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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2)

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2)

NONGQAI VOLUME 10 NO 4A (2) WW1 - 2019 Table of Contents Contents WELCOME ...................................................................................................................................... 5 SA WAR TRAINS ............................................................................................................................. 6 World War 1: The role of the SAR in support of the (new) SA Police in Natal .......................... 6 German Internees ..................................................................................................................... 6 WORLD WAR ONE: INVASION OF GERMAN SOUTH WEST AFRICA ......................................... 6 Barberton Commando: Troops by ship from Cape Town to Walvis Bay ................................... 7 1915: Lüderitz: No. 1 Armoured Train “Trafalgar” ..................................................................... 7 Report from Aus ........................................................................................................................ 9 Some War Graves from Aus: Brig. HB Heymans .................................................................... 10 •

POW Camp Aus: GSWA/SWA ......................................................................................... 10

Grave: Johann Thies......................................................................................................... 11

Grave: Capt. CK de Meillon .............................................................................................. 12

Some other UDF Graves at Aus ....................................................................................... 12

1915: SOME WARTIME RAILWAY PICTURES FROM GSWA AND SWA ................................... 13 “Rough & Ready” .................................................................................................................... 13 Landing SAR rolling stock at Lüderitz: .................................................................................... 14 2


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Landing locomotives at Walvis Bay ........................................................................................ 14 Ebony Siding ........................................................................................................................... 15 1915: GSWA RAILWAYS............................................................................................................... 17 •

GSWA: German destruction of Railway Lines .................................................................. 17

Keetmanshoop: South African POW’s .............................................................................. 17

Photos from Barberton Commando ........................................................................................ 19 •

Gen. Botha in GSWA ........................................................................................................ 19

General Botha at Ebony.................................................................................................... 20

SAR: Salt River Workshops .................................................................................................... 22 Peace: GSWA becomes SWA ................................................................................................ 22 WORLD WAR ONE: INVASION OF GERMAN EAST AFRICA ..................................................... 23 General JC Smuts in GEA ...................................................................................................... 23 Union Defence Force troops in GEA ....................................................................................... 24 Other Wartime SAR NG Rolling Stock .................................................................................... 26 1914 – 1918: SAR TROOP TRAINS .............................................................................................. 27 THE COLOURS AND BATTLE HONOURS OF THE SA POLICE ................................................. 28 1916 – 1939 A COMPARISON ...................................................................................................... 29 1919 & 1920: THE GENERAL STRIKE 1919 AND THE RED REVOLT 1920 ............................... 29 1921: SAR LINE TO ROBERT’S HEIGHTS ................................................................................... 30 1922: RED REVOLT ON THE RAND ............................................................................................ 32 19XX: RAIL PATROL: SALDANAH ................................................................................................ 32 1925: SAR & H BRIGADE.............................................................................................................. 33 1928: ARMOURED TRAIN NO 1: SIR LOWRY PASS .................................................................. 36 1930: NO 2 ARMOURED TRAIN: POTCHEFSTROOM ................................................................ 36 •

Search light and 18-pounder gun ...................................................................................... 36

1933: SA POLICE FROM PRETORIA VIA CAPE TOWN TO BITTERFONTEIN FOR DUTY AT ALEXANDER BAY DIAMOND FIELDS: JOE MOMBERG ............................................................. 38 1939 ........................................................................................................................................ 39 1940: FOUR ARMOURED TRAINS IN SOUTH AFRICA ............................................................... 39 1943: “DEMOCRACY IN WAR” ..................................................................................................... 40 1939 – 1945: WARTIME PHOTOGRAPHS: MR LES PIVNIC ....................................................... 41 •

Serendipity! Sgt. J Pivnic .................................................................................................. 45

1939 - 1945: SA HOSPITAL TRAIN IN ACTION: THE NONGQAI................................................. 46 1939 – 1945: Leith Paxton ...................................................................................................... 47 SAR Hospital Trains................................................................................................................ 47 War Car No 1 .......................................................................................................................... 48 3


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) 1941: SAR TROOP TRAINS .......................................................................................................... 49 1941: THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR TRAIN................................................................................... 51 •

Correspondence: Mr HL Pivnic ......................................................................................... 51

Correspondence with Sandstone Heritage Trust .............................................................. 51

1941: War Train! ..................................................................................................................... 52 1941: War Train ...................................................................................................................... 53 1942: ON FURLOUGH .................................................................................................................. 68 1942: PAINT SPECIFICATION OF SAR MILITARY TRAINS ........................................................ 71 1945: A JOURNEY AHEAD ........................................................................................................... 74 Repatriation of Sick and Disabled Italian Prisoners of War ..................................................... 74 •

SAR Hospital train............................................................................................................. 75

THE FRIDAY SPECIAL ................................................................................................................. 77 •

A Four Hour Sixty Mile Journey ........................................................................................ 78

1961 – 1994: SUBURBAN TRAINS AND THE SA RAILWAYS POLICE ....................................... 82 1993: Anti-Terror Trains: Rollo Dickson .................................................................................. 82 Anti-Riot Trains: Petrus Botha ................................................................................................ 83 Klas 38 gepantserde lokomotiewe: Mnr Petrus Botha ............................................................ 85 SAR Fire Brigade on Rails: Mr. Petrus Botha ......................................................................... 87 1966 – 1989: THE BUSH WAR...................................................................................................... 88 •

The Role of the SAR Police in the Operational Area......................................................... 88

1979: Chris en Kobus: Herman Bosman: SAPS Meganiese Skool, Benoni ...................... 88

1975 THE VICTORIA FALLS CONFERENCE ............................................................................... 90 1979: SA RAILWAYS POLICE: BOSPADDA ................................................................................. 91 •

Armoured Special Purpose Road and Rail Vehicles: Frans Bedford-Visser ..................... 91

SAR MARBLE HALL: COUNTER INSURGENCY TRAINING (HBH) ............................................ 92 SA RAILWAYS POLICE: “BOSPADDA” RESIN MODEL ............................................................... 93 BOSPADDA ................................................................................................................................... 95 •

Bestuurdersposisie ........................................................................................................... 97

Ontsnappingsdeure........................................................................................................... 97

Agterste (Spoor) Bestuurdersposisie .............................................................................. 101

Chris in SWA (bo) en Kobus (onder) in RSA .................................................................. 102

1977 PATROLLIES MET SAS-TROLLIES ................................................................................... 103 •

Sersant J.P.L. Strydom, “Kobus” en “Chris” .................................................................... 103

SASP: FUNKEY MOTORTROLLIE EN PADVOERTUIE: BRIG. RONNIE BEYL ........................ 103 •

Adjudant-offisier Loekie Jordaan .................................................................................... 104 4


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) •

Die motortrollie wat ontspoor het (Funky) ....................................................................... 104

Bospadda: SAS Polisie op patrollie ...................................................................................... 105 Lisensie: Spoormotortrolliedrywer ......................................................................................... 108 SWA: Deursoeking van Spoorbaankampe............................................................................ 109 THE WAR IN RHODESIA ..................................................................................................... 110 Landrover converted into an armoured rail trolley ................................................................. 110 1976: OPERATION SAVANAH .................................................................................................... 110 1981 DIE MOLES MET DIE TROEPE OP DIE TREIN ................................................................ 111 •

Kaptein J van Heerden en sersant J.P.L. (Koos) Strydom .............................................. 111

Sersant Armando Bianco ................................................................................................ 111

1993: INTERNAL STABILITY UNIT (ISU) | AFDELING BINNELANDSE STABILITEIT (ABS): BRIG. HB HEYMANS .................................................................................................................. 112 2004: MILITARY TRAIN: LION’S RIVER: BRIG HB HEYMANS .................................................. 113 2009: SAPS MOBILE CHARGE OFFICE COACHES .................................................................. 117 SAPS Coaches: PA Stow ..................................................................................................... 117 Notes by Peter A Stow .......................................................................................................... 117 Photographs by Peter Stow .................................................................................................. 118 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SOME ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ............................................................ 120 INDEMNITY & © | VRYWARING & © .......................................................................................... 121

WELCOME Welcome to the second edition in this series about ‘War Trains’ used by the Union Defence Force and the South African Defence Force and trains used by the Railways Police and the South African Police and South African Police Service from 1915 to present date. The railways and trains were regarded as of great strategic importance to the country and any war effort. I remember fondly how I, as a young Constable, had to walk in the morning from the King’s Rest police station down to the SAR’s King Rest Halt and receive the post bag from the train’s guard when the train arrived. In the bag was the two newspapers, the Natal Mercury and the previous evenings Daily News. I longed to read them whilst on Charge Office duties. In the afternoon the process was repeated. The bag with the official mail was sent to its destination via post bag and was received by the guard and taken to Durban. Later I would make several official journeys by train some from Durban to Pretoria and some from Pretoria to Cape Town. The service was excellent – especially the Lounge Car and the food served in the Dining Car. (I never had the privilege to travel on the “Drakensberg” or the “old” Blue Train. This booklet only covers some aspects of “War Trains” and is not a complete guide. It is impossible to put everything in. Thanks to the Officers and Men of the former SA Railways Police. HBH.

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SA WAR TRAINS This edition takes the history in account from after the 1914 South African Rebellion and starts with World War One - the invasion of GSWA during 1915.

World War 1: The role of the SAR in support of the (new) SA Police in Natal When war was declared Lieut.-Col. RS Godley, a senior police officer, was summonsed to Pretoria and told he had been transferred to Pietermaritzburg as Acting Deputy Commissioner with the rank of Lieut.-Col. and was “ordered to proceed by the first available train” to his new station to take over police duties from the S.A.M.R. (Godley p. 128). The policing of Natal was the responsibility of the Union Defence Force’s constabulary, the South African Mounted Rifles. Godley had taken this responsibility over and needed details for police work urgently. The national carrier was the newly formed SAR who apparently did a good job in bringing in new men to Natal. “… I wired asking that Jack Fulford1 might be sent down, and within twenty-four hours he was in ‘Maritzburg. By this time officers and men were due to arrive from the Free State and the Transvaal. I sent Major Marshall of the S.A.M.R. and old Natal Police, who had now been attached to me for duty, up to Ladysmith, the junction of the two railway lines. He was to divert men direct to the various police posts (Godley: p. 130).

German Internees “We had no sooner completed taking over, or rather walking in, with police duties fairly normal once more, than orders came to arrange accommodation for some 2,000 Germans who had been interned in Pretoria (Godley: p. 130). The Government decided wisely to move the internees from Pretoria to a safer area, as they feared that the rebels might attempt to set the internees free. “Pretoria was one time seriously threatened, and loyal troops were holding the height surrounding the town” (Godley: p – 131). The old military cantonments at Fort Napier were brought into good shape and some 48 hours after receiving instructions to prepare for the internees, “ a special train steamed into the siding, with Lieut.-Col. “Bill” Manninng in command” A force of special constables was now enrolled to provide guards to the camp, and perform all duties in connection with it, with Manning as Commandant. … (A)nd I was gazetted Lieut.-Col in the Defence Force, and Commandant of Pietermaritzburg and district, in addition to other duties (Godley: p. 131).2

WORLD WAR ONE: INVASION OF GERMAN SOUTH WEST AFRICA • • • • • • • • •

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How to get troops, horses and materiel there? What are the alternatives? New line from Prieska to Upington – Keetmanshoop. Duel gage in GSWA. Military Objectives to capture railway line and rolling stock intact. German sabotage of water and bridges. Lines of communication. Battle honours. Signing of the surrender - special train.

