................... 7 1909 Railway Strike in Natal ....................................................................................................................... 17 The Water Police - Natal Police and SA Police – Hennie Heymans ............................................................. 18 The Railway Police of the Imperial Military Railways – The IMR Police ..................................................... 25 The Inter-Colonial Period ............................................................................................................................ 26 1910-11 Railway Police Johannesburg ....................................................................................................... 32 1911 Railway Police, Pretoria ..................................................................................................................... 33 1918 Railway Police – Touws River ............................................................................................................. 34 1924 Cape Town: Table Bay Docks ............................................................................................................. 35 1927 The Train Wreckers – Sub-Insp JA Stubbs of the Railway Police ....................................................... 35 1933 Chief Inspector O Steen – Controller of the SAR & H Police .............................................................. 38 1934 South African Railway Police is Formed ............................................................................................ 38 1938 Lt Col AA Stanford .............................................................................................................................. 41 1940 Const C Collen – an Early SAR Police writer ....................................................................................... 42 2


1940 - The SAR Policeman .......................................................................................................................... 43 1942 SAR Police Band Durban .................................................................................................................... 44 1944 Col HJT Venter .................................................................................................................................... 45 1946 Brig JB Bester ..................................................................................................................................... 45 1947 Royal Visit – SAR Police ...................................................................................................................... 47 SAR Police Badge c1955 .............................................................................................................................. 48 The “Water Police” in Durban Harbour ...................................................................................................... 48 1957 Social Events ...................................................................................................................................... 48 1959 Brig CJG Baartman – Chief Superintendent SAR Police ..................................................................... 50 1973 First Ladies in the SAR Police ............................................................................................................. 51 A more modern version of the Water Police .............................................................................................. 52 Water Police ................................................................................................................................................ 54 Some Railway Police heraldry ..................................................................................................................... 55 1974 new commissioner – Gen JJJ van Vuuren .......................................................................................... 55 1934 - 1984 ................................................................................................................................................. 56 1984 Message – Gen HJ Visagie .................................................................................................................. 56 1986 – Unification with the SA Police ......................................................................................................... 58 1st of October 1986 ............................................................................................................................. 62 National Transport Police ............................................................................................................... 62 National Transport Plan .................................................................................................................. 62 SAR Police Dogs ................................................................................................................................... 63 Oubaas se honne! ............................................................................................................................... 65 A History of the South African Railways Police – Brig R Beyl ...................................................................... 65 Capt Thys du Plessis – SAP New Canada ..................................................................................................... 67 Die Vervoer van Specie – Ronnie Beyl (oud- SASP)..................................................................................... 71 3


Photographs of Specie Coaches & SAR Police – Hennie Heymans ............................................................. 72 The Story of the Missing Confidential Bag – Col HF Trew........................................................................... 74 Onwettige Deportasie van Vakbondleiers – Hennie Heymans ................................................................. 76 Spesiale Trein .......................................................................................................................................... 78 Some SAR Police uniforms and badges ....................................................................................................... 87 Blue & Khaki – Lt-Col Richard S Godley OBE, KPM...................................................................................... 88 Captain Nesbit VC, Mashonaland Mounted Police ............................................................................. 90 Salisbury Rifles .................................................................................................................................... 90 British South Africa Police (B.S.A.P.) ................................................................................................... 90 “Advance Rhodesia”............................................................................................................................ 90 Anglo-Boer War................................................................................................................................... 91 Service aboard an Armoured Train ............................................................................................................. 91 Service in the South African Constabulary (S.A.C.) ............................................................................. 92 Blockhouse Duties ............................................................................................................................... 92 (Blockhouse) Murder most Foul ......................................................................................................... 93 Recruits for Heidelberg ....................................................................................................................... 93 Watermelon-thief ............................................................................................................................... 94 Royals and the Railways - 1910 ........................................................................................................... 95 1913 Miner’s Strike ............................................................................................................................. 95 World War 1 ........................................................................................................................................ 95 The role of the SAR in support of the (new) SA Police in Natal .......................................................... 95 German Internees ............................................................................................................................... 96 The General Strike 1919 and the Red Revolt 1920 ............................................................................. 96 1925 - Visit of HRH the Prince of Wales .............................................................................................. 96 1930 Royal Visit ................................................................................................................................... 97 4


Suburban Trains and the SA Railways Police .............................................................................................. 97 Missing photographs............................................................................................................................... 98 APC’s used by SAR Police ............................................................................................................................ 98 Trains and the new South African Police Service – Lourens Sturgeon ..................................................... 100 APC used by Metro Rail – Petrus Botha .................................................................................................... 101 The SA National Defence Force on Rail – Hennie Heymans ..................................................................... 101 The Railway Police of the South African Police Service ............................................................................ 102 SAR Fire brigade on Rails – Petrus Botha........................................................................................... 103 Provisional Index ....................................................................................................................................... 104 Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................. 109 Copyright ................................................................................................................................................... 109

Front Page Recently at a wreath laying ceremony Brigadier Ronnie Beyl [ SA Police (Ret) and a former member of the defunct SA Railways Police] laid a wreath on behalf of members of the SAR Police who died on the border. Few people know that the SAR Police also served on the border at the request of the SA Defence Force. They were primarily used to protect convoys in the operational area. This is a job well done!

Welcome to this special provisional edition This is a provisional edition which is devoted to Police & Railways in Southern Africa and the defunct South African Railways Police. What I mean is; this edition will later be withdrawn. It will be improved upon as I receive further information on this subject from our readers. So it is not cast in concrete!

Editorial This special edition is solely there to serve as future building blocks for the history of the South African Railways & Harbours Police. This will be an edition where English and Afrikaans will be 5


used. I do not have time to translate all the Afrikaans portions. Therefore please excuse the failure on my part for not translating the Afrikaans parts. This is due to an excessive workload which I placed on myself! The translation is a task that I am leaving to those who will follow in our footsteps.

Geneaology For genealogical purposes all people and policemen are indexed. The completed edition will be to their lasting memory.

Tribute I would also like to pay tribute to Mr Less Pivnic our Patron. For many years Les was involved with the SAR as a custodian of the SAR’s heritage and museums. Incidentally he helped the SAR Police with their Gedenkalbum 1934 – 1984 / Memorial Album 1934 – 1984 and he received a commendation from the SAR Police for his involvement.

SAR Police colours The colours of the SAR Police were Back and Old Gold

The First Railway Police

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The Railways Police of Natal

History of the Natal Railway Police – Supt DJ Sherrell, Railway Police ALTHOUGH Act 1 of 1894 amalgamated the Railway Police with the other branches of the Natal Police, it still remained under the control of the Railway Department, in the person of Mr. A. E. Hammond, head of the Police and Labour Department. The staff then consisted of 7


two European Police, stationed at Durban and Pietermaritzburg respectively; one Indian Sergeant; and about thirty Indian and Native Police, but only the latter were stationed at Ladysmith and Charlestown. The first action taken towards policing the Railway from the Natal Police was on the 22nd May, 1895, when Maddon was granted fourteen days' leave, and Trooper Mackay was sent down to relieve him. The only document handed over was the Report Book; the clerical work was done at either of the Indian clerks' desks, whichever happened to be unoccupied at the time. Some mention was made of the existence of a Police Office somewhere near the Gaol, and, after a careful search, it was found in a corner of the Railway Yard, adjoining the Indian Barracks, on the ground now occupied by the Power Station. The furniture consisted of a press, table, chair, one large box of broken handcuffs and badges, and a drawer full of old correspondence (and cockroaches). The size of this building was about 8ft. by 8ft., and later on it was moved nearer to the platform, and visited on more than one occasion by the then Chief Commissioner of Police, whose opinion of the structure is not on record. The leave abovementioned closed Maddon's career on the Railway, as he did not return to duty there. In consequence of this, Trooper Mackay's 14 days' temporary duty was extended to 13 weeks, in spite of all his efforts to get back to Headquarters, for, when the novelty of the change had worn off, the strain of tramping the Durban Yards day after day in "Mounted" uniform was anything but pleasant, the most exciting incidents being the arrest of a gang of 255 Indians on one occasion, the conducting of the Moharrum Festival, and the arrest of another gang of 77 Indians, later. On August 15th Sergeant (now Inspector) Bousfield arrived from Headquarters for permanent duty on the Railway Police, and took over from Trooper Mackay, who returned to Headquarters, with the intention of taking his discharge, for which he had applied as a last resource in his efforts to get away from Durban; but after an interview with the Chief Commissioner of Police, he consented to transfer to the Railway Police, on the understanding that he would be allowed to marry. About the middle of August, Lloyd was promoted to the rank of Lance-Sergeant, which rank he held until he retired from the Force on 12th December, 1900. On 25th August Trooper Mackay reported to Sergeant Bousfield for permanent duty on the Railway Police. At this time the line was only open to Standerton, and the arrival of the mail train was regulated by the running of the coach from Johannesburg, which, in its turn, was regulated by the weather, etc., so that the hours of duty were often lengthened thereby. On 21st December Trooper Lightening was transferred to the Railway Police, and the duties were reduced to night and day shifts of 12 hours each. 8


The year 1896 opened with a rush of refugees from Johannesburg, and this, coupled with the accident at Glencoe, brought crowds to the Railway Station, and the aid of the Borough Police1 was invoked to deal with them. The late Superintendent Alexander willingly gave us all the assistance he could. On 21st January, the Railway Police had to attend the arrival and embarkation of Dr. Jameson2 and his Officers. This was arranged very quietly in the early morning, and the embarkation was completed before Durban knew of their arrival. Far more trouble was experienced on the 24th January when the men were embarked, as the arrival of the trains was delayed, and, owing to all the Prisoners of War being in mufti, great care had to be taken to prevent them mixing with the crowd which had collected at the Point. Several exmembers of the N.P.3 were amongst the prisoners. On 7th February Sergeant Bousfield and Trooper Mackay met the wounded men and conveyed them to Addington Hospital. One of these was ex-Sergeant Fyvie, N.P., mentioned under "Correspondence" in No. 13 Issue of the "Nongqai," who was severely wounded in the foot. On 1st July Sergeant Bousfield fell ill, and Mackay took over charge. Up to this time Mr. Hammond had retained the control of the Police Department; but on the 9th July Sergeant Bousfield was promoted to the rank of Superintendent, and the final break was made when he resumed duty on July 25th. On 21st September Sergeant Sherrell reported for duty, and shortly afterwards Trooper Whitehead (now License: Inspector, City) and Trooper Clark reported, and the eight! hours’! system was inaugurated, which was a great relief, as, owing to the arrangements at the Court, the man on night duty often had to hang about the Court all day waiting for his case to come on, and the strain was beginning to, tell. Arrangements were then made to open an Outpost at Ladysmith, and Mackay was detailed for that duty, but the exigencies of the service required a change of men at Pietermaritzburg, and Mackay was sent to take over from Lance-Sergeant Lloyd, who proceeded to Ladysmith, and took charge of No. 3 Section in January, 1897. The traffic at Pietermaritzburg at this time was in a state of chaos, and it took nearly two years' struggling and battling with ‘ricksha’ owners and cab drivers to get it into proper working order. On 15th February Sergeant Hunt (late Sub- Inspector) transferred to the Railway Police, and on March 20th was posted for duty at Pietermaritzburg. The strength of the detachment gradually increased, and in August Trooper Whitehead was sent to open, and take charge, of No. 4 Section at Newcastle. The work now being thrown on the Police Department became very heavy, and although the eight hours' system was in

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Durban Borough Police – this later became the Durban City Police, one of our oldest and finest Police Forces in Southern Africa. They were fully fledged policemen in terms of the Criminal Procedure Act – Hennie Heymans. 2 Dr LS Jameson 3 Natal Police

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vogue in Durban, the other Sections had to manage as best they could, and in consequence the duty was very long. On 31st December Sergeant Hunt transferred to the C.I. Department. On 1st January, 1898, Mackay took over charge of No. 2 Section. In July Troopers Whitehead and Mack ay were both promoted to the rank of Lance-Sergeant. In April, 1899, the twelve hours' shift was started in Section 2 on the arrival of Trooper Hawkins. The Railway had been during these years gradually extending, and detachments of Native Police had been stationed on the North, and South Coast Lines, on the Richmond and Greytown Branches, and also at Dundee. In September, owing to the friction in the Transvaal, Troops were steadily moved up-line, and the Refugees began to come down in large numbers; squads of temporary duty men were obtained from Headquarters to assist in keeping the platform clear. Numbers of railway employees were also told off for duty as bridge guards on the line. The outbreak of war in October drove Sergeant Whitehead and his Native Police to Dundee, and here he, being left behind when the Troops evacuated that town, was captured by the Boers and sent to Pretoria. Later on, he, with other non-combatants, were brought back to Ladysmith, where he did duty under Mr. Bennett, R.M4., at Indomba Spruit. Prior to his arrest, Sergeant Whitehead, seeing the impossibility of escape, had secreted his revolver in the roof of a house from where he removed it on his release. All his Native Police escaped except one Zulu, who refused to leave without his Orders, and was captured, but escaped on the day of the Pomeroy fight, and made for his kraal at Nkandhla, buried his uniform, and worked round to Pietermaritzburg, via Greytown. The tide of war rolled around and beyond Ladysmith, and Sergeant Mackay and Trooper Abrams narrowly escaped being shut in, escort duty taking them there the evening before the siege closed it up. The closing of Ladysmith, and the shutting in of Hodgson, who had charge of No. 3 Section, threw all the work between Botha's Hill and the railhead on to No. 2 Section. Owing to the number of petty complaints at Estcourt, Jackson was posted there for a time, and he, too, was cut off when the enemy moved down to Highlands, but the arrival of troops soon caused them to retire beyond the Tugela. Estcourt was thus relieved, and Jackson returned to Pietermaritzburg. The arrival of Trooper Mackenzie from Headquarters for the Railway Police, re-established the eight-hour shift in No. 2 Section.

