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THE ULOLWE SOUTH AFRICA – SUID-AFRIKA A monthly railway research / historical publication ‘n Maandelikse spoorweg historiese en navorsing publikasie Vol 2 No 5 (Revised) Un-official / Nie Amptelik Everything to do with the former South African Railways: i.e. Railway Stations, Harbours, Airways, RMT, SAR Police, Armoured Trains, Lighthouses, Pipelines, Catering, SAR Models, Diagrams of Locomotives etc and books on the Railways in Southern Africa Hennie Heymans, Pretoria, South Africa heymanshb@gmail.com May 2011

Bosveld Train Safaris: Photo taken in the mist on Van Reenen’s Pass [Photo: HBH – 16-11-2003]

Patron - Les Pivnic - Beskermheer

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Contents - Inhoud Welcome - Welkom .............................................................................................................................. 6 Editorial ................................................................................................................................................. 6 Language ....................................................................................................................................... 6 Attitude.......................................................................................................................................... 6 Approach ....................................................................................................................................... 7 Layout ............................................................................................................................................ 7 Main Story ............................................................................................................................................. 7 Photo Report on SAR Coaches No’s 17 and 18 – Hennie Heymans ......................................... 7 Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 7 Eric Conradie ................................................................................................................................ 7 The Problem .................................................................................................................................. 8 The known Facts on No 17.......................................................................................................... 8 1895............................................................................................................................................... 10 29 May 1900................................................................................................................................. 13 “Capital on Wheels” .................................................................................................................. 14 SAR Period .................................................................................................................................. 15 1934............................................................................................................................................... 18 The Loubser Report ................................................................................................................... 19 Dr Loubser made the following recommendations, that: .................................................... 20 Comments - HBH ....................................................................................................................... 21 ZAR Coat of Arms ..................................................................................................................... 25 SAR Coach No 18 ....................................................................................................................... 26 Conclusion .................................................................................................................................. 32 Andre Kritzinger – Locomotive series 2 ......................................................................................... 32

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South African "Natal" 0-4-0WT .................................................................................................... 32 Manufacturer .............................................................................................................................. 34 Service .......................................................................................................................................... 35 Superstition ................................................................................................................................. 36 Resurrection ................................................................................................................................ 36 References ................................................................................................................................... 37 Wepener’s Perambulations ............................................................................................................... 37 Railway History ................................................................................................................................. 40 Natal Government Railways .................................................................................................... 40 Oranje Vrijstaat Staat Spoorwegen (OVSS) ............................................................................ 41 Oranje Vrijstaatsche Gouvernements Spoorwegen ............................................................... 41 Cape Government Railways ..................................................................................................... 43 Nederlandsche Zuid-Afrikaansche Spoorweg-Maatschappij ............................................. 45 Zuid-Afrika Huis........................................................................................................................ 45 Zuid-Afrika Huis - Amsterdam ............................................................................................... 46 Anglo-Boer War – Armoured Trains ....................................................................................... 47 HMAT Spitfire ............................................................................................................................ 47 Imperial Military Railways ....................................................................................................... 47 Central South African Railways............................................................................................... 48 Cape Central Railway (CCR) .................................................................................................... 49 South African Railways ............................................................................................................. 49 1932 - 1933 SAR Summer Excursions ...................................................................................... 50 1932 Dangerous Practices.......................................................................................................... 50 Spoornet .............................................................................................................................................. 53 1990 Transnet ...................................................................................................................................... 53 3


South Africa: Industrial Railways.................................................................................................... 54 Richard Searle ................................................................................................................................. 54 Reference 1: Brakpan ..................................................................................................................... 54 Locomotive of the Rand Central Electric works named “Brakpan” ................................... 54 Reference No 2 - Volta ................................................................................................................... 56 “Volta” ............................................................................................................................................. 56 Railways in Southern Africa ......................................................................................................... 57 Photographs ........................................................................................................................................ 57 SAR Stations - Matroosberg .......................................................................................................... 57 What is the colour of this armoured train?............................................................................. 59 “The 150th Anniversary of the first Railways and the 10th Anniversary of the RailRoad Association of South Africa” – Allen A Jorgensen .................................................................... 59 Ysterwiele ........................................................................................................................................ 61 Spoorwegtaal – “Railway Talk” ............................................................................................... 61 Private Coach – Namib – SAR 3 ............................................................................................... 63 Messers JAE van Zijl, JJ van Zijl and “Namib” ...................................................................... 63 Mr JA Carstens Prieska ............................................................................................................. 63 Railway People ........................................................................................................................... 66 RMT .............................................................................................................................................. 66 1940-07-881 .................................................................................................................................. 67 SAA History Boeing 707 Livery ................................................................................................... 68 Our 1st Boeing ZS-SAA .............................................................................................................. 68 Harbours...................................................................................................................................... 69 Durban – Point in the days of sail and steam......................................................................... 69 Pipelines ...................................................................................................................................... 69

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Transnet Pipelines .............................................................................................................................. 69 Catering Division ....................................................................................................................... 71 South African Railways & Harbours Police ............................................................................... 72 Inspector Stubbs and Sub-Inspector Fairbairn - Durban ...................................................... 72 Railway News ................................................................................................................................. 73 Shosholoza Meyl ................................................................................................................................ 73 1. “Hello Peter” ........................................................................................................................... 73 2. Shosholoza Meyl services ..................................................................................................... 73 3. A train spotter in Cape Town reports ................................................................................. 73 Railway mishap in Canada ....................................................................................................... 74 Models ................................................................................................................................................. 76 1930’s -Durban’s Model Steam Railway ................................................................................. 76 Model Isuzu – Paul Bosman ..................................................................................................... 76 MRIG................................................................................................................................................ 78 Railway Sites ................................................................................................................................... 79 http://www.bahnbilder.de/name/bilder/hierarchie1/S%FCdafrika.html................................... 79 Mail Bag ............................................................................................................................................... 79 Piet Conradie ...................................................................................................................................... 79 Piet Conradie ...................................................................................................................................... 80 Hannes Slabbert ......................................................................................................................... 80 Rudy Venter ................................................................................................................................ 80 Koot Swanepoel – NG G13 No 80 Joubertina ........................................................................ 84 Werna Maritz van Ysterwiele ................................................................................................... 84 Dennis Walters ........................................................................................................................... 84 Stimela - Dr Laurence Wright................................................................................................... 85 5


Piet Conradie - PPSM Nylstroom / Nylstroom loco of PPR................................................ 85 Basie Diedericks – Oos Londen ................................................................................................ 87 Kelvin Naylor - Railway Genealogy – Pretoria Pietersburg Railway................................. 87 Tablet ........................................................................................................................................... 89 Allan Jorgensen .......................................................................................................................... 89 Andre Grove - Watervalboven ................................................................................................. 93 William Marshall – Paint – Union Defence Force & SAR ..................................................... 95 Piet Conradie – 1977 Keetmanshoop SAW/ SADF Troop Train Accident ......................... 98 Jacque Wepener – New generation shunting ....................................................................... 100 Piet Conradie Old Steamlocomotives ................................................................................... 101 Alex Faria – Railway books .................................................................................................... 102 The Railwayman’s Prayer – Spoorwegman se Gebed ........................................................ 102 Next Issue .......................................................................................................................................... 102

Welcome - Welkom Welcome to our May-issue of the e-Railway Gazette for Southern Africa. Baie welkom! Editorial Language We do realise that South Africa has eleven (or more?) official languages. As an Afrikaans speaking South African and I have decided to write in my second language, English, mainly for the benefit of our readers overseas who are also interested in our Southern African railway heritage. However please bear in mind that if I receive an article in Afrikaans, I will place it in Afrikaans, if practical I will try to place a summary of the content. (My Zulu and Latin are too rusty to even try!) Please excuse my English it is not always the Queen’s English. Attitude My attitude to Railway History can be best summed up in the words of Sue Lawrence when she recently wrote on SAR-List about her drawings: “In the past I have always been willing to put these on disk (I had them scanned long ago) and posted them to whoever wanted them, as my 6


philosophy has always been that the only way to keep the heritage alive is to spread the material around. I have also always hoped that the people to whom I have freely sent the material (I never charged for it) would do the same to others, but my hopes may have been in vain.” Thus, the only way to conserve our “railway heritage” is; in the TRUE words of Sue: “... to spread it around” and hopefully it would stimulate others – especially those in Transnet’s middle management, to conserve our rich cultural heritage. Since I was a little boy I have loved trains. For many years I hid away my personal files and photographs of trains from others away by putting it under the proverbial bushel – I did not want to share them with anybody! One of my philosophies is ‘the more you help others, the more you help yourself!’ Now, since I have been sharing and spreading my little bit of information around, I have been immensely enriched by others who share the same interest in our railways. Approach A friend, who is a retired industrial chemist, has given me a lecture on a strategic and scientific way to approach my publications. However you will notice that this edition is probably better planned and better presented. We are constantly trying to improve the presentation and to make the publication more user friendly. I must thank Bruce Jones for all the unseen backroom work he put into this e-Railway Gazette. Layout As far as the layout is concerned I do it myself working on word.doc. Please bear with me I am learning to do layout and sometimes I have to make use of “fillers” to fill the gaps between articles!

Main Story Photo Report on SAR Coaches No’s 17 and 18 – Hennie Heymans Introduction For some considerable time Railway Historians have pondered whether coach No 17 was really used by the late pres S.J.P. Kruger or did Mr G.A.A. Middelberg, Director of the NZASM, use it? Was No 18 instead not Kruger’s coach? Is Kruger’s coach really the one preserved at the Kruger House in Pretoria? Eric Conradie After a hundred years Eric Conradie had the following to say: “ … the old NZASM in 18971 took delivery of two vehicles which surpassed anything of its kind in this country. These private saloons of President Kruger and Mr. G.A.A. Middelberg, 1

Whether this date is correct I don’t know. The vehicles were ordered during 1894 to be delivered the

same year or early the next year.