Captain Jack Fulford. Khaki and Blue - Twenty-Five Years' Service in South Africa: RS Godley (1935)

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Barberton Commando: Troops by ship from Cape Town to Walvis Bay

Armadale Castle escort to Gaika Barberton Commando-file)

1915: Lüderitz: No. 1 Armoured Train “Trafalgar”

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First train to leave Walvis Bay: General Botha and staff en route for Swakopmund.

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Report from Aus

See photo of grave: Capt. CK de Meillon 9


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Some War Graves from Aus: Brig. HB Heymans • POW Camp Aus: GSWA/SWA

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• Grave: Johann Thies

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• Grave: Capt. CK de Meillon

Some other UDF Graves at Aus

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1915: SOME WARTIME RAILWAY PICTURES FROM GSWA AND SWA One the Rebellion was quelled in December 1914, General Louis Botha and his men including Col. HF Trew, who was in charge of the GOC’s Body Guard, did not take long to subdue the Germans in GSWA. General JC Smuts did visit GSWA but went to GEA. [In GEA there was a very able German Commander and he evaded the British and South African Forces in that country.] A railway line was built in South Africa from De Aar via Upington and from there to connect to 3’ 6” line at Keetmanshoop in GSWA. Other war materiel was moved from Cape Town by steam ships to Lüderitz, Walvis Bay and Swakopmund.

“Rough & Ready” It is either on horseback or in an open truck! The choices are few! Hot-water from the engine was provided for tea!

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Landing SAR rolling stock at LĂźderitz:

Landing locomotives at Walvis Bay

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Ebony Siding Here the “normal 3’ 6” lines meets up with the 2’ 0” line. Goods have to be transhipped.

The “Crown Price” in South African hands

Narrow Gauge Locomotives being imported into SWA from South Africa.

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Leith Paxton writes: “Thank you for these two exceptional photos. As a NG fan, who would have thought that after 100 years that a photo of the locos sent to help the occupying forces in GSWA would surface. The loco on the left is a class NG3, (just cannot read the number) from Natal and the right is a NG8 from the Avontuur. These would have been sent by ship from the Union, which would have formed part of the push to extend the line from Upington into SWA in 1919. It was also the reason that the SA government bought whatever NG locos that was available to replace those sent to there. The Lawleys from Bamboo Creek was part of this, but they were a dismiss failure. Eventually the SA engines were returned as they slowly got the existing German engine back in service.� [Full letter will appear in WW2 section.] Diagram of NG3

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1915: GSWA RAILWAYS • GSWA: German destruction of Railway Lines

Germans: Rail been blown.

• Keetmanshoop: South African POW’s

Keetmanshoop, German Southwest Africa, Union Defence Force POW’s, Sept. 1914 17


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Lunch at Keetmanshoop. (Filler) A German SWA NG Locomotive: Class Hb No 2

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Photos from Barberton Commando • Gen. Botha in GSWA

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• General Botha at Ebony

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Derailment Karub.

Batch of German prisoners.

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SAR: Salt River Workshops

Peace: GSWA becomes SWA

GSWA: Seitz (left) and General Louis Botha

GSWA: Otavifontein: White Flag Train

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WORLD WAR ONE: INVASION OF GERMAN EAST AFRICA [Just a few words it was not a true South African operation, although General JC Smuts was in command. I have lovely photographs of destroyed and captured German rolling stock. This was done by South African troops fighting as British Imperial troops in German East Africa and not as South African Troops per se] • • • • • • • • •

How to get troops, horses and materiel there? What are the alternatives? Military Objectives as far as Railways are concerned? 1 metre gauge Col Rose-Innes – railway engineer German sabotage of water points and bridges. Lines of Communication. Major Pretorius, DSO. SA Battle Honours.

General JC Smuts in GEA

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Union Defence Force troops in GEA

UDF on Dar-es-Salaam line.

UDF at Morogoro Station

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SA Pioneer Battalion (SASC) at Kilosa.

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Other Wartime SAR NG Rolling Stock I am in possession of photographs of Narrow Gauge3 rolling stock. It is unknown whether it was used in GSWA or GEA:

UDF: WW 1: Col Ford Rose-Innes at Robert's Heights. This vehicle was used in GEA.

24 inches apart instead of the normal 3’ 6”. The SAR and the GSWA railways had 3’6” and 24” (or 2’ 00”) gauges – HBH. 3

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German Locomotive in GEA – Photo: Nico Moolman.

1914 – 1918: SAR TROOP TRAINS

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Witwatersrand Rifles - Cape Town.

THE COLOURS AND BATTLE HONOURS OF THE SA POLICE

The SA Police was awarded a battle honours for their role in WW1 (SWA & GEA)

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1916 – 1939 A COMPARISON

1919 & 1920: THE GENERAL STRIKE 1919 AND THE RED REVOLT 1920 Strikes took part in Johannesburg during 1919 and the Railways were sabotaged, trains were derailed (e.g. the Port Elizabeth mail train on 9 March, 1920) and fired on – I will not go into detail because it does not fall under the ambit of this study. These riots were serious, the total causalities were: 43 Soldiers and 29 policemen were killed, 219 officers and men wounded and 66 injured. For his actions Lieut.-Col. Godley was rewarded with the King’s Police Medal (Godley: p. 238).

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1921: SAR LINE TO ROBERT’S HEIGHTS

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1922: RED REVOLT ON THE RAND During the 1922 Red revolt on the Witwatersrand many police and soldiers were transported to the Witwatersrand. Sabotage of the railways were a daily occurrence.

19XX: RAIL PATROL: SALDANAH

UDF, WO 1 - Saldanah SA Naval Forces - sea mines.

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1925: SAR & H BRIGADE

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1928: ARMOURED TRAIN NO 1: SIR LOWRY PASS

No 1 Armoured Train called “Active” part of the consist is truck No. 41101Z. Source: SAR & H Magazine 5-1928-848.

1930: NO 2 ARMOURED TRAIN: POTCHEFSTROOM • Search light and 18-pounder gun

No 2 Armoured Train [SAR & H Magazine May 1930 p. 698.] 36


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No. 2 Armoured Train [SAR & H Magazine, May, 1930 p. 697]

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1933: SA POLICE FROM PRETORIA VIA CAPE TOWN TO BITTERFONTEIN FOR DUTY AT ALEXANDER BAY DIAMOND FIELDS: JOE MOMBERG Up to the late 1980’s all passengers and goods of the South African Police was sent by the faithful old SAR. Each police station in South Africa and in South West Africa had an official address which was published in the SAP Address Book; the telephone number, telegraphic address, street address, postal address, passengers’ station and goods station was furnished and had to be kept up date. Even prisoners were sent by rail. The defence force also used the SAR extensively. Those days are gone. Today the police deliver their stores and goods, in large trucks, all over South Africa.

Class 15 locomotive on mainline between Pretoria and Cape Town.

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1939

Source: SAR & H Magazine, January 1939

1940: FOUR ARMOURED TRAINS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Source: SAR Magazine: 1940-07-896A

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1943: “DEMOCRACY IN WAR”

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1939 – 1945: WARTIME PHOTOGRAPHS: MR LES PIVNIC

Durban 1942 Hospital Ship

Mapleton 1941 troop train.

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1942 Troop train Robert's Heights

Hospital train Robert's Heights

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Hospital train Robert's Heights

Hospital train Robert's Heights 43


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SAR Manufactured Armour 44


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SAR Armoured locomotive at Mapleton: Class 4A locomotive No. that was armoured and stationed at Mapleton on the Germiston - Volksrust line. No 6 from the left is Brig. Hoffe.

• Serendipity! Sgt. J Pivnic

Sergeant J. Pivnic. Mr. Les Pivnic was working in the SAR photo archive when he found his father on a wartime photograph on a train to Durban on his way “Up North”.

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1939 - 1945: SA HOSPITAL TRAIN IN ACTION: THE NONGQAI

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1939 – 1945: Leith Paxton

For those readers interested in diagrams of SAR coaches might be interested in Leith’s book on Main Line Drawings (1892 – 1957).

SAR Hospital Trains

Note coaches are marked “W” which stands for “Hospital Ward Car”

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War Car No 1

Diagram of Ward Car No 1 furnished by Leith Paxton.

Hello Hennie,

Thank you for these two exceptional photos. As a NG fan, who would have thought that after 100 years that a photo of the locos sent to help the occupying forces in GSWA would surface. The loco on the left is a class NG3, (just cannot read the number) from Natal and the right is a NG8 from the Avontuur. These would have been sent by ship from the Union, which would have formed part of the push to extend the line from Upington into SWA in 1919. It was also the reason that the SA government bought whatever NG locos that was available to replace those sent to there. The Lawleys from Bamboo Creek was part of this, but they were a dismiss failure. Eventually the SA engines were returned as they slowly got the existing German engine back in service. The second photo I would guess is taken in the WW2. Wounded troops were sent from Europe to SA to convalesce. A train of suitability modified suburban coaches was prepared and would fetch troops from Durban harbour up to Baragwanath. Each coach was numbered. I have seen a Pathe News(?) film clip of the train in Durban Harbour. I have tried to find searching the web for it, without success. I have attached a drawing of one of the coaches – note the Red Cross painted on the roof in both the drawing and photo. I also attach a photo of my Mainline coach book. I do have a few copies left at my email address. Cost R400 plus R50 registered local postage. Regards, Leith

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1941: SAR TROOP TRAINS

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1941: THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR TRAIN • Correspondence: Mr HL Pivnic Dear Hennie, Thanks for passing on the “War Train”4. I had a quick look through Andy Selfe’s interesting article and I will enjoy reading it in detail later. In answer to his opening paragraph, I for one, certainly remember the South African Government’s War Effort during WW2 – especially, the SAR & H! The SAR published a book called “We fought the Miles” which details all the effort on the part of the Railway Administration to support the War Effort. Notably, the SAR & H Brigade did phenomenal work in the Middle East and Italy in repairing railways that the Nazis destroyed as they retreated. They rebuilt bridges; opened up blown tunnels and a lot more – especially in Italy. Back on the Home Front, the SAR Workshops built armoured cars, medical equipment and a whole lot more as detailed in the book. The SAR even shipped locomotives to the Middle East to work on the repaired railways! The Administration also operated hospital trains to ferry injured troops from Durban off hospital ships to military hospitals at Oribi outside Maritzburg and Baragwanath near Johannesburg. My dad was a pharmacist at Baragwanath Hospital before he was transferred to Snell Parade in Durban and then sent overseas – “up north” to the Middle East where he was posted to a military hospital near Cairo. Les Pivnic (31 March 2019) (Former Assistant Curator: SAR Museum, Johannesburg) Hennie Inligting oor die “SAR’s War Train“ is beskikbaar in die “SAR & H Magazine“ – 1941 tussen Januarie en April – bladsy 387 en weereens - Julie – Des – bladsy 939. Les Pivnic (31 Maart 2019)

• Correspondence with Sandstone Heritage Trust From: Sandstone-Estates Web [mailto:daver@sandstone.co.za] Sent: 29 March 2019 14:18 To: daver@sandstone.co.za Subject: Sandstone Enquiry / Comments

4

Name

Hennie Heymans

Telephone Number

072-336-1755

http://www.sandstone-estates.com/index.php/railway-heritage/39-railway-heritage/240-war-train-1941

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heymanshb@gmail.com

Comments / Enquiry

May I commend you on your article: WAR TRAIN! 1941 With your permission I would like to reprint the article in a coming NONGQAI which is solely devoted to armoured - and hospital trains. Thank you

Hi Hennie, Where did this article appear? Kind Regards Dave Richardson Sandstone Heritage Trust

daver@sandstone.co.za

31 Mrt. 2019 13:14 (4 dae gelede)

aan my

Hennie, This is no problem for you to use. I will be out of the office for 14 days so just copy from the web,

1941: War Train!

