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NONGQAI: VOLUME 9 NO 11B The Water Police: Work in Progress A Short History of the Water Police in South African Harbours Contents .................................................................................................................................................. 1 ADMINISTRATION | ADMINISTRASIE.......................................................................................... 10 Publisher | Uitgewer ................................................................................................................ 10 Contact Details | Kontakbesonderhede................................................................................... 10 Aim | Doel ............................................................................................................................... 10 Policy | Beleid ......................................................................................................................... 10 Welcome | Welkom ................................................................................................................. 10 VISIT OUR WEBSITE | BESOEK ONS WEBWERF ...................................................................... 12 Web Pages | Web Bladsye ......................................................................................................... 12 Justitia..................................................................................................................................... 12 Benevolence ........................................................................................................................... 12 Nongqai .................................................................................................................................. 12 Historical ................................................................................................................................. 12 UCT: CENTRE OF CRIMINOLOGY .............................................................................................. 12 POLICE HISTORY | POLISIE GESKIEDENIS ............................................................................... 14 Introduction to a study of the Water Police: Brig. HB Heymans (SAP Ret) ............................. 14 Servamus................................................................................................................................ 15 Water Police to Naval Police ................................................................................................... 15 Covert Action: Water Police .................................................................................................... 15 Special Acknowledgement: SA Railways Police ..................................................................... 15 2


DURBAN HARBOUR: PORT NATAL ............................................................................................ 17 1840 ........................................................................................................................................ 17 1854: Durban Borough Police (Durban Gemeentelike Politie) ................................................ 17 1877 ........................................................................................................................................ 17 1883 ........................................................................................................................................ 18 1889: On the sea .................................................................................................................... 18 1890 ........................................................................................................................................ 18 1890’s: Captain George Edward Tatum .................................................................................. 19 1892: Water Police Station ..................................................................................................... 19 1894: Pre-1894: Water Police: Durban ................................................................................... 19 •

Superintendent J. C. McCarthy ........................................................................................ 19

1894: Natal Police Take Over ................................................................................................. 19 •

1898 .................................................................................................................................. 19

1895 ........................................................................................................................................ 21 1898: Natal Police take over as Water Police ......................................................................... 21 1899 ........................................................................................................................................ 21 1899 – 1902: Anglo Boer War................................................................................................. 22 1901 ........................................................................................................................................ 23 1904 ........................................................................................................................................ 23 1905: Establishment ............................................................................................................... 23 1905: Inspector C. E. Fairlie ................................................................................................... 24 1905: Zulu Member: Water Police .......................................................................................... 24 1905: Group Photographs of Staff .......................................................................................... 25 1906 ........................................................................................................................................ 26 Water Police: Jurisdiction........................................................................................................ 26 1906: Duties: Water Police ..................................................................................................... 26 1908: Increase in Trade .......................................................................................................... 26 1909: Water Police: Staff: Durban .......................................................................................... 27 1911: Point Water Police ........................................................................................................ 28 1913: Natal Police was absorbed into the Union Defence Force ............................................ 29 Police and Nature conservation .............................................................................................. 29 1913 SAP................................................................................................................................ 29 1914: Martial Law, Industrial Strikes and Covert Action .......................................................... 30 Lt.-Col. Trew’s record of events .............................................................................................. 31 1914 – 1918: Wartime Appointment: Capt. J McCarthy .......................................................... 39 Mounted Water Police Officer: Sub-Insp. J McCarthy ............................................................. 40 Page 55 .................................................................................................................................. 40 3


1915: Nongqai: August ........................................................................................................... 42 •

SAP Dreadnought ............................................................................................................. 43

1916: Mast head ..................................................................................................................... 44 1917 Nongqai: April ................................................................................................................ 45 •

Water Police launch: SAP Dreadnaught: Durban ............................................................. 46

1917 Nongqai: April ................................................................................................................ 47 •

1917: April Water Police Station: Point: Durban ............................................................... 49

1917: Uniforms: Water Police Durban............................................................................... 49

1917: Water Police Station: Bluff ...................................................................................... 50

1917: Whales .................................................................................................................... 50

1917 Nongqai: May ................................................................................................................. 51 1917 Nongqai: June ................................................................................................................ 53 1917 Nongqai: July ................................................................................................................. 54 1917 Nongqai: August ............................................................................................................ 55 1917: Nongqai: September ..................................................................................................... 57 1917 Nongqai: October ........................................................................................................... 59 1917 Nongqai: August ............................................................................................................ 61 •

1917: Funeral: No 6472 Const C Botha ............................................................................ 62

1917 Nongqai: September ...................................................................................................... 63 1917 Nongqai: October ........................................................................................................... 65 1917 Nongqai: November ....................................................................................................... 67 1917 Nongqai: December ....................................................................................................... 70 1917 Nongqai: December ....................................................................................................... 71 1918 Nongqai: January ........................................................................................................... 72 •

Water Police: Durban Harbour: Bluff Out-station or Sub-station ....................................... 73

Water Police: Durban Harbour: Congella Sub-station ....................................................... 73

1918 Nongqai: April ................................................................................................................ 74 1918 Nongqai: May ................................................................................................................. 75 1918 Nongqai: June ................................................................................................................ 76 •

Cupido .............................................................................................................................. 77

Major Miller, DSO, RFC and Aircraft ................................................................................. 77

Sgt. Sturana ...................................................................................................................... 77

1918: Nongqai: July ............................................................................................................... 78 1918: Nongqai: August ........................................................................................................... 79 1918: Nongqai: October .......................................................................................................... 80 •

Sailors jumping ship .......................................................................................................... 80 4


Gold .................................................................................................................................. 80

1918 Nongqai: November ....................................................................................................... 82 •

Col Mentz .......................................................................................................................... 83

Ownership: Salisbury Island ............................................................................................. 83

1918 Nongqai: December ....................................................................................................... 84 1919 Nongqai: March ............................................................................................................. 85 1919 Nongqai: April ................................................................................................................ 88 1919 Nongqai: June ................................................................................................................ 89 1919 Nongqai: July ................................................................................................................. 90 1919 Nongqai: August ............................................................................................................ 91 1920 Nongqai: October ........................................................................................................... 92 1920 Nongqai: November ....................................................................................................... 93 1920 Nongqai: December ....................................................................................................... 95 1920: Durban Borough Police ................................................................................................. 96 1921 Nongqai: February ......................................................................................................... 96 1921 Nongqai: May ................................................................................................................. 99 1921 Nongqai: June .............................................................................................................. 100 •

1921: The RMS Arundel Castle ...................................................................................... 101

1922: Group Photo: Water Police: Durban............................................................................ 103 1929: Capt. J McCarthy ........................................................................................................ 103 1929 and 1930 Political Pressure on Durban Borough ......................................................... 104 1929 Nongqai: April: Water Police Cape Town and Durban: The End of an Era .................. 105 1929: Durban Borough Police ............................................................................................... 111 1934 SAR Railway Police was founded ................................................................................ 111 1936: “Oribi”: Durban-hawe .................................................................................................. 111 1937 Major J McCarthy: Former Head of the Water Police Durban ...................................... 111 1941 – 1943 .......................................................................................................................... 111 1946 ...................................................................................................................................... 112 1947: Bote van die Waterpolisie ........................................................................................... 112 1956: (circa) Durban Harbour ............................................................................................... 112 1957: Railway Police: North Pier .......................................................................................... 115 1957: Konstabel Adam Hurter: Water Polisie Durban ........................................................... 115 1970’s Water Police: Durban: Osprey ................................................................................... 116 1970’s Water Police: Durban: Vink ....................................................................................... 119 1981: Platoon 161: Const. RK Pegram Water Police ............................................................ 121 1983: Skipper’s Licence ........................................................................................................ 122 Model of Vink in Transport Museum in George ..................................................................... 123 5


1980’s Durban Harbour......................................................................................................... 123 1984: “Vink” en “Osprey”....................................................................................................... 124 Gedurende 1984 was “Vink” en “Osprey” die bote in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Durban-hawe. ....................................................................................................................... 124 1984 ...................................................................................................................................... 124 1984: ‘n Wakende Oog oor die waters… .............................................................................. 124 1986: SAP Vink en SAP Osprey ........................................................................................... 126 1987: “Osprey”: SAP: Durban ............................................................................................... 127 1989: SAP Pintado ............................................................................................................... 127 CAPE TOWN: TABLE BAY .......................................................................................................... 128 1860 ...................................................................................................................................... 128 1867 ...................................................................................................................................... 129 1871 ...................................................................................................................................... 129 1880 ...................................................................................................................................... 129 1883 ...................................................................................................................................... 129 1886 ...................................................................................................................................... 129 1917 Water Police: Cape Town: Head-Constable Larpent ................................................... 129 1917: August: 2/Head-Constable Larpent ............................................................................. 130 1918: News Water Police Cape Town .................................................................................. 130 1918: Munity on the High Seas ............................................................................................. 130 1924: Table Bay: Water Police on beat................................................................................. 131 Uniform Water Police ............................................................................................................ 131 1924: Water Police Cape Town ............................................................................................ 132 A bygone era ........................................................................................................................ 133 1929 Nongqai: April: Cape Town .......................................................................................... 134 •

Enlargements .................................................................................................................. 139

General Service Medal ......................................................................................................... 140 1934 SAR Railway Police was founded ................................................................................ 140 1934: Tafelbaai: "Mauretania" ............................................................................................... 140 •

Silver Leaf and Gemsbok ................................................................................................ 141

1937: SAR & H Police: “Gemsbok”: Cape Town ................................................................... 141 1941: SA Spoorwegpolisie neem dienste oor van die ESPC ................................................ 143 The “Old Gemsbok” .............................................................................................................. 143 1970’s: Cape Town Harbour ................................................................................................. 144 1978: ML Loerie .................................................................................................................... 144 •

May I Sing: “Michael Row the Boat Ashore”? Keith Alfred Rudolf Blake. ........................ 144

ML Loerie ........................................................................................................................ 145 6


A Roof Story: Shaun Pfister ............................................................................................ 145

‘n “Loerie”-storie: Henk Fourie ........................................................................................ 146

“Dieseldruppel”: Albert Treurnich .................................................................................... 146

Kloekmoedige optrede: Konst. B Saayman .......................................................................... 147 •

ML Loerie: Boet Saayman Riversdale............................................................................. 148

1984: Loerie .......................................................................................................................... 148 1986: SAP Kormorant ........................................................................................................... 148 1986 SAP Tobie .................................................................................................................... 148 1989 ...................................................................................................................................... 149 1986 AMALGAMATION: RAILWAYS POLICE AND SAP ............................................................ 149 WATER POLICE: OTHER HARBOURS IN SOUTH AFRICA ...................................................... 150 East London / Oos-Londen (Buffalo Harbour) .............................................................................. 150 1984: Sparrow ...................................................................................................................... 150 1986 ...................................................................................................................................... 150 1988: SAP Seeduiker ........................................................................................................... 151 Lüderitz Harbour ................................................................................................................... 151 Mossel Bay / Mosselbaai ............................................................................................................. 152 1930 Mossel bay Harbour ..................................................................................................... 152 Port Facilities ........................................................................................................................ 154 1988: SAP Watervleuel: Mosselbaai ..................................................................................... 154 1988 SAP Seemeeu ............................................................................................................. 155 Port Elizabeth............................................................................................................................... 156 1906 ...................................................................................................................................... 157 1984: Leo .............................................................................................................................. 159 1988: SAP Stormgans .......................................................................................................... 160 Richardsbaai / Richards Bay ........................................................................................................ 160 First Patrol Vessel launched: Date Unknown: Skipper: Sgt C Meintjies ................................ 162 1984: Robin .......................................................................................................................... 163 1984: Beheergebied: Durban en Richardsbaai ..................................................................... 163 1984: ‘n Wakende Oog oor die waters… .............................................................................. 163 1986: SAP Pikkewyn ............................................................................................................ 165 Saldanha ...................................................................................................................................... 165 1984: Tobie ........................................................................................................................... 166 1986 ...................................................................................................................................... 166 1986 SAP Kormorant ............................................................................................................ 166 1988 SAP Seeswael ............................................................................................................. 166 Ingang na Hawe .................................................................................................................... 166 7