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Director of the NZASM. Both coaches were of the same design with Kruger’s coach only more luxurious. Each was furnished with the very best of interior fittings. Teak and mahogany furniture was selected and upholstery was in the finest morocco leather. All the ornamental woodwork was hand carved by some of the best craftsman in Holland. These coaches were manufactured by the firm JJ Beijnes of Haarlem who regarded the building of these coaches as their crowning achievement. The vehicles were in sets of two, coupled together. Each set rested on an under frame with two axles. This was an unfortunate fault because very soon after being placed in service the coaches were found too unstable while in movement. As a result, both were provided with NASZM bogies (i.e. two sets of four wheels each). At the same time they were fitted together on one single under frame.” The Problem The problem is that the two coaches are so similar in appearance that mistakes occur even in the official SAR files. Even official photographs and diagrams of the two coaches in question have been filed incorrectly. If one refers to articles on the Kruger Coach the information is vague. “The saloon was delivered in the Transvaal in 1897.2 With an overall length of 51 foot and a balcony at one end, it was, forty years ago, considered a handsome vehicle. Records show that £3,164 was paid for it, …” See South Africa’s veteran Rolling Stock by Eric Rosenthal, SAR & H Magazine December 1939, page 1694. “The two units were later [they don’t say when] combined into a single unit, which provided most of the facilities found in houses of the time, including an ornate coal-stove in the kitchen.” See Historical Monuments on Wheels by Peter Holz, SAR & H Magazine, March 1959, page 226. According to information [Beeld, 26 –3-1998] the two sets of carriages, later SAR No’s 17 and 18 were ordered during 1894.3 The known Facts on No 17 During 1924 the Chairman of the National Party in Upington, Mr E. Mooi, wrote as follows to the Minister of Railways: “… That, as far as we are aware, there is a coach in existence, which was at one time the private coach of H.E. President Kruger….” Letter dated 19th of September 1924. During 1925 The Honourable J.A.W. de Villiers, Judge of Appeal Court, Bloemfontein, wrote to the Minister of Railways, The Hon. C.W. Malan: “On my recent journey in South West Africa in connection with the Rehoboth Commission I have used the State Coach of the late President Kruger – No 17 – a coach, therefore of the greatest historical value. … The approaching Centenenary

2

See footnote 1.

3

See footnote 1.

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Kruger Celebrations to be held on the 10th October will in my opinion be a fitting opportunity to present the coach to the People of South Africa�. [Letter dated 24-7-1925]

Pres. Kruger’s saloon as originally built.

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Pres. Kruger’s saloon as originally built. Colour Light grey (pale grey) and Ultra “Maryn”. (Other sources say “Black lines with red centres4) The colour scheme was later changed. Note position of the balcony door. According to the Sunday Times dated 19th May 1935 it is alleged that the vehicle was taken into use 1892. No date supplied with the photograph. The Advisory Engineer, at the SA Embassy in London, Mr T.C. Swallow, reported on the as follows: “ … (F)rom conversations with some of the staff who remember the coach, it was ascertained that it was painted pale grey on the outside and picked out below the windows with black lines (with red centres) in a stenciled pattern … The under frame was painted black as also were the bogies and apparently the balcony gates were picked out in silver … “ [Letter dated 26th February 1935 to the General Manager, SAR, Johannesburg. “No 17” during 1895

Photograph supplied by Dave Rhind from the Rhind Collection. By now the two parts have clearly been joined together.5

4

Report RS.9/B/3 dated 9-6-1961: The outer consisted of steel panels painted pale grey and picked out

below the windows with black lines (with red centres) in a stencilled pattern. … balcony gates silver … On one side the coat-of-arms of the Transvaal was painted, and the coat-of-arms of the Orange Free State on the other side. Under frames and bogies black. Upholstery brown morocco leather, woodwork teak or polished mahogany. …There was a painting by Frans Hals at one side, … and two portraits … of … Rembrandt. Carpet … red predominating. 5

The two parts were joined together and placed on a single under frame before 1900. See RS.9/B/3.

Dated 9-6-1961.

10


Photograph taken on the same day and place as the one above. Photograph supplied by the Kruger Museum. VIljooensdrift is on the border between the ZAR & OFS.

President Kruger at the opening of the Modderfontein Dynamite Factory 1896. Here we see two distinct parts of the vehicle but joined together. The “gap” is open. Note position of the door on balcony. Look at position of passenger’s hand. A wheel appears at feet of the Guard of Honour.

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The President and Dr Heymans on the balcony of his coach at Machadodorp c1900. Photograph: Dr de Jongh-Collection.

This is Kruger’s Coach from the inside and positively identified by Dr Loubser as such. Note the Barometer and Clock on ceiling and artwork. Middleburg’s coach did not have the clock and barometer. Note the two Rembrandt prints.

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“No 17” on 29 May 1900

Once again a photograph of the president’s private saloon. This photo was allegedly taken at Eerste Fabrieke, outside Pretoria, on 29 May 1900. President SJP Kruger and Dr Heymans appear in the saloon.

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“No 17” as “Capital on Wheels”

Capital on Wheels at Machadodorp, Pres Kruger’s coach on the Delgoa Bay line. The saloon crossed the frontier on 11 September 1900 on its way to Lourenco Marques where Pres. Kruger boarded the Gelderland.

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No 17 during SAR Period

The “oldest” blue print available for SAR service. Note date 1897. This is clearly not correct.

The Steps – See diagram No 17: “ … It is understood that coach No 17 was rifled during the Boer War and that certain alterations were made during the British occupation, of which the most important was the provision of three steps at the end for the convenience of Lord Roberts …” Letter RS9/B/3 dated 9th June 1961.

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Photograph of No 17. Note position of the balcony door and steps.

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Free translation: The Volksblad, Saturday, 10-3-1934. The coach of the late Pres. Kruger. The coach was built by the Koninklijke Fabriek van Rijtuigen en Spoorwagens van JJ Beijnes, Hofleverancier, Haarlem, Holland. At the S.A.R. Head Office very little is known about the carriage. The Administration however knows with certainty that the carriage as used by the President of the old South African Republic [ZAR]. On the best authority readers are informed that two carriages, No’s 17 and 18 were delivered to the ZAR. No 17 was the old President’s coach, which was donated as a gift by Queen Wilhelmina to the President. No 18 had originally cost £3,164.00s.00d. During either 1901 or 1902 No 17 was involved in a serious accident. There is no certainty that the carriage was rebuilt to its original form or if any structural changes were made to it. At that stage Mr. G.J. Viljoen, the System Manager, S.A.R. Bloemfontein, used the carriage. The steps and “viewing-room” are well known features. The carriage consists of a lounge, two bedrooms, a bath and a kitchen. One bed room, presumably that of the President, has a desk, bed, large mirror and built-in wardrobe. All woodwork was done by master craftsmen and done beautifully and artfully. Mr. J.A. Kruger a grandson of the late President and resident in Bloemfontein remembers that he travelled in the carriage from Pretoria to Johannesburg. The carriage arrived in the Transvaal during 1897. The carriage had the device of the ZAR on one side and the device of the OFS on the other side.

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No 17 during 1934 In June 1934 the System Manager, SAR, Bloemfontein, used the coach. It was in a bad state of repair and it was suggested that it be withdrawn from service. In July 1934 the Minister suggested that the Curator of the Kruger House Museum be approached to take the coach over from the Railway Administration. In Minute No 219/26 the Minister agreed that the coach be restored as nearly as possible to its original state and presented free of charge to the Kruger House Museum. The curator declined the offer. The coach was then offer to the Transvaal Museum who accepted it as a special exhibit for the Kruger House Museum. The CME, Pretoria, took up the question of restoring the vehicle to its original state. During January 1935 drawings and photographs were obtained from the makers in Holland. On instructions from the Minister it was established that No 17 was definitely the coach used by Pres. Kruger. On account of the heavy expenditure involved, the restoration work was abolished. During 1941 the question of exhibiting the coach was raised by the Kruger-genootskap. An appeal was made to staff through the medium of the Weekly Notice.6 During May 1942 the CME advised that various articles were found and the cost of restoration would amount to between 12,000 – 15,000 pounds. He suggested that the work be held in abeyance. During July 1942 the CME reported that far more of the original vehicle was available than was first anticipated and recommended that the restoration work be held over until after the War. During June 1948 the matter was brought up again. The coach was staged at the Railway Museum, Kaalfontein. The Minister was advised that the vehicle was to be restored as nearly as possible to its original state. On the 10th March 1951 Dr Bigalke advised Minister PO Sauer that the Transvaal Museum Board wished to inform him that space was available in the backyard of the Kruger house in Church Street, Pretoria. The coach could be staged there where thousands of visitors could view it. On the 14th April 1951 the Minister instructed that offer be accepted and the coach be transferred to the Kruger House.

6

See Weekly Notice 2721 dated 6-2-1941.

