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THE ULOLIWE

The Railways of Southern Africa: Past & Present SpoorweĂŤ van SuidelikeSuidelike-Afrika: Toeka tot Nou A monthly railway historical and research publication ‘n Maandelikse spoorweg historiese en navorsing publikasie Vol 4 No 4 UnUn-official / Nie Amptelik - Gratis Everything to do with the former SA Railways: i.e. lighthouses, harbours, staff, photos, books, RMT, stations, tugs, SAR Police, SAA, catering, pipelines, stamps, models, rolling stock, armoured trains etc Hennie Heymans, Pretoria, ZA heymanshb@gmail.com April 2013 2013

Model Train at Sun City

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Table of Contents Front Cover .............................................................................................................................. 5 Wepener’s Perambulations .................................................................................................... 5 Blue PRASA 18E’s in Kroonstad ....................................................................................... 5 2013-03-16 On the Free State Gold Mines ........................................................................ 7 Easter in the Free State ..................................................................................................... 12 09th March 2013 ................................................................................................................ 22 SAR Police Duties Waterval Boven: HBH ......................................................................... 26 Return to Pretoria .............................................................................................................. 45 Photographs: Capt Van Vuuren (SAR & H Police) ...................................................... 46 Collection: HBH ................................................................................................................ 46 SAR 15069: Hospital Coach official drawing ................................................................ 49 Gathering of information ................................................................................................. 49 Response: Rollo Dickson .................................................................................................. 49 Response: Peter Stow........................................................................................................ 50 Response: J Stuart Grossert ............................................................................................. 51 Response: Bruno Martin: Australia ................................................................................ 52 Response: Hein Truter: Werna Maritz’s book .............................................................. 53 Response: 15AR, Driver Petrus Botha ............................................................................ 53 Response: Leith Paxton 15A 1968 ................................................................................... 56 Response Geoff Pethick: Coaches all 3rd Class ............................................................ 57 Gold, Diamonds and Specie - HBH .................................................................................... 58 Specie Coach No 4094: Gold Reef City: Johannes Botha ............................................. 62 Train Robbery at Goudplaas or Eerste Goud................................................................ 71 Railway History: Combating of Unauthorized Transportation ..................................... 71 Port Elizabeth SAR Coaching Stock: Mark Ruddy .......................................................... 72 “University on Wheels” ................................................................................................... 74 SAR No 5562 ...................................................................................................................... 75 Natal – Rudi Venter .............................................................................................................. 76 Metro – Natal: Rudi Venter ................................................................................................. 78 2


Train Design Test Coach – Bill Deyzel ............................................................................... 78 Train Design Coach: Jacobus Marais.................................................................................. 81 Train Design Coach Jaco Holtshauzen .............................................................................. 81 From my files: HBH .............................................................................................................. 83 Nuwe Treindinamikatoetswaens.................................................................................... 83 SAR 15092........................................................................................................................... 85 SAR 15093........................................................................................................................... 86 15096.................................................................................................................................... 87 Jacobus Marais: Zim Truck at Merrievale ......................................................................... 91 Johannesburg Tram: Dylan Knott....................................................................................... 92 South African Airways ......................................................................................................... 93 Statue at Jan Smuts, Johannesburg Airport now O Tambo Airport .......................... 93 SAA: Flights and Prices: Paul Mills ................................................................................ 94 Skycoach ............................................................................................................................. 95 Apartheid and Fares on SAA .......................................................................................... 95 International fares ................................................................................................................. 97 Boeing Timetable ............................................................................................................... 98 Gautrain .................................................................................................................................. 99 Gautrein vertraag ná diefstal........................................................................................... 99 Gautrain – South Africa’s fast one! Compiled by Jeanette Jacobs ................................. 99 News flash: Gautrain guards watch hijacking: Compiled by Jeanette Jacobs ........... 104 SAS Praghotel is nou soos seer vinger ............................................................................. 105 Railways and the Media..................................................................................................... 107 Venice-Simplon Orient Express – Sunday Times: 24 Feb 2013 ................................ 107 France: The Ouigo ........................................................................................................... 107 USA - San Francisco Rail Freeway (Almeda Route) .................................................. 108 Books and Rail Magazines ................................................................................................. 110 Steam Train Romance: Michael Walker ....................................................................... 110 Natal Newsletter: Railway Society of Southern Africa – Ashley Peter ................... 112 RMIG – Lionel Penning .................................................................................................. 113 3


Railway History Group – Wally Greig ............................................................................ 115 Railway Map of Southern Africa – Mark Newham ....................................................... 115 Value of ED Campbell’s book on the NGR ................................................................. 116 Aliwal North Museum ....................................................................................................... 117 Railway Badges: Nico van der Westhuis ......................................................................... 118 Philately: Nico van der Westhuis ..................................................................................... 119 Durban – Piet Venter .......................................................................................................... 120 Amamzimtoti – South Coast Line ................................................................................ 120 Metro: New From CTE – Pietermaritzburg..................................................................... 120 Scotburgh: South Coast Line ............................................................................................. 121 Wheels – fair wear and tear ........................................................................................... 121 Amabele Station - Eastern Cape - Junction for Mthatha - Anton van Schalkwyk .... 122 Western Cape: Francois Mattheüs .................................................................................... 126 Robert Maidment Wilson................................................................................................... 127 Holgate: Andre Kritzinger ................................................................................................. 129 Around the Globe ............................................................................................................... 130 Australia: Bruno Martin ................................................................................................. 130 This Happened In Brisbane: Gum Leaves Caused The Train To Crash! ................ 130 USA: Pullman Travel: Submitted by Andy Anderson from Umgeni Steam Railway and Compiled by Johan Jacobs ......................................................................................... 132 SAR & H Tugs: Peter Sinclair ............................................................................................ 137 SAR & H: Tugs: Mutiny On The High Seas: Peter Sinclair ........................................... 137 Some photographs: Peter Sinclair ................................................................................ 151 Heavy lift Ships: Received from Francois Lotz and Compiled by Johan Jacobs ....... 153 Pandora’s Box ...................................................................................................................... 158 Disclaimer and Greetings .................................................................................................. 158

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Front Cover Some of my friends had visited Sun City for a few days. Here is Malinda Lensing pictured ... “on the footplate”. She states the ride was rather expensive. I am glad that there is “miniature train” but wouldn’t a model of a SAR or Spoornet model look better? Seeing that so many visitors from abroad visit the internationally acclaimed resort.

Wepener’s Perambulations Blue PRASA 18E’s in Kroonstad Hi Guys. We have been sent photos of Blue PRASA 18E’s in Kroonstad. What we have been told is that the 18E’s will work the passenger trains all the way from Johannesburg to Bloemfontein and return. The Kroonstad drivers are to get training on these. Cheers. J & J.

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2013-03-16 On the Free State Gold Mines

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Easter in the Free State Hi Guys. We confirmed that 3 passenger trains were running on the OFS main line from Johannesburg to, East London, Port Elizabeth and Zastron [Bloemfontein only]. But railway men still refer to it as the "Zastron". Before departure we phoned Leeuhof. "Algoa not near ". Call to Union "Sy het 14h31 by my verby gegaan". Approaching Hennenman 15h00, we phoned the TCO, she said "John today is killing me, no trains all day, only the passenger trains this afternoon". Nearing Kroonstad we phoned Koppies "Algoa" not left Leeuhof". We carried on to Rooiwal arrived 15h25, were the TCO and security member were on the platform. He made a few calls and told us. "She is only near Sasolburg now", I knew nothing about these trains, no "YQ" received. Only the Car Train on Up Line due soon". We decided to wait in the cabin, still an original Lever Frame set up. Signals still mechanical, points electrical, female members, unable to pull then, if mechanical. Sad to see no "Van Schoor" instruments. Frame in good condition, but no shiny steel portions. TCO said, "When in College, we were shown, the metal glove, used to keep steel portion shiny, we said not interested, then shown "Brasso" again not interested, they took items away". All decided they were TCO's not cleaning staff. Lovely to hear the clunk of the Semaphore signal levers, the tingle of the wires along the platform. A phone call from Koppies "She is on her way". Whilst waiting a quick inspection of waiting rooms/toilets. Parquet blocks shining, red stoep also shiny, toilets clean/neat. A private person comes in once a week to clean/dust/polish Station buildings. More clunks and soon the Car Train, sped past at a high speed, with 140 axles the maximum on this main line. Hoots from the crew. Train fully laden, as seen on open trucks, many closed trucks also in load, some marked DOUBLE DECK or SINGLE DECK. [For Kombi/Mini bus type vehicles]. A minute later the Algoa sped past, again friendly waves from the crew. We noticed no Dining Saloon/Kitchen Car in consist. Sitter coaches full, 4 x Sleeper and 6 x Sleeper coaches also well occupied. More clunks and semaphore signals dropped into danger position awaiting next train. Chatted a bit, told that 3 x TCO's share an old SAR departmental house at R1,800.00 12


per month, each paying a third. Where are the days in Seventies when one hired a house for R27.00pm. On the way to Rooiwal we noticed that all the tall, thick trunks of old, Eucalyptus trees, plus all the bush next to the line had been removed from Westleigh onwards. [Been line side since doubling of main line]. Nearing Heuningspruit we came across a team busy, sawing down these trees. According to logo on vehicles, a private contractor. All the way further we smelt the pungent odour given off by these trees. Smelt like "Zambuk Salf". Asking the TCO at Rooiwal why the trees were being cut down he replied. "Gangs are stealing the overhead wire, cutting it up or just rolling it up, placing in the boots of two cars and speeding away in different directions". But mentioned has been quite for a while now. They use the trees for hiding and cover to steal the catenary. He also told that when it became apparent to Electrical Control in Johannesburg, [As soon as wire is cut, an alarm goes off and the Security and repair teams are alerted] It takes a short while for them to arrive and the repair team is always accompanied by lots of armed guards. "Wagte met GROOT gewere". Large high intensity portable lights are erected and within a very short time, the contact wire is replaced. Also said that drivers often would phone the TCO, advising that contact wires on their line, [Usually can see afar, that wire has come loose from the copper attaching clamps, stop train before damaged area or on an adjacent line are sagging]. When phoning Control, being advised, no alarm. TCO has to explain that wire is sagging, not making contact with rails or cut, hence current still flowing as normal, but dangerous to any approaching train. Only then is repair team sent out. Local TCO's stopping trains or working "Wrong road" around damaged section. The light was fading now and we tried for one last photo stop between Geneva and Holfontein. The railway lines to show the level crossing height were from the CGR 1903/04/06 and SAR 1910. The Algoa sped past, now with a Kroonstad crew, plenty of hoots. When we left here about a million flying ants were on the road and we had to stop to clean the windscreen at Hennenman. To our surprise were informed that FIVE train loads of coal have been loaded and transported from the recently re-opened coal mine at Vierfontein. This mine supplied the ESKOM power station there, was closed and cooling towers imploded in 1990's. Trains run via Westleigh, Kroonstad - Diesels off, Electrics on and then Northwards to Western Transvaal power stations. A TFR office has been opened there, to handle documentation of traffic. Not sure where office is, might be at mine. Station and 13