Simonstad / Simons Town ........................................................................................................... 167 1795 ...................................................................................................................................... 167 Naval Base Simonstown ....................................................................................................... 168 History................................................................................................................................... 168 •

Simonstown Dockyard Police ......................................................................................... 170

Dockyard Police Simonstown ............................................................................................... 171 1988 ...................................................................................................................................... 171 1988 SAP Albatros ............................................................................................................... 171 Walvis Bay / Walvisbaai ............................................................................................................... 172 1984: Elsie ............................................................................................................................ 172 SA Spoorwegpolisie: Patrollievaartuig: Elsie ........................................................................ 173 1986: SAP Seeswael ............................................................................................................ 173 1989 SAP Seeswael: Walvisbaai .......................................................................................... 174 WATER POLICE: SOUTH AFRICA: INLAND .............................................................................. 174 •

Vaal Dam: 1935 to 1950 ................................................................................................. 174

Barrage ........................................................................................................................... 174

Roodeplaat Dam ............................................................................................................. 174

Hartebeespoort Dam....................................................................................................... 174

Enquiries on Facebook: SAP Hall of Fame: Pretoria & Victoria Falls.............................. 175

Foto’s: Besonderhede onbekend ................................................................................................. 175 1966 – 1989: COUNTER INSURGENCY: RHODESIA AND SWA .............................................. 177 •

Enquiries Facebook: Nongqai ......................................................................................... 178

Enquiries: Facebook: SAP Hall of Fame ......................................................................... 178

Van Ovamboland tot Masjonaland: Louis Lubbe.......................................................................... 180 •

Kwandorivier ................................................................................................................... 182

Kazungula ....................................................................................................................... 182

Katima Mulilo .................................................................................................................. 183

Mana Pools ..................................................................................................................... 184

Pont: Impalila-eiland ....................................................................................................... 185

Bagani: Okavangorivier................................................................................................... 185

Impalila-eiland ................................................................................................................. 186

Choberivier ..................................................................................................................... 186

Zambezirivier, Kanyemba ............................................................................................... 187

SAPS: 2018: Gauteng Water Wing: Gauteng Watervleuel: Gert Visage ...................................... 188 SERVAMUS ARTICLES .............................................................................................................. 191 1998: Gauteng Watervleuel .................................................................................................. 191 8


Water vleuel .......................................................................................................................... 192 Watervleuel ........................................................................................................................... 193 2009: North East Rand: Water Police ................................................................................... 194 North East Rand: Water Police ............................................................................................. 195 North East Rand: Water Police ............................................................................................. 196 2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team..................................................................... 197 2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team ..................................................................... 198 2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team..................................................................... 199 2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team ..................................................................... 200 2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team..................................................................... 201 2000: German Water Police: Wasserschutspolizei ...................................................................... 202 1957: Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz............................................................................. 202 2000: Berlin........................................................................................................................... 202 Water Police: Danube River: Austria ............................................................................................ 205 INDEMNITY & © | VRYWARING & © .......................................................................................... 206 End / Slot ..................................................................................................................................... 206

Valsbaai: Foto Hennie Heymans.

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ADMINISTRATION | ADMINISTRASIE

Publisher | Uitgewer The Nongqai is compiled by Hennie Heymans (HBH) a retired Brigadier of the late South African Police Force and this e-magazine is published on ISSUU. Hennie lives in Pretoria, ZA. He is passionate about our police-, military- and national security history and holds a MA-degree in National Strategic Studies. Any opinions expressed by him, are entirely his own. Die Nongqai word saamgestel deur Hennie Heymans (HBH), 'n afgetrede brigadier van die voormalige Suid-Afrikaanse Polisiemag en hierdie e-tydskrif word op ISSUU gepubliseer. Hennie woon in Pretoria, ZA. Hy is passievol oor ons polisie-, militêre- en nasionale veiligheidsgeskiedenis en het 'n MA-graad in Nasionale Strategiese Studies verwerf. Enige menings wat hy uitspreek, is uitsluitlik sy eie. Contact Details | Kontakbesonderhede

Aim | Doel Our goal is to collect and record our national security history for publication in the Nongqai for future generations.

Onthou, skryf u storie, soms kan ons net op u geskrewe weergawe terugval want dit is al wat daar is. Deel u SAP- en SAW-foto’s met ons!

Ons doel is om die nasionale veiligheidsgeskiedenis in die Nongqai aan te teken en so vir die nageslagte bewaar. Policy | Beleid We publish the articles and stories as we receive them from our correspondents; we only correct the spelling mistakes. It's important to publish the stories in the form and context as we receive them from our correspondents. Policemen and defence personnel have their own language. We are not a scientific or literary journal. We only work with historical building blocks. Ons gebruik die artikels en stories soos ons dit van ons korrespondente ontvang; ons maak slegs die spelfoute reg. Dis belangrik om die stories te bewaar in die vorm en in die konteks soos ons dit ontvang. Lede van die veiligheidsmagte het hul eie taal en ons moet dit ook so aanteken. Ons is nie ‘n letterkundige of wetenskaplike joernaal nie. Ons werk slegs met die boustene van geskiedenis. Welcome | Welkom Welcome to this provisional edition on the Water Police. Your comments, advice, anecdotes and photographs are eagerly awaited. I have tried to chronicle the history chronologically. Thanks to Frans Bedford-Visser, Louis Lubbe, Annalise Kempen and Glenn Elsdon. 10


Sunrise over Port Natal: On the photo is Sgt. Frans van Heerden, one of my Durban-South colleagues. This photo was taken in Durban along the then Victoria Embankment late 1960’s early 1970’s. This is actually a familiar sight in Durban. We used to travel along this road to from the Police barracks in Durban to SAP King’s Rest on the Bluff. (Photo “Buks” – SAP) Work in Progress: Please send any comments or additional information and photographs to Hennie Heymans: heymanshb@gmail.com

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VISIT OUR WEBSITE | BESOEK ONS WEBWERF Web Pages | Web Bladsye

Justitia Benevolence Nongqai Historical Webmaster Webmeester Glenn Elsden glenn.elsden@gmail.co m http://www.samirror.com ALL PRESS RELEASES ISSUED BY THE FOUNDATION FOR EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW ARE PUBLISHED ON THE WEB SITE.

ALLE PERSVERKLARINGS UITGEREIK DEUR DIE STIGTING VIR GELYKHEID VOOR DIE REG WORD OP DIE WEBWERF GEPUBLISEER.

UCT: CENTRE OF CRIMINOLOGY Please see letter incorporated into this issue. 12


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POLICE HISTORY | POLISIE GESKIEDENIS

Introduction to a study of the Water Police: Brig. HB Heymans (SAP Ret) As a young boy I often heard the term “Water Police” and it was not until the 1960’s that I had joined the SA Police that I saw the name “Water Police” typed on a police telephone list in the Charge Office at King’s Rest Police Station. We were just over the Bay, on the Bluff-side of the Harbour. We had places like Salisbury Island, Island View and Wests in our precinct. The Railways Police covered the Bay of Port Natal and railway property. However, we (SAP) dealt with private property in the harbour and roads. We also attended to complaints of taxi drivers when sailors refused to pay when dropped off at their ships. We also had to attend to complaints on ships. Naturally we also arrested many prostitutes for a series of crimes. (I saw first-hand how the prostitutes were exploited by their pimps, how they were robbed and I have always hoped that the “oldest profession” would in some way be legalised one day and the women who practice this profession; be protected from exploitation.) I grew up in Durban and as a boy played in the bay – Bayhead and Bluff side. There were pristine mangrove swamps and I still remember the strange crabs running away diagonally. I remember the Indian fishermen and their boats. Fynnlands Beach was also a beautiful spot. It was a lovely sight to see the mail ships leave the harbour, like ships of the Union Castle Line and the “Europa”. As a schoolboy I also fished in the harbour near Wests. The railway police always wanted to see one’s fishing permit. Many times, we chased away by the SAR&H Police because some parts of the harbour were “restricted areas”. I salute them for doing their job without fear or prejudice. As a policeman I attended many complaints in the King’s Rest-precinct including the whaling station, Wests Hotel and even a murder on Admiralty grounds. This was in the bush above the Wests Hotel, above the harbour and railway servitude. We had quite a struggle to move the body in order to get it to the mortuary van. Many moonlit nights I drove to Salisbury Island on patrol and saw anglers catching fish. I drove the patrol van into the bay on a slipway and was curious to see all the sea creatures jumping up and out of the sea water because of the police van’s sharp lights shone into the water in the bay. I attended to two or three cases were foetuses were floating in the bay near Salisbury Island. As the investigating officer of some minor infringement the inspecting officer, Lt. AJ de Villiers, inspected my case dockets and instructed me to finalise the investigation in one specific case. My reply was the witness lived on a barge in the Indian Ocean about three miles from the coast opposite the Louis Botha Airport, where they were constructing an off-shore point for oil tankers to pump crude oil to the nearby oil refineries. His instruction was: “Take a boat and obtain statement from the witness!” I duly took a boat to the barge and on the way to the barge I was seasick a record number of times! That day I found out that I did not have sea legs. I nearly died because the boat went out in the morning at 06:00 and only returned at 12:00. (Later in life I travelled between Wales and Ireland in an Atlantic-storm and I was not even sea sick.) Many years later while doing post-graduate work in the Netherlands I met a Colonel of the “Koninklijke Rijkspolitie te Water.” (Royal Dutch Water Police.) He organised a cruise for me on the River Rhine from the German border to Rotterdam and then up to Katwijk-aan-Zee. I also had a 14


wonderful opportunity to study the Dutch Coast Guard operating under the auspices of the Koninklijke Marechaussee and the Dutch Water Police then under the auspices of the Dutch National Police (Rijkspolitie). It was the days of cultural sanctions against South Africa and through “police contacts” was able to research their excellent police system solely for academic purposes. (I abide by Providence: the information I gained was never put to any practical use. Today, after about thirty years, I can only share my experiences.) A few years later I had the opportunity to visit, amongst other things, the German Water Police in Berlin and we travelled on the River Spree in Berlin and we visited the “Bridge of Spies”. They have a special branch in the police solely doing the work of the “Water Police”. After reading the introduction can you, the reader, blame me, if I start with Durban harbour? Yes, I am biased; I will discuss “the fairest Cape of them all” in the second place with Simons Town harbour. [18 July 1580: Sir Francis Drake, rounded the Cape on his voyage round the world. He called it "a most stately thing and the fairest cape we saw in the whole circumference of the earth".]1

Servamus Without the cooperation and assistance of Ms. Annalise Kempen, Editor of Servamus, this edition would not have been complete. We thank her for permission to quote three articles from Servamus about this subject in our special edition.