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1941: War Train Details5 Last Updated: 24 September 2015. People may not be aware, or the older people may have forgotten, about the part South Africa played in support of the War Effort during World War 2. Not only did South Africa supply soldiers for all duties, both at the front and at the rear, but industry kicked in and clothed, fed and equipped them. Sir Patrick Duncan was Governor General of South Africa at the time and he established the Governor General’s fund. All Civil Servants accepted a drop in salary to augment this fund, and there were other means of fund raising, for example a patriotic ‘stamp’ which one could affix to a letter, showing that you had donated even a small sum to the fund:

5

http://www.sandstone-estates.com/index.php/railway-heritage/39-railway-heritage/240-war-train-1941

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Another example was an 18th Century Fair which was held in Pinelands, a ‘Garden Suburb’ of Cape Town:

Bear in mind that not everybody in South Africa at the time, from General Hertzog down, was entirely behind South Africa’s involvement in the War. Some, led by the Ossewa Brandwag, were expressly against it. Several publicity drives were carried out in the early stages of the war, showcasing smart soldiers and South African-made war materiel, from boots to Armoured Cars. Their purpose was also to 54


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) recruit, not only into the Armed Forces, but also into industries producing much needed equipment. The first was the ‘Steel Commando’, in which soldiers of the Special Service Battalion and the South African Permanent Force Band travelled the country in Ford trucks.

'Steel Commando’ crossing the Swartberg Pass This was followed by the ‘Air Commando’, specifically for the benefit of the Air Force. Then came was what became known as the ‘War Train’. In all, the detachment from SSB and the SAPF band covered about 40 000 miles in a period of four months.

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) The War Train took six weeks to tour the country, starting in Johannesburg on 22nd March 1941, travelling to the Eastern Transvaal, down through Natal to Durban, then inland through the Orange Free State and then South to East London, following the Garden Route, but taking in Oudtshoorn, to Cape Town. It then went North through the Karoo to Kimberley and the Western, then Northern Transvaal before turning South from Messina to arrive in Pretoria on 7th May. It made a second trip, starting in Pretoria on 12th May, and proceeded via Bechuanaland, then the Rhodesias, ending in Elizabethville in the Belgian Congo on 2nd June.

A combination of Military precision and Railway Time-table accuracy prevailed. At each of the 38 stops, everything was pre-arranged and timed to the minute! The troops and band would march, a civil reception was laid on with speeches and then the public, normally starting with the schoolchildren would tour the train and opportunities were there to sign up, to clamber over the equipment and even to taste the army biscuits! The troops on the tours were under the command of Colonel GCG Werdmuller. One gets a glimpse of the organisation required from this letter from him to the Adjutant General, dated 17th January 1941:

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Detail is shown below, in which he fights for the inclusion of ‘at least 200’ members of SSB which had ‘afforded one of the main means of propaganda on the last tour’. He adds that ‘this was most 57


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) forcibly demonstrated [on the last tour] by the fact that spectators from many miles off the Column’s route came to see the renowned SSB Retreats and Church Parades: (As a past member of 1SSB, it is great to be reading this!)

For example, when the War Train arrived in East London, their Daily Dispatch of Thursday April 10th 1941 read as follows (and I quote the article in full):

War Train arrives in East London “City Praised for its Part in Production of Supplies Turning out trench mortars in vast quantities 58


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) “The “War Train” arrived in East London yesterday morning and was officially welcomed to the City by the Mayor (Mr E W Pemberton) in an address delivered from a dais in front of the railway station. There was a large crowd assembled in the street for the ceremony and around the dais were Defence Force officers and detachments from the Women’s Auxiliary Services. The remarks of the speakers were met by loud bursts of applause.

Drum Major DA ‘Stoney’ Steenkamp leads the South African Permanent Force Band followed by a detachment of the Special Service Battalion (SSB) through the streets of Bloemfontein on Saturday 5th April, 1941 “Shortly before starting time, members of the S.S.B., touring with the train, marched along Station Street to form a Guard of Honour in front of the dais on which the Mayor and Town Clerk (Mr W Sinclair Thompson) in civic robes, the Mayoress (Mrs V G Lewis), Col. VG Lewis and his Brigade Officer, Lieut D. Gale, Mr RS Parsons, railway systems manager (Cape Eastern), Wing Commander J M Baxter, Fortress Commander, and Mr Ivan King, Chairman of the local advisory committee to the Director of War Supplies. “Col. GCG Werdmuller, at the head of his men, was addressed by the Mayor, who said he extended a hearty welcome on behalf of the City Council and residents of East London. They had followed the journey of the “War Train” with interest and had been keenly looking forward to a closer acquaintance with them and their wonderful train. “He hoped they would thoroughly enjoy their stay in the City, and he wished them every success in the remaining portion of their journey. 59


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Railway’s Effort “Mr Parsons said he would add the welcome of the railway staff of the Cape Eastern system to that the Mayor had said. He was sure that Col Werdmuller would be the first to admit the large part played in the production of war supplies by the Railway. There was another aspect of the question. That was in transportation. Ever since the shadow of war had descended on them the railway, on a single track, had carried enormous civilian and military traffic. He left it to them to judge whether they had been successful in that. From the 100 000 men employed on the railway they had released 8,000 for active service, yet those remaining had carried on with great credit. He thought that what the railways were doing would be viewed in the future as a wonderful effort. “The train would give an insight into what was being done towards the war effort. “If they could make complete howitzers in South Africa, even with South African steel, surely after the war their artisans could be utilised for the making of agricultural and industrial tools and machinery. “Col. Werdmuller, in reply, said that it was their privilege to visit East London in what was now generally called the “War Train”. He was sure they would find much to interest them in the trains which showed both the military and the home front sides of the Union’s war effort. Purpose of Tour “The main purpose of the tour was to demonstrate to the public what was being done to secure the home front. He would mention that not only had the armoured trains been fully equipped in the workshops of the South African Railways and Harbours, but also that all the equipment on the trains had been manufactured out of purely South African materials, with South African labour. “Another purpose of the tour was to recruit trainees for the basic technical training scheme, and applicants for training under that scheme were invited to register with recruiting officers on the trains. “Recruits for the army would naturally be accepted. They should apply to the recruiting officers on the train. “It should be clearly understood that workers would not be enrolled for immediate employment in war supplies factories. Workers desiring to be considered for such work, and particularly skilled artisans, were nevertheless invited to record their names with the recruiting staff accompanying the trains. He appealed to persons who had, through hobbies and otherwise, acquired a skill which readily fitted them for conversion into war supplies workers to come forward and offer their services. He made that appeal at the request of the Director-General of War Supplies, Dr. HJ van der Bijl.

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Dr H J van der Bijl (centre), Director-General of War Supplies, inspecting Armoured Car production. A total of 5 746 Marmonn-Harrington Armoured Cars were built in South Africa during the war. Compare this with other makes made in UK, e.g. Daimler Mk I & II, 2 694; Humber Mks I – IV, 5 400 (approx.) and AEC Mk I – III, only 629! Position of Key Men “There was another aspect of war supply which had to be emphasised, and that was that men employed in key positions in industry were doing their duty as definitely as those in the army. The home front was as vital to their success as the military one, and it was the Government’s definite policy that there should be no reduction in the production of food; that South African munitions industries should still expand, and they must not disturb the normal trade and commerce of the country more than was necessary. “Fine munitions work, including precision work was being done in the railway workshops, where they were turning out trench mortars in quantities in excess of expectations. Work was at present handicapped by the unavailability of the present building, but that would be rectified as he understood there were funds on the estimates for the purpose. They had also turned out hangars and fittings for the South African Air Force and they had done work, not only for local requirements, but also local firms had actually sub-contracted for inland centres. There was also a considerable production of glycerine, which, as everyone knew, was used in munition manufacture. “Col. Werdmuller said he was pleased to present Mr Ivan King, chairman of the advisory committee to the War Supplies Committee and also Colonel Lewis who had met them at Burghersdorp, Queenstown and now in East London. He was also pleased to see Mrs Lewis, commandant of the women’s auxiliary. They all know how much women were doing towards the war effort. “Last time he had been in East London he had boasted that there were 40 000 women playing their part, but now he could say that 400 000 women were standing four-square behind General Smuts to see the war through. “He thanked Mr Parsons for the excellent arrangements which had been made for the visit. Finally, he would reaffirm the confidence in their wonderful leader and Commander-in-Chief in the outcome of the war. “Following the ceremony, the Mayor, city councillors and members of the civic party welcoming Col. Werdmuller and his men were taken on a visit of inspection through the train. City councillors attending were Messrs Tiddy, Starkey, Neale, Lazarus, Lloyd and Bowes. There were in addition many prominent citizens. Children See Train “Since entering the Cape from the Free State, the “War Train” has been travelling over the mountains in three sections, which arrived within an hour of each other between 7.30 and 9.30 am yesterday. “Throughout the day a constant stream of sightseers thronged the station. “After the official party had inspected the train, the first to be given the privilege of passing through were the schoolchildren of East London. When they had seen the train, the public were allowed in. “Apart from the two trainloads of troops and civilian personnel – numbering altogether more than 400 – the train is composed of two war supplies exhibition vans and four armoured trucks carrying a searchlight flanked by machine-guns, an 18-pounder gun on a fixed mounting, the first howitzer on its carrying vehicle and with its ammunition trailer and a South African armoured car.