houses vandalised at Vierfontein. The reason for the longer route, is that the newly re-opened line to Orkney is still not up to standard, for heavy and long trains. Another interesting item is that when the Orkney to Westleigh line is fully operational, Suburban/Metro sets are to be introduced between Klerksdorp and Kroonstad. Apparently many workers travel between these two towns by road at present. We think this is just wishful thinking/dreaming. Then CTC is to be introduced between Leeuhof and Kroonstad, with Dover and Wolvehoek being closed in September 2013. Leeuhof will then control this section. Presently mini panels in use, which is easier to convert to CTC, than lever frame set ups. The other stations Koppies, Rooiwal, Heuningspruit and Westleigh thereafter. Target 2016 set as completion date, together with Hennenman, Whites, Virginia, Welgelee, Theunissen and Brandfort, these stations also have mini panels. Currently CTC from Kroonstad to Outer home signal at Hennenman on Kroonstad side. Staff to be used at Leeuhof, Kroonstad and Bloemfontein. Phoned TCO at Hennenman this morning at 10h20, said last train for today just past. Another killer of a day for her. Stated Amatola left Hennenman at 00h12 this morning, running five hours late. The "Zastron" was cancelled at last minute. Hence no one could give us departure details. Spoorweggroete. John and Jacque.

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09th March 2013 Hi Guys. Today's sightings are a bit different as I just could not get close to almost all of the trains! Due to access to yard areas and rain! The first shots are at Gunhill, mielies departing south, the yard shunt having a rest and 18E's on a train load of Caustic soda heading to Bethlehem and beyond. The pipeline markers have all been re-painted. The station building is Makwassie. Then Welkom station, mielies leaving for Kroonstad, RRL's locos and the Friedesheim timber shunt at the old goods shed in Welkom. Cheers. 22


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SAR Police Duties Waterval Boven: HBH Introduction During a visit to a Flea Market at Melrose House I saw some old junk for sale. I purchased some of the papers and the stallholder asked whether I was interested in more? I replied in the affirmative. He invited me to his house on the West Rand and my father and I visited him. There I bought three – four “Apple boxes” of books, notes etc. The owner of the documents was the late Lt Gen van Vuuren, a former Commissioner of the SAR Railway Police. I sifted through the papers and put them all in order. I kept a few items for my own collection and donated the rest of his “papers” to the Voortrekker Monument (Heritage Section). Gen Van Vuuren was a chairman of the ATKV – an Afrikaans Cultural body attached to the SA Railways for the promotion of Afrikaans Culture. In the collection I found some SAR Police Case Dockets, Police Pocket Books, reports, pay sheets, telegrams and some correspondence. Here is his report and the investigation diary of the accident that took place at Waterval Boven on 12 Novemeber 1949. [A police docket in South Africa has three 26


distinct sections: Section “A” – are the statements from “A – 1”; Section “B” is the correspondence from “B - 1”; while Section “C” comprises the Investigation Diary, each page of the diary is numbered from “C - 1”.] The purpose of publishing the investigation dairy is so that others could learn how to perform a task properly and to learn from past mistakes:

C-1 Here below appears the first entry (C - 1) in the Investigation Dairy and Report Form:

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It was 03:40 on 15 November 1949 when Capt Van Vuuren (in Pretoria) received news of the accident at Waterval Boven. He makes various arrangements; it was in the days before telephones. Policemen had to be visited at their homes and informed to come on duty. He and his men depart at 05:00 for Waterval Boven ,

C–2 Upon his arrival at 08:30 he finds that all injured have been removed from the wreckage. The injured were moved by train to Waterval Boven. The dead, at that stage 48 men, are moved under Police guard by truck from the scene to Waterval Onder. He inspects the scene of the accident and the carriages. Property of the passengers was collected and taken to Waterval Boven and placed under police guard. He describes the scene of the accident. Police control the crowds and ensure that rail workers can perform their duties without hindrance. The next page is a list of policemen at the scene of the accident. Some police arrived by car and other came by train. Interesting he notes that the road was very bad east of Middelburg.

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C- 3

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C-3

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It is law in South Africa that any unnatural death must be investigated and all evidence placed before the public prosecutor. Each person who died had to be photographed, fingerprinted and an autopsy had to be performed to establish the cause of death.

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He and men are busy at Waterval Boven. He sends an officer, Lt Venter, and men to attend to the injured and to keep uninjured passengers together. He arranges for a Police Photographer. Sgt Van Deventer is the man identified to “carry the docket”. Sgt Kokot, local SAP Station Commander, and members of the SA Police are also in attendance. SAP reinforcements arrive from Ermelo. The SAP District Commandant of Ermelo is also on the scene. The SAP DC “hands over” to Capt Van Vuuren. A police photographer has been dispatched to the accident and the SAP DC and his men depart. Sgt Kokot informs the Captain what he and his men had done. He interviews the District Engineer (SAR DE). The SAR DE will compile a plan of the accident, thus relieving Sgt Van Deventer of this duty. He notes that senior SAR staff arrive. He notes that 22 doctors were on the scene. He has a list of their names. C-4

He gives the time and date of the accident.

Composition of train 513: Then he gives the list of locomotives and carriages involved. Train 513 was used to convey mineworkers from the Rand to the border post Ressano Garcia.

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Description of accident for police purposes:

He describes the scene of the accident and the position of both locomotives and position of carriages. He gives particulars of the injuries and mentions who has died. He now places his witnesses on the scene of the accident: Driver Van Rooyen was there first, and then Mr Will the Station Master followed by Sgt Kokot of the SAP and then Dr De Jager. Mr CS Hutchison was in the hospital coach, also injured; however he assisted the other injured passengers. Mr Hutchison departed to Middelburg at 11:00 and his statement could not be obtained.

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He then describes that Conductor Swart protected his train and informed Waterval Boven’s Station Master that an accident took place. People were called to the station with a local siren. Mr Will the local SM informed “Pretoria” and pilot working was established on the line.

Capt Van Vuuren reports that the dead and the injured were removed from the scene. The uninjured mineworkers refused to help the injured and they were belligerent. Mr Hutchinson reported that some were confused and ran away. The Captain then lauds the residents of the railway hamlet, Waterval Boven and the local SA Police.

The dead and the injured are removed from the wreckage. Fires are lit, it’s raining. The injured moan and cry out in pain. The first train to arrive from the scene of the accident at Waterval Boven was at 06:47 with 37 passengers, the second train arrived

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with 96 passengers at 08:10. Two passengers had died. At 11:00 the ambulance train departed from Waterval Boven

Now the Captain thinks about the diplomatic ramifications. He phones Maj Baartman (SAR & H Police) and asks him to contact the Portuguese consul. Maj Bartman refers him to the “Protector” in Pretoria. He asks Lt La Grange to contact the “Protector” but he is unsuccessful. C-6

Now Capt Van Vuuren thinks about the practicalities. The survivors are then housed in tents in a shed. He arranges for their meals. Mr Thompson informs him that they will move the miners to the WANELA compounds at Witbank. With the aid of Mr Thompson he orders 60 coffins. Sgt Kokot (SAP) is asked to arrange with the local District Surgeon to perform an autopsy on Driver Green. Green’s watch stopped working at 23:30 but that is of no “evidential value”. After the autopsy on the driver, autopsies had to be performed on the dead passengers in order to establish cause of death. (In all cases blood is drawn from the various deceased.)

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The bodies start to arrive at Waterval Boven. They obtain a shed where they can perform their duties. Each corpse is numbered and their fingerprints taken. Cash and personal property is meticulously tagged and bagged. Graves are dug with assistance of Works Inspector.

He return to the scene of the accident where he meets the Commissioner of the SAR Police, Brig Bester and Mr Theron, a photographer of the SAR Publicity Dept. Explains what happened to them. Instructs the photographer to take photos of certain “points� of evidential value. Lt Venter had also taken some photographs.

He then turns to the safety of the onlookers at the bridge. They are not allowed on the bridge. Makes sure that nobody (injured or corpse) has been left at the scene of 36


the accident. Found property is placed under guard. A breakdown train has arrived to pull carriages back to Waterval Boven

C-7 Policemen are human, too. He arranges their duties, some to rest for night duty. He and his Commissioner visit the passengers and he addresses them. The passengers are unhappy because they have to return to Witbank. He speaks to Mr Thompson and the Station Master about this problem. He does not want a riot on his hands as well. Only four of the bodies are “positiviely� identified by the other passengers.

Mr Martins of the Portuguese Native Affairs office (Barberton) arrives. Mr Martins and the Captain have difficulties in communication. Mr martins addresses the Portuguese subjects.

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The local District Surgeon begins with the autopsies but is only doing what he can to establish cause of death. The Magistrate stops this “short-cut� and says he wants full autopsies on the bodies. The Captain phones one LT La Grange and asks him to get in touch with the Attorney General to appoint a few doctors as District Surgeons. The Captain meets Mr Friend, Assistant-Magistrate Carolina, who informs him that the Attorney General already has appointed more District Surgeons. The Captain succeeds in getting the telephone number of the Curator in Johannesburg but the railways police are unable to make contact with him.

C-8 Photographers of the SAP arrive to take photos of each corpse. The SAR photographer also arrives but has not enough film; he takes group photos of the corpses. The SAR electrician arrives to give them sufficient lights in the shed. Once again he visits the scene of the accident and spectators are moved away from the eastern side to enable workers to proceed with their duties.

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Dr Brink arrives at 19:00 and says he will enjoy supper first and will then proceed with autopsies. The Captain now makes the necessary funeral arrangements after speaking to interested parties. He visits the temporary morgue and the police are helpful however the conditions are very bad. The taking of fingerprints is difficult. At about 20:00 the Railway Police Commissioner, Brig Bester, return to Johannesburg. The Captain then proceeds to Waterval Onder to supervise the transfer of passengers and post to Ressano Garcia. The first count of uninjured passengers are 348. The post mortems continue until 14:30 when he takes a few hours off to rest. All 50 bodies have been examined by the doctors. He posts a guard there to keep people away and arranges for the SAR Health Dept to spray at the temporary morgue. The smell is awful. Once again he visits the scene of the accident to make sure everything is in order.

Filler: Two pocket books. (1) Pocketbook of No 15840 (Mounted) Constable M van Vuuren. (2) A pocket book full of descriptions of wanted people as used by the SAP and the SA Mounted Rifles. Const M van Vuuren, a graduate, became the Commissioner of the SAR & H Police. (Note old spelling of Poliesie (sic)).