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Provision of at least £1,000 pounds was made available in the 1952/3 Capital and Betterment Estimates for the restoration of the coach, and after the work had been completed the coach was transferred to the Kruger House. On the 25th of June 1952 the coach, in good condition, was transferred to the Kruger House.7 The Loubser Report on No 17 The General Manager of the SAR asked Dr. M.M. Loubser, a retired but eminent Chief Mechanical Engineer, to do research on coaches No’s 17 and 18. Even at that time there was uncertainty as to the “identity” of the two historical coaches. Diagrams of the two coaches and photos of the two coaches were not always correctly depicted or filed in the correct file. He completed his research on the 2nd of October 1961. The following facts are of importance: • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • 7

Conflicting evidence were received from Beijnes. Their information on the coach during 1935 and the information in their Centenary publication on the coaches differ. Facts in dispute: the colour of No 17; the copies of the paintings of the early masters originally placed in the coaches; and the chandeliers. Original parts were swapped between No 17 and No 18. No 17 and 18 were identical in many aspects; No 17 were ordered on 2nd January 1894. Cost 24,000 Dutch gilders approx. R4, 000.00. No 18 cost about 18,000 Dutch guilders, approx. R3, 000.00. Both vehicles had to be in service at the end of 1894 or during early 1895. Beijnes diagram No 68 refers to both vehicles. The president’s vehicle was more luxurious. Both sets of two carriages each were very quickly placed on single under frames. They told Mr. Swallow that No 17 was painted light gray with black and red lining but they furnish the colour of No 17 as “ultramaryn blaauw afgeset met rozenobelgoud’ in their Centenary publication. No 17 was painted in Holland blue with gold lines while No 18 was brown. A plate on the side of the carriage carried the device of the ZAR (on both sides?). No 18 was the 1st Private carriage in the Transvaal. No 17 was State property and not NZASM property. No 17 had a barometer and a pendulum while No 18 did not have it. No 17 had 8 small tables at each window. These tables were pulled out of the side. No 17 was painted in an ornate fashion. No 17 had a WC window with Railway logo and ornament. No 17 had three copies in colour of paintings by Dutch masters. No 18 had one black and white copy of a Dutch master. Both vehicles were changed in the sleeping areas and kitchens. No original areas left.

RS.9/B/3. Dated 9-6-1961.

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• • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • •

Both lounges were shortened in order to accommodate an extra sleeping facility. No 17 had, during 1951, returned to the original lounge. No 18 has the original panels etc in place i.e. in the lounge and first bedroom as well as the passage door and room end The windows with wooden frames in No 17 are of a later date. No 18 still have its original metal window frames. The fourth window from the balcony in No 18 has been made smaller and the fixed window may now be moved while the metal frame has been made smaller. The balcony of No 18 is still unchanged. The balcony of No 17 has been changed. The door has been placed at the back of the balcony, new steps were added and a gate placed in the centre of the balcony so that one could move to the next coach. “Dan het Nr 18 nog die originele ysterstyle met seskantige voetstukke, in die hoeke en die oorsronklike halfstyle weerskante van die dubbeldeure na die sitkamer”. In contrast, No 17 has the same but of a later date and design. No 17 were in a serious accident during either 1901 or 1902 and suffered serious damage. No 17 still has the original ornamental trelliswork and gate at the kitchen entrance. It is suspected that this was taken from No 18. The roof of No 18 is still in original shape – the most important change is that the oil lamps were removed; the ornate painted ceiling was repainted and the handles to open the upper lights were modern - in contrast with the roof of No 17, which has been altered. The carved wooden fruit does not belong in No 17 but in No 18 from where it was taken originally. The original barometer, pendulum and carved fruit were stolen from No 17. No 17 had two tables, which did not belong there. The door handles on No 18, with the exception of two, are probably original handles. Two handles on No 17 are also original handles. The five (remaining) chairs in No 17 are original chairs – whether they belonged to No 17 or 18 cannot be stated with certainty. The evidence about the painting in the vehicles is contradictory. After investigation is was ascertained that No 17 had coloured paintings while No 18 had black and white paintings.

Dr Loubser made the following recommendations, that: • • • • •

No 18 are, within reasonable means, restored. [He gives a list of the work to be done]; No 18 be exhibited at Pretoria Station; A copy of diagram 68 together with other items be obtained and exhibited with No 18 to give acknowledgement to Beijnes & Co; That coloured copies of the paintings in question be obtained for use in No 17 so that the black and white copy in No 17 be transferred to No 18 where it should be; At least one of the missing chairs (of No 18) be obtained from No 17 for use in No 18;

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• •

Some of the wood carvings in No 17 that were originally in No 18 be transferred back to No 18; and All work should be done for less than R1 000-00.

Comments - HBH It should be borne in mind that Dr Loubser had access to all available documents; files, diagrams, photographs and he interviewed people who knew both vehicles from days of old. He had a lively interest in Railway history and in this subject in particular. No 17 during 1952

Moving No 17 to the Kruger House. This movement took place during 1952.

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22


At the Kruger House 2001. Note the rack-track. An interior shot of coach No 17

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24


ZAR Coat of Arms on No 17

Coat of Arms on No 17 as staged at Kruger House. Letter 13.8.1.3. dated 21st January 1991 from the “Nasionale Kultuurhistoriese en Opelugmuseum”, Boom Street, Pretoria, states that one Fraley8 of the OVSS9 was responsible for the painting of the coat-of-arms. The same source states that the vehicle was used by Sir Arthur Lawley, Lieutenant-Governor, Transvaal. (Photo 2001)

8

One wonders what “one Fraley’s” history is.

9

Oranje Vrijstaat Staat Spoorwegen (Dutch) – Orange Free State’s State Railways or Orange Free State

Government Railways. Afrikaans: Oranje Vrystaat Staatspoorweë.

25


The interior light fittings: note they are up-side down. Photograph taken 2001. SAR Coach No 18

“Oldest� SAR blue print of No 18 that is available. Note date 1897. 26


Photo from SAR file No 17 but clearly coach No 18. Note the two small blocks above the veranda and compare

to

Dave

Parson’s

photograph.

Originally filed in SAR No 17’s file. This is clearly No 18 known as “Bloemfontein”. Note the two blocks on the side of the roof above the veranda. See article in the “Volksblad” dated 103-1934. 27


A beautiful photograph taken by Dave Parsons. The caption reads: “The private coach under guard by a railway constable at Glencoe was originally the NZASM saloons (two closed coupled coaches) for use by President Kruger. It is now housed as a monument at the back of ‘Kruger House’ in Church Street, Pretoria. The SAR rebuilt the original two-coach set into a single vehicle.” Back pages South African Photo Journal No’s 8 and 9 – Les Pivnic. Below: Official SAR photograph of No.18 on Pretoria Station, with NZASM locomotive No 61 named “Roos” in the front. The pair was exhibited on the station from 1965. [The locomotive is still there while the carriage was removed to take part in the Centenary of the Eastern Line. On the 8th July 1995 No 18 was in Maputo. The carriage is now stabled at George Railway Museum.

28


Coat of Arms and Flag of the ZAR & NZASM’s crest

29


Photograph taken by Alan Duff during August 2001 at the George Railway Museum. Two steps. Note position of the balcony door.

30


31


Interior photograph taken by Allan Duff. George Railway Museum 8/2001. Conclusion I find that SAR No 17 is Pres Kruger’s coach and SAR No 18 is De Heer Middelberg’s coach. Dr Loubser had all the facts at his disposal. There is no reason to doubt the information contained in Dr Loubser’s report.

Andre Kritzinger – Locomotive series 2

South African "Natal" 0-4-0WT From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia. 32


South African "Natal" 0-4-0WT

“Natal� plinthed at Durban station, circa 1944 Power type

Steam

Designer

Carrett, Marshall & Company

Builder

Carrett, Marshall & Company

Build date

1860

Total production

1

Configuration

0-4-0WT

Gauge

1,435 mm (4 ft 8.5 in) Standard

Driver diameter

45 in (1,100 mm)

Wheelbase

9 ft (2.743 m)

Length

17 ft 6 in (5.334 m)

Height

12 ft (3.658 m)

Locomotive weight

12 long tons (12.2 t) 33


Fuel type

Coal

Cylinders

Two[1]

Career

Natal Railway Company

Number in class

1

Official name

Natal

Delivered

1860

First run

26 June 1860

Last run

1875

Retired

1875[1]

Preserved

1

Disposition

Reconstructed and plinthed

The first locomotive to run in South Africa, the Natal Railway Company’s “Natal”, was landed at Durban on 13 May 1860 and made its inaugural run during the official opening of the first operating railway in South Africa on Tuesday, 26 June 1860. It was, however, not the first locomotive to arrive in South Africa, having been denied that honour by nine engines, the Pickering locomotive that arrived in Cape Town in September 1859 and the Cape Town-Wellington Railway’s eight 0-4-2 tender locomotives that arrived in two shipments on 20 March and 28 April 1860.[1] Although the Pickering locomotive had been used during the construction of the Cape Town-Wellington Railway that commenced on 31 March 1859, official railway operations in the Cape only commenced when the first section of track of the Cape Town-Wellington Railway, between Fort Knokke and Salt River in Cape Town, was officially opened on 8 February 1861.[1] Manufacturer The first locomotive to run in railway service in South Africa was a small 1,435 mm (4 ft 8½ in) standard gauge 0-4-0WT well tank engine named Natal. It was landed at Durban off the brig Cadiz on 13 May 1860. The engine arrived stripped down and was erected by Henry Jacobs, engine fitter, driver and locomotive superintendent of the Natal Railway Company, assisted by chief smith, fitter, spring-maker, platelayer and head of the repair shops Alexander Davidson. (A station on the Bluff was later named after Henry Jacobs.)[1][2] For many years credit as the locomotive builder had been given to the London company of Robert Legg, the City of London Engine Works, but subsequent research showed that Robert Legg was merely the distributor which handled the shipment of the locomotive to Durban. The actual manufacturer was a firm by name of Carrett, Marshall & Company of Leeds, while Robert Legg was its London agent. Further research by a member of the Railway Society of Southern Africa (RSSA) has shown that at least two of these locomotives were built, the other going to the Caribbean to work in the sugar industry.[3][4][5]