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) “The exhibition vans contain a tabloid display of war supplies made in South Africa almost entirely from South African material and with South African labour. “Even the parachute draped on the outside of one of the vans was made in South Africa, though the cotton had to be imported. “The parachute is being turned out in large numbers for the South African Air Force. It is used for dropping supplies to troops cut off from other means of transport. The 15 varieties of buckles are turned out in South African workshops from South African metal and the cordage and web harness are also made in South Africa from South African material. “In the munitions van is a great variety of arms and ammunition shown in the various stages of construction – the parts of a South African howitzer, shells, small arms ammunition, aerial bombs ranging from big 500 pounders to 20 pounders, bomb and shell fuses, and the first bayonet made in South Africa. “Enough bayonets to equip several brigades of infantry are now being turned out in Transvaal railway workshops. They are made from the finest coach spring steel. “There is armour plating, too, made in the great Iscor works, showing the mark of a bullet, and placed side by side, for comparison, with a piece of ordinary steel, several times thicker – the thickness it would have to be to resist the same bullet. Helmets and Mortars “Steel helmets are shown – South Africa is making thousands daily, enough to equip not only her own forces, but those of other units of the Commonwealth as well – with the famous camouflage net, a South African innovation, handmade by Natives, 1 000 of whom are employed in this work. “Among other things the South African mortar is shown, with a barrel in cross section to demonstrate how the bomb is fired into the air. East London railway workshops are contributing considerably in the production of mortars. “Equally interesting is the coach exhibiting the uniforms, clothing, blankets, and rations South Africa is producing in great quantities. “Next to the exhibit of modern South African army boots is a pair of old army boots which went through the East African campaign in the last war. “Miniature South African army biscuits (claimed to be the most nutritious in the world) were made specially for the war train’s tour, and are laid out for sampling by visitors in the army rations section. “All day, crowds of children crowded around the howitzer and clambered over the armoured car, which had been run off the armoured trucks on to the platform. “Behind the armoured trucks was a truck on which the men receiving instruction under the basic technical training scheme were at work on their machines. This proved a big attraction, as did the local basic training exhibit on the platform nearby. Here seven men from the East London C.O.T.T. centre, under the care of a local instructor, Mr T P Smith, were at work on a shaping machine, a drilling machine, a lathe, and a fitting bench. The exhibit was arranged by Mr P Gnodde, principal of the East London Technical College.” There was also a travelling Post Office on board, as borne out by these letters. Defence Force personnel on the train could send letters free of charge. Members of the public could use the facility, but had to affix a stamp:

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That is the end of the Daily Dispatch article. Similar articles must have appeared at every stop along the route. It raises several issues; not least Dr van der Bijl and the role of Iscor. From an excellent book published at the same time, early 1941, called South Africa Fights, by JSM Simpson, it is worth picking out just four pages:

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The second-last sentence is particularly relevant to this article: “There were the railway workshops, full of highly skilled technicians and plant which kept in operation the world’s most efficient 3-ft, 6in gauge railway system.” Finally, in connection with the famed Special Service Battalion, here is a picture of a treasured item in my collection:

It is an SSB Officer’s cane, found during the war by a friend of mine on a bench in Gardens in Cape Town. He gave it to me on account of my connection with the Battalion, in which I trained during 1969 and ’70. Andy Selfe February 2010. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1942: ON FURLOUGH

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1942: PAINT SPECIFICATION OF SAR MILITARY TRAINS Lt. Col. William Marshall (SANDF Ret) furnishes the following documents:

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1945: A JOURNEY AHEAD Repatriation of Sick and Disabled Italian Prisoners of War By WO II RS TOMS - Zonderwater Illustrated by Lt-Cmdr. FH Sibson6

The Prisoner-of-War Hospital at Zonderwater is the largest POW Hospital in the Southern Hemisphere. The modern and most up-to-date equipment in this hospital can favourably compare with any other South African hospital and can adequately meet any emergency that it may be called upon to deal with. Since its inception it has been prepared to combat any epidemic and could accommodate up to approximately 3,000 patients if the occasion demanded. Now that the war has drawn to a successful conclusion the predominant thought uppermost in the minds of the majority of Italian prisoners is repatriation, and naturally, sick and disabled men are given first priority. Owing, however, to International technicalities, the repatriations in the past have not been as expeditious as our Government - in conjunction with the British Government - would have liked them to have been; but as world conditions gradually settle so circumstances will permit more speedy repatriations in the future.

6

Lt-Cmdr FH Sibson is identical to Francis H Sibson of The Boys Book of South African Engines

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) The initial spade work in preparing such repatriation involves a tremendous amount of work and careful planning by many Defence Departments. When the provisional figures for a forthcoming repatriation of sick POW are received by the POW Hospital, work commences immediately. Each and every chronic case is carefully examined by two or more UDF Doctors and several Italian MO’s. After the requisite number of sick have been selected, one of the most difficult tasks arises, and that is the selection of the Italian Protected Personnel who, in accordance with the Geneva Convention, accompany each draft. From the hundreds of Medical Orderlies only a few are fortunate in being selected. Among them there are Interpreters, Medical Orderlies, Clerks and Male Nurses. These are selected from men who were captured in the early stages of the war. Their length of captivity is one of the deciding factors. As the final list nears completion, excitement and tension runs high. At a general assembly the names of those selected are read out, followed by excited cries of joy and expressions of disappointment. Each Patient and Orderly is then given instructions as to various times he has to report to different sections of the hospital-for pay purposes, drawing of equipment and inoculations. It is, for instance, essential that every man be vaccinated and have a yellow fever inoculation. These repatriates are well equipped prior to leaving the country and receive new issues of underclothes, boots, kitbags and a number of other items too numerous to mention here. The organization of this great task runs smoothly and efficiently. Hundreds of sheets of nominal rolls are roneo-ed in strict alphabetical order. For easy reference each man has a card tied to the lapel of his coat on which is a number corresponding to that on the nominal roll. Separate lists have to be compiled for inter-departmental work as the selected patients in each of the 120 wards are scattered throughout the hospital. Mental cases, trachoma’s, T.B.’s and other ailments have to be kept separate, and the amount of work thrown on to the Orderly Room staff may well be imagined. From dawn on the day of departure repatriates start lining up on the parade ground. They are soon surrounded with groups of well-wishers and friends bidding and kissing them farewell. Their kit, having been searched and checked the night before, is neatly stacked ready to be conveyed to the station. The buzzing talk grows loader as the time for the final parade draws near, and the word "Ciao" (cheerio) frequently echoes above shouts and laughter. At last the command to fall in sounds, and each man, who IS able to walk falls in his appointed position, ambulances, then start leaving from the hospital wards conveying stretcher, mental and infectious cases. The marching out of the hospital goes with mechanical precision and very rarely does a hitch occur. • SAR Hospital train A hospital train awaits the repatriates at Zonderwater Station. While the kit is loaded into the van by a special fatigue party, the patients are quickly taken out of the ambulances as they arrive and systematically placed into the bunks of the ward cars. The beds or train bunks run in double rows down either side of the coach. The blue SAR blankets and spotlessly white sheets would surely meet with a favourable comment from the most exacting of matrons. They are equipped with electric fans and radios for the comfort and entertainment of the sick. 75


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Magazines and books are also provided. A unique and compact dispensary coach fully equipped with emergency medicines and drugs is attached to the last ward car. The UDF train staff attached to this hospital train are railway men and their job is to attend to the welfare of the patients and act as a liaison between military and railway officials, Special care is taken with the mental and neurosis cases and trained Italian mental orderlies handle them tactfully. All the repatriates are easily distinguishable as they are dressed in second-hand British pattern battle-dress dyed brown-this appearance gives them the nickname of "Chocolate Soldiers", U.D.F. hospital staff accompanies the draft, and in addition to the Protected Personnel repatriates, are Italian Orderlies who assist on the journey to the point of embarkation. The SAR train staff perform their duties as efficiently as is their custom, and patients on special diets are catered for in every respect. No trouble has ever occurred on these train journeys. The prisoners are docile and willing to co-operate. A psychological study of these people portrays happiness at the thought of seeing their families and sadness in others. Questioning them reveals their mixed feelings; many are returning. With a feeling of great apprehension of bewilderment and uncertainty. One POW has just received a letter informing him that on the capitulation of the German Army in Northern Italy, his mother and daughter ran out of the house into the street to join the celebrations, when, suddenly, the Germans opened fire and killed them. Yet another is returning to a home razed to the ground. Others have had good news. Their families are safe and sound, thanks to the invaluable information and aid given by the Information Bureau of the SA Red Cross. The war with its consequent effects has left its permanent mark. On the arrival at Durban Docks, a word about the highly efficient organisation of the Embarkation Authorities is worthy of record. As the tram draws to a halt, a loading party of native stretcher bearers are awaiting the arrival of the POWs. They are lined up spick and span with their stretchers and wheel chairs in tidy rows beside them. After a short consultation and the handing over of varied documents, the actual embarking of patients from the train to the hospital ship is executed in a smooth clockwork manner. 'The whole

operation is Over in a short time, and the 'Orderlies on the quay side wave and shout their good wishes before departing to a Base Depot in Durban, from where they await their return journey. The depressed feelings of the Orderlies who have to return to Zonderwater can easily be understood. 76


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Back in camp a silent emptiness assails the hospital for a few days after the repatriation fever wears off, and the remaining prisoners wait in anxious expectation that they will be the lucky ones to be selected on the next draft- When Who knows? One thing is certain. The majority of POWs who have already left this country have taken with them the predominant thought of the democratic treatment that has been conceded them during their captivity; and the kind and generous nature of the South African people with whom they have come into contact at, various times will forever remain with them. •

In contrast our POW’s had a hard time in Italy and Europe during WW2.

THE FRIDAY SPECIAL The Nongqai March 1946, p.321.

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• A Four Hour Sixty Mile Journey By WO II RS Toms and illustrated by F. H. Sibson The Nongqai 1946-03-321 No cheering cries of farewell break the sultry silence when the green flag signals the train away from Zonderwater station each Friday afternoon at 5 pm. Well known are the "Friday Specials" by manyif not most of our gallant ex-Servicemen. Take your mind back to those days, dear Reader. Do you remember them? Ah! Of course! How can one ever forget the fifty-hundred,-thousand trips made on the “Friday Special”! Again we are back in Zonderwater's vast, expansive, bleak, scattered camp. Friday has arrived and we've won the battle for a hard-earned week-end pass. Our agitated minds prompt us quietly and unobtrusively to fade out of camp and head for the station as soon after 4 pm as possible. The train

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) is there. Yes! - So is the inevitable queue at the old tin hut where the tickets are sold. Sometimes we barely had the train fare (2nd class), sometimes we had money to burn. The heat beats down on the long ash platform and we perspire as we lug our suitcase, haversack or pack, searching for an empty seat. We dump our kit and automatically head for the ice-cream man who's on the spot as usual and never lets us down. Still we have half-an-hour to spare while we sit thirstily in the humid heat of the coach. The tall blue gum trees on the right and the Vehicle Reception Park with its unchanging graveyard of trucks is the only scenery which greets our bored eyes. The coach fills rapidly and conversation becomes general. Curses and grumbles of everyday parades, the RSM, the food, the weather and the whole army from the bottom to the top are predominant topics. At five minutes past five the train whistles, and with a jerk mingled with the squeaks of the woodwork of the ancient coaches, the train crawls out of this famous station. It hardly gathers speed before the grinding brakes drag it to a halt at the Black Cat. There is no platform here, but the close proximity of the road is more or less an indication where the driver is supposed to stop. Again we are off, and the piercing whistles of the engine punctuate conversation as we cross two main roads and glide into Cullinan. The station is packed as usual, and the hurried scramble of more would-be week-enders fills the coaches to capacity. The packed masses of humanity sort themselves out along the corridors, on top of the seats, sprawl on the floor, swear, curse, laugh and wonder why they ever joined the army. A couple of hard-boiled drunks invariably board the train and squeeze into a half vacant seat. " .. itsh blooming 'ot in 'ere!" he quavers to no one in particular. “Give ush a drink, chum!" mumbles his mate. The first speaker glares malevolently at his friend, then before he can reply bursts into song: "Roll out the barrel, roll out the barrel of fun. . . ".