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C-9 He states it is difficult to obtain a reliable figure of the number injured. So far he has established that 117 passengers were injured. He arranges for graves to be dug and to be completed before 09:00 on 16 November 1949.

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Coffins no arrive by train at Waterval Boven. The stench is unbearable. SAR Healt Dept sprayed in the vicinity. He arranges for coffins to be taken to the grave site. The Breakdown train is still at the scene of the accident. He visits the communal grave 7 feet x 9 feet deep, coffins are place two-two; one above the other. Corpses are placed in coffins which are marked. About 150 to 200 people attend the funeral. In the mean time he hears that the Magistrate does not want the funeral to proceed.

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C – 10 The reason the Magistrate does not want the funeral to proceed is that some of the next-of-kin may intend to attend the funeral. The Captain is consulting with various stake holders. Eventually the funeral had taken place, various denominations had officiated at the service. A shed is now put to the disposal of the police to sort out belongings and lost property belonging to passengers; deceased and injured passengers. Passengers collected their lost luggage. The track would be opened soon and passengers would be allowed to depart. He phones “Witbank� and requests that Mr Hutchinson returns passports he has in his possession. A car is dispatched to fetch same. In the mean time lists (in duplicate) are made of all property in the SAR Police possession.

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The captain now meets with Dr Sampaio, the Curator of Portuguese Natives. Dr Sampaio has spoken to all passengers and he is satisfied that everything possible has been taken care of. The Captain attends the funeral of Driver Green. The Rev Carney officiated and many people turned up to attend. At 16:00 he speaks to Mr Friend(Magistrate’s Office) about the stench at the graves. They need permission to close the graves. The Magistrate says the graves may be covered the next day. The captain phones Komitpoort en speaks to Sgt Heyns. He instructs him to go through the first train from Lourenco Marques to establish whether any next of kin were on their way. Upon further enquiries Sgt Heyns informs the Captain that no next of kin are on their way to Waterval Boven. Permission is now granted to close the graves. Officials of the Chamber of Mines arrive with passports and inform the Captain that they are going to Ressano Garcia to assist the miners over the border. Graves are closed under police supervision.

C – 11

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At 20:00 the miners are entrained. It is ensured that the train would proceed slowly over the bridge. The Captain and his Lieutenant sleep in Waterval Onder. The investigation is nearing completion and the Captain ties up all loose ends.

08:00; 17 November 1949 and he is back in Waterval Boven with other routine police duties.

C - 12

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Return to Pretoria 21 November 1949 at 17:00 back in Pretoria.

Left: Brig JB Bester, Chief Superintendent of the SAR & H Police at the time of the accident. Right: General M van Vuuren, speaking to Const Robberts (Best Lady Recruit: Esselen Park) and her parents, Det/Sgt & Mrs Robberts of Railway Police, Durban. [As a boy we lived in the same street as the Robberts family. He was a good policeman and detective. ] 45


Photographs: Capt Van Vuuren (SAR & H Police)

Collection: HBH

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I went through my collection and of the locomotives and rolling stock I only had the following in my files: From my Schoolboy scrapbook

Diagram 15 AR 47


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SAR 15069: Hospital Coach official drawing

A failed attempt in drawing SAR No 15069 by HBH

Gathering of information Via sar-List I asked members for further information.

Response: Rollo Dickson

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Dear RD Thanks very much! [To me history is like a puzzle - one has to find all the pieces to complete the picture!] HBH

Response: Peter Stow 1. Hi Hennie, The complete report of this accident is in the THL. It is one of the few earlier reports that seem to have survived. Some of the later ones were bound and Wally Brass used them for his Accident Reports in Railways Africa. I have the complete history of the coaches involved, as well as diagrams, if you are interested. As most of the derailed coaches fell on their roofs some of the under frames were reclaimable and new type closed vestibule type H-21 bodies were built on them. That explained why you had certain new type H-21 coaches numbered in the balcony type H-9 series on old under frames with bar trusses. Ironically one of these coaches, balcony type H-9 number 2579, which was rebuilt at Uitenhage in June 1950 as a type H-21 complete with illuminated numeral indicators in the fascia board as was then standard on new timber bodied stock, was written off in a head-on collision between a goods train and a passenger train, probably train 71 from Durban to Bloemfontein, both hauled by class 15E’s, on 12 July 1956 near Waghorn between Bethlehem and Bloemfontein. As one who has spent many hours in the National Archives going through accident reports to determine which coaches met premature demises as a result of collisions, derailments and fires I fully appreciate your comment that history is like a puzzle 50


and the satisfaction one has on finding one of these pieces and seeing how it fits perfectly in the bigger picture is a reward in itself. Unfortunately, some of the pieces have been lost or destroyed, but there are sufficient left to give us a glimpse of what the whole must have looked like. Yours in Rail Peter Stow 2. Hi Hennie, Further to my comment below, the accident was also described in a chapter of the book “Disaster Struck South Africa� by Jose Burman, published by Struik in 1971. There were also 3 dramatic pictures of the accident in the book as well. Regards Peter

Response: J Stuart Grossert Dear Peter and Hennie: I was intrigued that you have seen the accident report. As a young boy, I remember a little of my father telling us about the derailment, a horrific scene for the railway workers who went to assist. If my memory is correct the train was a special carrying mine workers back to Mozambique and being double headed was no doubt a long one. The old SAR policy for double headers was that the senior (more experienced) crew were in the front loco, and of course were responsible for working the brakes. Apparently the senior crew were in the second loco, with a junior crew in front. Obviously the train ran away down the 1:50 immediately after leaving Waterval Boven and it seems that either the brakes were not applied or something failed. Once a train runs away on such a steep grade, it probably can't be stopped. Are my memories correct and what were the findings as to the cause? It is a sad story, Stuart J. Stuart Grossert, Halifax, NS, Canada. 51


Response: Bruno Martin: Australia

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Response: Hein Truter: Werna Maritz’s book

Response: 15AR, Driver Petrus Botha Johannes Botha sent photos of a 15AR by his brother Mr Petrus Botha: 15AR 1930

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15AR 2093

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Diagram of 15AR – HBH Collection

Response: Leith Paxton 15A 1968

Class 15A No.1968 Photo DF Holland; Collection Leith Paxton. There are a few more responses; we will deal with them next month.

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Response Geoff Pethick: Coaches all 3rd Class •

3250 H-21 3rd class mainline, built SAR Uitenhage, entered service July 1940, withdrawn January 1984.

2579 H-9 3rd class mainline, built SAR Pretoria, entered service 23 November 1927, withdrawn March 1957.

2561 H-9 3rd class mainline, built Linke Hoffman, erected at SAR Bloemfontein, entered service 9 March 1927, withdrawn March 1950.

2590 H-9 3rd class mainline, built SAR Pretoria, entered service 27 April 1928, withdrawn August 1950.

2499 H-9 3rd class mainline, built SAR Salt River, entered service26 July 1927, withdrawn August 1950.

2697 H-21 3rd class mainline, built SAR Bloemfontein, entered service August 1937, withdrawn March 1950.

2646 H-9 3rd class mainline, built SAR Pretoria, entered service 24 March 1932, withdrawn August 1981.

2733 H-21 3rd class mainline, built SAR Durban, entered service October 1938, withdrawn November 1982.

3308 H-21 3rd class mainline, built SAR Uitenhage, entered service July 1942, withdrawn October 1978.

2552 H-9 3rd class mainline, built Linke Hoffman, erected Uitenhage and entered service 5 February 1927, withdrawn August 1952.

AMBULANCE 15069 8 wheel hospital coach, built SAR Pretoria, entered service June 1940, withdrawn March 1954.

3235 H-21 3rd class mainline, built SAR Uitenhage, entered service February 1940, withdrawn March 1953.

2669 H-21 3rd class mainline. CME’s Carriage Register has this renumbered from H-9 2521 which was built by Linke Hoffman, erected SAR Salt River, and entered traffic 7 May 1926. Listed as destroyed in the big Salt River Fire 8 March 1933. Entry for 2669 has it as being renumbered in January 1936, classified H-21, withdrawn July 1978. Perhaps it was a new body on an old underframe, but why bother?

3215 H-21 3rd class mainline, built by SAR Bloemfontein, entered service June 1940, no withdrawal date listed.

2468 H-9 3rd class mainline, built SAR Salt River, entered service 24 March 1926, withdrawn November 1971.

GV 4335 K-42 Main line Luggage Van, built SAR Pretoria, entered traffic 57


September 1938, withdrawn September 1980.

Gold, Diamonds and Specie - HBH Reading a book on the history of Freemasonry in South Africa, I read that the richest people the world had known, at one stage, lived in South Africa or had interests in our mining industry. That is before the discovery of oil. The railways in Southern Africa owe a lot to their development to the discovery of diamonds in Kimberley and later the discovery of gold on the Witwatersrand in the old ZAR. If it was not for mining, it is doubtful whether we would have been as industrially developed as we are. It is also no wonder that the Diamond Detective Department (DDD) of the Cape Colony is the oldest continuous unit of the former South African Police. The sole duty of the DDD is to protect the diamond industry by combating illegal trade in diamonds, the so-called “IDB”. They have to protect the industry in order for the state to receive its fair share in the form of taxes. Many poor farmers went to jail because they tried to dispose of the fruits of their farm in the illegal diamond trade. No person may possess an uncut diamond – any diamond found should be handed over to the police. (There was usually a reward for the innocent finder.) Gold and diamonds conjure dreams of wealth; like a magnet draws steel pins; mining and “bright lights” draws its fair share of crooks, prostitutes, destitutes, smugglers, the idle and the undesirables. In Africa, Johannesburg had without a shadow of doubt the most colourful crooks, the most evil, the most cosmopolitan of people, most corrupt officials and police. Pres SJP Kruger had appointed Jan Smuts as Attorney General for the ZAR and Smuts reformed the police, the detective department and established a “Geheime Politie” or a secret police. Johannesburg was a real cesspool of vice and big and easy money, creating ideal opportunities for corruption. Boer General Manie Maritz tells us of his interesting days in the ZARP’s and how some of the officers were corrupt. No wonder after the Anglo Boer War, Lord Milner appointed Lt-Col TE Mavrogordato as the head of the CID in the Transvaal Colony. In this article we focus on the export of gold, bullion and specie. I had a general idea what the word specie meant, but took the trouble to look it up as some coaches were called specie coaches. Here is the real meaning of the word specie: “money in the 58


form of coins rather than notes.”1 Specie wagons or specie trucks were purposefully developed to transport gold bars and specie from the mines to our harbours. For this duty the SA Police and later the SAR & H Police were employed.