34


The engine carried its water in a well tank and the coal in a locker on the footplate. A donkey pump on the coal locker fed water to the boiler. It was erected in a tarred timber shed on Market Square, then painted green with copper coloured wheels and with the huge brass dome cover polished.[1] Service

The “Natal� arriving at Point Station, 26 June 1860

The official opening of the newly mechanised Natal Railway took place on 26 June 1860, a little over a month after the engine arrived. Until then the railway had been operated using ox-drawn wagons. The inaugural run was across a 2 mi (3.2 km) stretch from Market Square in Durban to the newly built Point station at Durban harbour.[1] The Natal Railway’s initial rolling stock consisted of six wagons, two travelling cranes and one passenger coach. By 25 January 1867 the line had been extended a further 3.5 mi (5.6 km) to Umgeni, from where stone, quarried from the Umgeni River, was transported to the harbour.[2] The Natal remained in service for fifteen years, until the Natal Government decided in 1875 to convert the railways to 3 ft 6 in Cape gauge in conformance with the railways in the Cape Province.[1]

35


Superstition

The Natal was then put up for sale and purchased by a Mr Crowther with the intention of using it to drive a sawmill on his farm at Port St John’s. He was, however, unable to make use of it since the local population labour force objected to this “devil’s machine” and embarked on a boycott, culminating in Crowther having to abandon his farm, and the engine.[1][2] In 1886 one Alex Anderson purchased the farm for sugar planting, but when he decided to use the engine to drive a sugar mill, another early example of South African “rolling mass action” ensued and he, too, was forced to leave. The farm was then acquired by one Harry Cooper, who buried the engine on the banks of the Mzimvubu River and thereafter was left unmolested and proceeded to grow tobacco. He remained on the farm until 1901, when he sold it to one Sam Clarke of Umtata who converted the property into a fruit farm. By this time the actual location of the Natal’s grave had become lost.[1][2] Resurrection

The “Natal” after being exhumed, Durban shops, 26 June 1944

On 28 May 1943 the late Theo Espitalier, commissioned to prepare a history of the locomotives in South Africa, managed to locate the grave of the Natal. The remains were excavated and transferred to Durban, arriving there on 26 June 1944, eighty-four years to the day after this engine had hauled the first train in South Africa.[1][2] 36


The frame, the wheels, the springs, the cylinders and some odd loose parts were literally all that remained of the old locomotive. The engine was reconstructed in the Durban workshops, with many missing parts having to be fashioned to approximately the original shape and size, and was plinthed at Durban station. While not a true reconstruction in every sense of the word, it was sufficiently close to the original to give one a good idea of what the engine must have looked like on the day the South African Railways was born in 1860.[1] References 1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways, vol 1: 1859-1910, (D.F. Holland, 1971), p11, 20-21, ISBN 0 7153 5382 9 2. ^ a b c d e The South African Railways - Historical Survey (Editor George Hart, Publisher Bill Hart, Sponsored by Dorbyl Ltd, Circa 1978) 3. ^ Natal Society Foundation 2010 - Natalia 40 (2010) p20–31 - The first public railway in South Africa: The Point to Durban railway of 1860 4. ^ Carrett Marshall & Co., Sun Foundry, Dewsbury Road, Leeds 5. ^ Grace’s Guide – The Best of British Engineering 1750-1960s

Wepener’s Perambulations Jan Kempdorp: Is where ‘steam finally dreams’? No! These near surreal, bizarre and weird photographs depict where steam is dying an ugly, unworthy, undeserving and cruel death! A mortuary of the worst kind! (Who said a locomotive has no soul?) These former, once proud, locomotives charged in all their glory over the South African veld! Here we have represented here ‘millions of pounds’ in tourism and steam heritage! Refurbishing steam engines is a dying art. The government must do something and reemploy all the old SAR-employees and teach the young un-employed a dying trade. Steam and South Africa were synonymous – however the initiative must come from government! Jan Kempdorp is an agricultural town situated in the centre of the Vaalharts Irrigation Scheme in the Northern Cape province of South Africa. Originally, the border between the Cape and Transvaal provinces ran through the town, making it the only town in South Africa that was in two provinces. During the Second World War it was the site of a concentration camp called Andalusia, housing German men regarded as potentially dangerous by the authorities.10 Thank you to the Wepener’s for sharing with us the following photographs:

10

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Kempdorp

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38


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Railway History Natal Government Railways The Natal Government Railways (NGR) was formed in January 1877 in the Colony of Natal.

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Natal Railway Company In 1877 the Natal Government Railways acquired the Natal Railway Company for the sum of ÂŁ40,000, gaining the line from the Point to Durban and from Durban to Umgeni.[1] [2] In 1910 the Union of South Africa was formed and in 1912 the NGR combined with the other colonies' railway companies to form the South African Railways and Harbours (SAR & H).[3] Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natal_Government_Railways dated 4 May 2011.

Left - Photo: Sandy Haines

Oranje Vrijstaat Staat Spoorwegen (OVSS) Oranje Vrijstaatsche Gouvernements Spoorwegen

Bijzondere Collecties NEHA: Nederlandsch-Zuid-Afrikaansche Spoorwegmaatschappij (NZASM), Amsterdam As far as the OVSS goes, there are the following documents relating to the OVSS in the NZASM archives: 41


Oranje Vrijstaat (1882-1899) a. Spoorwegen. Rapporten. Bloemfontein [1882]. b. Rapport der Commissie benoemd bij Volksraadbesluit van den 15den Juni 1887 om ZHEd de Staatspresident bij te staan in zijne onderhandelingen met ZHEd den Staatspresident van de Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek en zijne Commissie, voorgelegd 22 october 1887. Bloemfontein z.j. c. Correspondentie over Tractaat van Vriendschap en Handel met de Z.A. Republiek, Eilanden in Vaalrivier en over Tolverbond en Spoorwegen. Bloemfontein 1887. d. Conventie (tussen de Oranje Vrijstaat en de Commissaris der Kroonlanden en Publieke Werken van de Kaapkolonie betr. aanleg van een spoorweg van de Oranje Rivier naar Bloemfontein, bekrachtigd 07.05.1889) e. Rapport van de Afgevaardigden naar de Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek, mei 1895. f. Oranje Vrijstaatsche Gouvernements Spoorwegen. Jaarrapporten over 1897 en 1898. g. Oranje Vrystaatsche Gouvernements spoorwegen. Passagiers vraghten, klassifikatie van goederen en tarieven voor pakketten, levende have, rytuigen en goederen. Van 01.01.1899, 04.1899 en 10.1899. [Ref: http://www.neha.nl/specialcollections/0493nedefull.php dated 4 May 2011]

Below: Edenburg Station – most probably during the Anglo-Boer War. Note the “Tommy” on the platform – left.

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Cape Government Railways

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The Cape Government Railways (CGR) was the government-owned railway operator in the Cape Colony from 1874 until the creation of the South African Railways in 1910.

History: Cape Town Railway and Dock Company The first railways at the Cape were privately owned. The Cape Town Railway and Dock Company started construction from Cape Town in 1859, reaching Eerste Rivier by 1862 and Wellington by 1865. Meanwhile, by 1864 the Wynberg Railway Company had connected Cape Town and Wynberg. For the moment, railway development at the Cape did not continue eastwards beyond Wellington because of the barrier presented by the mountains of the Cape Fold Belt. The discovery of diamonds, and the consequent rush to Kimberley that started in 1871, gave impetus to the development of railways in South Africa. In 1873 the government of the Cape Colony decided to standardise railway development on the "Cape gauge" of 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in), to ease construction of railways through the mountains. In the following year the railways were taken over by the government and the Cape Government Railways was created. Railway lines were built towards Kimberley from the three ports of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and East London; these three lines became known as the "Cape Western", "Cape Midland" and "Cape Eastern" lines respectively. By 1885 the separate sections were connected and the Cape Western line reached Kimberley. In 1886 gold was discovered in the South African Republic (the Transvaal), setting off the Witwatersrand Gold Rush. The Cape government and the government of the Orange Free State (OFS) reached an agreement by which the CGR would build and operate a railway line through the OFS to the rapidly-growing city of Johannesburg. This line reached Bloemfontein (the capital of the OFS) in 1890, and the first trains operated from Cape Town to Johannesburg in 1892. In 1897 the OFS government took over control of its portion of the line. 44


The Cape railway network played a significant role in supporting and supplying the British forces during the Second Boer War. After the war, when the Union of South Africa was formed in 1910, all railways in South Africa, including the CGR, the Natal Government Railways and the Central South African Railways, were taken over by the newly-formed South African Railways. Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Government_Railways dated 4 May 2011. Nederlandsche Zuid-Afrikaansche Spoorweg-Maatschappij

1. The Nederlandsche Zuid-Afrikaansche Spoorweg-Maatschappij (NZASM) was established in 1887 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, with the aim of taking up the construction and exploitation of the railway line between Pretoria and Lourenรงo Marques. In 1890, the concession of 1884 was made official for the NZASM to oversee the railway network construction between Natal, the Orange Free State and the Cape Colony as well as see to the foundations of the Transvaal railway network. [4 May 2011] Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years