4

Resident Magistrate

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Several of the Railway Police were besieged at Ladysmith, and when the siege was raised, Mackenzie was sent to relieve Hodgson, and he and Sergeant Whitehead came to Pietermaritzburg to recuperate. Trooper Jackson was transferred to the Mounted Branch, and attached to General's Bodyguard. In April Trooper Pinto-Leite (now Sub-Inspector) transferred to the Railway Police, but, not liking the work, returned to the Mounted Branch at the end of May. Mackenzie, who had been hankering to get to the Front, returned from Ladysmith as soon as his time had expired, and, taking his discharge, joined Thorneycroft's Light Horse, proceeded to Johannesburg, and died from enteric fever a few days after his arrival. In December, 1900, Lord Roberts visited Natal, the Railway Police supplying the Train Escort. As was perhaps natural at such a time, and in the condition of the country, a large quantity of goods failed to reach the proper consignees, in consequence of which Abrams and Lyne were told off to reside with a certain person who was suspected of interrupting the carriage of goods, in conjunction with a number of railway officials. Although the identity of the Police was disclosed by a Night Clerk, before the case was ripe, this ruse led to the arrest of five Europeans and the recovery of about ten tons of stolen goods. Another case led to the arrest of five Europeans, and the recovery of a likewise large quantity of stolen property, thus making in all ten Europeans arrested, eight of whom were railway employees. This, for a time, practically put a stop to thefts of goods in transit. A number of those implicated escaped punishment, and some are still in railway employ. In August, 1901, their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of York (our present King and Queen) visited Natal, the Railway Police patrolling the whole line continually, while Superintendent Bousfield and Sergeants Sherrell and Wevell acted as escort on the train. In October of the same year the High Commissioner, Lord Milner, visited this Colony, Sergeant Mackay acting as Train Escort until reaching Charlestown on the return journey, eight continuous days' duty in all. At the beginning of October 1902, a Durban gang of desperadoes approached a Guard named X————, with a view to robbing a train conveying specie. X———— informed the Authorities, and, with the assistance of the General Manager, Superintendent Bousfield arranged a "trap" with a safe containing "scrap iron." A suitable train was arranged for the despatch of the "safe," and the "gang" were duly advised by X————. A large case was placed in the rear of the van with observation holes, and Detective-Sergeant Lees-Smith, C.I.D., and Detective Wevell, R.P.5, concealed themselves therein. Three of the gang boarded the train at Durban, and travelled in the v a n under the charge of the informant, X————.

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RP = Railway Police of the Natal Police.

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During the journey the safe received special attention, the keyhole was plugged by dynamite, and a fuse prepared, whilst the Detectives within the case were silent onlookers. After leaving Pinetown Bridge the Guard was gagged, the safe moved to the door of the van, and, whilst the train was ascending an incline at slow speed, the safe was thrown out on to the embankment. The Detectives immediately jumped out of concealment, and ordered the robbers to "Hands up." Two jumped out of the van, followed by Sergeant Lees-Smith, while the third attempted to escape through the opposite window, and was captured by Detective Wevell. Sergeant Sherrell and Detective Kinsey, R.P., Detective Tuffs, C.I.D.6, and Detectives Percival and Jones, of the Borough Police7, had left Durban by a previous train, and remained in hiding at the spot where it was thought the safe would be thrown out. This anticipation had been arrived at, as the "gang" was previously "shadowed" by Detective Tuffs, C.I.D., hovering in the locality. The two robbers who escaped from the van were soon captured, and returned under escort to the train, which was brought to a standstill by Detective Wevell applying the vacuum brakes. On arrival at Pinetown all hands changed into a down train for Durban. Two accomplices were subsequently arrested, as one secured the dynamite and fuse, and the other financed the gang. All the accused were sentenced to five years' hard labour each by the late Justice Finnemore. Newcastle had now been re-opened, and Native Police placed at Howick Siding and Mooi River. In December, 1902, Hodgson was sent to open an out-station at Inchanga, and remained there until he took his discharge. In the same month escorts and guards were supplied for the Right Hon. J. Chamberlain's Special. At the beginning of 1903 Bubonic Plague was-discovered in Durban, and upon the Railway Police devolved the onerous duty of examining all suspects and passengers from the infected area. In March, 1904, Sergeants Sherrell and Mackay changed Sections, the latter going to Section 1, and the former to Section 2. In December Sergeant Mackay was appointed Messenger of the Court at Durban, Sergeant Janes taking over Section 1.

6 7

CID = Criminal Investigation Department of the Natal Police. DBP = Durban Borough Police.

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Considerable commotion was caused in Police circles on receipt of the news regarding the theft of N.G.R. Monthly Pay, amounting to £933, from a train at Leigh Station, in the Estcourt Division, on the 30th November 1904. A person dressed as a Sergeant of the N.P., approached the reserved compartment, armed with an "official" telegram conveying instructions that the escort was to return to Pietermaritzburg with the pay clerk under arrest. The escort being responsible for obedience, and not the order, alighted from the train with the pay clerk. The "Sergeant" took charge of the key and safe containing the cash, and continued with the train on its journey. On arrival at Estcourt Station it was found that the pseudo "Sergeant" had departed with all the cash. After the lapse of several days a railway free pass was picked up on the line near Leigh Station, and, on removing the bogus number, the pass was found to be the identical one issued to a man at Estcourt, and his arrest soon followed. His house was turned inside out for the missing cash, but without success. A sum of £718 odd was subsequently dug up in the, culprit’s fowl house by Detective Cuff, R.P., forming a valuable production in the case, which terminated on the 11th March, 1905, with a sentence of three years' hard labour. This was the first case tried by the present Judge President, Mr. Dove-Wilson, in this Colony. Between the years 1902 and 1905, thefts were again on the increase, and the arrest of a number of Indians and Natives at different Stations did not seem to have much effect. Every endeavour was now being made to locate the parties "operating" on trucks in transit, as each day brought forth fresh cases for investigation. On information received from Charlestown, Detective Craddock was sent to Section 4 to assist Sergeant Atkinson, and their investigations resulted in the arrest of six European railway employees on a charge of theft of goods. They were all convicted, and a large quantity of the goods, which they had stolen, was recovered, including silverware and two Punjab Frontier Medals for 1897-8. The convictions secured on the aforementioned had no deterrent effect on other gangs, as complaints from the Railway Department were as numerous as ever. During the latter part of 1905 another gang of twelve Europeans railway employees were arrested at Pietermaritzburg for theft, and a large quantity of goods, which had been stolen in transit, were found in their possession. Owing to the information supplied by our informant being about three years' old, the railway documents necessary to connect the accused with the trucks pilfered, were not obtainable, which was detrimental to the prosecution, and resulted in eleven of the accused being discharged, and one getting three years' hard labour. Some of those discharged by the Court were dealt with departmentally, and dismissed the Service. Detective Cuff and Mr. Saunderson (of the Claims Department) were both complimented by the presiding Judge at the trial, for the zealous manner in which they had worked up the case. About this time thefts were very prevalent at Richmond, and the complaints were placed in the hands of Detective Cuff, with the result that five station Indians were arrested and convicted. The Magistrate's w if e (Mrs. Gibson) was one of the 13


complainants, who made an excellent witness for the prosecution, and Detective Cuff was again specially mentioned by the Judge for his good (work). In consequence of Superintendent Bousfield's ill health, the head office was transferred to Pietermaritzburg in October 1905, Sergeant Wevell and Pearson accompanying him as clerks. Sub-Inspector Sherrell, as Assistant Superintendent, took charge at Durban, assisted by Sergeants Moule and Janes. As regards the Native Rebellion, the first intimation of unrest amongst themselves in Durban, was the holding of meetings amongst themselves on the Back Beach, and which were conducted by N.C. 8 Mjova, of this Department. He was promptly arrested, and investigations taken up by the Chief Magistrate. The most important event in 1906 was the theft of ÂŁ190 from the Durban Goods Office by the Chief Clerk, who absconded, and was subsequently traced by the Mounted Police at Charlestown, where he had attempted to commit suicide. He was brought to Durban, tried, and sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. Having uprooted so many gangs of thieves, and restricted complaints to a minimum, it was decided, in the latter part of 1906, to reduce the establishment by about one-half. Superintendent Bousfield was transferred to the Mounted Police, and many others had to go. Sub-Inspector Sherrell was l eft in charge as Superintendent. At this point it should be recorded to Superintendent Bousfield's credit that he was specially mentioned at the N.P. Officers' Conference in 1906, by the then Minister of Justice (the Hon. Thomas Watt), for the good work performed by his Department. During 1907 the time of the Railway Police was taken up a great deal in the investigation of three murder cases. In this year Sergeant Moule was transferred to the Court Messengers' Department, Durban, and Sergeant Janes was transferred to Headquarters. In 1909 two gangs of Native station burglars, seven in number, were arrested and sentenced to terms of imprisonment of -from two to six years and lashes. The total number of arrests affected by the Railway Police up to the 30th June, 1910, was 33,350, which shows that there is plenty to do for the small detachment of Police on the Natal Railway System. The duties performed include investigation of all offences committed within Railway limits, such as burglaries, thefts, assaults, and all serious crimes, in addition to the enforcing of the

8

NC = Native Constable.

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provisions of the Railway Law. All complaints, including missing luggage and goods, claims indicating thefts, and accidents (fatal or otherwise), are investigated. The escorting -and guarding of specie and revenue in transit are also duties performed by the R.P., assisted by men from Headquarters. The Native Police are employed on "Watch and Ward" duty, night and day, at the principal stations and goods sheds. The Indian Police supervise the Railway Barracks, where a large number of Indian railway employees are accommodated. When necessity has arisen, the greatest assistance has been rendered by the Mounted Police, C.I.D., Water Police, and the various Borough Police Forces. In conclusion, it should be recorded that, the embracing of all Police Departments, and worked under one head, has proved economical and satisfactory, and any departure from this principle, in the case of the Railway Police, would considerably weaken the co-operation with the existing Police Departments, a co-operation which is essential for efficiency in Police work. At present the most cordial relations exist between the R.P. and the Railway Department, and every endeavour is made to ensure the fullest co-operation.

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Although a cartoon – study the NP Railway Police uniform – note the rifle and spurs! NP badge is on the pugeree – left side of helmet. The spurs are worn because the Natal Police, formerly the Natal Mounted Police, was a mounted regiment. “Listen” to the language spoken by the Officer and the Constable!

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1909 Railway Strike in Natal

Ref: The Nongqai March 1911 – Names not in index, yet. Will have to look at Natal Police nominal role for initials and further personal particulars.The Natal Bridge Guards

Ref: 3 Hurst , Volunteer Regiments of Natal, p 117. Comdt JW Shores is unknown at this stage.

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The Water Police - Natal Police and SA Police – Hennie Heymans

If I remember correctly9 the old Durban Borough Police performed duty as Water Police before 1894. The Natal Mounted Police was formed during 1874 and during 1894 this progressive police force absorbed other Natal police agencies and became known as the Natal Police. They then took over the duties as Water Police. During the First World War there was a special Defence Unit that looked after the harbour. Later the SA Police took over the duties until 1935 when the SAR Police took over this

9

Find the source.

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function. Here are some pictures of the Durban Water Police before the SAR Police took over. As we all know the more things change, the more they stay the same – the SA Police once again took over this function and it is now performed by the SA Police Service. Durban – Point Water Police

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I have no idea whether this name is correct: HMS “Highflyer” – Note the Mangroves in the bay! 20


Natala Railway Police 1910: Spooner, HCC; Tyler, EFH; Kinsey, AS; Stuart, LA; Ramsay, WW; Stockdale, FR; Gregory, A; Craddock, JW; Hammond, CE, Webb, Sgt WJ, Mackay, Sgt FC, Sherrel, Sub-Insp; Wevell Sgt, Lechler, WIA, Cuff, JA, Walker, CE.

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I presume this is at Wests – just over the pier from Point.

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Left: Corporal Touzel, Head-Constable Walker, Sgt Larpent and Const Horace Lamb. Below: Funeral of Const Botha, bottom left is Sgt J Lynch

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Note the sailor like uniforms of the Water Police. I once spoke to an old Water Policeman of the SA Police and told me that they preferred whites to blue as the salt in sea water stained their blue-black uniforms with white salt marks! Note the policemen pulling the gun carriage of the funeral of Const Botha, they are also dressed as sailors. The firing party are dressed in normal NP Uniform.

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SuB-Insp J McCarthy – Later Capt in the UDF i/c of the Harbour.

The Railway Police of the Imperial Military Railways – The IMR Police

Above is the helmet plate of the Imperial Military Police (1900 – 1902) that operated in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. Does any body have a crest of the IMR? Could it be the crest on the left?