Our photo shows specie being loaded in Johannesburg in the old Transvaal Colony. Note the NZASM coaches in the background. My friend the late Dave Rhind wrote an interesting account of South Africa’s first train robbery in Railways Africa (December 1999:6.) The Natal Government Railways also had a robbery and here officials were involved. The NGR case was solved. (That is a story for another day.)

1

Definition of specie, noun: money in the form of coins rather than notes: the Bank of England in 1795 had held around £8 million in specie. Phrases in specie: Law in the real, precise, or actual form specified: the plaintiff could not be sure of recovering his goods in specie. http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/specie

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During the First World War and after the rebellion Col HF Trew who was the Commander of General Louis Botha’s body guard gave the following account of bullion being transported by train under SA Police escort: 60


“One day I went into the Civil Service Club, and there to my surprise, met Captain Giles of the South African Police. He told me that during the rebellion no gold had been sent away from the Rand. He had come down with two armoured trains and a police guard escorting about £14,000,000 of gold, which was contained in boxes. It was to be sent to England in a cruiser, and at the Cape Town railway station he had handed over the boxes to a naval guard, and obtained from the lieutenant a receipt for a definite number, which they had both counted, and checked. As we were dining together a telephone message was received from an agitated naval lieutenant to say that on recounting the gold they found that one box was missing, Giles left for the railway station, and returned to report that the missing box had been found in the ladies’ waiting-room; how it got there has remained a mystery to this day. The British Government were so afraid that the enemy might hear of this shipment, and try to intercept it, that I heard it had been transhipped twice before it reached England.”2

This is the scene during 1943. 2

Trew, 1936: p 62

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During 1946 the following advert appeared in the Nongqai:

[Cape Town Harbour: The Nongqai, Nov 1946, p1424.]

Specie Coach No 4094: Gold Reef City: Johannes Botha Johannes Botha visited Gold Reef City and took the following photographs for the benefit of our SAR modellers:

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Coach 4094

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The following are interior shots for our modellers:

I don’t think this is a fixture in the coach. 64


Bunk or bed

What a lovely stove! (To think they pay Railway Police for this job! I would have done it for free and enjoyed lovely “potjiekos� a.k.a. an Irish Stew (with a strong South African influence) on the route.) 65


Note ashtray on the safe.

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The toilet obviously partitioned off – not for visitors to Gold Reef City!

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Mm

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I doubt if this is the correct diagram of 4094. It is the only diagram I could find of SAR No 4094:

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Train Robbery at Goudplaas or Eerste Goud The other day I visited an old colleague, brig IWC Human, formerly from the Murder and Robbery Squad. He investigated a case where one of the suspects were also involved in a “great train robbery” near Pietersburg. He told me the story and showed me the police photos of the train robbery. A specie coach was also involved. If my memory serves me correct the robbery took place at “Eerstegoud” – or translated to English: “First Gold” or at “Goudplaas”3 or “Place of Gold”. Indeed, a suitable name for a train robbery. However they may change the name to “Lost Gold” as old Ivan Human had solved the case and recovered the stolen money. He later brought the SAR & H Police in on the case. He has interesting photos of the train robbery in his scrap book.

Railway History: Combating of Unauthorized Transportation The following is an extract from a SA Police Force Order (General) in a follow up to an order issued during 1963 to all police stations in South Africa: “4. Combating of Unauthorized Transportation: Motor Carrier Transportation Act No. 39 of 1930. Unauthorized transportation is increasing to such an extent that the South African Railways and other authorized and essential road transportation services are suffering serious financial losses. The problem has assumed such serious proportions that the Honourable, the Minister of Transport has specially requested the police to give intensive assistance in future with the combating of unauthorised transportation throughout the Republic. Every member of the Force must take steps so as to stamp out this evil by prosecuting offenders. In this connection, attention is drawn to circular SAP 1/8/31 Vol ll dated 11th May 1960, from this office under heading “MOTORTRANSPORTWET Nr 39 van 1930” and paragraph 6 of Force Order (General), no 25, of 1963 in which detailed instructions are given.” These instructions must again be brought to the notice of members of the Fore for necessary action. Index: Motor Carrier Transportation Act — Combating of Unauthorized Transportation. Unauthorized Transportation — Combating of. (29/61/2/4.) 3

If it is indeed Goudplaas the former Dutch spelling could have been Goudplaats – meaning place of gold and not farm with gold - HBH

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Comments by HBH The old SAR was the National Carrier and was of great strategic importance to South Africa and our Allies (i.e. Britain and the Commonwealth before 1961.) In order to be the national carrier the vested interests of the state had to be protected against “unfair” competition. It must be remembered that the SAR had to serve uneconomical lines as well. During 1964 the CID at my police station, Wentworth, investigated corruption charges against members of the Transportation Board. I was fortunate that Mike Bowery, the investigation officer visited me before he died, and he told me about the case. (I remembered reading one of the cases in the Charge Office.) It was so serious that he and the District Criminal Investigative Officer (DCIO) had to fly down to Cape Town to brief the minister. Later the SAR & H Police continuously enforced these rules on the national main roads of South Africa.

Port Elizabeth SAR Coaching Stock: Mark Ruddy You, Jacobus Marais, Noel Welch, Alexander James Knight and 2 others like this.

Dylan Knott Seating inside? Alexander James Knight Looks like standing room only. It is a compo coach. Should be saved maybe someone should speak to HRASA. This coach could easily be used by a group needing a subbie and they could use to arrange its interior to suit their needs. Alexander James Knight @Mark. Thanks for all the photos. Do you know when this coach will be scrapped? Mark Ruddy They are busy cutting other wagons in the same yard at this stage. I would not give this coach long to live. Dylan Knott let’s do something Alexander James Knight Get a business to sponsor its restoration and in return they can use the exterior as a marketing for their business for a year or two. It will be cheaper for them as many will see the advertising.

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Hennie Heymans Dankie Mark Ruddy! Mag ek die foto's in die Uloliwe gebruik asb? Mark Ruddy dis reg oom Hennie, jy mag so doen.

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“University on Wheels”

''Univesity on wheels, drivers road knowledge training'' -rytuig staan vergete onder ‘n afdak in Deal Party, PE.

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SAR No 5562

Discussion about No 5562:

Mark Ruddy on Suid-Afrikaaanse SpoorweĂŤ / SA Railways / Ulolwe The side door standing at Deal Party, PE. Number 5562. I noted the ends differ. The 75


one end is flat (this angle) but the other end curves in. You, Jacobus Marais, Noel Welch, Alexander James Knight and 2 others like this. Alexander James Knight @Mark. Thanks for all the photos. Do you know when this coach will be scrapped? Mark Ruddy They are busy cutting other wagons in the same yard at this stage. I would not give this coach long to live. Dylan Knott let’s do something.

Natal – Rudi Venter

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Note the old colour scheme on the second diesel – HBH.

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Metro – Natal: Rudi Venter

Train Design Test Coach – Bill Deyzel

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ST E1525 & 40117

E 1525 Rolmat Eksperimentele Lokomotief

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Train Design Coach No 15092

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Train Design Coach: Jacobus Marais

Train Design Coach Jaco Holtshauzen

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From my files: HBH Nuwe Treindinamikatoetswaens

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SAR 15092

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SAR 15093

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15096

What a T D C looks like inside;

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Source: SAS-SAR 1961-08-755

Source: SAR

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Jacobus Marais: Zim Truck at Merrievale

Hennie Heymans Is dit 'n Suid-Afrikaanse trok? 91


Bill Deyzel Hennie Heymans dit is ‘n Rhodesian trok. Jacobus Marais Rhodesian trok, die no is 50701511 en geen SA kenmerke nie.

Johannesburg Tram: Dylan Knott

You, Jacobus Marais, Danie Els, Alexander James Knight and 3 others like this. Deon Gouws Never seen it? Maybe in the transport museum? Dylan Knott Either Kempton Park or Walkerville. No - not in a transport museum. Rinke Blok there is one standing railway preservation society in Millsite. will check if I took a pics on my last visit.

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Dylan Knott cut up Hennie Heymans Dylan Knott - a nice atmospheric photo! I will ask in the next Uloliwe.

South African Airways Statue at Jan Smuts, Johannesburg Airport now O Tambo Airport Dr Henry Abbott asks what happened to the two statues at the former Jan Smuts Airport. Hallo Hennie, “Upon entering our fine new airport, travellers were met by statues of the country’s two most distinguished flyers, Sir Pierre van Rynevld DSO, MC, and Sir Quintin Brand DSO. Hesperus Andrias Van Ryneveld (better known by his friends as “Pierre” and, by my parents, as “Pierrie") and his brother before him had both, successively, been connected with the Royal Air Force from the day it was born on 1 April 1918, and in time Pierre was to become one of the two pioneer aviators who made the first flight from Britain to South Africa. After the war, he was called back to South Africa by Prime Minister Smuts in order to set up a South African Air Force.” Weet iemand op jou lyste dalk wat het van hierdie twee standbeelde geword? Dit moes al verwyder gewees het voor ek in omtrent die 1970’s die eerste keer daar gekom het, of ek het dit nie opgemerk nie. Die Lughawe het ook deesdae te veel ingange, ‘n mens weet nie eintlik watter een is die “Hoofingang” nie. Sien ook http://blogcritics.org/culture/article/oh-dear-such-is-life/page-2/ Groete, Henry Abbott •

Any further information re the statues will be welcome.

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I may mention on an official visit to the SA Air Force HQ I remember seeing the statue of Sir Pierre van Reyneveld in the foyer. Being a former “mountie” I remember him also dressed in riding breeches. I remember thinking flying in riding breeches? I also remembered we had the British tradition for some time in the defence force and police that all officers should be able to ride a horse. Even Scotland Yard had the tradition still in force a few years back; all police (commissioned) officers had to ride. It was also a condition of employed in days gone by, that an officer received an allowance for his charger.

The monument to Sir Pierre and Quinten Brand on the grounds of the University of Pretoria has been vandalised. The “air force” eagle has been removed, stolen and sent to the scrap dealers for recycling in ad finitum.

SAA: Flights and Prices: Paul Mills

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Skycoach

Apartheid and Fares on SAA (Note discrimination re price for “Non-Whites�; but not regarding seating or drinks.)

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International fares

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Boeing Timetable

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Gautrain Gautrein vertraag ná diefstal 2013-03-20 07:41 Johannesburg. - Vertragings kom Woensdag voor in die Gautrein-diens Gautrein tussen Midrand en Samrand nadat sowat 370 meter se seinkabels in daardie omgewing gesteel is. 'n Woordvoerder vir Bombela, wat die Gautrein Gautrein-diens diens bedryf, sê vertragings tussen 15 en 30 minute word verwag. "Alle treine tussen Centurion en Midrand sal teen 30 km/h beweeg." Hy het gesê die probleem sal hopelik voor 12:00 opgelos wees. Gautrein-dienste dienste van oos na wes, insluitend die lughawe-diens, lughawe word nie geraak nie. - Sapa http://www.beeld.com/Suid http://www.beeld.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Gautrein-vertragings-na-diefstal diefstal-20130320 Gautrain was delayed due to theft of 370 metre of overhead cables cables.