The two endeavour to sing but their thick voices trail off halfway, and they stare sullenly about them. 79


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Usually at 5.25 pm the train moves off again, climbs tortuously over the first hill and halts puffing at Montrose. We're off again, to stop at Balloon. One or two Africans get on here and the train continues its journey. Many of us have held our breath in the few anxious moments while we negotiate that dangerous" S� bend outside Rayton. We stop at Rayton to allow an empty train to cross. Though evening is drawing on the atmosphere is close, and many doze off while others chat, play cards or sit in silence and look bored. The rhythmic click of the wheels as we start once again is an antidote to our uncomfortable semidoze; and we open our tired eyes to gaze blandly at the familiar landscape surrounding Pienaarspoort. Ah! Sweet mysteries of veld, bush and scrub, how much longer are we going to halt here? A goods train rattles by, but still we don't move. Another ten minutes pass and we unexpectedly jerk off-gathering speed-now going faster and steadier, and we sink back into slumber. A yell penetrates our foggy brain in what might be described as musical form: "Ah-Ma-Ma-You're the one for me. . .!" With a start we awake and peer out of the window to see several native 'urchins with coal and bootbrown faces. "Penny-Me-Mister!" yells the faces. "No!" shouts some awakened and indignant occupant of the coach. "Penny-Me- Mister, Oh-Ma-Ma Penny-Me- Mister, You're the one for me...!" yell the superharmonious voices. "Roll out the Barrel..! ", yells one of the drunks. This disturbing element arouses us and shatters further thoughts of dozing. Our necks are stiff, our mouths are dry, our limbs are cramped-and we're half way to Pretoria. Eerste Fabrieke, that ancient and historical spot, necessitates a long halt. Whether it is to give the labouring engine a rest or to give the fireman a respite in his continual shovelling, is unknown-but perhaps it is to allow another empty passenger train to pass. With Silverton in sight and thoughts near home, we again endeavour to engage in amicable conversation regardless of the drunk fellow opposite who gazes bleakly at us. The twinkling lights, in the dusk, rush by as our special passes the numerous sidings and nears the capital. As we draw nearer to the station the human cargo gets restless. It shuffles and edges-usually towards the engine. The secret? It's easy! One doesn't have so far to walk up the platform. The two drunks get up and shove their way up the coach amidst indignant protests from the docile passengers. Before the train finally draws to a stop it begins belching forth its passengers -soldiers, civvies and Africans. 80


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The buzzing talk of hurrying people mingles with the hissing steam of engines and the perpetual hum of electric coaches as humanity swarms towards the entrance and buses. Five minutes to go and returning soldiers with packets of sandwiches, buns, fruit and bulging jaws are evidence of the sandwich rush on the poky station tea room. The two drunks have stimulated their fuzzy brains in the bar and return with an unsteady gait, sing loudly. They have difficulty in finding their original seats and as they pass, we overhear their conversation. “I’sh thish Friday Special?” “No! What-sh his name?" “I dunno, never 'eard of 'im!" “Mush be our train. . . !" The modern electric train swoops off and glides gracefully through the night past green and red lights. The rush of cool air refreshes our weary minds, and we are almost ready to crack a joke or two now that we are free of dust and grime. Little need be written here of this latter stage of our journey as it is too well-known, and time soon passes as we enter Germiston. Here we while away the time by gazing enviously at the 9 p.m. Durban train or watch the shunting opposite.

Once again over the well-worn tracks passing through Denver and Tooronga, with the shattering echo of the c1ickity-c1ack against the corrugated fences of warehouses reminding us that our "Special" has almost reached its destination. At last we glide gently into Johannesburg station and our journey has ended. The time? Almost 9.20 pm (if we're lucky). The two drunks, by alcoholic magnetism, make a bee-line for the pub - so do many more of us. Others are anxious to catch trams and buses, and in a short time our "Special" stands forlorn, rid of all its passengers. Will you forget those trips, Soldier? And will you ever forget the return journey back to that bleak and far-distant camp on the Sunday night? The rainy, windy night? The cold and miserable night? The rush to catch that 8.36 "Special"- Ah! sweet memories of army life and journeys with "Friday Specials".

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1961 – 1994: SUBURBAN TRAINS AND THE SA RAILWAYS POLICE 1993: Anti-Terror Trains: Rollo Dickson

5M2P Pakkieswaens met DZ voor en agter - 1993 Bomaanvalle SAP – foto Rollo Dickson

5M2P Pakkieswaens, Observatory - Maitland link – foto Rollo Dickson 1993

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Anti-Riot Trains: Petrus Botha

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Police coach with wire mesh before the windows and inside view: Seating arrangements for police

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Klas 38 gepantserde lokomotiewe: Mnr Petrus Botha

Daar was vier gepantserde klas 38-lokomotiewe. Hulle kan beide op krag of diesel loop. Mnr. Botha vertel hulle was onder meer op die Thembisa-lyn gebruik gedurende 1996. Let op samestelling van die trein: Sandtrok, twee personeel trokke, twee lokomotiewe en ‘n trok gevul met sand. Let op lig en bufffer.

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(Filler) Class 6A was once staged at De Aar

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SAR Fire Brigade on Rails: Mr. Petrus Botha With riots or terror, a fire brigade is very useful – not all fires on rails are assessable to ordinary fire brigades.

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1966 – 1989: THE BUSH WAR • The Role of the SAR Police in the Operational Area • 1979: Chris en Kobus: Herman Bosman: SAPS Meganiese Skool, Benoni Goeie more Brig. Hennie. Na ons laaste e-posse het ek na ISSUU-webwerf gegaan en ook die SAS/SAR tydskrifte gevind. In een van hulle het ek ‘n kort beriggie gelees oor “Chris & Kobus”, die eertydse Spoorwegpolisie se pantsertrollies. Operasionele foto’s is uiters onbekombaar, aangesien die ouens maar sku was om foto’s te neem weens die situasie in die land en ook die geheime aard van die spesifieke voertuie/trollies. Hier ‘n bietjie meer inligting aangaande die twee trollies. Die twee voertuie was plaaslik ontwerp deur ‘n Spoorwegingenieur, mnr. Chris van der Merwe en vervaardig by die spoorwegwerkplaas te Langlaagte. Ongeveer 6800 onderdele moes in die werkswinkel ontwerp en vervaardig word. Vroeg in 1987 is die twee voertuie by die Spoorwegpolisie kollege te Esselenpark aan hooggeplaastes bekend gestel en is die voertuie dan ook vernoem na “Chris” (Mnr. Chris van der Merwe, die ontwerper) en “Kobus” ( destydse Hoofbestuurder van die SA Spoorweë, dr JCH Loubser, noemnaam Kobus). Die voertuie was koeëlvas en ook so ontwerp om landmyn/bomontploffings te kon weerstaan. Die voertuie kon op ‘n gewone pad, sowel as ‘n treinspoor gebruik word. Hulle kon ‘n snelheid van oor 60kph behaal en het ‘n reikafstand van 750km per pad en 1000km per spoor op een tenk brandstof gehad en het 12 ½ ton elk geweeg. Op elke wiel was daar ook ‘n hidrouliese motor geïnstalleer en die hidrouliesepomp wat die hidrouliese motors voorsien het met hidrouliese olie is deur ‘n sessilinder Magirus Deutsch diesel enjin aangedryf. Die veerstelsels van die voertuie is ook so ontwerp dat die voertuie op die swakste, denkbare paaie kon beweeg. Verder was die trollies ook voorsien met ‘n staal raamwerk voor die treinwiele wat so ontwerp was om bomme te kon onskadelik stel of detoneer wat op die spoorlyn geheg was. Om die trollies op die spoor te kon gebruik, is die trollies bo-oor die spoor getrek en is die treinwiele laat sak en dan kon dit op die spoorbaan gebruik word. Aangesien die trollies ook op die pad gebruik kon word moes lede ook oor swaarvoertuiglisensies beskik het en die lede met die spoorweë se luukse Eagle busse opgelei om sodoende hulle swaarvoertuiglisensies te bekom. 88


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Verder moes die lede ook ‘ treinbedryfskursus te Esselenpark, Spoorwegkollege deurloop het. Gedurende Januarie 1978 het sersant J.P.L Strydom van Suidwes-Afrika en verskeie ander lede in die Republiek die treinbedryfskursus deurloop, waarna die twee trollies intensief getoets is. Sersant Strydom was die enigste lid afkomstig van Suidwes-Afrika en “Kobus” is daarna per spoor na SWA vervoer waar dit deur Sersant Strydom in bedryf gestel is, terwyl “Chris” vir die patrollering van die spoorlyne in die Republiek gebruik was. “Kobus” het die Spoorwegnetwerk vanaf Mariental in die Suide, Gobabis in die Ooste, Walvisbaai en Outjo in die Weste en Tsumeb en Grootfontein in die Noorde van Suidwes-Afrika gepatrolleer. Ongelukkig was daar ‘n probleem weens die volgehoue druk waarmee die hidrouliese olie aan die hidrouliese motors voorsien moes word en het die koppelings van die hidrouliese pype nie gehou nie en is die padwiele dan ook later permanent verwyder en is net die treinwiele op die spoorbaan gebruik. Verder het die trollies wat in SWA gebruik is ook ‘n nadeel gehad weens die feit dat ‘ ligter tipe spoorstaaf op die spoorbaan gebruik is. Die bemanning van elke trollies het normaalweg bestaan uit ‘n bevelvoerder (sersant) en vyf konstabels, gewapen met 9mm pistole en R1 gewere. Weens die tegniese (hidrouliese) probleem is daar toe besluit om van die gewone “Funkey” spoortrollies gebruik te maak om die spoorbane te beveilig. Die “Funkeys” was ook gepantser met koeëlvaste glas, maar was nie mynbestand nie en was aangedryf met ‘n petrol aangedrewe twee liter Ford enjin met ‘n vierspoedratkas. Hulle bemanning het bestaan uit ‘n sersant en drie konstabels met bewapening soortgelyk aan die panstertrollies “Chris & Kobus”. Tydens die onttrekking van die Suid-Afrikaanse Magte uit SWA is “Chris” daar agtergelaat en word tans in die Museum te Windhoek uitgestal. “Kobus” is aan die Spoorweë agtergelaat tydens die samesmelting van die spoorwegpolisie en die SA Polisie op 1 Oktober 1986, waarna verskeie veranderings aangebring is om dit sodoende te kon gebruik vir spoorbaan inspeksies en onderhoud in gevaarlike gebiede. Groete

Herman Bosman 4 April 2018

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Photo: Hennie Heymans.