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The Inter-Colonial Period Paul Els sent the following interesting documents:

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1910-11 Railway Police Johannesburg

Kinning, PC; Jooste, PC; Smith, PC; Byers, PC; Rae, PC; Taylor, Sgt; Davis, Chief Inspector VE; and MacLachlan, Sgt. •

One black policeman has SAR on his cap while the other one sports CSAR on his cap.

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1911 Railway Police, Pretoria

Marchant, PC; Mosureik, Wm10, Reynolds, Wm, Taylor, PC; O’Brein, Wm; Richards, PC; Stubbs, Sgt; McMurtrie, PC, Koekemoer, Wm.

10

I presume “Wm” stands for “Watchmen” i.e. plainclothes policemen or detectives.

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1918 Railway Police – Touws River 1918: Tows River SA Police & SAR Police: Fourie, Const SA; Humby, Railway Constable, Beams, Lance Corp JL (SAP) and Urquhart, Railway Constable.

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1924 Cape Town: Table Bay Docks

SAP on left and SAR Police on right. SAP had a station in the Docks.

1927 The Train Wreckers – Sub-Insp JA Stubbs of the Railway Police

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1933 Chief Inspector O Steen – Controller of the SAR & H Police Chief Inspector O Steen succeeded by Lt-Col AA Cilliers, former Head of the CID of the Union of South Africa.

1934 South African Railway Police is Formed We read that the SAR Police is formed in 1934. I do not understand this – please refer to the article by Sub-Insp Stubbs dated 1927. 1937 S

1937 SAR Police – Training Depot - Johannesburg

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Note the new SAR Police launch – The Gemsbok.

1938 Lt Col AA Stanford

The Nongqai 1937 -11- 1105

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1940 Const C Collen – an Early SAR Police writer

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1940 - The SAR Policeman

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1942 SAR Police Band Durban

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1944 Col HJT Venter

1946 Brig JB Bester

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The Nongqai November 1946-1362

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1947 Royal Visit – SAR Police

Royal Train at Harrismith

Nelspruit

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SAR Police Badge c1955

The “Water Police� in Durban Harbour

Constable Adam Hurter in Durban harbour sent in by Gerhard van Eeden.

1957 Social Events 48


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1959 Brig CJG Baartman – Chief Superintendent SAR Police

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1973 First Ladies in the SAR Police

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Det/Sgt Robberts of the SAR Police lived in our street when I was a little boy!

A more modern version of the Water Police 52


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Water Police The History of the Water Police goes back to the founding of Port Natal – D’Urban to be precise. The Water Police was first part of the Durban Borough Police. It was taken over by the Natal Police 1894 and it was quite an elite unit. When the South African Police was established during 1913 the Policing in Natal had a curious arrangement: The Durban Borough Police had their jurisdiction within the borough limits and their own detective for petty crimes, the South African Police was responsible for policing the harbour, court orderly duties and the detective service whilst the Union Defence Force policed Natal by means of the 2nd and 3rd Regiments of the SA Mounted Rifles. So Durban was policed by the Borough, the SA Police and the SA Mounted Rifles. When War broke out the Harbour Police were transferred to Defence and a special constabulary was set up to guard the Harbour. When the SAR Police was established they took over the duties of the Water Police from the SA Police and the more things change the stay the same! The SA Railways Police was absorbed into the SA Police. Once again the SA Police took over the water police from the SAR Police – I think it is now called the Water Wing. During the revolutionary onslaught the SAR Police was responsible for the landward defence of the harbour and the SA Defence force for the Seaward defence of the harbour.

Durban Harbour was – and still is – one of South Africa’s National Key Points and the SAR Police did much to safeguard the harbour from attack and to promote safety regulations. The SAR Police were also responsible for the physical security at the harbour. With all the oil storage tanks and gas tanks a fire or sabotage was a real threat. To comply with safety regulations all oil tankers that were in Durban Harbour fell under the control of the Railway Police – they mounted a guard at each oil tanker. We worked closely with the SAR Police and the Water Police and they were a fine group!

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Some Railway Police heraldry SAR Police Flag

SAR Police IMR Police

1974 new commissioner – Gen JJJ van Vuuren

I bought many of his documents at a Flea Market and donated it to the Voortrekker Monument. He was a very cultural person – ATKV etc. 55


1934 - 1984

1984 – SAR Police were 50 years old – below message by Gen JH Visagie.

1984 Message – Gen HJ Visagie

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1986 – Unification with the SA Police 58


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1st of October 1986 On the 1st of October 1986 the South African Railways Police ceased to exist ... This once proud force was integrated into the South African Police during a parade at Esselen Park which I was fortunate to attend. I was a witness to the demise of the Railway Police and that led to the ultimate demise of the railways, the national carrier we once knew. The SAR Police were active all over the globe guarding the vested interests of the SA Railways, Harbours and Airways. Due to certain events that took place the State President at a meeting of the State Security Council decided that all law enforcement agencies in South Africa would be rationalised. I was a staff officer at the Secretariate of the State Security Council. I wrote the letter to the Commissioners informing them formally of the decision that had taken place.

National Transport Police As a (retired) South African Police officer who is interested in trains, aircraft and transport generally I secretly hoped that a National Transport Police would be established to police the roads, railways, harbours, waterways, airports and airways. The South African Police serve the country and the people generally – while the SAR Police served a specific client, viz the South African Railways (or the ultimately Dept of Transport.) At one time the SAR was part of the Dept of Transport and I would have kept the SAR under Transport and that would be the portfolio the SAR Police as the National Transport Police could serve! (One could also see that South Africa was mainly focused on the revolutionary onslaught and trying hard to improve matters on the social side of society – schools, hospitals, education, water, and, and.)

National Transport Plan If we had a coherent National Transport Plan which covered the whole spectrum of transport including: roads, railways, airways, commuter traffic, taxis, busses, ships, boats, heavy transport, integrated transport systems between them all, I think the Gautrain would not have been necessary! A Strategic Reserve of Steam Locomotives, rolling stock including preservation and tourism would have been catered for in a coherent and integrated way. [A rail service from Groblersdal via the old KwaNdebele would have been a much be better investment! The present Metro between Pretoria and Johannesburg could have only been improved upon. More feeder lines between various new townships and Pretoria, Johannesburg, Sharpeville, Vereeniging, and Sasolburg is very necessary – to mention a few ideas. A new line for fast passenger train service is needed between Pietersburg / Polekwane / Moria (ZCC 62


Church) and Pretoria, Johannesburg and Soweto! The line between Magaliesburg and Pretoria is slowly being stolen! While the sleepers on the line between Cullinan and Rayton is being stolen bit by bit! ] Here are some photographs that I found in a collection of photographs that belongs to Maj-Gen Leon Mellet, former spokesman of the Ministry of Law & Order:

SAR Police Dogs

Sers ‘Skip’ Scheepers (later major en die BO van die hondeskool op Esselenpark) met sy hond R2 Rommel / Sgt Scheepers and Rommel.

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Sersant ‘Tokkie’ Koen (oorlede) met sy hond R3 Rex

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Oubaas se honne!11 The book below, by Brig Ronnie Beyl, is in Afrikaans and a valuable reference to what the old SAR Police did in South Africa before 1981.

A History of the South African Railways Police – Brig R Beyl

11

This Police dog is undentified. (The identification of the dogs and their handlers was done by Brig R

Beyl)

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Enquiries: "Ronnie" <rbeyl@iburst.co.za>

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Capt Thys du Plessis – SAP New Canada Below: Capt Thys du Plessis is a 2nd generation railway policeman – Thys and I was at school together in

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Durban. We met again in Soweto, at New Canada. Both Thys and I gave evidence at the Goldstone Commission on Train Violence. I contacted the HSRC and Dr De Kock visited us on the spot to help us understand th complex problems of train violence. There were many factors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; e.g. when the train ran smoothley commuters were attacked in order to intice them to use the taxis. I travelled many a day on these trains! Source: Scope 30 April 1993

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Comments HBH: I was attached to the ‘Physical Rendering of Service’ in Soweto during 1992. We had 6 000 policemen in Soweto. At that time I regularly travelled on the commuter trains between Soweto and Johannesburg. We had approx 500 policemen on the trains daily. We were in a “catch-22” situation. The trains travelled fast and if there was a fight on board in the next coach we could not go there, as each coach was sealed off. When the train stopped at the station there were so many commuters that that you could not move from coach A to B! I would not have believed it, if I had not seen it myself. The coaches were sealed off because it stopped robbers from moving from coach to coach. One train e.g. full of commuters would sing hymns from Vereeniging – via Soweto – to Johannesburg, the next train would be full of XYXZ Party while the next train would be ABDC Party. I saw trains travelling next to one another, in the same direction, fighting running battles when the trains stopped – they would fight across the platform until the trains departed. Getting in the wrong train could mean death! Many dead commuters were picked up along the line!

Die Vervoer van Specie – Ronnie Beyl (oud- SASP) Tot en met die sewentiger jare, was groot hoeveelhede edel metale en kontant geld deur lede van die eertydse S.A.Spoorwegpolisie begelei. Gekeurde lede was verantwoordelik om stawe goud per trein vanaf Johannesburg stasie na Durban hawe te begelei. ‘n Spesiaal ontwerpte spesiewa van hout was vir die doel gebruik. Bo elk van die wa se aste was ‘n brandkluis aan die binnekant gemonteer. Vir die lede se gerief was ‘n koolstoof en yskas in die spesie wa geplaas. Die rede vir die koolstoof is dat die lede self etes vir hulle moes voorberei. Hulle was egter verbied om enige eetgoed onderweg na Durban te koop as veiligheidsmaatreël dat hulle nie vergiftig of verdoof kon word nie. Die wa was dan vanaf Johannesburg stasie na Rand Refinery in Germiston gesleep waar die goud in die brandkluise gelaai was. Twee lede bewapen met 9mm HMK’s was dan in die wa toegesluit en terug na Johannesburg stasie gesleep. Met aankoms te Johannesburg was die spesiewa agter aan die Trans Natal trein gehaak en na Durban gesleep. Die Posbevelvoerders op die seksie na Durban was dan per teleks in kennis gestel van die besending wat onderweg is. Met aankoms van die trein by stasies waar daar ‘n Posbevelvoerder was, het ‘n offisier die lede in die spesiewa besoek om te verseker dat alles in orde was. Met aankoms te Durban word die spesiewa na die hawe rangeer vanwaar die goud op die Castle Liner gelaai word. Honderde duisende rand kontant wat vanaf die Reserwe Bank na die

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verskillende banke in al die stede

gestuur was, was in die kompartement van die

passasierstrein, waarin passasiers gereis het deur lede in uniform begelei. Nooit het daar â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n roof of diefstal plaasgevind nie. Vandag is die vervoer van kontant met spesiaal toegeruste pantser voertuie nie eens meer veilig nie.

Photographs of Specie Coaches & SAR Police â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hennie Heymans

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The Story of the Missing Confidential Bag â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Col HF Trew LORD MILNER WAS THE FIRST SOUTH AFRICAN Governor; I was privileged to meet. Before Gating him, however, an experience with his confidential mail bag gave me a great fright. One day, during the S.A. War, I proceeded to the Castle at Cape Town to get orders with regard to my return to the front. Colonel Cooper, the Base Commandant, informed me that I could either go up in command of a troop train, or take up confidential mails for Lord Milner and the Commander-in-Chief. The troop train meant a 12-days' journey, whereas the Commander-in-Chief's mails took only four; of course, I chose the mail! On the appointed day I was handed 12 bags of mail; 11 of these were for Lord Kitchener, and one was very small, covered with seals and marked "very secret," for Lord Milner. My orders were that in the event of the train being captured, I was to burn the bags, and for this purpose I was handed a bottle of paraffin. Whatever might happen, the "very secret" bag was not to be allowed to fall into the hands of the enemy. At any station where I left the carriage, an arrangement was to be made with the Railway Staff Officer to place a sentry on the door of the compartment. With the bags, I was duly installed in a reserved compartment, and the journey started. My batman travelled in a second-class compartment, and at various stopping places came along to see if I required anything. After every halt, I carefully took the bags from the rack and counted them.

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The first incident was at Springfontein junction, where just at dusk the R.S.O.12 informed me that the line had been blown up ahead of us, and, although the break had been repaired, he did not like the idea of allowing the Commander-in-Chief's mails to proceed. Colonel Cooper had given me orders that the train was not to be held up except in the event of an actual attack, so I took the responsibility of ordering him to send the train on. However, I was beginning to wish I had not volunteered for the duty. Next morning we stopped at Bloemfontein for breakfast, and after seeing the sentry posted, I went off to the refreshment room. Immediately after my return to the compartment the train started and I took down the bags and proceeded to check them. To my horror I found that the small "very secret" bag addressed to Lord Milner was missing. Feverishly I searched everywhere in the compartment; it was no use; the bag had gone. Visions of a court-martial and being cashiered flashed through my mind. The only thing to do was to telegraph at the first station we stopped at and report the loss to the R.S.O., Bloemfontein, where the bag must have been stolen. At the next stop, I was excitedly recounting my loss to a Staff Officer when up came my servant. He was Cockney, quite a character, and late of the 1st Life Guards, with a real Cockney accent, he asked, “What 'ave you lost, sir?” I replied, “Chivers, I have lost that small mail bag addressed to Lord Milner." “What?” he asked, “That little bag with all them red seals?” “Yes," I replied. “Oh," said Chivers, "when I was a-making up your blankets in the valise at Bloemfontein that little bag fell down, and I thought it would be safer if I strapped it in the valise!” MY first meeting with Lord Milner took place in Johannesburg. I had applied for a commission in the South African Constabulary, and I knew that my application had been recommended by General Baden-Powell, under whose command I had served in the Rhodesian Field Force. Time went on and I heard nothing with regard to my application, so I determined to try and see the High Commissioner. Leave having been granted me by my Column Commander, I went to Johannesburg, and applied for an interview with Lord Milner. He was very short and sharp with me, and said that he had received 12,000 applications for commissions in the Constabulary, and that I had not a chance. He also said that he was having trouble with Lord Kitchener, as the latter did not wish officers to

12

Railway Staff Officer?