Water Police to Naval Police One harbour that differs from the rest is Simons Town. This harbour, dating back to the Dutch India Company, was for many years a great Royal Navy Harbour and it was later handed over to the South African Navy. Whilst under British rule Simons Town had its own Naval Police. To complete the study on the Water Police the Naval Police will be included in this section. I was once fortunate to attend a course in Simons Town Naval Base and we lived in the hotel called “Rhodesia-by-theSea”. I was dressed in mufti and enjoying a quiet drink in a Navy Officer’s Club when an agitated Admiral entered the officer’s club – a ‘yellow police patrol boat’ was anchored in the bay and he was most upset as he was not informed. So, we know that the SAP had a patrol boat in False Bay at one stage. (I did see the boat the next day.)

Covert Action: Water Police Covert Action, as we all know, is an instrument of statecraft. General JC Smuts instructed the SA Police to carry out – the first documented case of a covert operation that I could find – and the police succeeded because of the critical assistance of the Water Police. To complete this study, I will also give full details of a highly illegal “covert action” executed by Capt. HF “Harry” Trew. In my readings I have come across covert work performed by the Ossewabrandwag in Durban harbour and how the wartime Special Branch of the SA Police combatted this threat. However, most wartime files were destroyed on instructions of Field Marshal JC Smuts when the National Party came to power. (Likewise, many other files on Ossewabrandwag members, sympathisers and detainees in detention camps like Baviaanspoort, Leeukop and Andalucía (Jan Kempdorp) have been destroyed by order of the later General HJ van den Bergh – OC of the Security Police. This section then does not actually fall under the ambit of the Water Police and is left out of this script.)

Special Acknowledgement: SA Railways Police

1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16th_century_in_South_Africa

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Photo: The watchful eye of the Water Police in Durban harbour. They were attached to the SAR & H Police. Photo courtesy of Mr. Les Pivnic. During the revolutionary onslaught when Durban was known as “Bomb City” the Railways Police performed magnificently in the protection of the Durban harbour. The SA Navy was responsible for the “seaward defence” and the SAR Police were responsible for the “landward defence”! (Like their predecessors in WW1 and WW2.) A salute to all, for a job well done! 16


DURBAN HARBOUR: PORT NATAL 1840

1854: Durban Borough Police (Durban Gemeentelike Politie) The first South African Water Police HQ was established at the Point, Durban, in 1854. Initially a small Force, it grew in strength until by the end of the century it comprised over 50 men.2 The duties of the Water Police were “the observance of law in the harbour and the maintenance of order therein.” 3

1877 Although the council offered the services of the Water Police under the ambit of the Durban Borough Police and the use of the borough’s buildings the Colonial government decided to do the job themselves. Instead the government; “wishing to keep entire control in their own hands”.4

2

https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html Jewell, 1989: p. 62. 4 Jewell, 1989: p. 62; Jewell says after 53 years; however, I count 33 years from 1887 to 1920 – HBH. 3

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1883 “Inspector D Irwin Nolan was reported by the Collector of Customs in 1878 for ‘insulting behaviour', mentioning ‘rumours to his discredit’. Despite this, Nolan was Superintendent of the Water Police by 1883.” 5

1889: On the sea On Sunday 31 March 1889 the police had to go out to sea. On board the ss Fernandez a drunk sailor caused as problem. He could not be restrained aboard. The captain sent for the police who arrested him. Francis Calvalerio was later found guilty and fined one pound or twenty days hard labour.6 The police had to act when three stowaways were discovered aboard the ss Conway; Ismael. Ibrahim Ismael and Hussain Ismael were accused by the ship’s captain of being stowaways from Mauritius.7 Charlie, an African man, was arrested for stealing a bottle of whisky from a steamer, the poor thief was sentenced to 15 lashes and one month’s hard labour. 8 Mr. J Commins, a fireman aboard the ss Melrose, came to shore on leave and stayed ashore. The police had to search for him. He was found and he was taken to court, found guilty and sentenced to imprisonment until the ship had to depart two days later. 9 The body of George Cardwell who had been in the water for some days was found floating in the harbour. Sailors from the ss Severn and ss Mertola pulled the decomposed body out of the water. The police took the body to the mortuary. A verdict of “death by drowning” was recorded as foul play was not suspected. 10

1890 “It is possible that this native constable was a member of another corps such as the Natal Water Police - a port and harbour customs enforcement corps in Natal. Uniforms as worn by all of the above police units were very similar although period photographic examples tend to show members of the Water Police and possibly Natal Police wearing an oval metal identification badge on their left sleeve. In none of the other images that I have examined do any native constables wear anything close to the beautiful necklace that this man wears.”11 Uniforms were indeed similar – some wore white drill trousers. I see no uniformity in the police dress code, look at the various photos that are reproduced. This specific photo is seen on various sites. Look at photo of Water Police Station (1892).

5

https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html Jewell, 1989: p. 63. 7 Jewell, 1989: p. 64. 8 Jewell, 1989: p. 64. 9 Jewell, 1989: p. 64 - 65. 10 Jewell, 1989: p. 65. 11 http://www.soldiersofthequeen.com/SouthAfrica-EuropeanandNativeConstabulary.html 6

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Appearing quite valuable and implying a certain status to the wearer, he probably wore the necklace specifically to look his best for the photographic session.12,13

1890’s: Captain George Edward Tatum In the early 1890s Captain George Edward Tatum was Superintendent of the Water Police, under the Natal Harbour Board. 14

1892: Water Police Station See photograph of old Water Police Station on next page.

1894: Pre-1894: Water Police: Durban Before the Police Act of 1894 the Water Police at Durban comprised Superintendent G. E. Tatum, two N.C.O.’s, eight European constables and twenty-two natives. 15 This force carried on for some years, but increased staff became necessary and men of the Natal Police were drafted into the establishment. In the latter years of last century, the work became heavy; Supt. Tatum went on active service with the Natal Naval Volunteers in 1899. 16

• Superintendent J. C. McCarthy Superintendent JC McCarthy then took command of the Water Police (he had been the senior sergeant for some time and was well experienced in the tough work which fell to the lot of the force). As a matter of course, they worked in conjunction with the Port Captain and other officials at the docks. Mutinous crews of ships had at times to be dealt with, and sailors ashore on the spree often gave much trouble. Supervision of the fisheries, action against smugglers and all the many matters which arise when ships are in port required tact, resolution and often physical hazards were met with. Sgt. Lynch, a senior N.C.O., was a valuable member of the Water Police. When he retired, Captain McCarthy lived in Durban; he died quite recently at the age of ninety years. 17

1894: Natal Police Take Over The Natal Police took over the duties as “Water Police”. In 1894 the Natal Mounted Police, the Water Police and the Railway Police were amalgamated into one Force - the Natal Police. 18

• 1898 According to Holt it was not until 1898 that members of the Natal Police were drafted into the Water Police. 19 There is probably no shipping port in the world at which vessels get better and quicker attention from the police than is the case at Durban, where the Water Police have formed an interesting branch of the Natal Police since the force was taken over in 1894. At that time, it consisted of two

12

http://www.soldiersofthequeen.com/SouthAfrica- EuropeanandNativeConstabulary.html Cabinet Photograph: William Laws Caney – Photographer: West Street, D'Urban, Natal, South Africa. c. 1890. 14 https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html 15 Wood 53- 54. 16 Wood 53- 54. 17 Wood 53- 54. 18 https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html 19 Holt 342 13

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sergeants, eight European constables, and twenty-two natives, these being under the control of Superintendent G. E. Tatum. 20,21 A dilapidated old building constituted the head-quarters, and as Durban was at that time almost in its infancy, there was comparatively little work to do, though the task of the police has steadily increased as the Durban wharves have extended. 22 I wonder if the building depicted below is the old dilapidated building referred too?

20

Holt 342 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 22 Holt 342 21

20


Source.23 The Water Police now work eight hours a day, though from 1894 to 1901 they each worked for a nominal twelve, but an actual thirteen, hours a day, for three hundred and sixty-five days a year, it being impossible to grant half-day holidays. The men generally reserved their annual fourteen days' leave until they had a month or two to fall back upon. This continued until just over ten years ago, when three watches a day were instituted. 24

1895

1898: Natal Police take over as Water Police It was not until 1898 that members of the Natal Police were drafted into this force, and then three troopers were sent to Durban, and a sergeant became boarding officer under the immigration regulations. 25

1899 Mr. Tatum was in command of the Natal Volunteers as well as Superintendent of the Water Police. When the last Boer War broke out, he went to the front with the first of the Natal Volunteers that were called out, Sergeant McCarthy being left in charge of the Water Police, who had a great deal of hard work during that time. Only half a dozen of them were Europeans, and the idea of regular watches had to be abandoned. They mustered at five a.m., and did not leave duty until the last of the trains containing troops had gone up-country. There were crowds of refugees in Durban, and the whole of the work of regulating the traffic at the congested wharves26 devolved upon the Water Police, who had to erect barriers round the troopships and keep the crowds back. 27

Nongqai 1929-04-312 ‘Water Police Station’ Holt 342 25 Holt 342 26 Holt 342 27 Holt 344 23 24

21


Whenever an accident occurs in the bay the Water Police are expected to put off in their small rowing-boat to render assistance, and there is often grave risk of the little craft being capsized. A decked-in steam or motor launch is badly required, but apparently the authorities do not recognize this. 28 In addition to their other duties, the Water Police carry out instructions received from the captain of the port, the port manager, and the harbour engineer, the force working in conjunction with these officials. The Water Police also act as Customs officials. Until recently there was only one preventive officer on watch at night, the Water Police being recognized as the men responsible for the detection of smuggling. The principal delinquents are sailors who, having been refused an advance of money by their captain, take ashore plugs of tobacco in the hope of being able to sell it, preparatory to a burst of intemperance. 29

Photo: George McCall Theal.

1899 – 1902: Anglo Boer War During the war the duties of the Water Police became even more strenuous30.

28

Holt 344 Holt 344 30 Nongqai April 1929, 312. 29

22


1901 It became necessary to increase the force in strength in 1901, owing to the number of restricted immigrants that were taken to Natal, principally from India. 31 Whenever there is serious trouble with a drunken crew the Water Police are looked to preserve order. There was one particularly exciting night in 1901, when the crew of the British troop-ship Columbian set the captain at defiance. The Columbian was moored at the quay, and she had about thirty men on board. Inspired with the all-prevailing spirit of warfare, the sailors were a dangerous gang to handle. There were only six members of the Water Police available for duty, but they tackled the mutinous crew. It was pitch dark when they went up the gangway to the vessel with drawn batons, and there was every appearance of their having a rough time, but under the direction of Sergeant McCarthy they advanced boldly. 32 At first the mutineers showed defiance, and the police deemed it wise to retire, so they secured the assistance of two of the Borough Police and returned to the attack. This time they went up the gangway at a run. 33 " They're coming! " yelled one of the crew. " Yes, and there's a regiment of us this time.' shouted back one of the police. Without a moment's hesitation they rushed straight on, and began to hit out at every one who resisted, with their batons. The fighting lasted for several minutes, and then the crew bolted into the fo'castle, where nineteen of them were arrested and taken to gaol by the eight policemen.34

1904 While the British sailing-ship Loch Garve was making her way towards Durban in 1904, the crew mutinied on the high seas, got at the whisky and gin, and refused point-blank to do any work. One or two apprentices remained loyal to the captain, and helped him to work the ship into Durban. 35 As the vessel approached the shore she signalled for the police, and four men went off in a small boat. They found twenty-three members of the crew intoxicated, and mutinous; and arrested them all. The small boat used by the police was not nearly large enough to take the prisoners ashore, so a motor boat had to be sent for. The men were sentenced to terms of imprisonment varying from three to nine months. 36 On another occasion a number of the crew of a large liner had broached six cases of gin while the vessel was lying at anchor off the wharf. They became utterly unmanageable, and when the vessel was moored at the side of the quay Sergeant Lynch and two other members of the Water Police boarded the liner, tackled the offenders unaided, and arrested eleven of them. 37

1905: Establishment There were 27 constables employed boarding ships, and dealing with the immigrants, until 1905, when a wave of depression swept over the colony, and all these men were transferred to headquarters at Pietermaritzburg and Zululand, just in time for them to take part in the fighting during the last rebellion. 38

31

Holt 344 Holt 344 33 Holt 345 34 Holt 345 35 Holt 345 36 Holt 345 37 Holt 345 38 Holt 342 32

23


Superintendent Tatum retired on a pension in 1905, being succeeded by Inspector Fairlie, who supervised the work of the Water Police until he returned to Zululand as Commandant of the Zululand Native Police. 39

1905: Inspector C. E. Fairlie When he retired on pension in 1905, Inspector C. E. Fairlie took charge for a time until he returned to duty in Zululand. There is a story, that Charles Fairlie was once “piped on board� one of His Majesty's ships in Durban harbour. In his semi-naval uniform, I can quite imagine it happening; his fine figure and imposing appearance, wearing his habitual eye-glass could have made just the right impression? 40

1905: Zulu Member: Water Police

39 40

Holt 343 Wood 53- 54.