1975 THE VICTORIA FALLS CONFERENCE

From the front: Mr Kenneth Kaunda, Dr Hilgard Muller and Genl HJ van den Bergh

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) The Victoria Falls Conference took place on the 26th August 19757 aboard a South African Railways train halfway across the Victoria Falls Bridge on the border between the unrecognised state of Rhodesia (today Zimbabwe) and Zambia. It was the culmination of the "détente" policy introduced and championed by Adv BJ Vorster, the Prime Minister of South Africa, who was attempting to improve its relations with the Frontline States to Rhodesia's north, west and east by helping to produce a settlement in Rhodesia. The participants in the conference were a delegation led by the Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith on behalf of his government, and a nationalist delegation attending under the banner of Abel Muzorewa's African National Council (UANC), which for this conference also incorporated delegates from the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), the Zimbabwe African People's Union (ZAPU) and the Front for the Liberation of Zimbabwe (FROLIZI). Vorster and the Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda acted as mediators in the conference, which was held on the border in an attempt to provide a venue both sides would accept as neutral. The conference failed to produce a settlement, breaking up on the same day it began with each side blaming the other for its unsuccessful outcome. Smith believed the nationalists were being unreasonable by requesting preconditions for talks — which they had previously agreed not to do — and asking for diplomatic immunity for their leaders and fighters. The nationalists contended that Smith was being deliberately intransigent and that they did not believe he was sincere in seeking an agreement if he was so adamant about not giving diplomatic immunity. Direct talks between the government and the Zimbabwe African People's Union followed in December 1975, but these also failed to produce any significant progress. The Victoria Falls Conference, the détente initiative and the associated ceasefire, though unsuccessful, did affect the course of the Rhodesian Bush War, as they gave the nationalist guerrillas significant time to regroup and reorganise themselves following the decisive security force counter-campaign of 1973 – 74. A further conference would follow in 1976, this time in Geneva.8

1979: SA RAILWAYS POLICE: BOSPADDA • Armoured Special Purpose Road and Rail Vehicles: Frans Bedford-Visser Kobus (SAS R 810 493 - Roepsein SP1) en Chris (SAS R 810 494 - Roepsein SP2) die twee Bospadda (ook net Padda genoem) pantserkarre, wat deur die S.A. Spoorweg onder die oog van mnr Chris van der Merwe, werksbestuurder by Langlaagte, ontwerp om albei op die pad sowel as op die spore te kan ry. Koeëlvas en gebou om landmynontploffings te weerstaan, die twee pantserkarre was heeltemal uniek wêreldwyd, in dat hulle twee stelle wiele besit het. Padwiele was natuurlik gebruik word as mens op die pad ry, en spoorwiele, wat mens laat sak as jy op die spore wil ry. Aangedryf deur sessilinder BF6L913 lug-verkoelde Magirus-Deutz 6,125L turbo-dieselenjins, kon die pantsers snelhede van 60 km/u behaal, en met een tenk brandstof (200 liter) 1000km per spoor, of 750km per pad aflê. Hulle was vernoem na die destydse hoofbestuurder van die Spoorweë, mnr H.C. (Kobus) Loubscher en die werksbestuurder van Langlaagte PMD, mnr Chris van der Merwe. Chris (SAS R 810 494 Roepsein SP2) is in 1979 Suidwes Afrika toe gestuur om passasier en goedere trein begeleiding te doen, terwyl Kobus in die Republiek agter gebly het.

7 8

The Bush War began in SWA on 26 August 1966 – HBH. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Falls_Conference_(1975)

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Chris het hidrouliese probleme opgetel, met klippe wat die pype gebreek het, en is later omskep om uitsluitlik op die spore gebruik te word. Chris is nog steeds in Windhoek, by die TransNamib Museum. Kobus (SAS R 810 493 - Roepsein SP1) was ook so omskep, en was weer gebruik deur gedurende die onluste in 1991, maar het probleme opgetel met die ratkas en dryfstelsel, en was dus opgelê op Braamfontein aangesien Spoornet en Metrorail nie die onkoste wou dra om dit reg te stel nie. In 2010 was Kobus opgeknap deur Naledi Rail op opdrag van PRASA, om gebruik te word om die spoorlyne gedurende die Voetbal Wêreldbeker te patrolleer indien nodig. Alles het goed afgeloop, en Kobus was toe nie gebruik nie. Daarna was Kobus opgelê in die Braamfontein Spooropleidingsentrum, waar dit nog steeds bevind kan word. Op die skakel kan jy die foto’s wat Naledi Rail geneem het gedurende Kobus se opknapping in 2010 http\://www.naledirail.co.za/portfolio-item/in-fringilla-suscipit/

SAR MARBLE HALL: COUNTER INSURGENCY TRAINING (HBH) From the 1970’s onwards all COIN-training in the South African Police Force took place a Maleoskop. For the purpose of attending the course SAP members from all over South Africa and the then South West Africa had to travel from their stations by rail to Marble Hall. From there were conveyed by truck to Maleoskop outside Groblersdal for training and then after the course; the same way back! To think they even paid us for having fun!

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SA RAILWAYS POLICE: “BOSPADDA” RESIN MODEL /35 Scale model of “Chris”, the Bospadda armoured car, Chris, used by the South African Railways Police to protect the railway lines in the then South West Africa during the Bush War period. This high-quality model is made by BaxMod, Cape Town, and can be purchased as a kit to self-assemble, or as an assembled model. 1

Link to BaxMod’s website: http://baxmod.co.za/index.php/1-35-models/products/display/bospadda1-35

Description: The Bospadda was an Armoured train developed by the SAR in the late 70's. Only two of the vehicles were ever manufactured. The Bospadda had road as well as rail capability. BaxMod has developed the rail only configuration with plans to later release the road / rail configuration as a conversion set. The resin model comes with interior detail, the rail detail, instructions, decal set for both vehicles and PE set. Contact details Chris Baxter trading as BaxMod. 26 Woodhead Drive, Edgemead, Cape Town, 7441. Phone 0215593094 | Fax 0214148091. chris@baxmod.co.za

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BOSPADDA • SASP BOSPADDA PANTSERKARRE | SARP BOSPADDA ARMOURED VEHICLES: FRANS BEDFORD-VISSER Amptelik genoem “Armoured Special Purpose Road and Rail Vehicles”, was die pantserkarre op hulle voorstelling Paddas gedoop, en die pers het hulle so aan die publiek voorgestel. So deur die jare het hulle ook die bynaam Bospadda so langs die pad opgetel. Eers voorgestel in 1978 te Esselenpark, was die Bospaddas se doel om treine te begelei en die spoorlyne veilig te hou. Kobus (SAS R 810 493 - Roepsein SP1) en Chris (SAS R 810 494 - Roepsein SP2) die twee Bospadda (ook net Padda genoem) pantserkarre, wat deur die S.A. Spoorweg onder die oog van mnr Chris van der Merwe, Werksbestuurder by Langlaagte, ontwerp om albei op die pad sowel as op die spore te kan ry. Koeëlvas en gebou om landmynontploffings te weerstaan, was die twee pantserkarre heeltemal uniek wêreldwyd, in dat hulle aanvanklik twee stelle wiele besit het. Padwiele was natuurlik gebruik word as mens op die pad ry, en spoorwiele, wat mens laat sak as jy op die spore wil ry. Aangedryf deur sessilinder BF6L913 lug-verkoelde Magirus-Deutz 6,125L turbodieselenjins, kon die pantserkarre snelhede van 60 km/u behaal, en met net een 200 liter tenk brandstof of 1000km per spoor, of 750km per pad aflê. Hulle was vernoem na die destydse hoofbestuurder van die spoorweë, mnr H.C. (Kobus) Loubscher en die werksbestuurder van Langlaagte RMT, mnr Chris van der Merwe, beter geken as "Oom Chris". Chris (SAS R 810 494 - Roepsein SP2) is in 1979 Suidwes Afrika toe gestuur om passasier en goedere trein begeleiding te doen. Ongelukkig het Chris het hidrouliese probleme opgetel, aangebring deur om spoor ballas klippe op te tel en teen die hidrouliese pype gegooi, wat hulle gereeld gebreek het, en is later omskep om uitsluitlik op die spore gebruik te word. Chris is nog steeds in Windhoek, by die Transnamib Museum te Windhoekstasie. Kobus (SAS R 810 493 - Roepsyn SP1) het in die Republiek gebly, en was gereeld tussen Germiston en Katlehong gebruik om treine te begelei, en seker te maak dat die spoorlyne veilig was. Later ook omskep vir uitsluitlike gebruik op die spore, was Kobus weer na samesmelting gebruik gedurende die onluste in 1991, maar het probleme opgetel met die ratkas en dryfstelsel, en was opgelê op Braamfontein aangesien Spoornet en Metrorail nie die onkoste wou dra om dit reg te stel nie.

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In 2010 was Kobus opgeknap deur Naledi Rail op opdrag van PRASA, om gebruik te word om die spoorlyne gedurende die Voetbal WĂŞreldbeker te patrolleer indien nodig. Alles het goed afgeloop, en Kobus was toe nie gebruik nie. Daarna was Kobus opgelĂŞ in die Braamfontein Spooropleidingsentrum, waar dit nog steeds bevind kan word. Op die skakel kan jy die foto's wat Naledi Rail geneem het gedurende Kobus se opknapping in 2010: http\://www.naledirail.co.za/portfolio-item/in-fringilla-suscipit/

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• Bestuurdersposisie Die pantserkarre het twee bestuurdersposisies gehad. Op die pad was daar ‘n “voor” en “agter”, maar op die spore kon hulle van albei kante af bestuur word. Soos ‘n trein met ‘n lokomotief voor en agter, as die pantserkar tot ‘n punt kom waar dit in die teenoorgestelde rigting bestuur moet word, stap die drywer eenvoudig van een posisie na die ander en daar gaan hy. Die het heeltemal weggedoen met die nodigheid om of die treinwiele op te tel en Padwiele gebruik om die voertuig om te draai, of ‘n sylyn te gebruik om in die teenoorgestelde rigting te ry. Aanvanklik, toe hulle nog die pad en spoor wiele gehad het, was daar ‘n stuurwiel op die “voorste” bestuurdersposisie.

• Ontsnappingsdeure Bo op die dak is daar twee deure, daar gesit nie net om bo te kan uitkyk as jy ry nie, maar ook om ontsnapping te help sou die pantserkar omkeer. Die sy deure was heeltemal te swaar om op te lig, en as die voertuig op sy kant beland na ‘n lokval, kan die bemanning nog steeds van kajuit ontsnap, deur om die deure op die dak te gebruik. Hulle was so gestel dat net een van hulle op ‘n slag oopgemaak kon word.

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• Voorste bestuurdersposisie Voorste bestuurdersposisie sonder die stuurwiel. Die gaping waar die stuur kolom deur die vloer gekom het kan onder gesien word. 98


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• Agterste (Spoor) Bestuurdersposisie ‘n Gedeelte van die agterste bestuurdersposisie kan hier gesien word. Daar is heelwat minder kontrole beskikbaar, en dit is meer soos die kontrole van ‘n trein. Om die pantserkar te bestuur moes drywers ‘n drie-maand lank kursus loop om nie alleenlik hulle swaar voertuig lisensie te kry nie, maar ook te kwalifiseer as ‘n treindrywer.