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leave their regiments in the field to join the new Police Force. He gave me the impression of being a very hard man without much human sympathy. Leaving his office in despair, I suddenly thought of one man who might help. Years before I had been attached as a colonial officer to the staff of Lord Hopetown, Governor of Victoria. He was now the Marquis of Linlithgow, and, I knew, held some post in the English Cabinet. A cable was promptly dispatched to him, and two days later I received the reply: “Milner requested apply Commander-in-Chief for your services."

Onwettige Deportasie van Vakbondleiers – Hennie Heymans Na die 1913 Indiër moeilikhede op die suikerplantasies van die suidkus van Natal het sake intussen snel voortbeweeg en ’n ander groot avontuur het op die nuut gestigte Suid-Afrikaanse Polisie gewag. ‘n Geheime operasie deur ‘n voormalige Britse offisier, inderdaad ‘n onwettige operasie, in opdrag van twee voormalige Boere generaals - nou aan die spits van die nuwe Unie van Suid-Afrikaanse se regering was in aantog! …great general strike had broken out all over the Union. But Generals Botha and Smuts were prepared for it. Martial law was at once proclaimed and the Defence Force and Burgher Commandos called out… Generaal Tim Lukin van die SA Berede Skutters13 is aangestel as die offisier belas met die toepassing van die krygswet in Pretoria. Trew is op sy staf aangestel om die polisie aspekte van die krygswet te administreer. Trew het onmiddellik met die staker se leiers geskakel en hulle verwittig dat, tensy daar geweld was, die polisie glad nie sou inmeng nie. verder het Trew gereël dat die stakers uit hul eie geledere ‘spesiale polisie14’ sou aanstel. Die spesiale polisie is met rooi armbande uitgereik. Die armbande het aan hul gesag verleen. Die spesiale polisie was verantwoordelik om orde tussen die stakers te handhaaf. Die eksperiment was ‘n groot sukses. Geweldpleging was aan die orde van die dag in Johannesburg en elders maar te Pretoria het die konsep van spesiale polisie goed gewerk, daar was geen geweldpleging nie.. Trew se persoonlike siening oor vakbonde was, vir ’n polisieman, nogal realisties: In the Victorian days I saw how the workers were often exploited by their employers, and became a great believer in Trade Unions, and the principle of collective bargaining. But I do not think anyone can defend the general strike as a Trade Union weapon. It is never a strike: it always develops into a revolution. Die Botha-regering het besluit om die om die stakers se tien leiers te arresteer en vir hoogverraad aan te kla. Lasbriewe vir hul inhegtenisname is uitgereik en die leiers is stil-stil in die nag by hul huise gearresteer. Toe die stakers hul oë uitvee, was hul leierloos, hul leiers was agter die tralies. Die tiende leier het egter die veiligheidsnet ontsnap. Trew vertel dan ‘n kostelike staaltjie oor verdagte nommer tien: ... one Sunday afternoon I received information that he was living in hiding, in a house on the outskirts of Pretoria. Taking a detective with me in my car, we drove out to the house. As we drove up the street approaching it an old woman passed on the side walk. Only months later I learnt that this was our man in disguise. Naturally when we searched the house we could not find him. The daughter of the house was a very pretty girl, but I could not understand why she offered us tea and entered into a long conversation. I thought perhaps she had fallen a victim to the charms of my goodlooking young detective, but of course she was gaining time to enable her pal to escape. 13 14

SA Mounted Rfiles. Soortgelyk aan wat ons vandag ‘marshalls’ sou noem.

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This leader succeeded in making his way to Durban, and these sympathizers smuggled him on board a ship bound for Australia. In Melbourne he addressed a meeting of some ten thousand Labourites on the South African Strike, and incidentally gave me an unsolicited testimonial, saying: "Only one man on the Government side knew how to keep order without violence, and that was Major Trew of Pretoria!" Die arrestasie van die leiers het die gewenste uitwerking gehad en die staking was vir praktiese redes verby. Die vraag op almal se lippe was, wat gaan die regering met die stakers doen? Trew vertel dat hy bewus was van die feit dat die staat nie genoeg bewyse teen hulle gehad het om ‘n suksesvolle saak van hoogverraad teen hulle te bewys nie. Dit was ook feit dat indien hulle vrygelaat word stakings weer aan die orde van die dag sou wees. Intussen gedurende vroeg Januarie 1914 arriveer sir Benjamin Robertson, toenmalige hoof kommissaris van Indië se sentrale provinsies, in Durban op om namens die Indiese regering ‘n kommissie van ondersoek te hou na die skietery van die polisie op die plaaslike Indiër stakers. Trew word gedagvaar om in Durban getuienis voor die kommissie af te lê. Die dag voor Trew se vertrek na Durban om getuienis te lewer, ontbied die kommissaris van polisie, kol T G Truter, hom. Truter verwittig dat die kabinet by die Uniegebou vergader en dat die kabinet vir die sekretaris van polisie, kol Manie Bredell15 en vir Trew ontbied het. Terwyl hulle na die Uniegebou in die motor ry wonder hulle wat die doel van hul besoek aan die kabinet was. Na ‘n rukkie se gewag kom die minister van justisie, mnr De Wet16 en deel hulle die volgende mee: Gentlemen, the Cabinet have just decided to deport to England the nine labour leaders now imprisoned at the Fort, Johannesburg." Die mededeling het hulle sprakeloos gelaat. Hulle was bewus van die feit dat die regering se besluit onwettig was. Die minister het Trew verwittig dat aangesien hy na Durban vertrek om getuienis te gee, dit sy dekking sal wees. Die eintlike doel van sy besoek aan Durban sal wees om geheime reëlings te tref sodat die groep van nege leiers die land stil-stil kan verlaat. Die minister het beïndruk dat die hele operasie in die geheim sou geskied een dat geen woord daaroor gerep mag word, nie op skrif, per telegram of telefonies nie. Met Trew aankoms in Durban moes hy met die agente van die stoomskip redery Bullard King Line skakel. Intussen is die agent reeds deur ’n senior doeanebeampte in Durban geskakel m.b.t die huur van die stoomskip Umgeni. Almal is natuurlik in die duister oor die werklike redes waarom die regering die skip gehuur word. Trew moet die agent in sy vertroue neem en hom die doel meedeel en Trew moet verder met hom onderhandel. Trew mag onder geen omstandighede met die regering skakel nie. Trew het volmag om, indien iets onvoorsiens gebeur, na goed denke op te tree. Trew vertel: “On a sheet of paper, torn from his pocket book, he (Gen Smuts) wrote in pencil:

15 16

Trew beskryf Bredell as pres S J P Kruger se sekretaris. Nicolaas Jacobus de Wet [*Mooifontein (Aliwal-Noord) † 11-09-1873 – Pretoria 16-03-1960]

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1. See Agent Bullard King Line make all arrangements. 2. Provide complete set warm clothing for each deportee. 3. If wireless on ship have it dismantled. 4. Give Captain £27 in cash for him to hand deportees on arrival in London. 5. Arrange to have Government Solicitor on board to draw up powers of attorney for representatives nominated by deportees. 6. Wire Minister of Justice c/o Station Master, Matjesfontein, Wednesday morning, before 8 a.m. if deportations successfully carried out. Die minister het toe nog ’n papiertjie aan Trew oorhandig waarop die volgende geskryf is

Union Buildings, Pretoria. Major Trew, S.A.P., is in full charge of operations for deportation of labour leaders. Government officials are to render him every assistance he may ask for. (Sig.) J. C. Smuts, Minister Administering Martial Law.

Spesiale Trein Die regering se plan is aan Trew verduidelik en is soos volg: op ‘n bepaalde aand sal ‘n vragmotor die leiers in aanhouding vanaf hulle selle in die Fort, Johannesburg, na ‘n spesiale wagtende trein op ’n afgeleë sylyn buite die stad neem. Die leiers sal onder bewaking in die trein wees. Die trein sal, sonder om stil te hou, regdeur na Durban reis. Die trein sal dan middernag op die kaai langs die ss Umgeni stilhou. Die leiers moet dan vinnig aan boord geneem word en in hul kajuite toegesluit word. ‘n Wag moet aanwesig wees. Die Umgeni moet onmiddellik vertrek en na die oop see vaar, buite die land se gebiedswaters.17 Sodra hulle buite die gebiedswaters was, moes die leiers in die salon bymekaar gebring word waar Trew hul moet verwittig van hul lot. Hulle kon gou aan hul vriende skryf en ‘n volmag onderteken. Die hawekaptein se sleepboot moes hulle volg en sodra die formaliteite afgehandel was moes Trew met die hawekaptein se sleepboot terug keer na Durban. Die minister het beklemtoon dat niks, maar niks, in die weg van die deportasies mag kom nie! Selfs as sou ‘n habeas corpus op Trew bestel word, moes hy dit ignoreer. Sou enigiets gebeur waarvoor daar nie beplan is nie, moes hy na goed denke optree. Die regering sou hom steun. Hy moes vir die manne klere koop en sê toe dat hy nie hul mate gehad het nie. Mnr de Villiers Roos, die sekretaris van justisie, het belowe dat Trew die volgende oggend die mate van die leiers sou

17

Die gebiedswaters was altyd 3 myl van die kus af totdat dit later verader is.

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ontvang. Hy het sy woord gestand gedoen. Jare later sou Trew verneem dat Roos die persoonlik na die Fort gegaan het en die manne besoek het onder die voorwendsel om te verneem of hulle klagtes gehad het. Hy het elke aangehoudene met die oog gemeet een na elke besoek die mate sorgvuldig aangeteken. Sy skatting was so goed dat alles netjies gepas het. Trew het na sy huis vertrek een ‘n “money-belt” geneem en die twee briefies daarin versteek en om sy lyf, onder sy klere gedra. Ironies genoeg dieselfde aand het Trew ‘n ete aan huis van ‘n regter van die hooggeregshof bygewoon. Tydens die ete is die lot van die leiers bespreek. Trew gaan voort: I could not help looking at my host, and wondering what he would say if he knew that I was party to a plot to steal nine prisoners out of the jurisdiction of his honourable court and send them overseas. Some months later I said to the judge: " I f you had served a court order on me to hand over the prisoners to your messenger and I had disobeyed it, I suppose you would have given me six months for contempt of court?" “Six months," he said,”I would have given you ten years!" Dit sê beslis iets vir die onafhanklikheid van die regbank. Verseker sou Trew tronkstraf uitgedien het want nie alleen was die regering se optrede onwettig nie, Trew se eie optrede was geheel en al onwettig. ’n Onwettige bevel is nie ’n verweer nie! Die volgende oggend is Trew per trein van Pretoria na Durban. Die trein was vol offisiere, SAP, SABS en imperiale offisiere wat met verlof was. Trew het ’n kompartement bepreek en gou was sy kompartement vol offisiere. Die offisiere het weereens die kwessie van die stakers se leiers te berde gebring. Hy het deurgaans probeer om die onderwerp te verander dog sonder sukses. Wat Trew verder getref het is die feit dat behalwe vir twee reisgenote het die res van die offisiere almal nege maande later op die slagveld gesterf. Die volgende dag in Durban het hy met die agent van die Bullard King Line kontak gemaak en hy en die agent het die hele kwessie bespreek. Die agent was verstom toe hy die doel van die operasie verneem. Hy wou sy direksie in Londen raadpleeg maar op versoek van Trew het hy dit toe nie gedoen nie. Die agent het een kwessie te berde gebring wat Trew en die regering buite rekening gelaat het nl die kwessie van vrywaring sou die leiers die redery in Londen dagvaar! Trew was baie bekommerd oor die aspek, aangesien duisende ponde ter sprake was. Mnr Siedle die agent het weer daarop gewys hoe onregverdig dit sou wees indien die redery aanspreeklik gehou sal word. Indien Trew nie die borgakte namens die regering sou teken nie, sou die redery die hele kwessie laat vaar. Gevolglik het Trew maar die borgakte geteken dat die regering verantwoordelikheid vir enige siviele eise sou aanvaar. Volgens Trew het dit vir hom gevoel asof hy sy eie doodsvonnis geteken het. ’n Verdere kwessie is die van vergoeding vir verlore inkomste! Mnr Siedle het ’n redelike bedrag vorendag gebring wat die skip se verlies aan inkomste sou wees omdat die skip nie meer Port Elizabeth en Oos-Londen aandoen nie en gevolglik nie vrag en passasiers inneem nie. Trew het toe namens die Unieregering verantwoordelikheid vir die bedrag aanvaar. Verder het Trew vasgestel dat die agent bedrewe in die tipe werk was want hy was behulpsaam met die deportasie van the rebellious Zulu chief, Dinizulu, and also the officers of Jameson's ill-starred raid. Trew het die agent verwittig dat hy die kaptein van die skip, die skip self en die leiers se akkommodasie wou inspekteer. Dit was belangrik dat hy die skip onder dekking besoek. Trew wou nie gehad het dat hy aan boord herken moes word nie of dat die doel van sy besoek aan die lig sou kom nie. Gesamentlik is besluit dat hy as die bestuurder van ‘n toneel geselskap, nl die London Gaiety Company, aan boord sou gaan. Die mense was juis besig met opvoerings in Johannesburg. Soos ‘n goeie spioen het hy ‘n legende ontwikkel wat soos volg daaruit gesien het: The story was to be that my company was to arrive on Wednesday, at midnight, by special train and go straight on board, when the ship, whose sailing had been delayed for them, should put straight out to 79