2. The Netherlands-South African Railway Company (Nederlandsche-Zuid-Afrikaansche Spoorwegmaatschappij) was established in August 1884 in the Transvaal, and funded by Dutch, German and Transvaal capitalists. The license was conditional on the route from Delagoa Bay to Pretoria being complete before the end of 1894. The line opened on November 2, 1894. The line was created in an attempt to break the dependence of the South African Republic on the British colonies to the south. By building a railway eastwards into Portuguese Mozambique the settlers would have a trade route that did not run through British territory. http://www.facebook.com/pages/NZASM/115529261794907Wikipedia, 4.5. 2011. Zuid-Afrika Huis http://www.zuidafrikahuis.nl/content/bibliotheek Genealogy - Genealogie

More than a century ago, a Dutch company constructed a railway in South-Africa. Between 1887 and 1899 there were thousands of Dutch people, often with their families, working for 45


these Dutch-South-African-Railway-Society (NZASM) and who also then immigrated to South Africa. For most of them their stay was only for a short time: in time of the AngloBoer War (1899-1902) half of the Dutch people in South Africa were sent out of the country by the British authorities. Some of them got work in of the then Dutch Indies. They could also have made a claim to receive financial help from the 'Support Fund for ex-NZASM personnel'. The South Africa House houses many treasures, most unknown, and contains biographical materials about these railway-people and their comings-and-goings after their return to the Netherlands. The files are a valuable resource for family-research, because they give a (sometimes very detailed) picture of the lives of these people in the Netherlands till 1940. There is an alphabetical list of names of nearly 3000 employees who were working for the NZASM at the end of the nineteenth century or who have asked for help from the support fund. The list is made up from the archives at the Zuid-Afrika Huis, and can be ordered for € 12,00. You can view the archives at the South Africa House, while members of the NZAV can read the archives for free. If you are not a member of the NZAV yet, we ask a for contribution of € 5,00. Photographic archives

The NZAV has an extensive photo collection. This collection contains many unique photos with a historical character. The collection is an overview of the history of South Africa from the last 25 years, and also the Dutch-South-African part of the country's history. Special mention is reserved for the pictures of the Boer-republicans Transvaal and Oranje-Vrijstaat (1880-1902) and the Anglo-Boer War (1898-1902), and the portraits of the African literators and politicians. The collection of photos can be made available for expositions and publication. Photos cannot be made available for loan (except for expositions), but can be copied on request, at cost to the user. Besides this we ask a contribution of € 25,00 for each photo used and oblige you to mention the NZAV photo-collection as a source. • Regarding the NZASM it would appear there is much research to do! – HBH.

Zuid-Afrika Huis - Amsterdam Keizersgracht 141 1015 CK Amsterdam Phone: 020-6249318 Fax: 020-6382596 E-Mail: info@zuidafrikahuis.nl

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Anglo-Boer War – Armoured Trains Does anybody have an idea of the livery of the Armoured Trains used by the British Forces in South Africa against the Boers? If I had to guess I would say the armoured vehicles were battle ship grey. Below a photo of HMAT Spitfire:

HMAT Spitfire

1900 – Anglo-Boer War. HMAT Spitfire was employed to patrol the line from Warrenton to Orange River. It is difficult to make out the colours of the armoured trains. One was even showing the Union Jack.

Imperial Military Railways During the Second Anglo-Boer War, control of the Transvaal railways was taken over by the Imperial Military Railways, but the NZASM did not entirely cease as an entity until 13 October 1908, when all its assets were taken over by the Central South African Railways (CSAR), which had been constituted, shortly after the peace, as the civil administration to take over from the military. The control that passed to the CSAR included all the railways in operation during the existence of the two Boer republics. Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years [4 May 2011] • I can’t find a logo for the IMR

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Obituary – Col Percy Girouard, KCMG, DSO.

Col Girouard was the Director of the Imperial Military Railways that operated in Southern Africa in the two former Boer Republics viz the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal respectively the Orange Free State Republic and the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek.

Central South African Railways

Orange River Colony, CSAR crest & ORC Flag. 48


The CSAR was established in 1902 to take over the Transvaal and Free State railways from Imperial Military Railways. The Transvaal section of the network was primarily under the control of the NZASM, which was taken over by the military shortly after the outbreak of the war in 1899. Before the unionisation, the CSAR preferred to maintain its own railway line to Lourenรงo Marques rather than provide the Cape with transportation services. Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years [4 May 2011] Cape Central Railway (CCR) The Cape Central Railway (CCR) was implemented in1883 in accordance with a law passed by the Cape parliament, and was first used in 1887 between Worcester and Roodewal (Ashton). This service was halted in 1892 as competition in the form of ox-wagons forced the company to be liquidated - even with its R2 million capital. Thereafter, the New Cape Central Railway came into being. Ref dated 4 May 2011: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years

New Cape Central Railway Thereafter, the New Cape Central Railway came into being, with the existing network extending to Swellendam (1899), Riversdale (1903) and Voorbaai (Mossel Bay) in 1906. Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years [4 May 2011]

South African Railways

The South African Railways and Harbours administration was established when the four colonies amalgamated to form the Union of South Africa. The CSAR, the CGR and the Natal Government Railways (NGR) functioned more or less independently for a while, but gradually merged, and the final amalgamation took place in 1916 with the formation of South African Railways. In the new system Johannesburg, as South Africa's most important commercial centre, became the seat of management. 49


The term "South African Railways" included railways, harbours, airways (as of 1934) and associated services such as the road transport services, oil pipelines, catering services, and the management of publicity and travel. The system was state-owned and administered and worked under the Ministry of Transport, assisted by the Railways and Harbours Board in an advisory capacity. The top management of the railways, harbours and associated services consisted of a general manager, two deputy general managers, seven assistant general managers and a financial manager. There were also nine 'system managers' who superintended sections of the railway network and were stationed at Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth, Kimberley, Bloemfontein and Windhoek respectively. This arrangement lasted until 1981, when the Government decided to restructure the SAR&H according to private business policy. The SAR&H therefore became the South African Transport Services (SATS) - a state business enterprise - on 1 April 1981. Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years [4 May 2011] 1932 - 1933 SAR Summer Excursions The SAR did much to foster “railway tourism� in Southern Africa as the following advert will show. Many tours were also arraigned for tourists visiting South Africa by boat.

1932 Dangerous Practices 50


The SAR and its police were ever vigilant to ensure the safety of staff and passengers on all their railway lines. Today in the new democratic South Africa we have far more serious impediments! Many commuter trains have been burnt! Even Pretoria railway station was a victim of arson. [Ref 1932111431]

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Spoornet

The State became the sole shareholder in SATS, resulting in another restructuring and namechange: this time, the company was named Transnet Limited, with Spoornet being one of the major divisions within the parent company. In turn, Spoornet contracted the rail commuter services (and assets) out to the South African Rail Commuter Corporation (SARCC). Once again, seven years later (1997), the SARCC was restructured to form Metrorail - a direct division of Transnet - with more than 10 000 employees being transferred to this new rail commuter controlling body. In 1999, Spoornet controlled three major freight divisions, namely General Freight Business (GFB), Orex and COALlink, as well as a mainline passenger service (the Shosholoza Meyl) and a luxury passenger line (the Blue Train). Ref: http://myfundi.co.za/e/South_African_Railways_I:_Ownership_through_the_years [4 May 2011]

1990 Transnet Transnet Limited is a large South African rail, port and pipeline company, headquartered in the Carlton Centre in Johannesburg.[2] It was formed as a limited company on April 1, 1990. A majority of the company's stock is owned by the Department of Public Enterprises, or DPE, of the South African government. The company was formed by restructuring into business units the operations of South African Railways and Harbours and other existing operations and products. The business units of Transnet include: • Transnet National Ports Authority and South African Port Operations NPA and SAPO - own and operate the country's main seaports • Transnet Pipelines - principal operator of South Africa's fuel pipelines • Transnet Property - property investment company • Protekon - transport infrastructure design • Transnet Freight Rail railway operator - freight service • Transtel - private telecommunications network, forming part of South Africa's second landline telephone operator 53


Transnet Rail Engineering - rolling stock manufacturing and maintenance.11

South Africa: Industrial Railways Richard Searle Introduction: The late Richard “Ric” Searle was my friend. We shared a lot in common – railways, history and genealogy. Before he died he gave me many of his uncompleted notes, diagrams and photographs. He did a lot of research into the railways of South Africa. He was an employee of Escom and as such the steam locomotives of Escom were dear to his heart. I have typed his notes and here is a part of his notes that I typed out:

Reference 1: Brakpan Locomotive of the Rand Central Electric works named “Brakpan”12 1. Background to the Power Station at Brakpan. After the discovery of the Main Reef in 1886 there was an immense rush to the Witwatersrand. The gold mines, as well as the people of course needed lots of fuel. Until coal was discovered at Boksburg in 1887 they had to make do with timber. Soon coal was also discovered at Brakpan and Springs. The gold mines boomed until 1890 when the softer portion of the gold reef has been completely mined and bedrock was struck, making mining more expensive and also making gold extraction, from a lower grade ore, very expensive. Gold mining almost came to a standstill until the McArthur-Forrest cyanide gold extraction process became viable. By 1895 the rand was again in a boom. This “gold” boom lead to an unprecedented demand for labour and energy. The electrical equipment manufacturing firm of Siemens and Halske had seen the possibility of supplying electricity from a central power station for underground lighting purposes. In 1894 the firm obtained a concession from the Government of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek (ZAR) for the supply of electricity to the mines of the Witwatersrand. In 1895 this concession was ceded to the Rand Central Electrical Works (RCEW) who proceeded to erect a power station at Brakpan, which was completed in 1897. This was the first commercial electricity supply undertaking in South Africa. 11

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transnet

12

See also “VOLTA”.