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• Chris in SWA (bo) en Kobus (onder) in RSA

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1977 PATROLLIES MET SAS-TROLLIES • Sersant J.P.L. Strydom, “Kobus” en “Chris” Gedurende Januarie 1977 was sersant J.P.L. Strydom van Suidwes Afrika en verskeie lede van die Republiek genomineer om ʼn treinbedryf kursus by die Spoorwegkollege te Esselenpark by te woon. Hy was deel van die eerste groep Spoorwegpolisielede wat as spoormotortrolliedrywers gekwalifiseer het. Na die opleiding en intensiewe toetsing van die twee pantsertrollies was Kobus per spoor na Suidwes Afrika vervoer en deur sersant J.P.L. Strydom in bedryf gestel. Chris was vir die patrollering van die spoorlyne in die Republiek van Suid Afrika aangewend. Sersant Koos Strydom was die enigste gekwalifiseerde lid van die Spoorwegpolisie in Suidwes Afrika wat in staat was om die pantsertrollie te dryf. Die trollie was gebruik om die Spoorwegnetwerk vanaf Mariental in die suide, Gobabis in die ooste, Walvisbaai en Outjo in die weste en Tsumeb en Grootfontein in die noorde van Suidwes Afrika te patrolleer. Die pantsertrollie was ook met groot sukses voor passasiers- en troeptreine aangewend om die spoortrajek te beveilig. ʼn Staal raamwerk was aan die voorste treinwiele van Kobus gemonteer wat as vroeë waarskuwing gedien het wanneer daar ʼn toestel aan die spoorlyn gekoppel was. Die lede wat op die Kobus diens gedoen het, het noue skakeling met die taakgroep gehad wat verantwoordelik was vir die begeleiding van die treine. Ongelukkig het Kobus ook sy kwota probleme opgelewer. Vanweë die volgehoue geweldige hoë druk waarmee die hidroliese olie aan die hidroliese motors voorsien moes word, het die koppelings van die hidroliese pype nie gehou nie. Tegnologiese ontwikkeling van die hidroliese pype was nog nie op die verlangde vlak waar dit die druk kon hanteer nie. Aangesien ʼn ligter tipe spoorstaaf op die baanvlak in Suidwes gebruik was, het dit veroorsaak dat Kobus nie tot sy volle potensiaal gebruik kon word nie. Die bemanning van die pantsertrollie het bestaan uit ʼn Bevelvoerder (sersant) en vyf konstabels bewapen met 9mm pistole en R1 gewere.

SASP: FUNKEY MOTORTROLLIE EN PADVOERTUIE: BRIG. RONNIE BEYL Weens die tegniese probleme wat met die pantsertrollie ondervind was, is daar besluit om die gewone “Funkey” spoortrollies9 te gebruik om die beveiliging van die spoorbaan te verseker. Dié spoortrollies (vir die SA Spoorweg Polisie) was ook gepantser met koeëlvaste glas, maar was nie mynbestand of ontwerp vir oorlogvoering nie. Die trollie kon net op die spoorlyn beweeg en aandrywing het geskied deur middel van ʼn petrol aangedrewe twee liter Ford masjien met ʼn vier spoed outomatiese ratkas. Die trollie was baie beweeglik en het vir baie kilometers diens gedoen. Bemanning het bestaan uit ʼn sersant as seksieleier en drie konstabels. Kleredrag en bewapening was soortgelyk aan die van die pantsertrollie. Die S.A. Polisie het ʼn “Hippo” voertuig met registrasie nr. SAP 35394 aan die S.A. Spoorwegpolisie beskikbaar gestel vir die vervoer van sy lede. Die “Hippo” voertuig was mettertyd met ʼn Casspir voertuig van die S.A. Polisie vervang. 9

Foto brig HB Heymans, Windhoek spoorwegstasie.

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Ek en ander lede van die Spoorwegpolisie het gedurende 1981 ‘n Treinbedryfkursus te Esselenpark Spoorwegkollege deurloop. Gedurende 1982 het ek spesiale dienste in die noorde van Suidwes as drywer van die pantsertrollie, Kobus, gaan verrig.

• Adjudant-offisier Loekie Jordaan Ons basis was te Grootfontein en die Posbevelvoerder daar was adjudant offisier Loekie Jordaan wat ons dienste gekoördineer het. Aanvanklik sou ons die Grootfontein - Otavi trajek met Kobus patrolleer, maar weens meganiese probleme met Kobus het ons die begeleiding van treine toe met ʼn Funkey motortrollie gedoen. Ek het ʼn groep van 5 manne onder my bevel gehad. Een oggend, nadat ons so ongeveer drie weke daar was, het ons ʼn trein met petrolvoorrade vir die weermag vanaf Otavi na Grootfontein begelei. Dit was met eerste lig en die sig was swak. Terwyl ons gery het, was elkeen met sy eie gedagtes besig toe ons meteens ʼn harde slag en die geknars van staal gehoor het. Dit was een stofwolk en die volgende oomblik lê die motortrollie op sy linkerkant. Ons het in die beperkte spasie binne die motortrollie oor mekaar geval en hier en daar ʼn hou met die geweer teen die kop gekry. Die eerste gedagte was dat ons ʼn ploftoestel, wat op die spoor was, afgetrap het. Met die spoed waarmee ons gery het, het die motortrollie vir ongeveer sestig tot sewentig meter op sy kant op die spoorlyn geskuur voordat dit tot stilstand gekom het. Almal was deurmekaar en verward, maar in tye soos hierdie skop die opleiding wat jy vir dié tipe gebeurtenisse ontvang het in en jy reageer feitlik soos ʼn robot.

Photo – Ronnie Beyl

• Die motortrollie wat ontspoor het (Funky) Die belangrikste was om so vinnig as moontlik uit die motortrollie te kom want ons was nou ʼn “sitting duck” vir die terroriste. Ek het opdrag gegee dat die manne rondom verdediging moes doen ingeval daar op ons geskiet sou word. Ons het ʼn sitrap na Grootfontein gestuur vir versterking asook die verwydering van die omgeslane Funkey, toe ons agterkom dat daar nie op ons geskiet was nie. Ons het na die plek waar die ontsporing plaasgevind het beweeg deur op die spoorstawe te loop ingeval 104


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) daar antipersoneelmyne langs die spoorlyn geplant was. In sulke gevalle moes die aankomende treine teen die ongeluk gewaarsku word deur knalpatrone op die treinspoor te plaas wat as opdrag gedien het dat die trein so gou doenlik moes stop. Die aankomende trein met die petrol voorraad het kort op ons hakke gevolg en kon nie betyds stilhou nie. Die dieseleenheid en ʼn aantal van die trokke het oor die beskadigde spoor geloop voordat die trein heeltemal tot stilstand kon kom. Gelukkig het nie een van die trokke ontspoor nie, anders sou dit chaos afgegee het as die petroltrokke aan die brand geraak het. Die spoor was vir ʼn uur of wat gesluit toe die Spoorbaaninspekteur en sy span die motortrollie met ʼn hyskraan op ʼn weermag voertuig gelaai en van die toneel verwyder het. Ondersoek op die toneel het aan die lig gebring dat die lasplate wat die spore aan mekaar koppel deur die terroriste verwyder was. Hulle het ook ʼn gat onder die spoorstawe gegrawe met die gedagte dat die gewig van die vrag die spoorstawe na onder sou druk om sodoende die trein te laat ontspoor. Dit was ʼn wonderwerk en genade van Bo dat geeneen van ons ernstige beserings in die ontsporing van die motortrollie opgedoen het nie asook dat die vrag met petrol nie ontspoor het nie. Die tydperk in die noorde het ook vir heelwat humor gesorg. In dié tyd het ek nie my baard of snor afgeskeer nie en na ʼn maand se groei was my snor en baard redelik lank. Ons het een keer per week ons rantsoene by die 101 weermagbasis gaan afhaal en een oggend, toe ons met die bruin Land Cruiser waarmee ons gery het by die basis aankom, het daar ʼn een pip luitenant by die hek gestaan. Voordat ons die luitenant nog kon salueer spring hy op aandag en met duidelike verwarring op sy gesig salueer hy vir my as sersant en die konstabel wat my vergesel het. Nou moet ek ook net meld dat die konstabel maklik vir ʼn Portugees aangesien kon word en later het ons verneem dat die luitenant ons met die bruin kamoefleer uniform van die Spoorwegpolisie, die bruin Land Cruiser en my lang baard as lede van 32 bataljon aangesien het.10

Bospadda: SAS Polisie op patrollie

Die Bospadda en die spoorwegpolisie begelei ’n passaierstrein in SWA.

10

Sien Uloliwe vol 2 No 7 saamgestel deur HB Heymans – HBH. 105


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Foto’s verskaf deur Frans Bedford-Visser en Floris Botha

1980: SWA: Duppie, Frans Bedord-Visser en Krausie 106


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Foto deur Oliver Brown.

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Lisensie: Spoormotortrolliedrywer

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SWA: Deursoeking van Spoorbaankampe. Positiewe inligting was ontvang dat meelopers en terroriste in die spoorbaan kampe langs die spoorlyne gehuisves was en derhalwe was luitenant Beyl van Hoofkantoor en tien lede van die Spesiale Taakmag na SWA gestuur om bystand te bied. Hulle opdrag was om die terroriste wat by die spoorbaan kampe tuis gegaan het uit te snuffel en te elimineer. Lede van Grootfontein, wat vertroud was met die gebied, het die taakspan vergesel. Alle kampe tussen Kranzberg, Grootfontein en Tsumeb was deursoek en die lede het ʼn passasiersrytuig by Otavi stasie as ‘n tydelike basis ingerig. Die watertenks van die rytuig was een aand, tydens hulle verblyf te Otavi stasie, leeg, en die lede kon gevolglik nie stort nie. Die lede was agter in patrolliewaens vervoer omdat die SASP op daardie stadium nie beskik het oor enige gepantserde voertuie nie. Gevolglik was die lede op die betrokke aand, soos elke vorige aand, vaal van die stof en feitlik onherkenbaar. Dit was ʼn uitgemaakte saak dat die manne dié besondere aand net eenvoudig moes stort ten einde die volgende dag fris en vars te kon wees. Gelukkig vir hulle was daar op Otavi-stasie ‘n oorhoofse waterpyp wat gebruik was om die watertenks van die stoomlokomotiewe vol te maak. Die water het met soveel geweld uit die pyp gestroom dat, wanneer dit die lid se kop getref het, hy skoon van balans en onvas op sy voete was. Dit was nie eers nodig om seep te gebruik om die sand en stof te verwyder nie. Tydens die operasie het die taakmag se spore dikwels met dié van die SAP taakmag, wat onder aanvoering van Majoor Blackie de Swart was, gekruis. (Ronnie Beyl)

A/O Gert Louw en sers Johan Lotriet : 60mm PATMOR opl. 109


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THE WAR IN RHODESIA Landrover converted into an armoured rail trolley

Landrover converted into an armoured rail trolley – Bulawayo Museum11. (Via Frans BedfordVisser).