sea. Having purchased a soft black hat, and assuming as theatrical an air as possible, I left with the agent by car for the ship. There I was introduced to the skipper, who proved to be a bluff old British tar of the old and bold type. On my requesting to see the cabins which were to house the members of my company, the ship's purser was sent for. He proved to be a good-looking young man, who, as he took me down to inspect the cabins, confided to me that he loved carrying theatrical folk, as they were always so matey. He asked me if the girls in the party were good-looking. I told him that the only word that could describe them was “peaches ". He said that he hoped they would occasionally give a show in the saloon. My reply was that I knew my troupe would oblige very often. He rather stumped me when he asked how many girls there were amongst the nine. On the spur of the moment I replied five, which later on fitted in very well as they were two-berth cabins, and I required a single cabin for one of the deportees, who was a phthisis sufferer. Later die oggend moes Trew voor die Indiese kommissie getuig. Hy het gou van sy teatrale klere ontslae geraak en sy uniform aangetrek. Na sy getuienis het die kommissaris hom vir aandete genooi. Trew het aanvaar dat die kommissaris te vrede was met Trew se optrede tydens die staking. As mens ‘n polisieman is kan die wêreld soms maar klein wees as jy bekend is. So vertel Trew: The next day I went to Harvey Greenacre's draper's shop to buy the nine sets of warm clothing. The assistant who served me saved me the trouble of thinking out a new lie by saying suddenly: "I suppose, Major Trew, this clothing is for the police shooting team going to Bisley?" “Of course," I assented, "but how did you know me?" His reply was: “Oh, I am not a crook, but I lived in Pretoria for years, and know you well by sight." The clothing was made up in nine parcels, all numbered and addressed to my hotel. That night I went with a party of friends to the theatre, and in the interval, while I was having a drink a man came up and introduced himself as a newspaper reporter. He said: “Major, I saw you giving evidence before the Indian Commission. I would be glad if you can tell me about what date the labour leaders will be brought up for trial?" My reply was: "I am sick to death of the labour leaders, and I neither know nor care what happens to them." Op die groot dag word Trew wakker met die besef dat indien alles wel is, is die spesiale trein oppad na Durban met die leiers wat gedeporteer moet word. Na ontbyt het hy die hawekaptein gaan besoek en hom op hoogte van sake gebring. Hy het die kaptein ook die briefie van Smuts getoon. Trew het versoek dat die hawesleepboot ook die aand, langs die kaai, om middernag gereed moes wees om die Umgeni na die oopsee te volg. Sy volgende stap was om die bevelvoerder van die troep wat die krygswet administreer te gaan sien. Dit was ooreengekom dat hy die kaai vanaf 11-45 met ’n gewapende mag sou beset, dat hy alle siviele persone in die hawegebied weg hou. Ook sou hulle ’n kordon om die trein trek wanneer dit arriveer en veseker dat niemand deur die kordon sou breek nie. Die bekende waterpolisie is ook opgeroep vir diens, hulle moes wagte verskaf om middernag op die Umgeni diens te doen. Teen hierdie tyd is Trew al ‘n bekommerde man en bevrees dat iets i.v.m die deportasie dalk uitgelek het en dat hy met ’n hofbevel bestel sou word om die prisoniers vry te laat en aan ’n beampte van die hof te oorhandig. ... Of course I realized that the whole of our action was illegal, but I was determined to carry out my orders and ignore any court order which might be served on me.

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Dit was ‘n lang dag en hy het die gevoel gekry dat hy dopgehou en agtervolg word. ’n Goei polisieman moet vindingryk wees en inisiatief aan die dag kan lê. Sonder steun, welwillendheid en aanwendig van alle magsmiddle is ’n polisieman magteloos. Trew besluit toe om sy vermoedens te bevestig: To test it I walked up West Street, and went into a shop which I knew had a back exit. I asked to see some socks, and whilst examining them had a careful look through the shop window. There on the opposite pavement stood the reporter who had spoken to me the previous evening. I hurriedly purchased a couple of pairs of socks and walked out through the back exit. My intention had been to visit the Umgeni before dinner, but this incident decided me to remain in the hotel until the last possible moment. Net soos ‘n boer ‘n plan maak, so moet ’n polisieman ook op sy voete kan dink en die wet aan sy kant probeer kry: As I was, however, afraid of the reporter, I called on the press censor under martial law, and after showing him my authority requested him to refuse to pass all telegrams or newspaper articles referring to the S.S. Umgeni, or to anything that might occur on the wharf that night. In enige hofgeding is ‘n geloofwaardige getuie goed werd, veral as so ‘n getuie vir ‘n polisieman, of die staat, moet getuig. So maak hy van sy vriendskap met generaal Tim Lukin se aide de camp gebruik: General Lukin's A.D.C. was dining with me that night, and during dinner it struck me that it would be a good idea to take him on board the ship with me so that I might have an independent witness in case it was later alleged that I had behaved with undue harshness towards the deportees. He was a noted ladies' man, so I asked him if he would come down to a ship with me to see some theatrical girls off. He jumped at the idea, but said that first he must return to his hotel and have a second shave and get on his newer dinner jacket. This I assented to, and he turned up later looking the acme of smartness. At last, accompanied by Mr. Siedle, we left by car for the ship. Trew vergesel van Lukin se aide de camp besoek die skip en spreek die kaptein. Die kaptein word toe ingelig wie sy passasiers sou wees. Beide die aide de camp en die kaptein is stomgeslaan. Dit het baie oortuigingswerk gekos om die twee manne te oortuig. Beide was stom geslaan en het geweier om Trew te glo. Die kaptein het toe vir Trew gesê: Look here, I've got to take these men to England. Won't they put me in gaol for kidnapping them? Trew het toe aan die kaptein verduidelik dat die deportasies ingevolge krygswet geskied en in opdrag van die regering. Die kaptein sou vry wees van enige blaam. Die uitgeslape kaptein antwoord toe: All right, Major, I'll do it. But the log book is my Bible —you write in it all my orders and sign it for the Government. Aangesien Trew s nie bewus was of die Unie-regering sy Britse eweknie oor die deportasies ingelig het nie, het hy die kaptein beveel om die vakbondleiers slegs aan die die bemanning van ‘n Britse oorlogskip te oorhandig.Hierop het die kaptein geantwoord: You bet I'll stop if a damned man-o'-war signals me to do so. Those perishers would think nothing of putting a shell in my boilers. (Trew hat baie oor hierdiee uitlating gedink toe die Umgeni later die slagoffer van ‘n Duitse duikboot geword het). Die kaptein het later van bui verander en opgewek gesê: Ah, well, you'll see the picture papers full of the old Umgeni and her gallant skipper when we reach old London Town. Daar was ander passasiers aanboord een hulle is almal gewaarsku om teen elf uur aan boord te wees. Die meeste passasiers was in hul kajuite. Tydens ’n inspeksie of die manne se klere in hul kajuite afgelewer is, het Trew ’n verdagte man aan boord gesien wegduik agter ’n deel van die lugpype. Trew het ’n speurder gestuur om die man aan te keer. Tot almal se verbasing is die vindingryke verslaggewer! Niemand het geweet hoe hy aan boord gekom het nie! Die man is toe ingevolge die bepalings van krygswet gewaarsku. Hy is van die skip af geneem en deur die dokke se hek gestoot met ’n goeie waarskuwing, nl dat indien hy weer daar aangetref sou word sou daar teen hom opgetree 81


word. Om kwart voor twaalf die nag het troep stelling ingeneem en ‘n kordon om die bepaalde gebied gegooi. Presies twaalf uur het die trein langs die skip ingestoom. Die trein is deur soldate omring. ‘n Moeë inspekteur Hill18, verbonde aan die speurdiens in Johannesburg het van die trein afgeklim. Hy was in bevel van die trein en sy prisoniers. Die arme man wa toe al meer as 24 uur aan diens. Hy vertel hoe hulle die prisoniers by die tronk gaan afhaal het en hoe die prisoniers die rewolusionêre Red Flag gesing het in ‘n poging om hul vriende van die verskuiwing in kennis te stel. Die prisoniers is op die trein geplaas wat op die eensame plek vir hul gewag het. Die trein het vertrek het die heel tyd gery sonder om stil te hou. Die blindings was in die kompartemente afgetrek een die manne het nie geweet waar hulle hul bevind nie. Die prisoniers was almal vas aan die slaap, elk in ‘n kompartement vergesel deur twee speurders. Trew en Hill het toe gereël dat elke aangehoudene om die beurt gewek en na sy bepaalde kajuit toe oorgeplaas word. Elk een is in sy eie kajuit toegesluit met twee lede van die waterpolisie as wagte voor elke deur. Te midde van al Trew se probleme, daag daar ‘n ordonnans op wat hy by die hotel gepos het, op met die woorde: " A telegram for you, Major." Met bewende hande skeur hy die telegram op omdat hy gedink dit is ‘n hofbevel. Die telegram het gelui: Hearty congratulations; wife gave birth to daughter to-day. Both very fit. Tipies vir ‘n Engelsman van daardie tyd! So beskryf Trew die verplasing van die prisoniers van die trein na die Umgeni: The first prisoner climbed off the train yawning and rubbing his eyes; on each side of him a detective affectionately held his arm. Suddenly he saw the ship and started back, saying: ‘I’m not going on any damned ship. Are you trying to shanghai me?’ The detective, placing a hand the size of a leg of mutton on his back, said: ‘Climb that ladder, George, and argue the point afterwards.’ The man looked at the ranks of soldiers, with the moonlight glistening on their bayonets, and then shaking his head moved forward to the gangway. And so, one by one, the nine were taken on board, and I gave Hill a receipt for his captives. Nadat almal op die skip was bevel Trew die kaptein om so spoedig moontlik te vertrek en aan Trew te rapporteer sodra hulle buite die territoriale waters was. Trew en sy kollegas beweeg na die salon om te kyk of alles in orde vir die onderhoude met die prisoniers was. In die salon was daar ‘n tafel met tien stoele. Voor nege was papier, pen en ink sowel as blanko volmagvorms. Die staatsprokureur was aanwesig om instruksies af te wag ten opsigte van hul eiendom in Suid-Afrika. Trew kon sien dat die staatsprokureur dink almal wat by hierdie ongerymdhede betrokke was, van hul sinne beroof was. I hope you realize what a serious step you are about to take?" het die prokureur gewaarsku. Trew sê hy kon daardie dae nie Amerikaans praat nie, ander het hy geantwoord: ‘ You're telling me!’. Nog ‘n haakplek het vir Trew gewag, en sy vindingrykheid beproef. Na ‘n lang tyd kom die kaptein sê: ‘ I am sorry, Major, but the chief engineer refuses to start the ship's engines. It seems that he and one of the ship's officers have had a few drinks, and the chief claims that the officer insulted him. He will not allow the engines to be started until the officer is punished1’. Vir Trew was dit noodsaaklik dat hulle so spoedig moontlik buite die gebiedswaters kom. Hy vra toe die kaptein of hulle nie maar die hoof ingenieur kon arresteer en aanhou tot die volgende oggend nie, terwyl die tweede ingenieur dan oorneem nie? Daarvan wou die kaptein nie hoor nie aangesien die hoof ingenieur reeds 40 jaar by die maatskappy werk en die direkteure dink die wêreld van die man.

18

Kry geen rekord in King se boek. Soek elders vir sy besonderhede.