Gautrain – South Africa’s fast one! Compiled by Jeanette Jacobs

A Short History Gautrain is an 80-kilometre kilometre (50 mi) mass rapid transit railway system in Gauteng Province, South Africa,, which links Johannesburg, Pretoria,, and OR Tambo International Airport.. It was built to relieve the traffic congestion in the Johannesburg–Pretoria Pretoria traffic corridor and offer commuters a viable alternative to road transport,, as Johannesburg has a limited public transport infrastructure. The project was completed with the opening on 7 June 2012 of the final section between Rosebank and Johannesburg Park Station Station. 99


A diagram of the Gautrain's Electrostar

Gautrain route network. Total route length - 80 km (50 mi) (including 15 km (9.3 mi) underground) Off-peak Off frequency - 20min Peak frequency - 12min Travelling at up to 160 kilometres per hour, Gautrain takes 42 minutes to travel between Johannesburg and Pretoria. From Sandton to the OR Tambo International Airport takes 15 minutes, and provision has been made for air passengers to remotely check in at Sandton Station in future. Gautrain has 24 trains, each made up with four cars: 19 trains service the commuter network and five the airport link; the latter consists of forward rail cars specially adapted for the airport link with storage area for luggage and more luxurious seating. Our journey On 19 December 2012 commemorating our anniversary celebration we excitedly awaited the arrival of the Gautrain, looking forward to a journey on this phenomenal gold and silver, super fast train for people on the m move! ove! Soon we were 100


on our way from the Rhodesfield station to Sandton.

Between OR Tambo International Airport and Rhodesfield station

Gautrain arrives from OR Tambo at Gautrain Station Rhodesfield - Photographer: Jeanette Jacobs.

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Enjoying the Gautrain ride! Myself with hubby! Photographer – J Lotz.

Smooth sliding doors

Luxurious interior

First stop to Sandton at the Marlboro Station - Photographer: Jeanette Jacobs

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Surprisingly the train ride was not as smooth as expected and also not as fast as anticipated - the approximately speed of 100 kilometres per hour felt much slower indeed!

The luxury of the coach was enjoyed though and the journey in the

compressed silence seemed way too short.

Arrival at Sandton Station

... a peek into the driver’s cabin Photographer: Jeanette Jacobs

Sandton Station was a buzz of passenger’s trafficking to and fro on either escalators or lifts between four clinically clean floors with a visible presence of Security guards all over.

Exit / Entrance Sandton Station – Photo_ grapher: Jeanette Jacobs.

The friendly Tuc-Tuc driver made the R20 trip just about around the block worth our while. Photographer: Jeanette Jacobs.

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It is a brisk walk from the station to Sandton City and once walking around in the huge shopping centre which is the heart throb of Sandton, one can conveniently rely on a pleasant and somewhat bumpy ride in a so called ′Tuc-Tuc′ At the end of our return trip we realised to travel on the Gautrain to any of the destinations on the 80 km route can be as surprising and pleasant, comfortable and safe as promised in their logo – it is definitely for people on the move! ©JeanetteJacobs20130225 Acknowledgements: Wikepidia for information Other Photo’s : Wikepidia / Gautrain Website (Gautrain endorsed).

News flash: Gautrain guards watch hijacking: Compiled by Jeanette Jacobs Article courtesy of The Star Newspaper

Johannesburg - If you fall victim to crime in the vicinity of a Gautrain station, don’t expect Gautrain security to assist.

Security guard at the Gautrain This was the experience of a Jo-Burg man hijacked outside the Marlboro station last Wednesday. Corrine Pietersen said her husband, Kevin, was waiting to pick her up outside the station when two men approached him and told him to get out of the car. As he did, one of the men shot him. The bullet went through his left arm and into his abdomen. The bullet is still lodged next to his pelvis, but doctors told Corrine that it did not cause any damage or internal bleeding. His left elbow, however, was shattered and would need an operation. “He is stable at the moment. We are waiting for the operation because they can’t operate until the swelling has subsided,” she said. He is at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. 104


Corrine said a passer-by had witnessed the event and organised a taxi to take Kevin to the hospital while she looked after their nine-year-old son, who had witnessed the shooting. “If it weren’t for her, my husband would be dead,” said Corrine. She said she wanted to thank the woman, but had not taken her contact details because she had been in shock. The hijackers stole Kevin’s cell phone, wallet, sunglasses and a licensed firearm. However, Corrine said the police had not contacted her or Kevin to take a statement or the gun’s serial number. She said the car had been recovered, but could not be released until the investigation was over. Corrine was angry that the Gautrain’s security staffs were “just standing there”. But Gautrain spokesman Errol Braithwaite said: “Gautrain security personnel are not authorised to police the suburbs around our stations. “By law our policing powers are confined to our own premises.”Incidents should be reported to the Gautrain toll-free number at 0800 811 811. Police spokesman Warrant Officer Moses Maphakela said he would look into the case.

SAS Praghotel is nou soos seer vinger Transnet is the owner of the legendary and historic Carlton Hotel in Johannesburg. It is the highest building in Africa. Today it is nothing more than an “ugly sore finger” in down town, Johannesburg.

2013-03-14 23:51 - Jana van der Merwe - Beeld Die Carlton-hotel in die Johannesburgse middestad is deesdae net ’n spookagtige skaduwee van die glorieryke statussimbool wat dit vroeër was. Oudpress. Nelson Mandela en FW de Klerk het hul vredesverdrag hier onderteken. Die 600 slaapkamers, restaurant, swembaddek en banketsaal met plek vir tot 500 gaste wat ’n speelplek vir die rykes was, is alles tot niet. Dit was veral vir oudwerknemers ’n tragedie toe die spoghotel in 1997 deur die ekonomie en hoë misdaadsyfer tot stilstand geruk is. Die gebou is in sy geheel aan Transnet verkoop. Tori Anderson, ’n voormalige besprekings-en-skofbestuurder in die hotel, het in Januarie 2005 ’n reünie vir oudwerknemers gereël. Anderson, deesdae ’n topkonsultant in die onthaalbedryf, sê wêreldklas-hotellui is oor die dekades heen daar opgelei. ’n Nuwe Carlton-hotel is gebou nadat die oorspronklike een wat in 1906 geopen is in 1963 gesloop is. Dit het sewe jaar geduur om die nuwe luukse hotel te bou wat sy deure in 1972 oopgemaak het. Nadat ook dié hotel daarmee heen is, het Transnet die hotelgebou, parkeergebou en die aangrensende toringgebou vir R32 miljoen bekom. Transnet het nuwe lewe in die Carlton-sentrum geblaas en die hoë toring in sy 105


kantore omskep. Die Transnet-toringgebou met sy 50 verdiepings is vandag ná 39 jaar steeds die hoogste gebou in Afrika. Die Carlton-sentrum is ’n besige inkopieparadys met kettingwinkels en wegneemete-restaurante. Die leë dop van die eens swierige hotel is egter soos ’n seer vinger. Moses Sekhokho, eiendomsbestuurder van die sentrum, sê Transnet beplan om die gebou in die nabye toekoms te vernuwe. Mboniso Sigonyela, korporatiewe kommunikasiehoof van Transnet, het op ’n versoek om die binnekant van die hotel te besoek, gesê dit is sleg vir Transnet se beeld om die media hier toe te laat. Dae later het hy die versoek weer afgekeur omdat dit ’n veiligheidsrisiko inhou om besoekers in dié geslote hotel toe te laat. - Bronne: www.joburg.org.za; deathofjohannesburg.blogspot.com; soulsafari.wordpress.com/2012/01/21/last-night-at-the-carlton-johannesburg/; wikipedia.com

Die Carlton-hotel in die Johannesburgse middestad was vroeër ’n uitspanplek vir die rykes. Foto’s: Cornél van Heerden

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Railways and the Media Venice-Simplon Orient Express – Sunday Times: 24 Feb 2013

France: The Ouigo

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Source: Sunday Times 24 February 2013

No 21004 op 31-10-2003 te Kaapstad - H B Heymans.

USA - San Francisco Rail Freeway (Almeda Route)

At first glance it looked like a model lay out – but it is in fact a real railway! This is a study of how to do it! Source: Beeld 25 February 2013. 108


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Books and Rail Magazines Steam Train Romance: Michael Walker

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This delightful book was picked up for a snip at the local Hospice for R15-00. A must for anyone interested in the railways of Central and Southern Africa!

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Natal Newsletter: Railway Society of Southern Africa – Ashley Peter

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RMIG – Lionel Penning 113


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Railway History Group – Wally Greig

Bulletin No. 116 March 2013

Class 16E No 858at the head of the re-enactment Union Limited run in September 1977 to coincide with the departure of the last mailboat. No 858 hauled the train between Kimberley and De Aar, in both directions. Photo by Peter Cooper who was a passenger on the train

Railway Map of Southern Africa – Mark Newham

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Look at this map one can follow the demise of the SA Railways. No date available.

Value of ED Campbell’s book on the NGR Campbell, Edward Donald. THE BIRTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATAL RAILWAYS. Pietermaritzburg: Shuter and Shooter, 1951. 170 p., [40] leaves of plates: ill., ports., map. Cloth. Signed by Campbell on 116


front free endpaper. No. 869 of an edition limited to 1000 copies. R 950 The first railway in South Africa was opened from the Point to Durban in June 1860 and from that time onwards, engineers and railwaymen planned and worked to get railways into the interior and to other major centres in Natal. The arrival of the first train in any city, town or village led to expressions of huge civic pride and outpourings of patriotism. By 1890 one could travel from Durban to Pietermaritzburg in five hours and to Ladysmith in twelve hours. By 1895 trains ran for the first time between Durban and Johannesburg. Source: Select Books, Cape Town.

Aliwal North Museum

Received with thanks from the Aliwal North Museum. It is a pity that the SAR in no more in Aliwal North.

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Railway Badges: Nico van der Westhuis

Cape Govt Railways, Central SA Railways Volunteers & Railways & Harbours Rifles

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Philately: Nico van der Westhuis

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Durban – Piet Venter Amamzimtoti – South Coast Line

Metro: New From CTE – Pietermaritzburg

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Scotburgh: South Coast Line

Wheels – fair wear and tear

Middag, Kyk hoe lyk die wiele wat van die rytuie afkom blykbaar is dit die remblokke wat dit so gleuwe in vreet. Groete. 121


•

Piet speculates that the brake blocks might have caused the damage.