24


1905: Group Photographs of Staff

25


1906 ‘The Water Police are a body of men specially enlisted to patrol the harbour in boats or launches. The Docks are in charge of the Water Police, whose duty also consists in preventing contraband goods being passed through. They are closely connected with the Customs Department. They also assist in case of emergency with the lifeboat and life-saving apparatus. Its strength is about 53 constables and 4 officers and non-commissioned officers. The pay the men receive is on the same scale as the Railway Police, a constable receiving seven shillings a day. The whole charge of the wharves is left to them, the Borough Police of Durban (which, like the Pietermaritzburg Borough Police, is an entirely separate body) having no jurisdiction at the Port.’ 41

Water Police: Jurisdiction According to the Natal Almanac & Yearly Directory, the Water Police had jurisdiction over: - all the waters and islands of the Port and Harbour - all vessels on these waters or on the foreshores - all wharves of the Harbour Department - the portion of the Bluff under control of the Harbour Department - all criminals, offenders or suspected persons within the jurisdiction of the Water Police, ‘or in flight therefrom’ - all property suspected to be stolen or smuggled

1906: Duties: Water Police Duties: Water Police were thus described: - the maintenance of peace, dignity and order - the prevention of crime - the prevention of smuggling and of contraventions and evasions of the Customs Laws - the enforcement of the Port and Harbour Regulations - the protection of public and private property - the arrest of criminals, offenders and suspected persons - the prevention and repression of mutiny and insubordination on board vessels - the seizure of property reasonably supposed to have been smuggled or stolen42

1908: Increase in Trade “…. and as the trade of the port increased a force of 26 special European constables were engaged at the request of the various shipping agents in 1908. They’re not members of the Water Police, but work under the supervision of that body in protecting the various ships that enter Durban.43

41

https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html https://molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/04/was-your-ancestor-in-durban-water-police.html 43 Holt. p 345 42

26


1909: Water Police: Staff: Durban

Many competitions took place between the Water Police and the Royal Navy in Durban. The Water Police were excellent rowers. All photos from the Nongqai. 27


1911: Point Water Police

28


1913: Natal Police was absorbed into the Union Defence Force In 1913 the Natal Police was absorbed into the Union Defence Force. To-day [1913] Superintendent J. McCarthy, who is at the head of the Water Police, has under him four sergeants, twenty- two European constables, and sixty-four natives. There are seven miles of wharves to be patrolled.44 Some years ago, one of the duties of the Water Police was the rounding up of all the firemen from the public-houses for the ships that sailed on Saturdays. This was very dangerous work, because the firemen, half-demented by bad liquor, often refused stubbornly to go back to their ship, and displayed murderous tendencies when urged to do so. Jiu-jitsu was, and still is, a very necessary part of the training of the Water Police, and it was exceedingly useful when the firemen had to be driven on board. In the majority of cases they had to be frog-marched through the streets, and the shipping companies were charged a revenue fee of five shillings for each fireman taken to the boat by the police.45

Police and Nature conservation When the supervision of the fisheries was in the hands of the Water Police, the men had many thrilling adventures with the poachers who put out their nets at midnight in the prohibited portions of the river. Several men still in the corps had narrow escapes from death. One night, Sergeant McCarthy and Sergeant Edwards went out on foot to patrol the head of the bay, reaching Congella at twelve o'clock. They half stripped, and, with most of their clothes fastened on their shoulders, waded into the water to cross the channel. It had been a fine, moonlight night at first, but at about two o'clock the weather changed and the moon was obscured by a mist. Some little distance away they had seen a number of Indians poaching, and with great caution they approached them. The two Europeans captured the whole party, numbering nine, illicitly using smallmesh nets in prohibited water. Then the moon vanished altogether, and when the police tried to wade to the shore, they lost their bearings. The water came up to their hips, and whichever way they went it was deeper. They floundered46 about hopelessly for a while, and as the position became desperate the two Europeans decided to release their prisoners, thinking the latter would probably know the safest way back to the shore. This they accordingly did, but the Indians began to howl, for they were no better off than the Europeans. The water seemed to be steadily rising with the tide, and all the eleven men would probably have been drowned had not the mist lifted slightly and revealed the Bluff light dimly shining in the distance.47 Taking his bearings from that point, Sergeant McCarthy decided that the Congella beach must be in a certain direction, so he determined to swim for it or drown. He waded on until the water was up to his neck and then found himself on rising ground. Although the situation was still critical the police again made prisoners of the Indians, who were with great difficulty taken ashore. It was after four o'clock in the morning when they arrived at the police station, wet through, with the nine poachers. 48

1913 SAP When the Union Defence Force was established the Natal Police went over to the Union Defence Force and became the 2nd and 3rd Regiments of the South African Mounted Rifles. They policed Natal while in Durban the Borough Police policed the borough. The outside stations like Rossburgh and King’s Rest were taken over by the SAMR. The only elements of the SA Police in Durban were

44

Holt, Holt, 46 Holt, 346. 47 Holt, 347. 48 Holt, 347. 45

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the Water Police, the CID (detectives) and the Court Ushers. So, the Water Police went from Natal Police to the SA Police.

1914: Martial Law, Industrial Strikes and Covert Action

The 1914 Industrial Strikes: During January 1914 a strike was called by (white) mine workers, (white) railwaymen and (white) industrial workers. This led to the greatest strike South Africa up to then had experienced. Martial Law was declared. Ring leaders were arrested and all their documents confiscated. The illegal deportation of the leaders was carried out on the instructions of Minister NJ de Wet (Justice) and General JC Smuts. It was, as far as I could ascertain, the “first covert action” carried out by the SA Police, ably assisted by the Water Police and SA Railways & Harbours. The men: • • • • • • • • •

49

Bain, Mr. James Thompson; Crawford, Mr. Archibald; Livingstone, Mr. William; Mason, Mr. George William; M'Kerrell, Mr. David; Morgan, Mr. William H.; Poutsma, Mr. Hessel Jakob; Waterson, Mr. Robert Burns; and Watson, Mr. Andrew49, were secretly moved by special train to the docks in Durban and place on the steamer “Umgeni” for London.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/people/mr-herbert-asquith/ (accessed 9 April 2017).

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Lt.-Col. Trew’s record of events Here is Col HF “Harry” Trew’s record of events:50 Colonel Truter sent for me and told me that a Cabinet Council was being held at Union Buildings, and that the Secretary to the Police, Colonel Bredell (formerly President Kruger's secretary) and I had been sent for. As we motored up to Union Buildings we wondered what sins of omission or commission we had been guilty of that the "Brass hats" should require our humble presence. We were shown into the office of the Secretary for Justice, and he told us that our Minister was still in Cabinet. After a short wait Mr. de Wet, the Minister of Justice, came into the room and said: "Gentlemen, the Cabinet have just decided to deport to England the nine labour leaders now imprisoned at the Fort, Johannesburg." This took our breath away for the moment, because we realized that it was an absolutely illegal proceeding. He went on to tell me that I was to go to Durban, ostensibly to give evidence before the Indian Commission, but secretly to make preparations for, and carry out, the deportation. He impressed on me that secrecy was imperative, and that to preserve it nothing was to be put on paper, telegraphed or telephoned. On arrival in Durban I was to see the agent for the Bullard King Line of steamships, who had already been approached by the senior customs officer at Durban, with regard to chartering the steamer Umgeni; but he had not been told why the Government required the ship. The agent was to be taken into our confidence, and I was to make all arrangements with him. On no account was I to try and communicate with the Government, and if anything unforeseen cropped up I had full authority to act on my own discretion. On a sheet of paper, torn from his pocket book, he wrote in pencil: 1. See Agent Bullard King Line make all arrangements. 2. Provide complete set warm clothing for each deportee. 3. If wireless on ship have it dismantled. 4. Give Captain £27 in cash for him to hand deportees on arrival in London. 5. Arrange to have Government Solicitor on board to draw up powers of attorney for representatives nominated by deportees. 6. Wire Minister of Justice c/o Station Master, Matjesfontein, Wednesday morning, before 8 a.m. if deportations successfully carried out. He then handed me in addition a small slip of paper on which was written: Union Buildings, Pretoria. Major Trew, S.A.P., is in full charge of operations for deportation of labour leaders. Government officials are to render him every assistance he may ask for. (Sig.) J. C. Smuts, Minister Administering Martial Law.

50

Trew, HF Lt.-Col.: African Manhunts, Blackie & Son, London, 1936 pp 260 – 274.