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Between 1899 and 1902 the gold mining industry on the rand came to a standstill, this of course being due to the Anglo-Boer War. Initial recovery after the war was painfully slow but the year 1905 heralding an enormous upswing in the demand for electricity. The reason for this was twofold. Firstly the country had been brought back to normality and the mines were in full production. Secondly, and of far reaching significance, two papers which had been published and which was to revolutionise the gold industry. In 1902 Mr H C Behr, then Consulting Engineer to the Consolidated Goldfields Group, had published a paper entitled “Winding Plants for Great Depths” in which he outlined his design of electrically driven winding gear which could be placed underground to haul ore from great depths. (This was, of course, not possible with steam driven gear.) It is obvious that the introduction of such winding gear would necessitate the supply of a lot of electrical power, which he had estimated at 20 MW within six to seven years. The year 1905 saw the publication of a paper which was to have an unprecedented effect on the development of electricity-generation and distribution in Southern Africa. This was Mr Robert Hammond’s work entitled: “Electrical Power Distribution on the Rand” in which he convincingly illustrated that a large central power station could supply electricity much cheaper and more reliably than a large number of small dedicated stations. The RCEW was quick to see the enormous potential of electricity generation for the mines and early in 1906 they placed an order for 5MW of new plant with AEG. The emergence of the Victoria Fall Power (VFP) on the Rand, the takeover and extension of the Brakpan power Station and building of Summerpan, Rosherville, and Vereeniging power Stations serves to illustrate the correctness of Mr Hammond’s vision. 2. Fuel for the boilers - A locomotive and trucks. In the RCEW annual report for 1897 (the year in which Brakpan Power Station was completed) it is stated that the works had received a locomotive and trucks. Nothing more is known of this equipment, the photo which was discovered in 1989 being the only other piece of evidence of its existence. The power station obtained coal from Apex Colliery, which was situated about two or three kilometres from the power station. The locomotive and trucks were obviously used for the conveyance of the coal from the colliery. In the authoritive work “Industrial locomotives of Southern Africa” by Hardy, Spit and Lucas it is stated that the Transvaal and Delgoa Bay Collieries obtained a new 0-4-0 side tank locomotive, from Brooks Locomotive Company in 1896 under works number 2725. It is significant that the authors state that this locomotive went to the Electricity Supply Commission (ESC). We know that the ESC as such did not obtain such a locomotive but the

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author of this report thinks that there is a distinct possibility that it is the locomotive obtained by the RCEW during 1897. It is evident from the photo that the locomotive was used on construction work when the VFP built the new power station at Brakpan during 1908/09. Be as it may, this locomotive and trucks is very historical as it is the first of such equipment that came to South Africa especially for electricity-generating industry. 3. Name of Locomotive: “Brakpan”. Author has taken the liberty, for identification purposes, of naming this locomotive “BRAKPAN”. This also serves to draw attention to this very historic power station. (Signed) R SEARLE - 14-11-1995

Reference No 2 - Volta

“Volta”13 1. Refer to par 6 below. 2. Please see the background to Brakpan Power Station contained under reference no. 1. In the days of NZASM there was a siding at the present Dalview connecting the Rand tram line with the power station. At this stage it is not known where the colliery pithead was and how coal trains operated. It would be worthwhile to research this aspect further. 3. “Volta” and “Brakpan” worked at Brakpan Power Station until 1912/3 when “Kitty” and “Hunslet” were brought in. “Volta” worked at the following places: (a) Brakpan Power Station – 1904 to 1913; (b) Rosherville Power Station – 1913 to 1920; (c) Vereeniging Power Station – 1926 to 1935; (d) Witbank Power Station – 1926 to 1935. 3.1. “Volta” was then sold to Johannesburg Municipality where she worked at Orlando Power Station. 4. Dave Parsons photographed her at Orlando Power Station, refer to the photo appearing on the last page of the story of “Kitty and her Sisters” by AA Jorgenson. 5. She has been scrapped. 6. In the authoritive work by Spit et al about industrial locomotives it is stated that “VOLTA” was bought new by the contractors of Brakpan Power Station, namely Siemens-Schuckert. She was then sold to VFP when the construction was completed. 13

See also “BRAKPAN”.

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(Signed) R. SEARLE

16-11-1995

NB: There is no diagram available. We should obtain one from JA Maffei or perhaps from the Johannesburg Municipality – RS.

Railways in Southern Africa

Photographs SAR Stations - Matroosberg Matroosberg – literally translated Matroosberg means something like Sailor’s Hill. Its 145 miles from Cape Town and 3147 feet above sea level. When one travels on the N1 to Cape Town, one turns left at Matroosberg to go to Ashton and Montagu. Due to all the new deviations and tunnels the railway line between Kleinstraat and Matroosberg has been lifted. The station buildings and SAR houses still exists.14

14

Information received from Boon Boonzaaier (Bosveld Train Safaris) on 2 May 2011. [Unfortunately

BTS does not exist anymore due to Transnet who has too few locomotives to pull BTS- and other private tourist trains.]

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Photo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Matroosberg_new.jpg

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Source: Reader’s Digest, Illustrated Atlas of Southern Africa pp 94 – 95

What is the colour of this armoured train?

“The 150th Anniversary of the first Railways and the 10th Anniversary of the RailRoad Association of South Africa” – Allen A Jorgensen This is a very large and heavy book. When I went through my borrowed copy I said to myself this is book I have to buy! This book will become a classic like Zurnamer, Holland or Paxton’s books. What Dusty Durrant did for Garratts, this Alan Jorgenson with Eric Conradie’s able help, accomplished for South Africa’s 150 years of railway history. A must have for any serious railway enthusiast. This book looks nice next to my PivnicCollection and other railway books! I have to give it back!

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Ysterwiele - Werna Maritz

Hier volg ‘n uittreksel uit een van die boeke: Spoorwegtaal – “Railway Talk” - Werna Maritz Soos die rekenaar-industrie dikwels nuwe woorde moet skep om iets nuuts te beskryf so het die spoorwegman daagliks ‘n taal van hul eie ontwikkel. ‘n Aansienlike aantal van die spoorwegwoorde, sê oom Ockie, het hul pad na die Afrikaanse spreektaal gevind. “Meeste van ons Engelse vriende”, sê hy, “Dink nie eens aan die spoorweg konnotasie wanneer hulle sê : “Don’t shunt me around!” of “The project came off the rails!, nie. Baie van die Afrikaanse woorde is nooit geskep of uitgedink nie maar het spontaan ontstaan. Waar wil mens byvoorbeeld ‘n meer gepaste naam kry as “Doppies” vir die dinamiet trein? Of “Spokie” vir of die optel- of betaal trein? Na aanleiding van die spotprentkunstenaar, Boonzaaier, se skets wat gespot het met die ryk mense wat op die trein gereis het, het die Union Limited wat later die Bloutrein geword het, op die platteland bekend gestaan as die “Hoggenheimer”. Wat sou n lid van die publiek daarvan gedink het as die Essem (SM = stasiemeester) sou sê, “Ek het die doppies voor my (aan die kom) Hoggenheimer agter en hier kom Spokie ook nog 61


aan!” Of vreemder nog, “Vier-op het gekalf voor die stokke!” (Trein 4-op het onklaar geraak voor die sinjale.) Sou hulle verstaan as die rangeerders gesê het, “Die pad is haaktand!” wanneer n sekere spoor vol was en nie meer verkeer kon vat nie? Dit is spoorwegtaal! Op Lydenburg ’n paar jaar gelede het ’n klomp verveelde toeriste een Sondag in die hotel gesit en nie geweet wat om die dag met hulself aan te vang nie. Die trein wat daardie presiese oomblik hard en duidelik gefluit het, het egter die probleem opgelos. “Kom ons gaan ry trein!” was die eenparige besluit. Dirk Maritz was agter die kontroles van die enkele 35 klas diesel toe die vier mans met hulle vrouens by die passasierstrein opgedaag het. Op Burgersfort het die kondukteur, Dirk du Preez, egter met ’n versoek van die manne agter in die trein by die drywer aangekom. “Maat, die ouens daar agter vra of hulle nie ’n bietjie hier voor kan kom ry nie.” Omdat daar nie saam met die drywer en assistent soveel mense voor in die beperkte spasie van die lokomotief se kajuit kon wees nie, moes hulle beurte gemaak. Dus het die eerste twee kort daarna hul opwagting in die kap van die lokomotief gemaak. Op pad Steelpoort toe is Dirk met vrae gepeper. Watter borde is dit daar langs die pad? Hoe werk die en hoe werk daai? Waar is die petrol pedaal? Die rathefboom en die stuurwiel? Op Steelpoort aangekom moes Dirk rangeerwerk verrig saam met sy kondukteur en die een rangeerder wat op die plekkie gestationeer was. Omdat loopgeselsers nog nie in bedryf was nie, is die nodige bevele vir die verskillende rangeerbewegings hardop uitgeroep met gepaardgaande handseine. Vanaf drywerskant was die rangeerder onder op die grond nie sigbaar nie en dus het die assistent aan sy kant uitgekyk om die bevele weer aan Dirk oor te dra. Bevele soos, “Vorentoe! Vorentoe! Stoot maar! Stoot maar! Koppel! Koppel! Koppel! Hokaai! Hokaai!” het die diesel telkens brullend heen-en-weer gejaag in die uitvoering van pligte. Deur-entyd het twee mans in stille verwondering gestaan en luister. Tot een van hulle sy bewondering nie langer kon wegsteek nie. “Man, maar ek laaik die CB-taal van julle!” Op pad terug was dit die ander twee se beurt om voor te kom ry. “Dit,” het een van die mans vir Dirk gesê toe hulle op Burgersfort afklim, “was nog die lekkerste dag van ons hele vakansie!” Dit lees lekker! Dankie Werna. Ek het al gehoor: “Is die crossing ge-protect?”- HBH.