Amabele Station - Eastern Cape - Junction for Mthatha - Anton van Schalkwyk Hi, These photos I took a few days ago of the station and some old railway houses around the station. Many train drivers I know, did duty here in the 60's and 70's. I understand from staff there that the service to Mthatha is to recommence on 1 April 2013. I also saw a lot of railway workers busy on the route to Mthatha.

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Western Cape: Francois Matthe端s

Cement truck: XBJ 18-017-223

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Between Muldersvlei and Klapmuts 4 April 2013

A new rail trolley

Robert Maidment Wilson

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No 3417 nr Minnieskloof

15F 3153 at Dal Josefat

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Holgate: Andre Kritzinger

Holgate-Sylyn, rigting Oudtshoorn

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Around the Globe Australia: Bruno Martin Greetings Hennie Attached are a few items which may of interest: a scan from the 1949 General Manager’s Report on the accident at Waterval Boven (unfortunately I only copied one page, the last sentence begins with “The South African Blood Transfusion...). The second item is not anything to do with South Africa, but you may want to use it as page filler at some stage. This accident happened near where I live; in fact it’s the nearest railway station if a want to catch a train into Brisbane. Happy Easter. Kind regards Bruno

This Happened In Brisbane: Gum Leaves Caused The Train To Crash! At 09:38 on 31 January, 2013, a six-carriage QR CityTrain mounted the concrete stop block and collided with the recently refurbished station building at Cleveland. The train crew and 13 passengers sustained minor injuries, 10 of which were admitted to hospital. In the incident the cab front of the leading car was damaged as was around 300 metres of overhead catenary and associated infrastructure. The day following the accident the Rail Tram and Bus Union (RTBU) called for train crew members to refuse to drive the 160/260 series IMU/SMU, which make up 64 of the CityTrain’s fleet of 200, “due to an imminent risk to public safety”. This directive was overturned hours later as there was no evidence to suggest that there was an inherent brake system failure on the CityTrain’s newest rolling stock. The report into the accident cites “leaves on the rails” are likely to have contributed to the train’s wheels slipping as the brakes were applied. The driver, who had 20 years’ experience, did all he could to stop the train, but “poor adhesion to the track” caused the train to slide, then mount the stop block and was brought to a stop when it crashed into the gentlemen’s toilet block. Fortunately, nobody was inside at the time.“Therefore, the primary factor which led to the collision of train T842 with the buffer stop and the station building at Cleveland was the poor wheel/rail adhesion” the report concludes. Gale force winds over the 25 and 26 January that brought down branches onto the overhead wires and a thick layer of leaf litter on the rails forced the closure of the line for 4 days before the debris was cleared and the power restored. When train services resumed on 31 January, the report notes that on the morning of the crash, 11 130


services - the first of which had departed at 05:51 - had arrived and departed without incident before the fateful T842 service. According to the Redland Times (our local newspaper) passengers on earlier trains had already reported trains overshooting the platform at Ormiston, the first station after Cleveland. Cleveland station is of a somewhat of an unusual design as a terminus with two dead-end track tracks either side of an island platform, but has the station building backing on to the stop blocks. Any train overshooting the stop blocks ends up demolishing the building! Now, I’ve heard it all - GUM LEAVES CAUSED THE TRAIN TO CRASH! Am I missing something here? All over the world trains operate in adverse weather conditions: snow, ice, dust, greasy rails caused by oily residue, but gum leaves causing a train to slide out of control? It not as if there is a severe gradient leading into Cleveland station, the approach is all on level ground and the points, where the track splits into two dead-end spurs, are some way before the island platform. Trains always approach the points at a snail’s pace and just find the cause given in the report very hard to comprehend. Also, given that 11 services came and went without a hitch before the fateful one. I have, however, observed that occasionally a driver misjudges his speed and overshoots the station by one carriage length and has back up the train. Not to mention there are eucalyptus trees growing beside railway lines all over Australia, so this should then be a widespread problem and yet I never heard of fallen leaves on the rails causing “poor adhesion on the track”.

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USA: Pullman Travel: Submitted by Andy Anderson from Umgeni Steam Railway and Compiled by Johan Jacobs Pullman Rail Journeys bringing back the golden era of the American Pullman Cars http://www.travelpullman.com/

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Remember Gracie Allen, former comedic partner of George Burns? Well here she is, in this Time Magazine Pullman ad from 1940!

Travelling through the beautiful landscape

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Inside the Pontchartrain Club car - here is a diagram of the PC car. You can see the layout clearly here - with the three bedrooms (two Class B and one Class A bedrooms), as well as the lounge and kitchen area.

The diner car with a scenic view

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A true Pullman takes on the popular "meat and potatoes".

Our Pontchartrain Club car with scenic view

Inside the Pontchartrain Club car - this is a panorama image of Bedroom "A" - one of three bedrooms on this car. Bedroom A features a full size dresser drawer and the 135


only public train bedroom in the United States with a full-size bed (vs. the traditional upper and lower bunks) - perfect for couples!

Our Pontchartrain Club car (with the double decker Scenic View dome car in front)!

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SAR & H Tugs: Peter Sinclair Dear Hennie Continuing the theme of Harbour tugs of the old SAR&H, I attach a yarn by Owen Keen, a retired tugmaster and senior pilot, writing about his experiences in the service. The tug which is central to this story about salvage operations out of Walvis Bay in 1970, is the RB Waterston, a model of which I have recently completed, photos attached. The RB Waterston was built in 1954, the last coal fired tug ordered by the Administration, starting life at East London where she was commissioned on March 28 1955. Later transferred to Walvis Bay where she worked alongside the RA Leigh and Otto Siedle, moved to Cape Town in the seventies, and withdrawn late in 1980. Photos attached Reference to the Railway police force in the story will also have particular relevance for you. Kind regards Peter Sinclair

SAR & H: Tugs: Mutiny On The High Seas: Peter Sinclair The ‘R.B. Waterston’ had the distinction of being the last coal burning tug built for the Administration, I use the word distinction with caution for she was something of a compromise therefore not as good as her predecessors and nowhere near as good as her successors. She had the lines of the oil burning tugs to come but the horse power of the older coal burners and was therefore clumsy to manoeuvre and underpowered. Having said this she was my tug and I loved her dearly, I keep her lifeboats name board on my desk to remind me of her to this day. The Chief Engineer, regrettably, but a common feature of the desert outpost, was the ‘dead beat’ brigade, a permanent fixture of the port, unemployable elsewhere completely incapable of controlling his staff but much worse, not a very good engineer. My Mate was German, who again was a permanent fixture in the port, Iky Beaumann was not entirely well disposed to me for had I not transferred to the port he would have been promoted Master. To complete the sea going complement 137


my 2nd Mate would be Jan Koster, a Dutchman with a very glamorous Indonesian wife. Below decks the crew were Ovambo, a very different kettle of fish to the cheerful and very competent Zulu. To begin with the Ovambo language is difficult to learn, whilst one very quickly picked up key Zulu words this was not the case with Ovambo, then there was the system whereby they worked on a two year contract without home leave. Coupled with very low pay the Ovambo had little to be cheerful about and plenty to feel aggrieved by, not a recipe for either a happy or efficient crew.The time before going to sea is always a busy one but more so on a tug, there was fresh water to take, trucks of coal to get into the bunkers, bedding, food, removing fenders and any number of jobs to do and items to think about before sailing. Being at sea on a tug is like no other ship, to start with even when the weather is fine within a day all your clothing is damp, the boiler room tops become the ships drying room, clothing hanging from every available spot. Then there is the smell, you either like it or you don’t, that mixture of steam and oil but for many worst of all is the tugs motion in the sea, they roll and pitch like no other ship I have ever sailed on. We rounded Pelican Point, the entrance to Walvis Bay late afternoon, I turned in that night thinking all was well in the best of all possible worlds, for I love the sea and for me this was bliss.

Not for long! The South African Harbour Service I had joined was a delightful mix of professional sailors playing at being amateur tug masters, dredger masters, pilots and harbour masters.

It was very much a service from the colonial days from

which it had sprung. The tugs, all varnished teak, polished brass, scrubbed decks, could have held their own with any luxury private yacht; no expense was spared in their

maintenance

design.

and

upkeep. There

was

just

one

fatal

flaw;

their

Intended principally for harbour use, from the earliest days of South

African harbours they had been expected to have a deep sea capability. Well, they had to have, because all were built in Britain and made their own way out to what was then the Cape Colony and Natal.

So for their use as harbour tugs they had

become somewhat large and cumbersome, but for deep sea work they were not large enough!

This design problem had been magnified by the deep seated conservatism of the Service, the last of the steam tugs, the “J.R. More” came out from Britain in 1962, essentially no different from the “Sir William Hoy” of 1920. But at least the “More” 138


was oil fuelled, the “R.B. Waterstone” was the culmination of a design 1900’s, she along with the “J.D. White” were the last of the coal burners. Unbelievably the “Waterstone” was built after the first of the oil fired tugs! The Administration was firmly under the impression that they had a tug capable of exerting a bollard pull of some 35 tons. More than likely possible in the days when well-trained stokers were employed, and proper ‘navigation’ coal available, sadly neither were available in 1970. The manning of the tugs in Walvis Bay was essentially identical as for those in Durban, save for one glaring difference, one that the S.A.R.&H. chose to ignore. The Zulu crews in Durban were employed and housed on exactly the same contract basis, there was one vital difference, the Durban Zulu could get home every other weekend, The Walvis Bay Ovambo could not, as far as their families were concerned they may just as well have been employed on the moon.