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Die kaptein raai toe aan dat hulle ‘n skynverhoor hou om die gemoedere te kalmeer en die wandader te straf. Trew gebied toe twee lede van die waterpolisie om die ‘beskuldigde’ te gaan haal en voor hom te bring. Die storie het toe so verloop: The captain then brought in the dour old Scottish chief engineer. The officer was marched in, the drink was dying in him, and he looked very frightened. I asked the chief to state his case against the accused, while I made play at writing down the evidence. The chief said: "This damned slip of a boy had the impudence to say, during an argument, that I was no' fit to grease ma own engines. I will no' start ma engines till he's been severely punished." I said: “Chief, will you accept an apology from him and call the matter square?" He replied: “I’ll do no such thing. He must be punished. Why, under your martial law I understand you can shoot a man." I said: "All right, I sentence him to be shot at dawn. March him to his cabin." The old Scot shook me warmly by the hand, saying: " I doot but what your sentence is a wee bitty severe, but he was terribly insulting to a chief engineer. Noo I'll gang awa and start ma engines." Daarna het Trew die kaptein van die skip gestuur om die jong offisier te verwittig dat alles maar ‘n klug was, maar dat hy tot die volgende oggend in sy kajuit moes bly. Uiteindelik is die skip gevolg deur die sleepboot die oop en diepsee in. Die deining was hoog. Gelukkig was Trew en sy metgesel ervare seemanne ander sou dit ‘n groot antiklimaks gewees het as hulle almal seesiek geword het. Die kaptein het later verwittig dat hulle buite die territoriale waters was maar dat ‘n storm woed, wind en reën. Die manne is ingebring om voor majoor Trew te verskyn, wat hulle soos volg meegedeel het: Men, I have been ordered by the Government of the Union of South Africa to inform you that you are being deported from South Africa, as you are considered to be a danger to the state. You are to be landed in England. You have one hour in which to write to your relatives and to prepare powers of attorney dealing with your affairs in South Africa. It is now 2 a.m.; at 3 a.m. this ship sails direct for England." Die manne se reaksie was om dadelik luidkeels protes aan te teken en daarop aan te dring om sy lasbrief te sien. Die gesprek en gebeure het toe, in Trew se eie woorde, soos volg verloop: I (Trew) said: " There is no warrant." Then they said: “Show us your written authority for this outrage." The reply was: "There is no written authority." Then they all jumped to their feet with cries of: “This is the twentieth century—you can't kidnap us like this!" and “What do you think you are, buccaneers on the Spanish Main?" One man said: "I demand to see a lawyer. I refuse to sail in this ship." The two most responsible men amongst them, Bain, the miners' leader, and Poutsma, the secretary of the Railwaymen's Union, tried to calm them down. To one man who threatened me with his clenched fist they said: “It’s not the Major's fault; he has to do what he is ordered. It's Botha and Smuts we want to get at." Bain then said to Poutsma: “I wonder if there is a wireless on this ship?" So Poutsma answered: “You know Jannie Smuts; if there was one I'll bet it has been dismantled." Trew het toe aan die manne, wat hewig ontstel was, verduidelik dat hulle geen reg tot appel kon rig tot enige mens of instelling nie! Indien hulle hulself gedra kon hulle die reis as eerste klas passasiers voortsit. Die manne het kalmeer en briewe aan hul geliefdes geskryf . Die staatsprokureur het inbeweeg en hul wense t.o.v die beskikking van hul eiendom verkry, om 0300 het die kaptein ingekom en gesê dat die see nou onstuimig raak en indien hulle nie nou van die skip afklim nie, hulle saam sou moes gaan tot in Londen. Trew het die onwillige gedeporteerdes aan die kaptein voorgestel. Die 83


volgende het toe plaasgevind: One of them as he shook hands said: ‘ You will find that we are not very dangerous anarchists. We have no bombs or revolvers.’ The tough old sea dog replied: ‘If you behave, you will be treated the same as any other passenger. If you make trouble, into irons you go.’ Die kaptein is gevra om die sleepboot te ontbied en Trew het drankies bestel. ‘n Heildronk is op die gedeporteerdes ingestel met die wens dat hulle ‘n voorspoedige reis sou hê. Die gedeporteerdes het die polisie neet die beste toegewens. Die briewe en die akte van volmag is in ’n sak verseel om na die militêre sensor, in terme van die krygswet aangestel, te gaan. Trew het nogal ’n mag oor die pen want hy beskryf die slottonele op die skip soos volg: It was a cheerless scene which met our gaze. The early morning was cold and dark, and the deck was slippery with the driving rain. In the distance we could see the lights of the tug, which was pitching and tossing in the heavy sea. Two sailors held flares burning over the rope ladder, which was the only means of leaving the ship. Underneath the ladder was the boat from the tug. At one moment it was twenty feet below us, at the next not more than ten. We sent off the Water Police and the attorney in the first load and the A.D.C. and I followed in the next. It was a nasty experience going down that rope ladder in the dark; the rungs were wet and slippery and as the vessel rolled it kept banging on the side. We arrived on board the tug, wet through with spray, but a big mug full of coffee, which the skipper had kindly prepared for us, soon warmed us up. Arriving at the wharf we found a Defence Force car waiting for us and at once drove to the telegraph office to notify the Minister of the successful accomplishment of the mission. I had an order from him to get the wire through to Matjesfontein on the Cape railway by 9 a.m. as the Cabinet were on their way to Cape Town for the Parliamentary Session. Having forgotten to notify the postmaster at Durban I found the telegraph office shut. However, I consulted a friendly policeman and he directed me to the Eastern Cable Company's office. They were most obliging and agreed to cable the message round to Cape Town, where it could be relayed to Matjesfontein. The message read:

Duty completed in accordance with orders.

Twee dae later is Trew met die RMS Edinburgh Castle na Kaapstad om persoonlik verslag aan generaal Smuts te lewer. Tydens die onderhoud het Trew vir Smuts ingelig dat hy die borg akte geteken het indien die stakers ’n siviele eis teen die redery sou indien, die regering die kostes betaal. Smuts het nie daarop reageer nie. Hy het Smuts ingelig dat hy gehoor het dat een van die gedeporteerdes opgemerk het dat wanneer die skip in Madeira aankom, waar die skip steenkool moes inneem, hulle daar van die skip sou afklim. Smuts het onmiddellik daarop reageer deur die Spaanse19 konsul te ontbied en hom ingelig oor wat gebeur het. Die nadraai van hierdie voorligting wa ’n brief wat die kaptein van die Umgeni aan Trew geskryf het, waarin hy Trew o.a. soos volg meedeel: What did you people tell the Spanish about my ship? When we got to Madeira they treated us as though we had plague on board. The ship was surrounded by armed picket boats, and not a soul was allowed to leave her. Trew sê niks verder oor sy baba dogter en sy vrou in Pretoria nie maar gaan voort dat met sy aankoms in Kaapstad het hy uitgevind dat kolonel Creswell, die leier van die Arbeiders Party in die parlement, 19

Ek dink dit moet lees Portugeuse konsul aangesien Madeira aan die Portugeuse behoort.

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te hore gekom het van die gebeure en dat die gedeporteerdes op die Umgeni was. Cresswell het ’n sleepboot gehuur het om die Umgeni naby Kaapstad te onderskep. Hy kon egter nie die Umgeni op die oopsee vind nie. Trew betrokkenheid by die deportasies het hom in sekere kringe onpopulêr gemaak in sekere dele in die Transvaalse gemeenskap. Die regering het hom drie maande verlof in Kaapstad toegestaan. ’n Maand lank het hy elke dag die parlement besoek en na heftige debatte, oor die deportasies, in die huis geluister. Die regering se optrede is met die van die Russiese tsaar, wat op daardie stadium nog geheers het, vergelyk. Die tsaar stuur sy onderdane na Siberië! Trew het skuldig begin voel maar het intussen ’n brief van gelukwense van die regering ontvang. Dit het hom aansienlik beter laat voel. Later in die dae lees hy in die koerante dat die gedeporteerdes ’n siviele saak teen de redery instel. Duisende ponde is ter sprake. Eendag ontmoet hy mnr Harry Siadle in Kaapstad en toe moes hy van hom verneem dat die regering sy waarborg verwerp het! Tot sy verbasing moes hy verneem dat die minister van finansies ontken het dat Trew oor die mag beskik het om die borgakte te teken aangesien Trew nie oor die mag beskik het om die regering onbeperk te kompromitteer nie. Die ‘permanente’ hoof van die tesourie, mnr James Leisk was een van Trew se vriende. Hy het ’n afspraak gemaak en Leisk gaan sien. Hy het aan Leisk verduidelik dat indien die regering Trew se eis repudieer, geen staatsamptenaar in die toekoms enige verantwoordelikheid in die toekoms sou neem nie. Leisk het belowe om die aangeleentheid met die regering op te neem wat toe later besluit het om die borgakte te honoreer. Trew word toe gewaarsku om voorbereidings te tref om vir die siviele saak na Engeland te gaan. Daar was gelukkig ’n op en wakker agent in Londen wat een van die nege manne oortuig het om ’n honderd pond te aanvaar as volle skikking van sy eis. Daarmee het die ander lede se eise hoë platgeval. Elkeen het later £100-00-00 aanvaar en die eis is geskik en Trew het nie na Engeland gegaan. Poutsma is die eerste gedeporteerde wat hy jare later in Kaapstad ontmoet het. Hy was die organiserende sekretaris vir die Verenigde Party onder generaal J C Smuts. Toe hy vir Trew sien, sê Poutsma: ‘Come on, Colonel, I can now stand you a drink in return for the one you stood me on the Umgeni’. Die deportasies was onwettig maar is ex post facto deur ‘n wet van die parlement gewettig. Trew dink dat die regering geregverdigd in die omstandighede opgetree het veral as die gevolge daarvan in ag geneem is. Daar was vir agt jaar relatiewe vrede in Suid-Afrika in die algemeen en Johannesburg in besonder. Gedurende die moeilike jare van WO1 het Trew ’n arbeidsleier tydens ’n lewendige vergadering hoor sê: ‘If there is a strike we must have no violence or attempts at violence. We don't want any more deportations.’ Trew sluit sy verhaal af met die volgende woorde: South Africa has proved a very kind foster-mother to me. I have personally never experienced any of the racialism20 that is so much written about. From 1908 I served under the following Dutch21 Ministers of Justice, viz. Judge de Villiers22, General Hertzog23,

20

In daardie tyd is altyd van die twee rasse in Suid-Afrika gepraat, nl die Afrikaners en die Engelse (British and Durch). Dit het niks met swart en wit rasse te doen nie. 21 Hy bedoel Afrikaanssprekende ministers. 22 23

Adv J M B Hertzog

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Judge Nicholas de Wet24, Mr. Tielman Roos25, and Mr. Pirow26. They not only gave me fair impartial treatment, but I experienced much kindness at their hands. Toevallig vind ek eendag hiedie beskrywing van Goodman, met die klem op die regsapekte, oor die deportasies wat in Durban plaasgevind het: Lucas27 will long be remembered - among other things -for his participation together with the leader of the Labour Party, Colonel Creswell, in an exploit which had as its object the release of the nine trade union strike leaders who were secretly placed on board a ship on the orders of General Smuts, for their deportation to England. It happened early in 1914 at the time of the general strike, when the nine men were secretly removed from the Johannesburg Fort at midnight on January 27, entrained for Durban, and on the following day placed on board the Umgeni. The Supreme Court in Johannesburg was urgently moved by Lucas for an order interdicting and restraining the Minister of Justice from deporting the men without trial, but the court could do nothing in the matter because the strike leaders were no longer within the jurisdiction of the Witwatersrand Local Division of the Supreme Court. And no immediate appeal could be made to the Supreme Court in Durban because the Government had imposed a censorship on telegrams! It was then that Lucas was carried away by a seemingly happy inspiration of chartering a small vessel to intercept the Umgeni before it was too far out at sea. But the best laid plans of mice and men gang oft agley! When Lucas and the valiant Colonel Creswell set out to sea in their little craft, called Magnet, it was their intention to hail the captain of the Umgeni, advise him that he had on board nine passengers who were travelling to England against their will, and demand that they be transferred to the Magnet preparatory to their return to South Africa. The stout little tug steamed out to sea for a distance of about 40 miles, but it had no hope whatever of catching up with the Umgeni, which was steaming steadily at a speed of approximately 12 knots an hour. It was obviously a forlorn if ambitious venture. Its only good effect was to provide newspapers in South Africa and in many countries overseas with one of the most sensational stories of the time. The two men on the tug returned the same day sadder and wiser men! No lawyer or politician ever fought harder for their interests.

24 25 26 27

Oswald Pirow Advokaat en later regter van die hoogeregshof.

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Some SAR Police uniforms and badges

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Blue & Khaki â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lt-Col Richard S Godley28 OBE, KPM Godley is another remarkable police officer that also put pen to paper and produced a work that is also very important to the South African History in general and Police History in particular. Fortunately the Railways also did their bit and he also not only gives descriptions but there are photos as well of carriages, P.O.W.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in trucks etc. etc. One has to remember that railways are not the focus of his book and that we have to use the bits and pieces that he gives to fill the gaps in our field of study.

28

Born 1876 in Woolwich, England.