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Private Coach – Namib – SAR 3

Messers JAE van Zijl, JJ van Zijl and “Namib” Mr JA Carstens Prieska

Official Diagram

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A note on “Namib” - HBH

No 3 at Koedoespoort – photo – Hansie Sturgeon

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No 3 at Windhoek – photo – Hansie Sturgeon

Can one of our readers in Namibia please give us a report on this vehicle? What is its status and what is her new number?

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Railway People Lt-Col Sir EPC Girouard (left) of the IMR and the famous locomotive engineer, Mr DA Hendrie from the NGR later the SAR’s first Mechanical Engineer.

RMT The Road Motor Transport (RMT) service or in Afrikaans the Padmotordiens (PMD) of the SA Railways & Harbours played an important part to “open up the undeveloped areas. It also stimulated the rural economy. Rhodesia had a similar service to develop their country. The duties of the RMT were to collect farm produce like milk, cream and wool on the farms. The RMT then took the produce to the nearest SAR station. The RMT was the lifeline for many farmers in the dry and arid Kalahari – the cream the farmers sold was a cash crop. Creameries made cheese and butter. Post and the newspapers were also delivered to people in remote areas. RMT passengers could reach many a remote police outpost, rural postal agency, trading store or even men on cordon-duty. Groceries were also delivered by the RMT. It was a calamity if a bag of coal or anthracite was dumped on top of a bag of sugar! Petrol, diesel or paraffin in drums were also conveyed as well as spare parts. By means of the train one could finally by utilising the services of the RMT reach almost any destination in South Africa. During the Border War in the north of Namibia the RMT conveyed goods from Grootfontein to places further north in the operational area. The SA Railways Police were responsible for the protection of all conveys from Grootfontein and further north. 66


1940-07-881

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SAA History Boeing 707 Livery

Our 1st Boeing ZS-SAA Photo supplied by Paul Mills.

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Paul writes: Paul is searching for the livery of the 1st Boeing 707 which has orange, white and blue painted on the engines, all he can find is a photo of this model. “Ek soek my vrek na ‘n foto van die 707 se heel eerste skema, waar die enjins blou/wit/oranje geverf was, al wat ek kry is ‘n model…”

Harbours

Durban – Point in the days of sail and steam. Pipelines

Transnet Pipelines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transnet_Pipelines

Industry

Pipeline services

Founded

1965

Headquarters Durban 69


Charl Möller, Chief Executive Key people

Lennie Moodley, Chief Operations Manager, Rob Bowden, CFO Pipeline operation service

Products

Petroleum storage Pipeline infrastructure management

Revenue

~ R1 bn 2006

Employees

~ 500

Website

http://www.transnet.co.za/PipeLines.aspx

Transnet Pipelines, a subsidiary of Transnet, is the principal operator of South Africa's fuel pipeline system. It is responsible for over 3,000 kilometres (1,900 mi) of pipelines. It is responsible for petroleum storage and pipeline maintenance. Transnet Pipelines works with petrol, diesel fuel, jet fuel, crude oil and natural gas (methane rich gas). Total throughput is over 16 bn litres per year. Transnet Pipelines uses a telecontrol system to monitor its pipeline. The telecontrol system is by Siemens Systems and "allows for automatic leak detection and batch tracking". The system operates with a 4 second delay between an event in the pipeline and on-screen display in Durban. The company's projects include a new multiproduct pipeline corridor between Gauteng and Durban. It is working on a partnership with Pande Gas in Mozambique. Rovos – 5E1

A pair of Rovos’ new electric units that have been beautifully restored!

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Catering Division “Service is Every Railwayman’s Pride”

“I express my thanks to the staff that allows the (Railway) Administration to serve the 71


Republic with an efficient transport system and I assure them the country's appreciation for their work�15 - BJ Schoeman the Railway Vote 1963-64. [South African Railways and Harbours Magazine, July 1963 page v.]

South African Railways & Harbours Police Inspector Stubbs and Sub-Inspector Fairbairn - Durban

15

A rough translation – HBH.

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Railway News Shosholoza Meyl

Die Pers Kombers – Fanie Kleynhans – The Purple Blanket Note new livery! Both ends purple.16 1. “Hello Peter” Have a look on what the public have to say and what people think of Shosholoza Meyl: http://www.hellopeter.com/search_results.php?search=Shosholoza+Meyl

2. Shosholoza Meyl services At the moment there are three Shosholoza Meyl services between: - Johannesburg – Cape Town - Johannesburg – Durban - Johannesburg – Port Elizabeth.

3. A train spotter in Cape Town reports: “Passengers went to catch their Shosholoza Meyl train yesterday from Cape Town to 16

Things are changing to fast for me! As soon as I am used to one livery, there is a new one! I wish I

could see a train with two purple 6E pulling a passenger train in the new livery.

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Johannesburg only to be told that the train had been cancelled due to no locomotives available. Come on Shos! That is very poor.� Railway mishap in Canada

This is Canadian National locomotive number 2699. It is a 212 ton machine powered by a 183 litre, 4400 hp V16, 4 stroke diesel. Shortly before this picture was taken, while working under load, 2699 experienced what is known in the trade as a "catastrophic uncontained engine failure". The train was passing the town of Independence, LA, at the time.

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The first picture below shows that the engine exploded and one of the 16 cylinder-packs that form the engine was ejected through the engine bay body side

and

thrown

clear

of

the

locomotive. In addition to this, the piston from that cylinder was thrown free by the force of the failure. It was ejected so violently that it traveled through the air and crashed through the roof of a nearby home where it imbedded itself into an interior wall.

•

This lends a whole new meaning to a "blown" engine. 75


Models 1930’s -Durban’s Model Steam Railway

During the 1950’s I could remember that there was a model steam railway on the Durban Beachfront. The railway ran parallel to the Marine Parade from more or less where the old Aquarium was, north towards the Snake Park. Model Isuzu – Paul Bosman Paul Bosman is a retired educational officer in Pretoria. His hobby is to build scale motor vehicles and tractors from steel plate and Pratley Putty. This particular model was made for the owner who won the real Isuzu truck in a SABC TV production called “50-50”. This is a true-to-life model of the real thing! Even the number plates and stickers are model replicas. This entails a large amount of hard and detailed work. He builds vehicles for his own enjoyment!

76


Paul Bosman

77


MRIG If you are interested in modelling South African Railways and antecedent railways in South Africa: this is the group for you. I have been a member for many years and have all the Journals. This group also covers, in a way, “railway history” – building replica models are also another way of preservation!

78


Railway Sites http://www.bahnbilder.de/name/bilder/hierarchie1/S%FCdafrika.html

Mail Bag Piet Conradie Hallo Hennie, Met verwysing na jou foto's in die nuusbrief van die Cullinan Brikor loko "176". Ek het glad nie van hierdie lokomotief geweet nie, en sal graag 'n (nuwe) inskrywing daarvan op my old Steam Loco blog wil maak. Kan jy asb vir my kopië van jou fotos aanstuur met vergunning om dit op die web blad te mag gebruik? Wanneer is die foto's geneem? Baie dankie. Groete uit Bellville – Piet •

Hallo die foto’s is op 13 Des 2010 geneem.

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Piet Conradie Middag Hennie, Nog 'n keer lastig --- kan jy asb ook vir my jou Nylstroom lokomotief foto kopië stuur en spesiaal asb 'n kopie van die koerant uitknipsel oor die Nylstroom toe dit na Esselen Park verskuif is. Ek sal dit waardeer om bietjie beter kwaliteit te hê as wat mens uit die enuusbrief kan kry. Wanneer is jou fotos geneem? Die idee is om dit ook op die bestaande Nylstroom

blog

bladsy

aan

te

bring.

Jy

kan

die

blogbladsy

hier

sien:

Modimolle (Nylstroom), locomotive "Nylstroom". Beste groete, Piet. •

Hallo Piet - dis my foto's c2000 geneem te Nylstroom. Die skersnit kom uit 'n ou SASSAR-tydskrif. Hannes Slabbert

“ ... Man hulle beweer mos biltong veroorsaak hoë bloeddruk en ek WEET dis waar maar ai dis darem net so lekker as treinry en kondensmelk." Rudy Venter He sent us some old SAR photographs that he shares with “old friends”

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1st Type outer home upper quardrant

Indicators

Between 1 and 2 tunnels on Ladysmith -

Between Ladysmith & Van Reenen

Van Reenen-line

81


Burlinton

Durban 1954

Danskraal

Frere station

Old Cape Town Station

82


Thornville •

Sure brings back many memories! Thanks for sharing!

83


Koot Swanepoel – NG G13 No 80 Joubertina

"Hennie, ek het in die Lokomotief in geklim. Alles is uitgebreek. Selfs die koper handvatsels, die meters. Ai, dit is hartseer. Ek was in die kondukteurswa, wat 'n gemors. Dit word as 'n publieke toilet gebruik."

Werna Maritz van Ysterwiele ‘n Foto van my en Dirk. Hy het 35 jaar lank vir Spoorweg gewerk op Diesel en Elektriese eenhede. Begin by Otjiwarongo in Namibie, daarna Lydenburg, Komatipoort, terug Lydenburg toe en op Ermelo afgetree gedurende 2001. Groete, Werna.