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The plan as explained to me was, that on a fixed night the deportees were to be taken from their cells in the Fort Prison, Johannesburg, and placed in a closed motor-van. They were to be driven to a lonely siding outside Johannesburg and there put on board a special train under close guard. The train would run through to Durban without stop. If everything went according to plan it would draw up on the wharf beside the Umgeni at twelve midnight. They were then to be hurried on board and locked in their cabins, with a guard. The ship was immediately to cast off, go out through the Heads and cruise outside territorial waters. Whenever we had passed outside the three-mile limit, I was to collect the deportees into the saloon and announce their fate to them. I was to arrange for the Port Captain's tug to follow the Umgeni out to sea to take my party off the ship after the deportees had been given time to write to their friends and sign their powers of attorney. The Minister finally impressed on me that nothing was to be allowed to stop the deportations. If a writ of habeas corpus was served on me I was to ignore it. If anything unforeseen occurred at the last moment I was to act accordingto my judgment; the Government would support any action of mine. One question I raised was the sizes of the men for whom I had to purchase clothing. Mr. de Villiers Roos (the Secretary for Justice) guaranteed to let me have the approximate sizes by the following morning. This he duly did, and the measurements were so accurate that everything fitted perfectly. Years later I learnt that Mr. Roos had personally gone over to the Fort that afternoon on the pretence of seeing if they had any complaints. He had then measured each man with his eye, not daring to write down the figures until he had left their respective cells. As soon as I returned home I looked out an old money-belt, in which I concealed my two slips of paper, and buckled it round my waist under my clothes. That night I went out to a dinner party given by a judge of the Supreme Court. During the whole of dinner the guests discussed the probable fate of the labour leaders. I could not help looking at my host, and wondering what he would say if he knew that I was party to a plot to steal nine prisoners out of the jurisdiction of his honourable court and send them overseas. Some months later I said to the judge: " I f you had served a court order on me to hand over the prisoners to your messenger and I had disobeyed it, I suppose you would have given me six months for contempt of court?" “Six months," he said, " I would have given you ten years!" The following morning my train pulled out of Pretoria Station for Durban. On board were a number of SAMR and police officers, going down to give evidence before the Indian Commission, and a number of Imperial Army officers on leave. I had a reserved compartment and a number of them gathered in it. Of course they immediately began to discuss what the Government was going to do with the labour leaders. I tried to lead the conversation away from this dangerous subject but without success. Within nine months all but two of the nine young officers who sat in that compartment had died on the battlefield. The following morning I called on Mr. Siedle, the agent for the Bullard King Line, and found him most charming and helpful. He, however, was rather astonished when I explained why the Government required to charter the Umgeni. He talked of cabling to his directors in London, but I explained that this course was impossible. He finally agreed to accept the responsibility, but brought up a question I had never discussed with the Minister, namely, the signing of an indemnity bond in case the deportees took action against the company before the English court and obtained damages. As this might involve the Union Government in an expenditure of thousands of pounds I was rather loath to sign. However, Siedle pointed out how unfair it would be to expect the company to run this grave risk, and that unless I signed the bond they would wash their hands of the whole affair. 32


Finally, I signed the bond, feeling very much as though I had signed my own death warrant. The other question to be settled was the amount of compensation the Government was to pay the company for the cargo missed by the cancellation of the Umgeni's call at Port Elizabeth and East London. Mr. Siedle put in what I thought was a reasonable claim, and I signed it on behalf of the Union. The agent, I discovered, was rather an expert at deportation, as he had previously deported the rebellious Zulu chief, Dinizulu, and also the officers of Jameson's ill-starred raid. I informed him that I wished to go down to the ship and inspect the accommodation and meet the captain, but that it was essential that none of the ship's people should guess who I was, or my business. We finally arranged that he was to take me on board and introduce me as the manager of the London Gaiety Company, who was then playing in Johannesburg. The story was to be that my company was to arrive on Wednesday, at midnight, by special train and go straight on board, when the ship, whose sailing had been delayed for them, should put straight out to sea. Having purchased a soft black hat, and assuming as theatrical an air as possible, I left with the agent by car for the ship. There I was introduced to the skipper, who proved to be a bluff old British tar of the old and bold type. On my requesting to see the cabins which were to house the members of my company, the ship's purser was sent for. He proved to be a good-looking young man, who, as he took me down to inspect the cabins, confided to me that he loved carrying theatrical folk, as they were always so matey. He asked me if the girls in the party were good-looking. I told him that the only word that could describe them was "peaches". He said that he hoped they would occasionally give a show in the saloon. My reply was that I knew my troupe would oblige very often. He rather stumped me when he asked how many girls there were amongst the nine. On the spur of the moment I replied five, which later on fitted in very well as they were two-berth cabins, and I required a single cabin for one of the deportees, who was a phthisis sufferer. Later that morning I was called to give evidence before the Indian Commission, so had to give up my theatrical rig-out and get into uniform. After I had given evidence the Indian Commissioner, Sir Benjamin Robertson, asked me to dine with him that night, so I knew that he must have approved of my actions during the strike. The next day I went to Harvey Greenacre's draper's shop to buy the nine sets of warm clothing. The assistant who served me saved me the trouble of thinking out a new lie by saying suddenly: "I suppose, Major Trew, this clothing is for the police shooting team going to Bisley?" "Of course," I assented, "but how did you know me?" His reply was: " Oh, I am not a crook, but I lived in Pretoria for years, and know you well by sight." The clothing was made up in nine parcels, all numbered and addressed to my hotel. That night I went with a party of friends to the theatre, and in the interval, while I was having a drink a man 33


came up and introduced himself as a newspaper reporter. He said: "Major, I saw you giving evidence before the Indian Commission. I would be glad if you can tell me about what date the labour leaders will be brought up for trial?" My reply was: "I am sick to death of the labour leaders, and I neither know nor care what happens to them."

ss Umgeni When I woke the following morning I knew that if all had gone well the special train with the deportees on board must be well on its way. After breakfast I called on the port captain, showed him my authority from General Smuts, and asked him to have a tug with steam up at the wharf to follow the Umgeni out to sea shortly after midnight. The next step was to interview the O.C. troops administering martial law in Durban. It was arranged with him that at 11.45 pm that night he would occupy the wharf with an armed force, turn all civilians out of the dock area and allow no one through a cordon to be thrown round the special train on its arrival. Water Police The Water Police were also directed to have a party detailed for special duty on the Umgeni at midnight. By this time I was getting rather nervous, and was afraid that some whisper of the proceedings might leak out, and I be served with an order from a judge of the Supreme Court requiring me to hand over the prisoners to a court official. Of course I realized that the whole of our action was illegal, but I was determined to carry out my orders and ignore any court order which might be served on me. The day seemed as though it would never end, and during the afternoon I got the impression that I was being shadowed. To test it I walked up West Street, and went into a shop which I knew had a back exit. I asked to see some socks, and whilst examining them had a careful look through the shop window. There on the opposite pavement stood the reporter who had spoken to me the previous evening. I hurriedly purchased a couple of pairs of socks and walked out through the back exit. My intention had been to visit the Umgeni before dinner, but this incident decided me to remain in the hotel until the last possible moment. As I was, however, afraid of the reporter, I called on the press censor under martial law, and after showing him my authority requested him to refuse to pass all telegrams or newspaper articles 34


referring to the s.s. Umgeni, or to anything that might occur on the wharf that night. General Lukin's A.D.C. was dining with me that night, and during dinner it struck me that it would be a good idea to take him on board the ship with me so that I might have an independent witness in case it was later alleged that I had behaved with undue harshness towards the deportees. He was a noted ladies' man, so I asked him if he would come down to a ship with me to see some theatrical girls off. He jumped at the idea, but said that first he must return to his hotel and have a second shave and get on his newer dinner jacket. This I assented to, and he turned up later looking the acme of smartness. At last, accompanied by Mr. Siedle, we left by car for the ship. On arrival there we were conducted to the captain's cabin and I explained to the latter who his prospective passengers were to be. Who was the more astonished at this statement I do not know, but both he and the A.D.C. at first refused to believe me. The captain then said: "Look here, I've got to take these men to England. Won't they put me in gaol for kidnapping them?" It was explained to him that the deportations were being carried out under martial law by order of the Union Government, and that he would be free of all blame in the matter. He replied: "All right, Major, I'll do it. But the log book is my Bible — you write in it all my orders and sign it for the Government." I was not aware if the British Government had been advised of the deportations, so I warned the captain that he was not to stop on the high seas, or hand his deportees over to anyone except a British warship. His reply was: "You bet I'll stop if a damned man-o'-war signals me to do so. Those perishers would think nothing of putting a shell in my boilers." I thought of that sentence when some years later the Umgeni fell a victim to a German submarine. He cheered up later and said: "Ah, well, you'll see the picture papers full of the old Umgeni and her gallant skipper when we reach old London Town." There were some other passengers on board who had come from east coast ports, and they had been warned to be on board by eleven o'clock. Most of them had gone to their cabins. Walking past them to see the warm clothing deposited in each cabin I suddenly saw a man dodge behind a windcowl. I sent a detective to round him up, and when he was marched up there was the enterprising reporter. How he got on board I never learnt. He was warned that under martial law he was liable to arrest for being in a forbidden area. He was escorted off the ship, and pushed out through the dock gates, being warned that if caught there again he would be arrested and locked up for the night. At 11.45 p.m. a body of troops marched on to the wharf and picketed the whole area. At 12, midnight, to the minute, in steamed the special train and drew up on the wharf opposite the Umgeni. It was immediately surrounded by troops with fixed bayonets. Off the train wearily climbed Inspector Hill of the C.I.D., Johannesburg, who had come down in charge of the prisoners. He had remained awake and on the alert for twenty-four hours, and looked a very tired man. He informed me that he had taken over the prisoners the previous night and put them in a closed motor-van. While motoring through the streets they had sung the "Red Flag", hoping that some of their comrades would hear them and trace their movements. He had put them into the special train at a lonely siding; the train had steamed out and never stopped again until that moment. The blinds on the windows had been kept down, and the prisoners had no idea of where their journey was to end. The prisoners were now all fast asleep, each man in a separate compartment with two detectives to guard him. 35


At that moment the driver of the train got off his engine, came up to me and asked what all the fuss was about. When I told him he was struck dumb for a moment. Then he said: "Well, can you beat it? I thought I was hauling police and C.I.D. who had been on the Reef on strike duty." Inspector Hill and I arranged that each deportee should be awakened in turn, escorted on board, and locked in his cabin, with two of the Water Police as guards. At that moment an orderly, whom I had left at the hotel, dashed up to me and said: "A telegram for you, Major." I at once thought it was a court order, and tore it open with shaking fingers. It read: "Hearty congratulations; wife gave birth to daughter to-day. Both very fit." The first prisoner climbed off the train yawning and rubbing his eyes; on each side of him a detective affectionately held his arm. Suddenly he saw the ship and started back, saying: "I'm not going on any damned ship. Are you trying to shanghai me?" The detective, placing a hand the size of a leg of mutton on his back, said: "Climb that ladder, George, and argue the point afterwards." The man looked at the ranks of soldiers, with the moonlight glistening on their bayonets, and then shaking his head moved forward to the gangway. And so, one by one, the nine were taken on board, and I gave Hill a receipt for his captives. Turning to the captain I asked him to put to sea as soon as possible, and to report to me when he was outside the territorial waters. We then went down to the saloon to see if the arrangements were complete for our interview with the deportees. There was a seat for me at the head of the table, and nine seats round it. Opposite each of the nine seats was a pen and ink, paper and a blank power of attorney form. The Government attorney was there waiting to take the instructions of the nine men as to the disposal of their property in South Africa. I think he thought we were all mad, and had said to me: " I hope you realize what a serious step you are about to take?" I could not speak American in those days, or I would have replied: "You're telling me!" The captain had not been absent long when he returned and reported: "I am sorry Major, but the chief engineer refuses to start the ship's engines. It seems that he and one of the ship's officers have had a few drinks, and the chief claims that the officer insulted him. He will not allow the engines to be started until the officer is punished." It was urgent that we should start at once, for I was haunted by fear of an order of court. I asked the captain if we could not arrest the chief and let the second engineer take the ship to sea. The captain replied that he dare not do it, as the old Scots engineer had been with the company for forty years, and the directors thought the world of him. He advised me to humour the old man and pretend to punish the offender. I sent two of the Water Police to arrest the officer and march him in to me. The captain then brought in the dour old Scottish chief engineer. The officer was marched in, the drink was dying in him, and he looked very frightened. I asked the chief to state his case against the accused, while I made play at writing down the evidence. The chief said: "This damned slip of a boy had the impudence to say, during an argument, that I was no' fit to grease ma own engines. I will no' start ma engines till he's been severely punished." I said: "Chief, will you accept an apology from him and call the matter square?" He replied: "I'll do no sich thing. He must be punished. Why, under your martial law I understand you can shoot a man." I said: "All right, I sentence him to be shot at dawn. March him to his cabin." The old Scot shook me warmly by the hand, saying: "I doot but what your sentence is a wee bitty severe, but he was terribly insulting to a chief engineer. Noo I'll gang awa and start ma engines." I sent the captain to tell the young officer that the trial was all a bluff, but that he was to remain in his cabin for the rest of the night.