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On the 27th of March 1896 he departed from Brentwood Station on his way to leave England and he embarked for Durban to enlist in the Natal Police under the command of Sir John Dartnell. On board were twenty of Dr. Jameson’s BSAP men, under the command of Capt Straker, returning to South Africa to rejoin the BSA Co.’s police in Rhodesia. At Madeira he and other recruits heard of the Matabeleland Rebellion. On the 13th of April 1893 they reached Cape Town he joined the “Matabeleland Relief Force” on the same day. He and his comrades left Cape Town that same evening at 21:00 for Mafeking. Godley and a friend “were packed into a 3rd class29 railway carriage with about ten others, en route for Mafeking and the unknown, having left all our belongings on the ship never to be seen again. How depressed and homesick I felt when, early next morning, after a very uncomfortable night of fitful dozing, I awoke to find that we were in the Karoo” (Godley p25 –27). It is important to note the following: “At Mafeking30, which was at this time the railhead going north to Rhodesia, we detrained, and went to the camp which had been erected on a waste piece of very dusty ground on the far side of the present railway station” (Godley – p27). Without the luxury of a Railway, this is the way they had to travel to Rhodesia: “As there would be water difficulties on our march through the Bechuanaland Protectorate to Macloutsie, some four hundred miles distant, Colonel Plummer decided to send one or two troops31 at a time, with their transport. There was to be a day’s interval between each party, to avoid congestion at the watering holes, and to minimize the risk of there being a shortage of water for men and animals” (Godley – 28). If they had the train it would have been an easier exercise! “Our route from Mafeking to the Khami Ruins32 lay on the old coach route, over which all supplies for Bulawayo and Matabeleland generally were hauled on ox-wagons from the railhead at Mafeking. On this road Zeederberg’s coaches, with their spans of twelve mules a-piece, used to travel with passengers and mails. Such coaches were huge “Buffalo Bill” affairs, swinging on enormous leather springs, and carrying twelve passengers, the driver and a Cape boy to assist him. Teams were changed every seven or ten miles, and throughout the whole distance of six hundred miles, ‘change stables’ were erected at the side of the road, where mules were put up and looked after by a couple of natives or Cape boys” (Godley 31 – 32).

29

rd

Recruits and soldiers also traveled 3 Class in the old days while there were special “non-white” carriages for st people of colour. Up to c 1955 all white SA policemen below the rank of 1 Class sergeant had to travel ‘with rd blankets’ – meaning they had to bring their own bedding. All non-white policemen traveled 3 class. Later all st policemen traveled 1 Class and could travel “without blankets”. Today they fly or travel by car.] 30 The British were geo-politically aware – study the route from Cape Town to Rhodesia. It missed the Boer Republics, which could have been a hindrance in a war situation. 31 In the former SAP a troop consisted of one ‘troop’ sergeant and 36 men. 32 Some 12 miles south of Bulawayo.

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To journey without a train was not easy. “ A journey in one of these conveyances meant days of trial and tribulation. … (Passengers) were packed like herrings for days on end. Inside there was no room to move or stretch one’s legs; one was also choked with dust. ” (Godley p.32). One should also remember that 1896 was the year of the “rinderpest” – many oxen and other cattle perished. So it was horse and mule power! Transport riders and farmers were ruined. “Along the road to Khami hundreds of wagons were left abandoned, many with whole teams of sixteen bullocks lying dead and rotting at their yokes (Godley – p 33). Godley describes how the goods were left on the wagons. Some stuff was looted.

Captain Nesbit VC, Mashonaland Mounted Police Nesbit33 won the coveted VC during the first few days of the outbreak of the Rebellion in Mashonaland. I think it is the same Nesbit of Mafeking who was also mentioned in regard to the armoured train incident at Kraaipan. If so, Godley furnishes some biographical detail.

Salisbury Rifles Godley was later transferred to the Salisbury Rifles as lieutenant. Here he came into contact with Colonel Baden-Powell and Cecil John Rhodes (Godley - p. 50).

British South Africa Police (B.S.A.P.) Godley was offered a commission in the new BSAP34. “Owing to incidents which occurred in connexion with Police Forces in Rhodesia and Bechuanaland before the Jameson Raid, the Imperial Authorities decreed that the new Force being raised for Matabeleland and Mashonaland (to be called the British South Africa Police) should be commanded by officers seconded from the Army. They would be placed under general control of an Imperial representative who was styled ‘Resident Commissioner, and Commandant General of Rhodesia’” (Godley – p. 54). Nesbit was also part of this new Force (Godley – p56).

“Advance Rhodesia” Godley says, if he remembers correctly, the railway from Umtali reached Salisbury during 1899. “A week’s festivities took place in the latter town to celebrate the event”. He took leave for a week to celebrate the occasion (Godley – p 64).

33

I need the initials of Capt Nesbit. I think he had a brother in the B.S.A.P. My library is being re-arranged. In Rhodesia the BSAP was the Senior Regiment. They always ‘stood right of the line’. They wore spurs with their mess dress. During 1974 I was seconded to the BSAP. 34

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Anglo-Boer War Before the actual outbreak of the War Col. R.S.S. Baden-Powell had been sent out with some special service officers, amongst them was Colonel (later Field Marshall Lord) Plummer and Godley’s brother35, “to raise an irregular corps for the protection of Rhodesian and Bechuanaland border, in the event of trouble taking place” (Godley – p.65). As soon as War was declared Godley, together with everyone else, endeavoured to get to the front. He was successful a few months later. On or about the 6th of March 1900, to Godley’s intense satisfaction, orders came from Salisbury that he was one of three BSAP officers selected to go with one hundred Rhodesian volunteers to reinforce Plummer’s column for the relief of Mafeking. The other two officers were Major Hopper36 and Lieut. Mundell 37 (Godley – p.66). Godley and his brothers in arms reached Bulawayo on the 14th of March 1900 and entrained to join Col Plummer, whose force at that time was at Crocodile Pools and Lobatsi (Godley – p.67).

Service aboard an Armoured Train Godley gives a description of various skirmishes with the Boers. “From Crocodile Pools Major Hopper and I, with two troops were sent to Lobatsi, on the armoured train, commanded by Captain Hoël Llewellen, of the BSA Police38 “. They found Lobatsi Station being shelled and they were immediately sent to occupy a position on a koppie facing the right front of the Boers. After heavy fighting they were ordered late that night to retire and entrain onto the armoured train back to Crocodile Pools39. On the 18th April 1900 Godley wrote as follows: “ … The Imperial Yeomanry, we believe are coming through Mashonaland from Beira40, under General Carrington, and are use purely for Rhodesian defence …”(Godley –p. 70 –p.71). A few days later he was ordered to join Capt. Nesbit’s squadron as a troop leader (Godley – p. 72). Godley suffered a wound and was taken to Mafeking that had just been relieved. According to Godley they had good rations within 48 hours after Mafeking was relieved. In June 1900 he left Mafeking for England with Capt. Forbes who had also been wounded. He believes he was the first officer from the Mafeking relief force to reach Cape Town. Lord Milner plied him with questions about the situation “up North” (Godley – p.79). After convalescence he was declared fit for duty during October 1900. He set sail for South Africa during November 1900. He suffered a bout of malaria and visited the sanatorium in Claremont. While in the 35

Later General A.J. Godley, G.C.B., K.C.M.G., and Governor of Malta. No initials supplied 37 No initials supplied 38 Later Chief Constable of Wiltshire. 39 Was this a wise command? To retire with the armoured train back to Crocodile Pools. 40 Again the strategic importance of the Beira Railway comes to the fore. 36

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sanatorium he received a telegram from General Baden-Powell offering him a transfer to the newly formed South African Constabulary41 (Godley – p. 81).

Service in the South African Constabulary (S.A.C.) “After a long and tedious journey by troop train, which was sniped on two occasions in the Free State, I arrived at my destination42 on December 18th, 1900”. At Modderfontein we had several alarms, and one night Zuurfontein Station43 on the Johannesburg – Pretoria line was heavily attacked, and we had to send a party of men to help beat the enemy off “ (Godley – p.82). On Christmas-eve he was transferred to Newcastle, Natal, to raise and train 250 men for the Utrecht Mounted Police (U.M.P.) for policing and patrolling Utrecht and Vryheid districts which had been detached from the Transvaal and annexed to Natal. Godley was appointed Military Magistrate and Officer Commanding, UMP.

Blockhouse Duties Later orders were received for the establishment of a Blockhouse line from Val Station44 on the main Elandsfontein45 - Natal main line, across to Wonderfontein on the former NZASM line from Pretoria – Delgoa Bay. He describes the blockhouse lines as follows: ” … lines … of small fortified posts, about five hundred yards apart, connected with a strand of wire (about 2 ft. from the ground), on which were hung old tins of every description. Timely warning was thus given should a party of the enemy attempt to pass through during the night. Each post was garrisoned by an N.C.O. and from five to eight men, the whole being divided into sections, for each of which a troop under a captain and subaltern were responsible. 41

According to Godley the SAC was formed on the instructions of Lord Milner who had been appointed Governor of the Transvaal and Orange River Colony (Free State). It was to be a Police Force of 10 000 mounted men.(Godley – p.81 –82). 42 Modderfontein Dynamite Factory, about 8 miles from Johannesburg. 43 What is called today? 44 Does it still exist today? 45 Now Germiston.

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The sniping, both by day and night, which continued for weeks and sometimes months with little or no respite, was a great strain on the nerves of officers and men. The line completed, it became one of my duties to accompany Lieut. -Col Fair, who had now succeeded Colonel Pilkington in Command of the Division, when he inspected it. Occasionally the Colonel would send me alone to obtain information from the various officers, to ascertain their wants, and to report to him on the situation generally. We often had to ride at full gallop from post to post while pot-shots were taken at us from some fold in the ground “ (Godley – p. 86).

(Blockhouse) Murder most Foul Murder46, a common law crime, stays murder even in a war situation. While serving in a Blockhouse Captain Miers was murdered. This is how Godley described the event: “A party of three mounted Boers appeared on a low ridge near his camp, bearing a white flag. He went out to meet them, accompanied by two men, whom he left about eighty yards of the party, and went on alone. Captain Miers was seen in conversation with the apparent leader, for some minutes. Suddenly one of the Boers47 raised his rifle and shot poor Miers dead, and all three galloped off. This dastardly deed was greatly resented and deprecated by the Dutch, and was the only incident of treachery, which I personally heard of during the war. Subsequently when peace was declared the man who committed the cold-blooded murder was arrested, through some information supplied by some of his own people, and the trail took place at Heidelberg48. He was found guilty, and sentenced to be shot, the carrying out of which sentence was witnessed by myself in the town’s gaol. Miers lies buried in the cemetery of that place, where a memorial stone has been erected by his regiment (Godley: p 86 – 87).

Recruits for Heidelberg Late in the year Godley was sent from Heidelberg to fetch 200 recruits at Cape Town. At Cape Town it was his first task to check the roll and divide them into two parties. Each recruit was provided with a rifle and a small amount of ammunition. Recruits also received something to eat49. “… (T) hen the whole crowd were packed and locked50 into a special train for the journey up country. Ordinary tinned rations were carried, to be issued for the day each morning, at our first stopping place. It was late in the evening before we actually got away, and about 6.30 a.m. next day found us at a small siding at the top of the Hex River Valley, where I ordered the men to be let out of the carriages to stretch their legs, and rations to be issued. About sixty yards from the siding was a small store. No sooner were the inmates out of the train than numbers of them made a bee-line for the building. Not being served quickly enough for their liking, they started helping themselves, and it was with difficulty they were got back into the train. After

46

The Roman Dutch Law was applied even after the British occupation. I think this is the Salmon van As case. Salmon van As is related to General Manie Maritz. 48 Transvaal. 49 No catering facilities on board? 50 Why should they be locked in? 47

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this incident they gave no further trouble, which considering the tediousness and the length of the journey51 reflects very much to their credit (Godley: p – 88). “Hostilities were still very active in the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, and raids on the railway line were frequently made. It was for this reason that rifles had been issued before leaving Cape Town. After crossing the Cape Colony border we had to halt each night at some fortified station or siding. (Godley: p. 88). An interesting fact about this special train: “At the rear of the was an open truck in which a corporal’s guard did duty during the twenty-four hours. It was relieved at regular intervals. The principal duty was to see that no one left their compartment without permission, and further to keep a sharp look-out for any enemy snipers or raiding parties who might be in the vicinity (Godley: p – 88/9).

Watermelon-thief “The train which was very long and heavy, traveled at a snails pace when ascending a slope of any kind. Once the process was so slow, that a man of the guard, espying watermelons growing near the line, thought one would be extremely refreshing in the prevailing heat. Jumping from the truck, he climbed through a wire fence, collected his trophy, and started to run back towards the train. Unfortunately for him the engine and some carriages had topped the rise, and gathering speed began to rush down the slope on the other side. On the matter being reported I thought it a good thing, orders having been flagrantly disobeyed, to inflict a severe lesson, and directed that the train should continue to the next stopping place, about one and a half miles distant. As we halted in the siding for a brief period, a solitary figure was shortly seen careering along the track. When the culprit came within a hundred yards or so, I told the guard to blow his whistle as though we were about to restart. Full marks must be given for the magnificent last sprint which the man made to safety. The corporal52 and his guard were sentenced to remain on duty in the truck until we reached Heidelberg the following afternoon (Godley: p – 89). “Before the end of the year53 a remount train was blown up and attacked about three miles from Heidelberg on the Natal line. It was a Sunday morning, and most of the garrison were at church when 51

What was the length of the journey, during the War, between Cape Town and Heidelberg? The Corporal concerned later became Major Mitchell, District Criminal Investigation Officer for the Witwatersrand. 53 1901 52

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the news was received. A mounted force, including about a hundred S.A.C., were sent to drive off the raiders, and to collect any uninjured horses that were loose on the veldt (Godley: p- 90). “The early months of 1902 were occupied in Staff and Blockhouse duties” (Godley: p –90). He describes a few skirmishes with the Boers and Peace was declared during May 1902.

Royals and the Railways - 1910 “Owing to the death of King Edward, however, to the regret of all this was impossible, and H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught54 came out instead, with the Duchess of Connaught and Princess Patricia, now lady Patricia Ramsay. I remember being much amused at hearing the latter remark that the only objection she had to South Africa was the shortness of the railway compartments, as when she lay down she had great difficulty in keeping her feet properly covered! “(Godley: p- 107). This Royal Party also visited Potchefstroom by train55 (Godley: p –107).