Dennis Walters Hallo Dennis , How about sending us an article for publication? HBH. Hi Hennie, That is a very good idea, I will definitely send one, as soon as I am able to get something together about Gen CR de Wet, and his exploits along the Free State railway 84


lines. I have to give a talk to our historical society about the flood of 1874 that destroyed several road bridges in our part of the woods. Regards, Dennis. Stimela - Dr Laurence Wright Hi Hennie Have you ever come across a small book on SA railway poetry called "Stimela" by Dr Laurence Wright of Rhodes University? There are some brilliant poems from old to new. The ones about the Boer War are brilliant, like Kipling's "Bridge Guard of the Karoo". I recently purchased a copy through the internet. It would make a brilliant article or two for your publication. Regards, Dennis Walters. • Thank you. I have not yet come across the book – however I know Kipling’s "Bridge Guard of the Karoo" – HBH Piet Conradie - PPSM Nylstroom / Nylstroom loco of PPR Hallo Hennie, Aangeheg 3 (swak) fotos van 1982 of 1984 van die NYLSTROOM loko - my dogter op die foto is in Maart 77 gebore. Oom Ben het die loko op 14 Junie 1954 op Nylstroom onthul volgens die koperplaat. Die interessantste foto is die een van die kajuut - na byna 30 jaar, het die loko nog al sy koperwerk gehad - in die mees onlangse foto wat ek gesien het, lyk dit of selfs die naamborde op die loko se kante nou afgesteel is ... Groete, Piet. NYLSTROOM DiaP3003 Piet Conradie ongeveer 1982

85


NYLSTROOM DiaP3004 Piet Conradie ongeveer 1982

NYLSTROOM DiaP3005 Piet Conradie ongeveer 1982

86


Basie Diedericks – Oos Londen

Ja, ek lees van al julle treine en raak hartseer ons het ook op ‘n tyd so 25 treine ‘n dag gehad hier in Oos Londen. Al wat ons nou oor het is 3 treine van so 40 trok. Na 31 jaar op die voetplaat en nou dit .... wat het verkeerd gegaan? [ South African Train Drivers driving local and Overseas] •

Dit laat mens dink van 25 treine per dag na drie treine in Oos Lonen is rede vir kommer – HBH Kelvin Naylor - Railway Genealogy – Pretoria Pietersburg Railway

Hello Friends, Today I received the attached documents from Ancestor.co.za. All but one relate to the carrying of explosives to Daspoort for the construction of the Pretoria to Pietersbury Railway Line. After our conversation regarding Daniel and him having possibly given your Grandfather, William Laxson the first to me, work on this project, I stumbled on the Ancestor.co.za site and have found them very useful and obliging with regards to accessing the SA Archives. I commissioned them to retrieve the attached documents which tends to prove your theory. Now to scratch further and see what else one can find out about this Pretoria to Pietersburg-project and our Daniel Naylor. Very best regards to all friends, Kelvin Naylor (Spyker) D Naylor 1896 Permit For Dynamite SS R14973.96

D Naylor 1896 Permit For Dynamite SS R14973.96 (1)

87


D Naylor 1896 Permit For Dynamite SS D Naylor 1897 Permit For Dynamite SS R14973.96

R8347.97

D Naylor 1897 Permit For Dynamite SS R8347.97 (2)

88


Tablet Various readers reported that the round “thing” is called a tablet. Thank you. Allan Jorgensen Dear Allen: Yesterday a friend lent me your latest book: THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST RAILWAYS AND THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RAILROAD ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA. Simply loved the book! My type of book - plenty history and plenty facts! Must get one - where does one buy it? I will also refer to it in the coming edition e-Railway Gazette of Southern Africa. Kind regards – HBH Dear Hennie, You must have seen one of the advance copies of the book which were given to sponsors. Unfortunately, there were printing problems and many of the B&W photos were reproduced too dark. In addition, there were numerous typographical errors as the proofreading was not satisfactory. When I saw this I immediately stopped the publishers 89


from printing a normal edition. Fortunately, they have agreed to make all the changes and I am expecting a final set of proofs within the next few days and when these are approved a new print run will follow. The book will be available direct from the publisher in Johannesburg or by mail order and I am attaching a rather poor reproduction of the Gatefold which will be widely distributed from next week. I have been given approval to announce the book on SAR-L and the Railway Society will be enclosing copies in the latest SA Rail. I have also approached agents from several countries while organizations such as Reef Steamers and the Umgeni Steam Ry will be distributing Gatefolds on their trains. Quantity discounts of up to 30% will be made through group orders, etc. I hope this gives you a good idea of the plans and I thank you for contacting me. Kind regards, Allen.

90


91


92


Andre Grove - Watervalboven

93


• Thanks Andre – Keep them comming! 94


William Marshall – Paint – Union Defence Force & SAR Hennie, The Chief Engineer SA Railways & Harbours drew up a schedule of paint colours for the UDF and it was issued to paint manufacturers. I have never come across an example as yet, only the accompanying letters which I have enclosed as reference. Could you place a request for anyone who may have an original copy to please supply me with a scan for reference purposes? I have also not come across it in the National Archive group for the Chief Engineer SAR & H. Can anyone help? mechinf@netactive.co.za Best regards, William Marshall

95


96


97


Piet Conradie – 1977 Keetmanshoop SAW/ SADF Troop Train Accident Keetmanshoop-troepetrein-ongeluk 1977 – Foto’s deur mnr HD Conradie, toe onderwyser.

98


99


Jacque Wepener – New generation shunting

Just have a look at what the "new" generation get up to when shunting... Cheers. J & J. •

Does it push and pull at the same time? On my layout I have been doing it for years!

100


Piet Conradie Old Steamlocomotives Hallo Hennie, Jy het gesĂŞ jy wil dalk later 'n old STEAM LOCOMOTIVES in South Africa skakel in jou enuus inbou. Die link is in die naam hierbo, maar kan ook gegee word as: http://steam-locomotives-south-africa.blogspot.com/ Onder is die jongste "nuus" van veranderinge in die blog, en die skakels is ook onderliggend. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

2011.02.26: new: Potchefstroom station forecourt, Class 8A no 1097 2011.04.17: new: Voorbaai Loco Shed (Hartenbos): February 2011 Images 2011.04.17: updated: Ashton Municipality - Class 14CRB No 2010 2011.04.17: updated: Riversdale, Town Center Class 7 No 970 2011.04.17: updated: Entrance to George OTM MUSEUM, SAR Class 7A No 1009 2011.04.24: updated with photos: Paarden Eiland Steam running Shed (defunct) 2011.04.24: updated with info about 'ROOS' NZASM loco - OUTENIQUA TRANSPORT MUSEUM 4/4 2011.04.24: updated with photos: Graaff Reinet, Kollege Road (N9) - Class 6 No 429 2011.04.24: updated with photos: Grahamstown, Railway Station, SAR Class GDA No 2257 (Garratt) 2011.04.24: updated with photos: Hartenbos Station, SAR Class 8 no 1070 (scrapped) 2011.04.24: updated with photos: Matjiesfontein Village - Class 7 No 987 2011.04.24: new with photos: Bloemfontein - old Steam Locomotive Depot (many locomotives) 2011.05.01: New: Cape Town - Monument Station: Atlantic Rail's operation of SAR 24 #3655 (in steam) 2011.05.01: Olifantsfontein: New: Brikor Limited, 1 Premier Rd: ex SAR A Class #176

Groete, Piet. 101


Alex Faria – Railway books Hi Hennie, Click on this link as there are a couple of Steam Train books selling on the latest auction. I know you probably won’t buy any but perhaps you will see one or two which you don’t have. Cheers! http://www.antiquarianauctions.co.za/categories/africana/page/7 •

Thanks Alex – sometimes it’s nice to see what one’s books are worth! The Railwayman’s Prayer – Spoorwegman se Gebed

Hennie, ek dink jy sal dit kan gebruik in jou volgende uitgawe van die Treine. Ek het as kind hierdie traktaatjie gekry en al die jare gebêre. Nou ja, min geweet dat ek dit weer sal kan gebruik om ons goeie verlede in herinnering te roep. 'n Spoorwegman se gebed. 'n Ou Spoorwegman het op 'n byeenkoms tot bekering gekom, en is gevra om te bid. Hy het 'n oomblik geaarsel, en toe eerbiedig met 'n bewende maar helder stem gesê: "Here, noudat ek die vlag gestryk het, bid ek U, neem my voete van die ruwe spoorbaan af en plaas hulle veilig bo-op die trein van redding. Laat wysheid my handlamp wees en die Bybel my hooflig. Laat die trein gekoppel wees met die sterk skakel van liefde. En, Hemelse Vader, hou alle wissels gesluit wat na die sylyne uitdraai, en veral die wat lei na 'n doodloopspoor.

O, Here, as dit U wil is, laat elke sinjaal langs die lyn die Witlig van hoop vertoon sodat ek die lewensreis kan aflê sonder om stil te hou. En Here, laat die tien gebooie my rooster wees. En wanneer ek die reis volgens roostertyd afgelê het en in die groot donker stasie van die dood ingetrek het, mag die Superintendent van die heelal sê; "Mooi so, goeie en getroue dienaar, kom teken die betaalstaat en ontvang jou loon van Ewige geluksaligheid." Seën en liefde vir jou Hennie. Toe my Pa sterf het ek aan die gebed gedink. My Pa was al die jare in Kondukteur op die Spoorweë. Koot Swanepoel. • Ook ons bede vir al die spoorwegmanne! - HBH

Next Issue Sometime in June! Hope it is not too cold! Walk Tall! Stuur solank julle stories, foto’s en feite – Mooi loop!

Hennie Heymans – Pretoria, ZA. © 2011 heymanshb@gmail.com 102


The Ulolwe vol 2 no 5