36


At last the ship moved off, and passed out through Durban Heads into the open sea, followed by the port captain's tug. We sat in the saloon, and by the motion could tell there was a fairly heavy sea running. It was very fortunate that we were both good sailors; it would have been a terrible anticlimax if we had been prostrate with seasickness. The captain came down and told us that we were clear of the territorial waters, and that it was raining and blowing up for bad weather. The deportees were then brought into the saloon, and I requested them to sit down. When they were seated I said: "Men, I have been ordered by the Government of the Union of South Africa to inform you that you are being deported from South Africa, as you are considered to be a danger to the state. You are to be landed in England. You have one hour in which to write to your relatives and to prepare powers of attorney dealing with your affairs in South Africa. It is now 2 a.m.; at 3 a.m. this ship sails direct for England." Immediately an angry storm of protest broke out, and they demanded to see my warrant. I said: "There is no warrant." Then they said: "Show us your written authority for this outrage." The reply was: "There is no written authority." Then they all jumped to their feet with cries of: "This is the twentieth century — you can't kidnap us like this!" and "What do you think you are, buccaneers on the Spanish Main?" One man said: "I demand to see a lawyer. I refuse to sail in this ship." The two most responsible men amongst them, Bain, the miners' leader, and Poutsma, the secretary of the Railwaymen's Union, tried to calm them down. To one man who threatened me with his clenched fist they said: "It's not the Major's fault; he has to do what he is ordered. It's Botha and Smuts we want to get at." Bain then said to Poutsma: "I wonder if there is a wireless on this ship?" So Poutsma answered: "You know Jannie Smuts; if there was one I'll bet it has been dismantled." I explained to the angry men that they had no appeal to any power or person. That as long as they behaved themselves they would be treated as ordinary first-class passengers. After that they calmed down and began their letters to their wives and other relatives. The attorney moved amongst them and took their wishes as to the disposal of their property. The captain came down at 3 a.m. and told me there was a big sea getting up and that unless we got off at once we would have to go to London with them. I introduced each one of the deportees to the captain. One of them as he shook hands said: "You will find that we are not very dangerous anarchists. We have no bombs or revolvers." The tough old sea dog replied: "If you behave, you will be treated the same as any other passenger. If you make trouble, into irons you go." I then requested the captain to signal the tug to send a boat for us. We rang for a steward and ordered drinks all round. We drank to them and wished them a pleasant voyage, and they in return drank to us. The letters and powers of attorney were sealed in a bag to go to the censor under martial law, and we went on deck. It was a cheerless scene which met our gaze. The early morning was cold and dark, and the deck was slippery with the driving rain. In the distance we could see the lights of the tug, which was pitching and tossing in the heavy sea. Two sailors held flares burning over the rope ladder, which was the only means of leaving the ship. Underneath the ladder was the boat from the tug. At one moment it was twenty feet below us, at the next not more than ten. We sent off the Water Police and the attorney in the first load and the A.D.C. and I followed in the next. It was a nasty experience going down that rope ladder in the dark; the rungs were wet and slippery and as the vessel rolled it kept banging on the side. We arrived on board the tug, wet through with spray, but a big mug full of coffee, which the skipper had kindly prepared for us, soon warmed us up. Arriving at the wharf we found a Defence Force car waiting for us and at once drove to the telegraph office to notify the Minister of the successful accomplishment of the mission. I had an order from him to get the wire through to Matjesfontein on the Cape railway by 9 a.m. as the Cabinet were on their way to Cape Town for the Parliamentary 37


Session. Having forgotten to notify the postmaster at Durban I found the telegraph office shut. However, I consulted a friendly policeman and he directed me to the Eastern Cable Company's office. They were most obliging and agreed to cable the message round to Cape Town, where it could be relayed to Matjesfontein. The message read: Duty completed in accordance with orders. Two days later I left Durban by the R.M.S. Edinburgh Castle for Cape Town to report personally to General Smuts. As soon as the interview started I informed him of the indemnity bond I had been compelled to sign, and he made no remark. I then told him that I had overheard one deportee remark that they would walk off the ship at Madeira, where she was compelled to call for coal. He at once sent for the Spanish Consul and informed him what had happened, and of the remark which had been overheard. The result of this appeared in a letter I received from the captain of the Umgeni. It ran as follows: "What did you people tell the Spanish about my ship? When we got to Madeira they treated us as though we had plague on board. The ship was surrounded by armed picket boats, and not a soul was allowed to leave her." On arrival in Cape Town I learnt that Colonel Creswell, the leader of the Labour Party in Parliament, had in some way learnt that the deportees were on the Umgeni. He had hired a tug and tried to intercept the ship off Cape Town. He, however, could not find her. It appeared that my part in the deportations had made me rather unpopular amongst a certain section of the Transvaal, so the Government granted me three months' leave in Cape Town. For a month I spent nearly every day in the House of Parliament listening to the very heated debate on the deportations. As I heard members comparing the actions of the Government with that of the Tsar of Russia in sending his subjects to Siberia, I began to feel as though I was an inhuman monster. I received an official letter from the Cabinet thanking me for the efficient manner in which I had performed my duty. Then I sustained a nasty shock. The papers announced that the deportees were taking action against the Bullard King Steamship Company for thousands of pounds worth of damages. At the Civil Service Club, Cape Town, one day I met Mr. Siedle, the agent from Durban. To my astonishment I learnt from him that the Minister for Finance had repudiated the indemnity bond I had signed, on the ground that I had no authority to pledge the credit of the Government to an unlimited amount. Fortunately, the permanent Head of the Treasury, Mr. James Leisk, was a friend of mine. Calling at his office I explained the whole position to him, and pointed out that if my signature was repudiated no Government servant would ever accept any responsibility in future. He promised to take the matter up, and shortly after informed me that the Government had agreed to honour the bond. However, I was warned that I would have to go to England to give evidence on behalf of the Company. Fortunately a very clever agent of the latter in London got hold of one of the deportees and persuaded him to accept ÂŁ100 in full settlement of his claim. This spoilt the big claims of the other men, and finally they agreed to accept ÂŁ100 each. The next time I met any of the men I had seen off on the Umgeni at Durban, was when I met Poutsma one day, years afterwards, in a club in Cape Town. He had returned to South Africa, and was now transformed by the whirligig of time into organizing secretary for the South African Party led by General Smuts. As soon as he saw me he said: "Come on, Colonel, I can now stand you a drink in return for the one you stood me on the Umgeni" The deportations were quite illegal, although subsequently made legal by Act of Parliament, but I think they were amply justified by the results. For eight years subsequently South Africa, and Johannesburg in particular, industrial peace. During the difficult War years I heard a labour leader 38


addressing a very excited meeting on the Rand, and this is how he finished his speech: "If there is a strike we must have no violence or attempts at violence. We don't want any more deportations."

1914 – 1918: Wartime Appointment: Capt. J McCarthy

39


Mounted Water Police Officer: Sub-Insp. J McCarthy

A Sub-Inspector is equal in rank to a Lieutenant while an Inspector is equal in rank to a Captain and a Chief Inspector is equal in rank to a Major.

Page 55 The year is unfortunately unknown – we presume it is either beginning 1915 or 1916. (Pages started at page one of each year.) 40


41


1915: Nongqai: August

It is noted that Sergeants of the Water Police in this stage, like the Mounted Police, wore chevrons on the right arm only. 42


• SAP Dreadnought

43


1916: Mast head

The 1916 mast head of the Durban Water Police as published in the Nongqai a 102 years ago! 44


1917 Nongqai: April

45


• Water Police launch: SAP Dreadnaught: Durban

Nongqai 1917-04-210.

46


1917 Nongqai: April

47


48


• 1917: April Water Police Station: Point: Durban

• 1917: Uniforms: Water Police Durban

49


• 1917: Water Police Station: Bluff

The Nongqai: Bluff (Water Police) 1917-04-211.

• 1917: Whales

The Nongqai: Whales (Water Police) 1917-04-211

50


1917 Nongqai: May

The Nongqai 1917-05-302 51


52


1917 Nongqai: June

53


1917 Nongqai: July

54


1917 Nongqai: August

55


Old chart: Port Natal 56


1917: Nongqai: September

57


58


1917 Nongqai: October

59


60


1917 Nongqai: August

61


• 1917: Funeral: No 6472 Const C Botha

62


1917 Nongqai: September

Note: 16 Lascars were arrested for refusing to work on a ship while 15 people were arrested for theft. 63


64


1917 Nongqai: October

65


•

Two German POW’s who escaped from Fort Napier were soon arrested by Cpl. Harris of the Water Police. 66


1917 Nongqai: November

67


•

Sub-Insp. J McCarthy was promoted to the rank of captain and Assistant Provost Marshall for the Docks Area. 68


69


1917 Nongqai: December

70


1917 Nongqai: December

71


1918 Nongqai: January

72


• Water Police: Durban Harbour: Bluff Out-station or Sub-station We note that Lance-Corporal Botha was in charge of the Bluff Out-station. (Nongqai January 1918 p 39) Also see Nongqai, Oct 1918, 479:

• Water Police: Durban Harbour: Congella Sub-station51 We read in the Nongqai of Oct., 1918; 479 that there was a sub-station of the water Police at Congella but we have not yet been able to find a photograph of the station.

51

No photo available? – HBH.

73


1918 Nongqai: April

74


1918 Nongqai: May

75


1918 Nongqai: June

76


• Cupido A school friend and former colleague, Andre Oosthuizen, told me an interesting story about the page above. His father was a young man on a farm in Free state when a policeman on mounted patrol in 1918 gave his father the Nongqai as a present. His father kept the Nongqai all his life. (My friend showed me the original Nongqai). His father joined the SA Police and was sent to Durban after his training. Later in Durban he met Miss Schutte and they married. Miss. Schutte was later his mother. [Head-Constable Oosthuizen was for many years a correspondent of the old Nongqai.]

• Major Miller, DSO, RFC and Aircraft A hundred years ago the Major’s landing in Durban caused quite a stir. (See page 289)

• Sgt. Sturana

In my young days each ship had a guard at the foot of the gang plank. It was illegal to board a ship without the Captain’s permission. 77


1918: Nongqai: July

78


1918: Nongqai: August

79


1918: Nongqai: October •

Parade Inspection: Divisional Inspector HF Trew

Sailors jumping ship

Gold

See below: Nongqai October 1918; p. 479. 80


81


1918 Nongqai: November

82


• Col Mentz Col Mentz page 525:

Hendrik Mentz DTD (1877–1938) was a South African Party politician and South African Minister of Defence from 19 March 1920 to 29 June 1924. He served in the Anglo Boer War. He also served in the First World War. The Strike Craft SAS Hendrik Mentz of the South African Navy was named after him.52 Page 526:

• Ownership: Salisbury Island

52

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendrik_Mentz

83


1918 Nongqai: December

84


1919 Nongqai: March

Sub.-Insp. McCarthy of the Water Police is acting District Commandant. 85


86


87


1919 Nongqai: April

88


1919 Nongqai: June

89


1919 Nongqai: July

Page 329.