1913 Miner’s Strike Godley describes how strikers set fire to the Park Station and obstructed the Fire Brigade in their work. A special train was used to deport the leaders of the strike. Godley explains: “ The Government had decided on the deportation of the leaders who had been arrested, and to prevent carefully laid plans from miscarrying, it was vital that no whisper be noised abroad until they were safe on board a ship, and outside the three mile limit56. At midnight a prison van unobtrusively left the Fort Prison in Johannesburg, containing the deportees. It conveyed them to Jeppe Station, where a special train waited, and immediately left for Durban. … Captain Trew57 had already gone to the coast, charged with the duty of seeing our prisoners safely embarked for England. Durban must be have been reached before the slightest suspicion of what was happening leaked out.” (Godley: p – 126). The operation was successfully carried out and the ringleaders deported before they could lodge an appeal. The boat was in any case in international waters by the time any thing was contemplated!

World War 1 When war was declared Godley was summonsed to Pretoria and told he had been transferred to Pietermaritzburg as Acting Deputy Commissioner with the rank of Lieut. -Col. and was “ordered to proceed by the first available train” to his new station to take over police duties from the S.A.M.R. (Godley: - 128).

The role of the SAR in support of the (new) SA Police in Natal

54

The Prince of Wales would have opened the first Union Parliament. Any information on this Royal Train will be appreciated. Was it a “White Train”? 56 The hand of Smuts can clearly be seen in this covert operation. 57 Our old friend the author. 55

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The policing of Natal was the responsibility of the Union Defence Force’s constabulary, the South African Mounted Rifles. Godley had taken this responsibility over and needed details for police work urgently. The national carrier was the newly formed SAR who apparently did a good job in bringing in new men to Natal. “ … I wired asking that Jack Fulford58 might be sent down, and within twenty-four hours he was in ‘Maritzburg. By this time officers and men were due to arrive from the Free State and the Transvaal. I sent Major Marshall of the S.A.M.R. and old Natal Police, who had now been attached to me for duty, up to Ladysmith, the junction of the two railway lines. He was to divert men direct to the various police posts (Godley: p – 130).

German Internees “ We had no sooner completed taking over, or rather walking in, with police duties fairly normal once more, than orders came to arrange accommodation for some 2,000 Germans who had been interned in Pretoria (Godley: p – 130). The Government decided wisely to move the internees from Pretoria to a safer area, as they feared that the rebels might attempt to set the internees free. “Pretoria was one time seriously threatened, and loyal troops were holding the height surrounding the town” (Godley: p – 131). The old military cantonments at Fort Napier were brought into good shape and some 48 hours after receiving instructions to prepare for the internees, “ a special train steamed into the siding, with Lieut. Col. “Bill” Manninng in command” A force of special constables was now enrolled to provide guards to the camp, and perform all duties in connection with it, with Manning as Commandant. … (A) nd I was gazetted Lieut. -Col in the Defence Force, and Commandant of Pietermaritzburg and district, in addition to other duties (Godley: p- 131).

The General Strike 1919 and the Red Revolt 1920 Strikes took part in Johannesburg during 1919 and the Railways were sabotaged, trains were derailed (e.g. the Port Elizabeth mail train on 9 March, 1920) and fired on – I will not go into detail because it does not fall under the ambit of this study. These riots were serious, the total causalities were: 43 Soldiers and 29 policemen were killed, 219 officers and men wounded and 66 injured. For his actions Godley was rewarded with the King’s Police Medal (Godley: p – 238).

1925 - Visit of HRH the Prince of Wales The Prince traveled by train from Pretoria to Johannesburg (Godley: p – 245). From Johannesburg the Royal Party went to Rhodesia (Godley: p- 246).

58

Captain Jack Fulford.

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“On July 20, the “White Train’ again steamed into Johannesburg, proceeding straight to the Show Ground siding at Milner Park. At the Royal passenger’s own request, it had been arranged that this should go to a quit spot. And that he might live therein during these few days of leisure. The train had been specially built in the Union59 for the Royal Visit .

1930 Royal Visit January 1930 the Prince of Wales again visited the Union in a private capacity. Godley was involved with the arrangements. They again traveled in the Prime Minister’s private coach attached to the ordinary mail train to Rhodesia where Godley’s duties came to an end. From Bulawayo the Prince also went to Beira. (Godley: p – 260).

Suburban Trains and the SA Railways Police

5M2P Pakkieswaens met DZ voor en agter - 1993 Bomaanvalle SAP – photo Rollo Dickson

59

I wonder what the coach numbers were.

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5M2P Pakkieswaens, Observatory - Maitland link – photo Rollo Dickson 1993

Missing photographs I had photographs of sub-urban coaches coverd with wire mesh. In front and at the back is special DZtrucks with cow cathers and lights. Can’t find these photographs. These trains were used by the police during riots.

APC’s used by SAR Police The SAR Police had developed their own APC’s [armoured personnel carriers] to travel on road or by rail. The diagram is from Petrus Botha who got it from Lt-Col Malmasari. Photographs from the SAR and from a visit to Windhoek. Photo - Hennie

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Photo - SAR

Photo - SAR

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Trains and the new South African Police Service â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lourens Sturgeon

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I would have loved to have driven in this “van”!

APC used by Metro Rail – Petrus Botha Photo by Petrus Botha

The SA National Defence Force on Rail – Hennie Heymans

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The Railway Police of the South African Police Service

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Here you can’t mis seeing the Railway Police!!

SAR Fire brigade on Rails – Petrus Botha

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Photos: P Botha.

Provisional Index 1909 Railway Strike, 2, 16 1913 Minerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Strike, 4, 103 Abrams, Trp, 10 Act 1 of 1894, 7 Advance Rhodesia, 4, 98 104


Alexander, Supt, 8 Armoured Train, 4, 99 Atkinson, Sgt, 13 Baartman, Brig CJG, 53 Back Beach, 13 Baden-Powell, 83, 98, 99, 100 Beira, 99, 105 Bester, Brig JB DSO, 49 Beyl, Brig R, 3, 73 Beyl, Ronnie, 79 Bloemfontein, 83 Botha General, 84, 91, 106 Botha, Const - Funeral, 10, 22, 23, Botha's Hill, 10 Bousfield, Insp, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14 Brigadier Ronnie Beyl Beyl, Brigadier Ronnie, 5 British South Africa Police, 4, 97, 98, 99 BSAP Bubonic Plague, 12 Bullard King Line, 85, 86, 87 Byers, PC, 32 Cape Town, 101 Nesbit’s Nesbit, Capt 99 Captain Hoël Llewellen Llewellen, Captain Hoël, 99 Captain Miers, 101 Captain Nesbit VC, Mashonaland Mounted Police, 4, 98 Chamberlain, Rt Hon J, 12 Charlestown, 7, 11, 13 Cilliers, Lt-Col AA, 39 Clark, Trp, 9 Collen, Const C, 45 Colonel Creswell, 94 Colonel Pilkington, 101 Craddock, Det, 13, 20 Crocodile Pools, 99 Cuff, Det, 12, 13, 20 Dartnell, 97 Davis, Chief Inspector VE, 32 Dove-Wilson, Justice, 12 Du Plessis, Capt Thys, 3, 75 Dundee, 9 Durban, 3, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18, 48, 52, 59, 60, 75, 79, 85, 86, 87, 88, 92, 94, 97, 103 Els, Paul, 25 Estcourt, 10, 12 105


Finnemore, Justice, 12 Fyvie, Sgt, 9 German Internees, 4, 104 Germiston, 79, 100 Goldstone Commission, 76 Gregory, A, 20 Greytown, 9, 10 Hammond, CE, 20 Harrismith, 51 Hawkins, Trp, 9 Heidelberg, 4, 101, 102 HMS “Highflyer”, 19 Hodgson, Tpr, 10, 12 Humby, Railway Constable, 34 Hunt, Sub Insp, 9 Hurter, Constable Adam, 52 IMR Police, 2, 24, 60 Indomba Spruit, 10 Jackson, Tpr, 10 Jameson, Dr LS, 8, 87, 97, 98 Janes, Sgt, 12, 13, 14 Jeppe Station, 103 Johannesburg, 2, 8, 10, 32, 70, 79, 83, 84, 85, 86, 88, 90, 93, 94, 100, 103, 104, 105 Jooste, PC, 32 Kinning, PC, 32 Kinsey, Det, 11, 20 Koekemoer, Wm, 33 Ladysmith, 7, 9, 10, 104 Lamb, Const Horace, 22 Larpent, Sgt, 22 Lechler, WIA, 20 Lees-Smith, Det-Sgt, 11 Leigh Station, 12 Lieut. -Col. “Bill” Manninng Manninng, Lieut. -Col. “Bill”, 104 Lightening, Trp, 8 Lloyd, L/Sgt, 8, 9 Lobatsi, 99 Lord Hopetown, 84 Lord Milner, 11, 82, 83, 99, 100 Lt-Col Richard S Godley OBE, KPM, 96 Lukin, Generaal Tim, 84 Lynch, Sgt J, 22 Lyne, Trp, 10 Mackay, Trp, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 20 Mackenzie, Trp, 10 MacLachlan, Sgt, 32 106


Maddon, Trp, 7 Mafeking, 97, 98, 99 Major Mitchell, 102 Marchant, PC, 33 Mashonaland, 4, 98, 99 Matabeleland Relief Force, 97 Matjesfontein, 86, 92 McCarthy, Capt J, 24 McMurtrie, PC, 33 Milner, Lord, 82 Mjova, Native Const, 13 Modderfontein, 100 Mosureik, Wm, 33 Moule, Sgt, 13, 14 Mr Less Pivnic Pivnic, Les, 5 Mr. A. E. Hammond Hammond, Mr. A. E., 7 Natal Bridge Guards, 2, 16 Native Rebellion, 13 New Canada, 3, 75 Newcastle, 9, 12, 100 NZASM, 100 O’Brein, Wm, 33 Orange River Colony, 25, 100, 102 Pietermaritzburg, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 103, 104 Pinetown, 11, 12 Pinto-Leite, Sub Insp, 10 Plummer, 97, 99 Point, 8, 18 Poutsma, 93 Prisoners of War, 8 Rae, PC, 32 Ramsay, WW, 20 Rand Refinery, 79 Red Flag, 90 Reynolds, Wm, 33 Richards, PC, 33 Richmond, 9, 13 RMS Edinburgh Castle, 92 S.A.M.R, 103, 104 South African Mounted Rifles, 103 SA Mounted Rifles, 59 SAR Police Band Durban, 48 SAR Police Dogs, 71 Saunderson, Mr Claims Dept, 13 Sers ‘Skip’ Scheepers, 71 107


Sersant ‘Tokkie’ Koen, 72 Sherrell, Supt EJ, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 sir Benjamin Robertson Robertson, sir Benjamin, 85 Smith, PC, 32 South African Constabulary, 4, 83, 100 specie, 11, 14 Specie Coaches, 3, 80 Spooner, HCC, 20 spurs, 88 Standerton, 8 Stanford, Lt Col AA, 2, 44 Steen, Chief Inspector O, 2, 39 Stockdale, FR, 20 Stuart, LA, 20 Stubbs, Sgt, 33 Supt DJ Sherrell Sherrell, Supt DJ, 2, 7 Taylor, PC, 33 Taylor, Sgt, 32 The Gemsbok, 43 Touzel, Corp, 22 Tows River, 34 Train Escort, 10, 11 Trans Natal, 79 Transvaal, 9, 25, 100, 101, 102, 104 Trew, 4, 82, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 103 Truter, 85 Tuffs, Det, 11, 12 Tugela, 10 Tyler, EFH, 20 Umgeni, 85, 86, 88, 89, 90, 93, 94 uniforms and badges, 4, 95 Urquhart, Railway Constable., 34 Utrecht Mounted Police UMP, 100 Venter, Col HJT, 3, 49 Walker, CE., 20 Walker, Head-Constable, 22 Watch and Ward, 14 Water Police, 2, 3, 14, 17, 18, 23, 52, 53, 59, 60, 92 Webb, Sgt WJ,, 20 Wests, 21 Wevell, Sgt, 11, 12, 13, 20 White Train, 105 Whitehead, Trp, 9, 10 Wonderfontein, 100 108


Zeederberg’s coaches, 97

Conclusion I hope you have enjoyed this little nostalgic trip through our “Police & Railway” section. Please send in your stories and your photographs about “Police & Trains”. Please send in biographical detail of railway policemen in Southern Africa if you knew them – for genealogical purposes. This is one way to honour our comrades who served before us. Photographs of their graves are also welcome! The “Military and Railways in Southern Africa” will hopefully be another project. I have found excellent photographs on our SA forces deployed in German East Africa during WW1. (We even had a provisional police force in Tanganyika made up by South African policemen!) My section on SAR Police personalities I have left out as well as the stories written by Ronnie Beyl on the deployment of “Kobus”. We issue another special edition later if we receive more information etc The Loubscher-Memories are also in the pipeline. This is a “gem”.

Copyright Please respect the copyright! By all means please off-load this document for your own enjoyment – but do not use these photographs for commercial purposes. Kind Regards Hennie-the-Policeman, aka Hennie Heymans

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