1976: OPERATION SAVANAH

SADF, Ops Savanah Sila Porto - Munhango 1976. 11

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Landrover_converted_into_an_armoured_rail_trolley._(11249395094).jpg

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1981 DIE MOLES MET DIE TROEPE OP DIE TREIN • Kaptein J van Heerden en sersant J.P.L. (Koos) Strydom Een aand, tydens een van Walvisbaai se gereelde feeste by die rugbyveld, was omtrent elke Sporie besig om fees te vier - behalwe natuurlik die voorbeeldige lede wat reeds getroud was. Terwyl ons nog so heerlik fees gevier het in die biertuin, het daar ʼn aankondiging gekom dat alle Spories by die uitsaaipunt moes aanmeld. Ek moet bysê dat ons baie vertroud was met die kuns van poetsbakkery en gevolglik het ons die versoek eenvoudig geïgnoreer. Teen die derde aankondiging wou ek graag vasstel wie dit was wat die poets wou bak en het ek toe doelgerig na die uitsaaipunt gestap en die man aldaar gevra wie die aankondigings gemaak het. “Nee”, het die man gesê, “dit was ʼn ou in ʼn groen uniform en ek dink die ou het sersant strepe gehad. Hy is reeds weg en het slegs die boodskap gelaat dat alle Spories dringend by die aanklagtekantoor moes aanmeld.” Daar was net een persoon aan diens wat hierdie aankondiging kon laat doen het en dit was sersant J.P.L. (Koos) Strydom. Toe het ek geweet; dié is nie ʼn grap nie! Ek het terug gedraf na my kollegas toe en gerapporteer dat die versoek eg was waarna ons almal soos een man daar weg gevlieg het. By die aanklagtekantoor aangekom, het ons vir sersant Strydom daar gevind en direk daarna het kaptein Van Heerden (Area Offisier) daar aangekom en die situasie aan ons verduidelik. Die kaptein het ons ingelig dat ʼn troepetrein, onderweg na Windhoek, in chaos verval het en dat die trein op Arandis stasie gaan staan het. Die swart troepe het geweier dat die trein verder mag ry. Daar was ongeveer 300 troepe aan boord en hulle het diep in die bottel gekyk vandat hulle uit Walvisbaai vertrek het en derhalwe was hulle sommer net opstandig vir geen rede nie.

• Sersant Armando Bianco Ons moes die ongeveer 90km so gou as moontlik na Arandis aflê waar sersant Armando Bianco en sy manne van Usakos ons sou ontmoet het. Vandaar sou ons almal op die trein klim en sorg dat daar orde kom sodat die trein verder kon beweeg. Ons moes elkeen ʼn HMK en rubberknuppel trek indien dit nodig sou raak om die oproeriges onder beheer te kry. Op Arandis aangekom, het ons vir sersant Bainco en sy manne ontmoet net toe hulle daar indraai. Die trein het daar gestaan en die kondukteur en treindrywer het ons ingewag. Hulle was alreeds twee ure agter skedule en die dronk troepe wou omtrent die trein afbreek. Ons was omtrent twaalf polisiemanne. Twee voertuie moes op die dienspad vir ondersteuning bly terwyl die res van ons op die trein moes klim. Die drywer het die teken om te vertrek gekry en kaptein van Heerden het opdrag gegee dat almal in hul kompartemente moes bly en geen individu mag in die gange rondgeloop het nie. Die helfte van ons het van die fees af gekom, so ons was heeltemal “opgegear” vir die situasie. Terwyl die kaptein nog opdragte gegee het, kom die eerste dronk troep verby geskuif met ʼn heel verkeerde houding want die eerste persoon wat hy uit die pad uit gestamp het, was die kaptein self. Fout! ʼn Klap op die oor het hom in die gang af gehelp en soos wat hy verby geskuif het, het hy nog twaalf van dieselfde gekry. Die ys was gebreek. Almal van ons het in die gange af beweeg en gesorg dat die troepe ordelik in hul kompartemente bly. Sommer vinnig het almal verstaan hoe dit voortaan sou werk met so hier en daar ʼn individu wat graag die grense wou beproef, maar met Sporie oortuiging het hulle gou besef dis dalk beter om te gaan slaap, want daar was groter kragte aan’t werk op daardie trein! As nuwe polisieman het ek nooit geweet dat ʼn rubberknuppel ʼn rif op ʼn skedel kon laat daar waar dit tref nie, maar daar was nog so baie vir my om te leer. Intussen het die trein voortgestoom teen ʼn ongewone spoed en teen die tyd dat ons op Usakos aangekom het, het die trein alreeds twintig minute van die verlore tyd ingehaal. Die troepe het ook toe alreeds besef dat dit beter was om te gaan slaap, want alles was doodstil op die trein. Drie van ons was opdrag gegee om die trein verder langs die dienspad tot op Karibib te begelei, en as alles steeds stil was, kon ons maar na Walvisbaai 111


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) terugkeer. Sersant Bianco moes ook saamgaan aangesien hy die area, en ook natuurlik die dienspad, beter as ons geken het. Die uiteinde van die saak was dat ons ongeveer halfsewe die volgende oggend na Walvisbaai teruggekeer het met ʼn koedoe agterin die vangwa. Die operasie was suksesvol uitgevoer. Die terugvoer van die treinpersoneel was dat al die troepe rustig gebly het tot op Windhoek stasie en heelparty het natuurlik ʼn hewige kopseer gehad van een van twee oorsake. Daardie aand het ek besluit dat ek die regte keuse gemaak het en dat ek nog lank en gelukkig by die Spories gaan wees.

1993: INTERNAL STABILITY UNIT (ISU) | AFDELING BINNELANDSE STABILITEIT (ABS): BRIG. HB HEYMANS During 1993/1994 I was attached to the ISU’s Head Office in Pretoria, Brigadier: Head of Liaison and Research. Previously I was stationed in Welkom and Soweto. I had first-hand experience in the combating of internal unrest. One of our problems were: Policemen were sent e.g. from Maleoskop12 or Unit 19 in Pretoria to Welkom or Pietermaritzburg arriving at their destination tired, cold and hungry; many times, late at night with no proper sleeping arrangements. Police who came to our assistance were housed in tents – cold and very uncomfortable. I made a suggestion to Lt. Gen. Johan Swart (Head of the ISU) that we should obtain passenger coaches from the SAR in which we could house our men. We could have a kitchen, lounge and dining cars, I know there was a shower coach, we could use flat beds for our vehicles and Casspirs, containers for equipment. We could even have a mobile operations room in a large baggage van. We could take a water- and petrol- and diesel railway tankers along. Meat etc could be kept in a refrigerator van. It could have been possible to have a few dedicated “ISU Trains” where our men could sleep and have the necessary mess faculties. Provision could also be made for the washing of clothing. The General went to the troubles at Bisho, Ciskei, and gave me feedback when he returned that he housed some members on detached duty in train coaches. Sadly as, a train lover this idea was never implemented!

12

There was passenger coach staged at Maleoskop and it was painted in the SAP Camouflage colours - HBH

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2004: MILITARY TRAIN: LION’S RIVER: BRIG HB HEYMANS During 2004 I found this “Military Train” in the Natal Midlands staged on a siding allowing our passenger train to pass:

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I asked no questions, I feared with the camera in hand, I could be accused of being a spy! – HBH. 116


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2009: SAPS MOBILE CHARGE OFFICE COACHES During 2007 the following SAPS officers served on the committee to have these coaches built: • • • •

Assistant Commissioner WA Venter Director M Robertson Director K Chetty Senior Superintendent S Naidoo

SAPS Coaches: PA Stow HISTORY OF COACHES USED TO CONVERT TO SAPS COACHES NUMBER DATE ORIGINAL ORIGINAL CONVERTED NEW DATE BUILT NUMBER TYPE TO TYPE RELEASED TO SERVICE AS SAPS COACH 39100 39101 39102 39103 39104 39105 39016 39107

1985 1981 1981 1981 1981 1982 1982 1982

39018 34076 34051 34055 34031 34507 34531 34538

GH-1 D-2 D-2 D-2 D-2 D-2 D-2 D-2

33078 33102 33109

E-3 E-3 E-3

10/2009 6/2010 6/2010 6/2010 7/2010 ?/2010 ?/2010 10/2010

Compiled by Peter A. Stow 2019/01/25

Notes by Peter A Stow 1. “Of the 8 SAPS coaches built, 5 are in Braamfontein 39100-39104 and 3 are in Cape Town 391057. The latter are apparently severely vandalized and have never turned a wheel. One, 39100, has its own generator but all the others rely on power from a power car. Regards, Peter. 2. It’s a pleasure Hennie. It was just a fraction of the correspondence but gives an idea of what was put into the project. You will see that at one point they wanted 50 vehicles, in the end only 7 were built of which only one was used for the Soccer World Cup. Only the prototype 39100 had it’s own generator while the others understandably were to work in the new power car sets where they would tap power off the train generator. Regards, Peter.

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Photographs by Peter Stow

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Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) Photo: Hannetjie Schoeman

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SOME ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Armoured_train_-_South_Africa_-_1914_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_18334.jpg; Bedford-Visser, Frans; Beyl, R Brig – former SAR Police; Boksburg Historical Association: Gen Beyers: Phil Beck; Boon Boonzaaier – various trips over the various lines of the SAR during his tenure as “Big Boss” of Bosveld Train Safari’s; Bosman, Herman; Botha, P; Conradie, Eric – Photographs and advice; Dickson, Rollo; Emms, Mervyn – Photographs from his various collections; Espitalier, Mr: South African Railways Magazine: October 1945: page 782; Fourie, Deon Brig-Gen (Prof) – SANDF; Godley, RS Lt.Col; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritz_Rebellion; http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rebellion?show=0&t=1287753303; http://www.traveljournals.net/explore/south_africa/map/m1846333/olifantsnek.html; Jones, Bruce – questions; Jordaan, L; Kantor, Stan – sharing diagrams; Lane, DA Col – What I remember, - Nongqai; 120


Nongqai Vol 10 No 4A (2) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Lawrence Sue – Comments; Maritz, Oom Manie – son of the General Maritz; Marshall, W Lt-Col – SANDF; Mills, Paul; Momberg, Joe; Moolman, Nico; Paxton, Leith; Pivnic, HL; Prinsloo, G Mr: Documentation Centre of the SANDF; Ritchie, E Moore – late Editor of the Nongqai; Sandstone Heritage Trust; Schoeman, Hannetjie; Searle, Ric: Photographs; South African Police Museum; South African Railways – diagrams; South African Railways Magazine: October 1945: Espitalier page 782; Stow, Peter; Strydom, JPL; The Nongqai, 1914; Thursby-Attwell, JEM, The Fighting Police of South Africa; Trew, HF Lieut-Col: Botha Treks; Union Defence Force Document A188/9199; Uys, Ian: SA Militarily Whose Who , Fortress, 1992; Verster, HV Lieut-Gen – who shared his father’s memories with me.

INDEMNITY & © | VRYWARING & ©

Dear reader Please note that in this quasi-historical magazine we make use of various sources and consequently it is obvious that the document contains various diverse and personal opinions of different people and the author of the Nongqai cannot be held responsible or be liable in his personal capacity. Geagte leser Vir hierdie kwasiehistoriese tydskrif maak ons van verskeie bronne gebruik en bevat die dokument uiteraard uiteenlopende en diverse persoonlike menings van verskillende persone en die opsteller van die Nongqai kan nie in sy persoonlike hoedanigheid daarvoor verantwoordelik of aanspreeklik gehou word nie.

Hennie Heymans 2010-10-24 © 2010 Hennie Heymans 2019-04-04 © 2019

Brig. Hennie Heymans: No 43630K (B) © HB Heymans 2019. 121

Profile for Hennie Heymans

Nongqai Vol 10 No 4 A (2)  

The Nongqai is a electronic magazine focusing on the history of the Police, Defence Force, Intelligence and National Security in Southern Af...

Nongqai Vol 10 No 4 A (2)  

The Nongqai is a electronic magazine focusing on the history of the Police, Defence Force, Intelligence and National Security in Southern Af...

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