90


1919 Nongqai: August

Sub-Insp. J McCarthy has been transferred on promotion to Johannesburg. The port has been very busy, 48 Special Constables in three shifts of 18 men each, had to be employed. 91


1920 Nongqai: October

92


1920 Nongqai: November

93


Page 580

94


1920 Nongqai: December

95


1920: Durban Borough Police From 1887 until 1920 various police forces acted as “Water Police� in and around the harbour. In 1920 the then state-run Water Police were abruptly withdrawn. After a lawless vacuum the Durban Borough Police were forced after a period of 5353 years to once more tasked to take over the duties of the Water Police. 54

1921 Nongqai: February

53 54

Jewell, 1989: p. 62. Jewell, 1989: p. 62.

96


Page 91

97


98


1921 Nongqai: May

99


1921 Nongqai: June

100


• 1921: The RMS Arundel Castle RMS Arundel Castle was a British ocean liner and Royal Mail Ship which entered service in 1921 for the Union-Castle Line. Originally laid down as the Amroth Castle in 1915, building was delayed by the First World War. She was eventually launched on 11 September 1919. 55

55

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Arundel_Castle

101


She received a refit in 1937, with her four funnels reconfigured into two, with new Babcock-Johnson boilers, her hull lengthened. Her bow remodelled from a blunt chisel-style into a more modern, angular design. She served in the Mediterranean during Second World War as a transport. 56

56

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Arundel_Castle

102


1922: Group Photo: Water Police: Durban

1929: Capt. J McCarthy

103


1929 and 1930 Political Pressure on Durban Borough On 14 January 1929 the District Commandant wrote to the Chief Constable and stated the South African Police (Water Police Branch) were being withdrawn from 1 April 1929 and the police would no longer perform duties in the docks area. 57 The harbour was state property. To police this area by the Durban Borough Police was in contradiction to Natal Act No. 36 of 1904 in which the Durban Borough Police were explicitly excluded from policing the Maydon Wharf area because it was government property; and the South African Police (who took over from the Natal Police) already policed that area. The railway police at that time could not help to police the docks and water ways and eventually the Durban Borough Police had to police the harbour. 58 The Borough Council undertook this task and informed Government that it would do the task at cost price to government. 59 To perform this task legally the Durban Borough Police made use of their powers vested in the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act (See Ord. 1 of 1854 section 69). 60, 61 According to Jewell the docks had not been policed for several months and crime was rife in the harbour area especially at Maydon Wharf. Itshimiyana was illegally brewed and sold to ships. The docks had become a crook’s paradise. Background: The Government (Adv. Tielman Roos) wanted to take over the Durban Borough Police – then described as one of the finest police forces in the then Union of South Africa. The Government later represented by Gen. JC Smuts, after he was appointed Minister of Justice, tried various tactics to force the Council to relinquish command and control of its borough police. Meetings with the then commissioner of Police, Col. IP de Villiers, minutes were taken, however the talks were recorded as unsatisfactory. 1930, 12th March In order to pressure the council further, the Chief Constable received another letter on 12th March 1930 from the Deputy Commissioner in Pietermaritzburg: “Crime, Durban Borough Instructed by the Commissioner, South African Police, I have the honour to inform you that as from the 1st proximo, it will not be possible for this department to deal with any crimes committed within the borough limits which are not classified as ‘serious’ in the latest Code Book published 3rd October 1929, which I understand you have a copy of. Kindly acknowledge receipt.” 62 The Council felt in both cases that the SA Police did not follow the correct procedure, the police should have addressed their letters to the Mayor and not to the Chief Constable.

57

Jewell, 1989; 138. Jewell, 1989; 138. 59 Jewell, 1989; 138. 60 Jewell, 1989; 138. 61 Jewell, 1989: 250. 62 Jewell, 1989; 138 - 139 58

104


1929 Nongqai: April: Water Police Cape Town and Durban: The End of an Era

105


106


107


108


109


110


1929: Durban Borough Police As noted in the Nongqai of April 1929 “The Water Police of Cape Town and Durban – A link with the early days now severed” page 309 and further, we see that the Water Police in Durban is taken over by the Durban Borough Police on short notice. In parliament Major Muller, South African Party MP for Durban Point, “complained that the arrangements in regard to the water police in Durban were quite inadequate … The (Durban) Borough Police gave what help they could but the water Police had no right to call upon them …”63 We don’t know what the situation in Cape Town was.

1934 SAR Railway Police was founded The South African Railways and Harbour Police (SARP - SASP) was established 1 July 1934.64 Supt. Du Plessis furnishes the date on which the SA Railways Police was established, as 26 June 1934. 65

1936: “Oribi”: Durban-hawe In 1936 het drie sersante en ses konstabels met die boot Oribi dienste in Durban-hawe verrig. Kort na die uitbreek van tweede wêreldoorlog is soortgelyke dienste deur die "Essential Services Protection Corps” in Durban-hawe verrig en was hulle ook verantwoordelik om permitte aan skepe en bemanningslede uit te reik. 66

1937 Major J McCarthy: Former Head of the Water Police Durban

Source.67

1941 – 1943 Tussen 1941 en 1943 is die volgende bote aangekoop vir gebruik deur die waterpolisie (dit is onbekend in watter hawens die bote diens verrig het): • • • •

Ranger Cherry Le Anne Talisman

63

Jewell, 1989: p 135. http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/160921Rapid_Rail_Police.pdf 65 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 66 Du Plessis, 1999: 3. 67 Nongqai 1938-04-388 64

111


• •

Iris Lamorna68

1946 Ranger en Talisman word verkoop.

69

1947: Bote van die Waterpolisie Gedurende 1947 was die volgende bote deur die waterpolisie (spoorwegpolisie) in Durban-hawe gebruik: • • • •

Oribi Lamorna Iris Cherry70

1956: (circa) Durban Harbour

Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection.

68

Du Plessis, 1999: 3 - 4. Du Plessis, 1999: 4. 70 Du Plessis, 1999: 4. 69

112


Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection.

Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection. 113


Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection.

Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection.

114


1957: Railway Police: North Pier

1957: Konstabel Adam Hurter: Water Polisie Durban

115


1970’s Water Police: Durban: Osprey

Osprey - 2 x V8 Cummins Diesels van Jacques du Toit

116


Osprey Durban Harbour - Peter Greenwood.

Osprey foto’s van Robert Pegram (1) 117


Osprey foto’s van Robert Pegram.

Osprey foto’s van Robert Pegram.

118


1970’s Water Police: Durban: Vink

119


Vink: foto’s van Robbert Pegram.

120


1981: Platoon 161: Const. RK Pegram Water Police

121


1983: Skipper’s Licence

SARP Police boat licence: Const. JI du Toit.

122


Model of Vink in Transport Museum in George

Photo by - Marius Avenant.

1980’s Durban Harbour

Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection. 123


1984: “Vink” en “Osprey” Gedurende 1984 was “Vink” en “Osprey” die bote in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Durbanhawe.71

1984 During 1984 Durban and Richards bay fell in the same command of the SAR Police.72

1984: ‘n Wakende Oog oor die waters… Beeld gedateer 1984 06 13 in ‘n bylaag berig soos volg:

71 72

Du Plessis, 1999: 4. Beeld: 1984 06 13

124


125


1986: SAP Vink en SAP Osprey Die polisiebote “Vink” en “Osprey” word na die SAP se watervleuel oorgeplaas en word onderskeidelik herdoop na SAP Vink en SAP Osprey. 73

73

Du Plessis, 1999; 5. 126


1987: “Osprey”: SAP: Durban

Source: Servamus.

1989: SAP Pintado Die SAP Vink word vervang met ‘n diepseeklasvaartuig SAP Pintado.74 Twee VSA-duikbote het ook die naam, Pintado, gedra.

74

Pintado means "painted" in Spanish or "spotted" in Portuguese and may refer to: • Cape petrel, also known as pintado petrel, a seabird whose range includes Antarctica and New Zealand • Spotted sorubim Pseudoplatystoma corruscans, a catfish-like species of South American rivers • (less often:) tiger sorubim Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum, known as cachara throughout most of Brazil but as pintado in the Amazon region • Cero Scomberomorus regalis, a large, spotted, mackerel-like fish, whose range includes the Florida coast and the West Indies, after which two USS Pintado ships were named • USS Pintado (SS-387) (1943-1969), a Balao class-submarine named for the fish • USS Pintado (SSN-672) (1967-1998), a Sturgeon-class attack submarine named for the fish • Cerro Pintado, a mountain in South America • A sombrero pintado, a style of Panama hat [ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pintado ]

127


CAPE TOWN: TABLE BAY

Photos: George McCall Theal.

1860 On the 7th of July 1860 an Act was passed in the Cape House of Assembly authorising the establishment of a body of men to be known as the Water Police for the Port of Cape Town. 75 To meet the expenses connected with the Water Police the tariff of charges reflected in the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, in respect of the Port of Cape Town were increased to the sum of 5/- per head

75

Nongqai April 1929, p. 309.

128


on the engagement of any seaman, whilst 3/- was the amount laid down if any seaman was discharged. 76 Later the Water Police of Cape Town were merged into and under the magistrate of Cape Town. At that time the Magistrate acted in a dual capacity: he was both Magistrate and Chief of Police. 77

1867 The “Harbour Police” was established during 1867. The force consisted of a “boat officer” and four Constables. 78 [We think this information may be incorrect in the light of the entry dated 1860.]

1871 On 16 January 1871 “boat-officer” J Robotham took command of the Harbour Police.79

1880 During 1880 the Harbour Police consisted of one boat-officer, two Corporals and eight Constables.80

1883

The Water Police in Cape Town.81

1886 Commissioner Bernard V Shaw of the Cape Police took overall command of the Harbour Police.82

1917 Water Police: Cape Town: Head-Constable Larpent

We note that Durban had an officer in charge.

76

Nongqai April 1929, p. 309. Nongqai April 1929, p. 309. 78 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 79 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 80 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 81 Nongqai, 192904310. 82 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 77

129


1917: August: 2/Head-Constable Larpent

Nongqai 191708103.

1918: News Water Police Cape Town In the Nongqai of January 1918 (p40) Horace Lamb, the correspondent of the Durban Water Police, asked:

1918: Munity on the High Seas The Water Police had also to deal with munity on ships e.g. on the “Puako” from the US. The SA Police sent out one officer, four sergeants and 18 constables. They took a harbour tug to attend. Due to heavy fog the ship was not found. The “Puako” later landed at Table bay. The Water Police established that 13 sailors had been shackled and were lying on deck. They were exposed to hunger, thirst and cold. The police had them removed to Docks Cafe and one died. The Captain and his two sons were arrested for murder and the US Consul was informed. Capt. Howe of the SA Police who at the time was Assistant Provost Marshal at the docks had to give evidence in America. 83

83

Nongqai April 1929, p. 310.

130


1924: Table Bay: Water Police on beat

Uniform Water Police Note two policemen above: Both are from the SAP. 84 The constable is on the left and dressed in the conventional SAP uniform for constables and sergeants of the Foot Police. The sergeant on the right is dresses in the uniform of the Water Police of the SAP. He wears a white helmet (something usually reserved for Head-Constables (WO’s) and Commissioned Officers of the SAP). He is also dressed in a naval type of tunic; double breasted with white shirt and blue tie. (Like a Sergeant in the Mounted Police he is only wearing chevrons on his right arm.)

84

Nongqai: 1924-06-614

131


Photo: SAR

1924: Water Police Cape Town

132


Note the difference in police uniforms: The Water Police wear double breasted naval-type tunics, white shirts with blue ties. Some staff have white cap covers while two are wearing white helmets. What would appear to be newer members of the Water Police, wear the conventional Foot Police tunics with neck-numbers.