The Ovambo crew, signed on up country in Ovamboland (northern South West Africa, now Namibia) to work for the South African Railways in South West Africa. They could just as well have found themselves as a porter on the platform of Windhoek station as shovelling coal in the stokehold of the “R.B. Warteston”. Housed in dormitories in railway hostels, away from their families for two years, the system was as old as European occupation of Africa and deeply resented. Even this handicap might have been overcome but for the officers and European petty officers. A breakdown of those on the Waterston paints the picture. The master, myself. A career officer from Durban, deep sea experience with the Union-Castle Line. Transferred to Walvis Bay two months previously as a career move in order to get to Cape Town, my preferred port. The mate, Iky Baumann, a German expat, a reclusive man, his wife mentally unstable, who had turned down every opportunity to leave South West and all promotion. So, instead of an efficient tug with a bollard pull of 35 tons, the Administration had a sluggish, somewhat cumbersome vessel which, on a good day, might just about reach twenty tons, crewed by resentful seaman and stokers, racialist petty officers, incompetent engineers, a resentful and un-cooperative mate, commanded by a young, well-meaning but woefully short on experience, master. As John Payne, the port captain never let me forget, I had had the fastest promotion to master in the history of the Service, gratifying as this was, there was a price to pay. The Port Captain, John Payne was one of those shortish, almost stout men who manage whilst being pompous to impress one with their ability and sincerity, the only similar person I have known was Captain ‘Logger’ Lloyd, master of the “Winchester Castle”. As an aside I must add that he proved to be a good friend to 139


me, Lyn and I would have a lot to thank him for. On the morning of the 12th August, not long after our arrival in Walvis, I was summoned to his office and instructed to get my tug ready for sea. John Payne outlined to me the rather dire situation a Greek tanker, the “Georgious V”, had found itself. Sailing from Cape Town having taken bunkers there, she had left behind her master and radio officer, both of whom were sick. On the Tuesday she suffered an explosion in the engine room, seriously injuring, mostly burns, the engine room staff. Unable to send out an S.O.S. on the main transmitter, having left behind the radio officer, they could only communicate via the radio telephone (RT). Now, standing by was the French liner, “Jean Laborde”, the master had managed to transfer his doctor, chief officer and some sailors to assist. But medical supplies were very low, much more were required; the following day, Thursday, a South African Air force Shackleton, from Coastal Command and the direct descendant of the old World War 2 Lancaster bomber, would leave Cape Town and drop medical supplies. But before the “R.B. Waterstone” could sail she first had to bunker. Coaling in Walvis Bay was, at best, crude. The trucks of coal were parked at a convenient spot along the wharf. A crude shoot was rigged, the idea being that the coal would be shovelled down the shut from the truck. This shoot was supposed to be able to direct the coal round the bunker, in practice it did nothing of the sort and we depended upon trimmers, two in each bunker, to trim out the coal. This again in practice never worked as the trimmers simply stood back and let the coal pile up, leaving huge air pockets. If we couple this with the disastrous engineering staff, well, after almost an entire days coaling, we had managed to get just two trucks of coal on board; the bunkers were far from being full, this I could see from the tug’s draught. By five o’clock that evening John Payne insisted we sail, I felt anything but confident in a successful outcome! At six o’clock in the morning I went down to the foredeck to look into the for’d coal bunker, I stood under a very cold shower, one look told me that we had nowhere near enough coal, it would be touch and go getting the tug back on it’s own, to tow a fully laden tanker back to Walvis Bay was impossible. The combination of the engineer’s inability to see that the trimmers did their job, coupled with the poor quality coal had left us in a precarious position. As if realising before we had even started there was not sufficient coal to get us home was not bad enough, the weather was rapidly deteriorating. The mornings’ sights confirmed our speed was awful, instead of the hoped for 14 or so knots we at best were making 12, and the “R.B. Waterstone” was making heavy weather of it. At the best of times tugs do not have much freeboard, the height of the main deck above the water, once at sea they resemble submarines about to submerge. The deck is virtually permanently awash, soon everything, bedding as well as clothing, becomes 140


damp. There is just one place where it is possible to dry things out, the boiler room gallery, the walkway that leads down to the stokehold. Very soon this area becomes a Chinese laundry, festooned with drying clothing. But for now I had more pressing problems, not the least being my own inexperience. The fact was that not one of us had ever attempted to put up a deep sea tow wire; as the second mate of the “J.R. More” I had watched whilst the tow wire was rigged and attached to a floating crane we brought down from Lourenco Marques (now called Maputo in Mozambique), so at least I had seen the deep sea towing wire rigged. Possibly I was the only person on the tug who had. After breakfast the two mates, Boatswain and both quartermasters and myself assembled on the bridge; I went through the drill and preparation necessary. There was the wire pendant, a full coil of 4” wire kept specifically for the purpose, kept stowed in the after hold, this wire was slightly smaller than the deep sea wire, the theory being that if the tow was to part, it would be the pendant that broke, not the deep sea wire. This had to be brought up on deck, thoroughly greased and ‘flaked’ up and down the afterdeck, great care being taken to see that as it paid out over the stern, when attached to the tow, it would not tangle with itself or snag on anything. The first turns ran up the starboard alleyway, the top of each remaining turn being lashed with rope to a bar specifically placed for the purpose at the for’d end of the afterdeck. The one eye was then shackled to the deep sea towing wire, the other would go up to the “Georgious V”. In port we used a ‘cant’ strop and wire on the towing hook, a much lighter rig, being controlled with a centring rope to the after winch. This being essential, it being absolutely vital that the towing wire was kept centred over the stern. If by nay chance it swung out to the tugs beam, it became a capsizing situation; the deckhand stationed by the towing hook was ordered to immediately knock out the pin, thus opening the hook and releasing the cant strop. But the deep sea rig needed something more substantial, bolted to each towing beam were rollers, through which the wire ran thus preventing it from going over the side. Iky Baumann, as the tug’s mate, would be in charge of the after deck, seeing the wire actually going up, his position would be right aft where from the bridge I could see him. Jan Koster, the second mate, was in charge of releasing the pendant as we steamed away. Not an easy job as it was important to cut the ‘ties’ at just the right moment; too soon and the weight of extra wire rushing out uncontrollably would result in a shambles of rushing wire, too late and the tie rope would part with a snap, possibly injuring the boatswain. When on the “More” I was fortunate in that the boatswain had done this several times, I only had to watch, but our boatswain had never even seen the operation, let alone do it. I very much hoped that I gave an air of professional confidence, it was certainly not how I felt. 141


That afternoon the South African Air force Shackleton, an aircraft whose granddaddy was the old war time Lancaster bomber, flew over us, having dropped medical equipment for the tanker and now on his return trip to Cape Town. The pilot and I had a chat on the radio, how I envied him, he would soon be enjoying a beer in the mess, safe and sound, whilst we still had another day of being thrown around before we even reached the tanker. The chief, second and third engineers came up to the bridge. I didn’t mince my words, I made it clear that whilst manoeuvring I expected two engineers in the engine room and the third in the stokehold in charge of the steam. With a deal of sarcasm I explained to them that having four boilers was not so that the engineers could spend their day on the bunks, but one was constantly being cleaned so that the other three maintained a full head of steam. But I finished my lecture with a warning; one which I made clear was not an empty threat. If one of them failed in carrying out my orders, they would be facing criminal charges of endangering the craft, with a lengthy spell in prison to follow. They were not happy bunnies! 142


We reached the “Georgious V” and the “Jean Laborde” about six that evening, the 13th but luckily not Friday! At once I understood that, with the master of the French ship, I was dealing with a thoroughly professional and capable seaman.

He explained to me that he had transferred his doctor and two

medical orderlies to the tanker, he had retrieved the medical supplies, would I take them to the tanker. Now in port, in sheltered smooth water and a tug surrounded by huge fenders, this would be a piece of cake, but in the open South Atlantic, in a rising south easterly wind and high swells, and no fenders and a tug pitching violently, this was rather different! But the transfer was made with the minimum of fuss, the “Jean Laborde” headed into the wind and sea, I crept up to her stern, close enough to enable the large container to be passed over with little effort. The Greek seaman were equally efficient, thus a potentially difficult task was made easy. But now came a frustrating but unavoidable delay. The French master, with a ship full of passengers, naturally wanted to get his doctor back as soon as possible. He had effected

the

transfer

the

previous

day

by

using

an

inflatable

life

raft. Positioning himself to windward of the tanker, his doctor and nurses had drifted down to the Greek, sheltered by the “Jean Laborde”. A masterly piece of seamanship. Now using the same method, when ready the medical team were to return by the same way. Now it is a fact that immobilised ships always lie across the wind, never with the wind, so it would be essential that the Frenchman be given all the sea room possible for this manoeuvre, a tug and tow wire was not an option. In any event the master very sensibly asked if I would shadow him in case something went wrong. This delay was first of all trying for my nerves, but secondly worrying. The south easterly wind was increasing all the time, a gale was forecast and I was anxious to get the tow up before dark. Sunset was fast approaching by the time the doctor was safely back home. Normally I would have chosen to head into the wind, go as close as safety allowed, then using the rocket line pass a line and ‘messenger’ rope followed with a light wire to the ‘downwind’ tanker’s bow, the crew would then heave this up to the foc’sle deck, followed with the pendant. But this option was not open to me, without power it would be completely impracticable to expect the Greek crew to pull such a weight aboard. Speed was of the essence, the only realistic chance was for me to take the “R.B. Waterstone” close under the 143


tanker’s bow, get a heaving line up so that the crew could pull the end of the pendant wire up and aboard with as little weight as possible.

This was

dangerous enough, but I added to the difficulty by deciding that it would be better for the Greek crew if I approached down wind. This gave me only one chance, if anything went wrong with the manoeuvre at best I would have to go round again and there wasn’t time before dark, at worst I could do substantial damage to the tug. But the benefit would be that the tanker would be blowing down to the tug, giving me a vital extra few minutes. It is a moment that even today I savour! This cumbersome tug, crewed from top to bottom by untrained amateurs, performed a perfect manoeuvre, I positioned the tug precisely, Iky Baumann, in charge of the deep sea wire saw it going up in seconds, Jan Koster and the boatswain expertly paid out the pendant, the deep sea wire followed. I felt a surge of elation, I had come through a very testing time! But my elation lasted a few short minutes, we were in dire trouble, there was absolutely no possibility of the “R.B. Waterstone” towing the heavily laden “Georgious V”. As soon as I got her to follow me, she took a violent sheer in the other direction, it was not so much as me towing the tanker, it was she towing me, or rather shaking the tug like a dog with a bone. I got onto the radio, informing John Payne that I had my tow wire up, but detailing my predicament. I ended by saying I intended to heave to until the morning and I could see better what I was doing. Before sunrise I was on the bridge. “Iky, let’s give it another go.” Slow ahead on two, the tug hardly moved, half ahead, absolutely no difference, full ahead was a waste of time. We had a problem. The sulky chief engineer came up to the bridge, he told me that the stokers had come out on strike for more pay. Now I had a mutiny on my hands! I was fairly sure the root of the problem (other than the chief engineer) was the third engineer, a most unpleasant man and a rabid racialist. But in such situations one has to be seen to be firm, in any event I was unable to promise the crew more pay! I was not even prepared to dangle the carrot of salvage money, I knew that even with top steam our chances of even getting the tanker half way were nil. The Ovambo crew quarters were below the fore deck, access was by a split companionway, reached through a covered doorway beneath the fire-fighting foam monitor. Split because one side led to the deckhands quarters, the other to the stokers. There was no bathroom, that was up along the starboard side alleyway. 144


I told the chief engineer to muster the stokers on the fore deck, whilst Iky Baumann looked after the tug and tow I and Jan Koster went down to the deck. Jan had his orders, I told the stokers I wanted to speak to them in their quarters ‘man to man’. We all trooped below, once in the cabin I outlined their situation.

There would be no promise of more pay, that was beyond my

power. But by their action they were endangering the tug and rest of the crew, if they did not return to their duties I would charge them all with mutiny. Needless to say they refused to a man, without a word I bounded up the companionway, Jan Koster slammed the door, dropping a bar across to prevent it being opened.

All this was watched with amusement by the deck

crew, who to a man carried on with their duties, if anything with a better will than before. I arranged with them to lower down the vent shaft buckets of water for sanitation purposes, other buckets of water a bread for sustenance, otherwise there was to be no contact with them whatsoever. By now the master of the “Jean Laborde” had divined that I had a serious problem, I lied gallantly and told him that we had a boiler problem During the morning the wind eased for a while, the master of the “Jean Laborde” asked me if he could attempt to tow the tanker. Of course I knew, as I’m sure so did he, that such an attempt would fail, but I also knew that by attempting the tow, it would substantially help in the French ship’s claim to part of any salvage award.

I felt he was entitled to this, throughout he had

displayed the highest quality of seamanship.

He brought his ship close to our port side, the deep sea tow wire had been brought in, the shackle connecting the pendant wire broken, and a messenger attached. Jan Koster, on his second attempt, scored a bulls-eye with the rocket 145


line. In a head wind that is much easier said than done, the messenger was attached and wire transferred to the “Jean Laborde”. As I was sure would happen, as soon as the French liner took the strain, the wire parted. The master of the “Jean Laborde” told me that he was himself seriously short of fresh water and would proceed to Walvis, if I was happy to release him. I informed John Payne of our situation, he told me that another tug, the “Britonia” would be coming, but she had first to bunker. I was to stay and hand over to her once she arrived. I obviously was not prepared at this stage to put over the air our true, almost dire position ourselves. Calling up the chief engineer I informed him that the bos’un, quartermasters and two greasers would fire the boilers, his two assistant engineers would take it in turns to supervise the stoke holds and that he and the second engineer would take it in turns to man the engine room. Now a very unhappy bunny! To save coal we would bank up all four boilers, two of which would be shut down. We would use the remaining coal from the after bunker first, changing to the for’d bunker and boilers as required to keep the tug’s trim. By Saturday I realised further economy of coal was required, I had no idea as to when the tug “Britonia” and now another tug, the “Collinsea” would arrive, by this time we were now some four hundred miles out from Walvis Bay. As an additional economy I ordered all steam to be shut down, this meant the generator stopped, we would rely on oil lamps. At midnight the “Britonia” arrived, he told me that the “Collinsea” was not far away and that I could proceed. Now we had to get back to Walvis Bay, I told the Port Captain of our position and who was firing the boilers, I did not want to inform the world that we had a mutiny on board! I could rely upon John Payne reading between the lines, in this I was not disappointed. John fully understood our dire position, scraping the bunker barrel, with a mutinous crew, hardly a strong poker hand. It was our good fortune that Sunday’s weather gave us a temporary relief. (The storm was the worst recorded for eight years.)

He had the “Otto Siedle”, the other Walvis tug,

stand by at Pelican Point in the event of our running out of coal before reaching port. As things turned out, we rounded Pelican Port at eight o’clock Monday morning, by now we were sweeping up the last of our coal, but with only ten 146


miles to go we could make our last economy. Shutting down the third boiler, now with just one in steam, and that one, just off the tanker birth we had to bank up. We berthed using the last of our steam! I felt sorry for the deck hands, they had remained loyal throughout, if rather sulkily. But the S.A.R.&H., in their usual heavy handed, insensitive way, had already employed two new crews, coloured people from Luderitz Bay. Drawn up at our birth were two third class passenger carriages, with a steam engine attached. On the quay side was a posse of twenty Zulu railway police, brought from Durban for the purpose. With no more ado, gangway ashore, up came the police major followed by his men. “Where are your strikers?” he asked. “Down there, locked up” I replied, adding that they’d been there since Friday morning on a diet of bread and water. “Not even I would have had the nerve to do that!” was his response. Eventually the large German tug managed to get the “Georgious V” to Walvis Bay, her master told me that it was the worst tow he’d experienced, a man with something like twenty years of salvage behind him. I later received £200, my share of the salvage award, not bad for an amateur. The following is from the report of the master of the “Danie Hugo”, John Drummond. On Monday, 10th August 1970, the “Georgious V”, a Greek tanker of some 30,000 tons deadweight, suffered ban explosion in the engine room, which immobilised the ship and seriously injured 10 of the crew.

The explosion

occurred when the ship was about 300 miles S.W. of Walvis Bay. The French passenger (ship) “Jean Laborde” was in the vicinity, and stood by, waiting for a force 8 gale to moderate so that she could transfer her doctor to the stricken ship. Tuesday, 11th August, 1970. “R.B. Waterstone” left Walvis Bay without full bunkers, to take medical supplies and attempt to tow “Georgious V” to W.B. (Walvis Bay)

147


Wednesday, 12th August, 1970. “Jean Laborde” managed to transfer doctor, chief officer and four seaman, and attempted to take the “Georgious V” in tow but broke all wires. (This para. Erroneous, see text.) “Danie Hugo” ordered to stand by to sail. Tug “Britonia” at sea and believed to (be) going to assist. No radio contact. Thursday, 13th August, 1970. An S.A.A.F. Shackleton took off from Young’s Field (South African Coastal Command base, Cape Town) with 12 canisters of medical supplies. Boat from “Jean Laborde” recovers 11 canisters. P.M. R.B.W. arrives on scene and starts connecting up. 13th

20.00 R.B.W. to G.V.

Vear to five shackles and hold on.

22.00 R.B.W. to G.V.

Is ship’s head coming more starboard now?

G.V. to R.B.W.

Ship’s 075 now

G.V. to R.B.W.

Ship’s head now 097

C.T.R. to W.B.R.

Any news of “Britonia”

W.B.R. to C.T.R.

Nothing

Friday 14th August 1970 0325

R.B.W. to G.V.

Please steer 060 true

0335

R.B.W. to G.V.

Put your wheel hard a’ port

G.V. to R.B.W.

Received

R.B.W. to P.C.W.B.

I can’t make it, I have not enough fuel, what

P.C.W.B. to R.B.W.

All received, hang on to your tow, there is an

0410 must I do? 0420 oil burner

coming from

Cape Town 0425

“Collinsea” to R.B.W. I am standing by if you should need any

help. 0450

“Danie Hugo” ordered to prepare for se.

148


0520

“Collinsea” asked to prepare for sea by P.C.W.N. “Colinsea” has to

deballast first, before taking bunkers, expects to take 6 to 8 hours. 0550

“Danie Hugo” sailing cancelled. “Collinsea” sailed about noon from (Lambert’s) Bay.

A.M.

“Britonia” arrived W.B., radio out of action. Bunkered and sailed

for G.V., with ship’s agent and doctor and possible two engineers on board. Saturday 15th August, 1970. P.M. 2000

position Approx. 400’ W of W.B. “Collinsea” nearby G.V. and requests Lloyds Salvage Agreement.

Sunday 16th August, 1970 1030

“Collinsea” commences towing, presumably releasing R.B.W.

who starts for home on two boilers. 2000

“Collinsea” to P.C.W.B. Tug “Britonia” passed “Collinsea” a

towline at 1730 in an effort to increase progress. Posn. 22. 16S 07. 00E 1981

R.B.W. to P.C.W.B. Posn. 22. 13S 08 07E 6.5 kts we have now

two boilers top steam using bosun, Q,M,, 2 greasers and 2 A.M.E.’s to supervise stokehold. N.B.

The “Collinsea”s position at 2000, 16th is some 30 miles N.W. of

the position given 24 hours previously. 2230

“Atlantic” leaves C.T. with medical supplies.

“Collinsea”

informed in message from P.C.C.T. P.M.

“Collinsea” requests medical assistance in part of a unreadable

message. 2 men injured (1 lost finger, 1 gashed thigh) 1suspect mumps. Monday 17th August, 1970 “Zwarte Zee” to “Britonia”. “Collinsea” replies: “Britonia” no R/T. V.H.F. or 500kcs. “Zwarte Zee” Are you towing?

“Yes” 149


Have you contract with G.V.? “Collinsea” to “Zwarte Zee” Contract Lloyds Salvage Form, “Britonia” no contract. Ordered by P.C.W.B. to stand by to assist Eventually arrived W.B. with “Atlantic” GLOSSERY P.C.W.B.

Port Captain, Walvis Bay.

P.C.C.T.

Port Captain Cape Town.

S.A.A.F.

South African Air Force.

Shackles

Anchor chains are measured in ‘shackles’.

True

The true ship’s heading, in contrast to the magnetic heading.

Ship’s head

Direction in which bow is pointing.

Deadweight

There are three measures of a ship’s size. Deadweight is the actual weight of the ship.

“Britonia”

A very small tug, ownership unknown, possibly private.

“Collinsea”

An old W.W.2 built tug (U.S.A.?) owned by Mr Collins who started the off shore diamond prospecting business. The “Collinsea” was used to tow the large pontoons.

“Zwarte Zee”

A very large Dutch tug owned by Smits of Amsterdam.

“Atlantic”

A large German salvage tug owned by Bugsier of Hamburg.

150


Some photographs: Peter Sinclair

151


152


Heavy lift Ships: Received from Francois Lotz and Compiled by Johan Jacobs A heavy lift ship is a vessel designed to move very large loads that cannot be handled by normally equipped ships. They are of two types: semi-submerging vessels capable of lifting another ship out of the water and transporting it; and vessels that augment unloading facilities at inadequately equipped ports. Short History: In the 1920s the Bremen-based shipping company DDG Hansa saw a growing demand of shipments of assembled locomotives to British India. That led to the construction of the world's first heavy lift vessel, MV Lichtenfels with a 120 t (118 long tons; 132 short tons) derrick. After World War II, DDG Hansa became the world's largest heavy lift shipping company. In terms of lifting capacity it reached its peak in 1978 with refitting the Japanese built bulk carrier MV Trifels with two 320 t (315 long tons; 353 short tons) St端lcken derricks. Shortly after that, in 1980, DDG went bankrupt. With that, only the Dutch shipping companies Jumbo and Mammoet (renamed Biglift) were left as heavy lift shipping specialists.

153


In January 2013, a heavy lift ship was spotted in False Bay…Xiang Rui You under the China flag with a 180 ton Ensco 5003 drill. Photo by David Hurwitz

154


MS Blue Marlin carrier USS Cole

155


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157


Pandora’s Box

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J & J Wepener

The next issue of “The Uloliwe” will be Vol. 4 No 5 and will be published, DV, sometime during late April / May 2013. Send in your comments, anecdotes and photographs please. Take care! Stuur solank u stories, herinneringe en eie foto’s aan heymanshb@gmail.com in jpg-formaat Hennie Heymans – Pretoria, ZA © 2013

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THE ULOLIWE  

A monthly railway magazine with the focus on South African railway history and related matters

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