A bygone era

The Carnavon Castle in Table Bay (Photo courtesy of Les Pivnic - HL Pivnic-Collection)

133


1929 Nongqai: April: Cape Town

134


135


136


137


138


• Enlargements

139


General Service Medal The Water Policemen who served in Cape Town harbour all received the General Service Medal. It is not generally known that the police found bombs and fuses near troop ships, something they fortunately discovered in the nick of time. No casualties were recorded.85

1934 SAR Railway Police was founded South African Railways and Harbour Police (SARP) was established 1 July 1934.86, 87

1934: Tafelbaai: "Mauretania" Op 26 Junie 1934 het die destydse Spoorwegpolisie die polisiedienste te Tafelbaaidokke van die S.A. Polisie oorgeneem. Die boot "Mauretania" is ook oorgeneem teen ÂŁ20. Dit het ÂŁ30 gekos om dit op te knap. 88

85

Nongqai April 1929, p 310. http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/160921Rapid_Rail_Police.pdf 87 Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 88 Du Plessis, 1999: 2 86

140


• Silver Leaf and Gemsbok The Mauritania was renamed the Silver Leaf. She was replaced by the Gemsbok.89

1937: SAR & H Police: “Gemsbok”: Cape Town

89

Du Plessis, 1999: 3.

141


Source.90

90

Nongqai 1937 – HBH.

142


1941: SA Spoorwegpolisie neem dienste oor van die ESPC In Desember 1941 het die Spoorweg en Hawepolisie al die dienste van die E.S.P.C. oorgeneem.91

The “Old Gemsbok”

Here the “old” Gemsbok is on the extreme right. Photo received via Frans Bedford-Visser.

91

Information received via Frans Bedford-Visser – HBH.

143


1970’s: Cape Town Harbour

Photos from the late Brig. Beyl’s Collection.

1978: ML Loerie

ML Loerie 1978 - Cape Town

• May I Sing: “Michael Row the Boat Ashore”? Keith Alfred Rudolf Blake. One morning I was at the Table Bay Harbour Charge Office busy reading the Information Book when I heard very softly over the police boat radio 'MAYDAY, MAYDAY" I walked towards the radio and then heard the late Constable Johan Visagie's voice again calmly calling "AK LOERIE, MAYDAY, MAYDAY" 144


I knew Visagie very well and was under the impression he was joking and I responded by singing back over the boat radio "MICHAEL ROW THE BOAT ASHORE HALLELUJA". Suddenly Visagie shouted over the radio: "Sersant Blake ek speel nie! Ons vat water! MAYDAY, MAYDAY". I got the shock of my life and asked for position and Port Control was contacted and a tug if I remember correctly, towed the almost sinking “Loerie” to safety. I rushed to the boat house and will never forget Visagie’s words: "AOW SERSANT! ONS SINK EN POMP SEEWATER VIR VOLK EN VADERLAND UIT DIE BOOT UIT, EN EK ROEP MAYDAY, MAYDAY, EN TOE KOM DAAI LIEDJIE DEUR, ‘MICHAEL ROW THE BOAT ASHORE’! TOE RAAK EK BENOUD!" •

ML Loerie

The ML Loerie - According to Boet Saayman of Riversdale who served on her, the most beautiful launch the Spoories had.

• A Roof Story: Shaun Pfister Small story ....as rofie92 in Table Bay harbour they didn’t really know what to do with me on shift, so I got posted on the ML Loerie one bright Friday morning with Sgt. Nel. Now he was a serious Sergeant and not really a morning person. It was just the two of us ‘cos his real mate was off sick well, after the morning coffee! We went down to the Loerie for the first patrol, ... Sgt Nel was not a man of many words ... “Maak los daar voor” -” Ja Sersant”. “Dan maak jy gou los agter” - “Ja Sersant”! I ran from front to back and as I was coiling the rope on the stern, Sgt Nel had moved the Loerie out. He gave a quick “Vroom” on those two V8-motors, the stern sank down, and as there was no guard rails at the back, I, with no ‘sea legs' went straight into the water! Full summer uniform! Now

92

Roof or rofie is a newly fully-fledged policeman – HBH.

145


that water is cold! I doggie paddled to the side and clung on for dear life. Luckily Sgt Nel checked back and on the starboard side saw me hanging on the tyres. I managed to climb out, and by this time he had pushed the Loerie front against the quay. He showed me to jump on, and when I got into the cabin all he said was: “Boet ons swem nie aan diens nie, jy moet vas klou! Gaan trek uit, daar’s ‘n overall agter.” I saw the smirk on his face, and the rest of the shift I spent drying and cleaning my uniform!! I never told anyone, but he sure did ‘cos I was called Soutie dam duiker for a long time! Sgt de Waal would smile big when he posted me back to the Loerie!!!!!!

• ‘n “Loerie”-storie: Henk Fourie Ja, eendag toe stuur “Port Control” ons om bote te gaan dagvaar wat binne die 1 km radius van die eiland gekom het, maar die water was rof. Bonie, ek en Oom Gellie gaan toe uit, maar toe Bonie die boot, die Loerie, by die breekwater uitsteek, gaan ons bo-oor die eerste brander en die tweede. Die derde was te kort op die tweede en die Loerie steek sy kop binne in die brander in. Oom Gellie val van die stoel af en begin bid, en oral waar jy kyk stroom net water in! Gelukkig hou Bonie kop en sit die boot in stern en bring hom terug agter die muur in. Van daardie dag af is ek bang vir die see, en sal nie sommer op ‘n boot uitgaan nie.

• “Dieseldruppel”: Albert Treurnich Ek was weer eendag saam met oorlede oom Gellie gepos op die boot, toe ons diesel moes gaan ingooi. Ek staan nog so hande-viervoet oor die bek van die diesel tenk, met die diesel pyp tussen my voete deur. Skielik sonder waarskuwing blaas ‘n stroom diesel by die bek van die tenk uit. Die tenk was vol en ek het dit nie geweet nie. Ek was van kop tot tone bedek met diesel. Mens, het oom Gelie gelag! Van daar af het hy my ‘ou Dieseldruppel’ genoem. As hy die storie oorvertel het, het hy gesê, toe hy my angsbevange gesig sien, sien hy hoe drup die diesel van my neus af! Ek wonder vandag nog of oom Gellie nie van meer geweet het nie. Hy't seker geweet wat gaan kom???? Nooit weer het ek daai posisie ingeneem as dit by diesel ingooi kom nie.

A model of ML Loerie in George Museum 146


Kloekmoedige optrede: Konst. B Saayman

147


• ML Loerie: Boet Saayman Riversdale

Met erkenning aan Trevor Jones ...... amper oorval die verdriet my .... wat kan nog mooier wees? "Die TAFEL" met sy "CASTLE"... en die LOERIE se gefluit...? Die LAASTE van die LAASTE.. die twee LADIES... ML LOERIE... en ...RMS WINDSOR CASTLE ...... MEMORIES vir oudag....ek was bevoorreg om op altwee van hulle diens te doen .... maar ek was nog nooit op die “TAFEL" nie.

1984: Loerie Die “Loerie” was deur die waterpolisie van die spoorwegpolisie in Kaapstadhawe gebruik.93

1986: SAP Kormorant Die polisieboot “Arend” word na die SAP se watervleuel oorgeplaas en word herdoop na SAP Kormorant. 94

1986 SAP Tobie SAP Tobie word van Saldanha na Kaapstad met SAP Kormorant omgeruil. 95

93

Du Plessis, 1999: 4. Du Plessis, 1999; 5. 95 Du Plessis, 1999; 5. 94

148


1989

Die Burger 25-04-1989

1986 AMALGAMATION: RAILWAYS POLICE AND SAP After amalgamation with the SA Railways Police (SARP) on 1986-10-01 the SAP preformed the function as part of the Branch: Transport Policing96 and now the new SA Police Service (SAPS) is performing this function.

96

Tak: Vervoerpolisiëring – HBH.

149


WATER POLICE: OTHER HARBOURS IN SOUTH AFRICA East London / Oos-Londen (Buffalo Harbour)

Map by Bruno Martin.

1984: Sparrow Gedurende 1984 was “Sparrow” die boot in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Oos-Londen hawe.97

1986 Die boot “Sparrow” word deur die SAP se watervleuel oorgeneem en herdoop na “SAP Sparrow”. 98 97 98

Du Plessis, 1999: 4. Du Plessis, 1999; 5.

150


1988: SAP Seeduiker Kuswagklasvaartuig SAP Seeduiker is aangekoop vir die watervleuel. 99

Lüderitz Harbour 1937

See Cape Town re: Gemsbok.

Lüderitz - Hawe 6-10-2003 HB Heymans.

99

Du Plessis, 1999; 5.

151


LĂźderitz - hawe 6-10-2003: HB Heymans.

Mossel Bay / Mosselbaai 1930 Mossel bay Harbour

Map by kind permission of Mr. Charlie Lewis. 152


Map by Bruno Martin. Mossel Bay is a harbour town of about 130,000 people on the Southern Cape (or Garden Route) of South Africa. It is an important tourism and farming region of the Western Cape Province. Mossel Bay lies 400 kilometres east of the country's seat of parliament, Cape Town (which is also the capital city of the Western Cape Province), and 400 km west of Port Elizabeth, the largest city in the Eastern Cape Province. The older parts of the town occupy the north-facing side of the Cape St Blaize Peninsula, whilst the newer suburbs straddle the Peninsula and have spread eastwards along the sandy shore of the Bay. The town's economy relied heavily on farming, fishing and its commercial harbour (the smallest in the Transnet Port Authority's stable of South African commercial harbours), until the 1969 discovery of natural offshore gas fields led to the development of the gas-to-liquids refinery operated by PetroSA. Tourism is another driver of Mossel Bay's economy.100

100

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mossel_Bay

153


Port Facilities The harbour of Mossel Bay caters mainly for fishing and service craft for the local oil industry and handles little other commercial cargo, and therefore has little in the way of sophisticated infrastructure. However, the fishing industry provides an important economic boost to the Southern Cape and the local community, as has the oil industry. An increasing number of ships for the emerging oil industry (several oil rigs operate off Mossel Bay) call at Mossel Bay. Supply vessels make use of two buoys anchored outside the port. In keeping with this industry, a full diving service is available for underwater inspection, hull cleaning, salvage etc. Bunkering is available at quays 2,3 and 5 and on the jetty. Ship chandling and stevedoring is available.101

Photo: Hennie Heymans.

1988: SAP Watervleuel: Mosselbaai Gedurende 1988 word ‘n afdeling van die watervleuel hier gestig. 102

101 102

https://ports.co.za/mossel-bay.php Du Plessis, 1999: 5.

154


1988 SAP Seemeeu Diepseeklasvaartuig “SAP Seemeeu” word deur die watervleuel te Mosselbaai in gebruik geneem. 103

Both photos: Hennie Heymans

103

Du Plessis, 1999: 5.

155


Port Elizabeth Port Elizabeth has been an important port and harbour on the South Africa east coast ever since the first British settlers began arriving from 1820. Today it is a multi-cargo port on the western perimeter of Algoa Bay, 384 n. miles southwest of Durban and 423 n. miles east of Cape Town at Longitude 25ยบ 42' E, Latitude 34ยบ 01' S.104

104

https://ports.co.za/port-elizabeth.php

156


1906

Photo: Mr HL Pivnic-Collection 157


Photo: Mr HL Pivnic-Collection.

Photo: Hennie Heymans. 158


1984: Leo Gedurende 1984 was “Leo” die boot in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Port Elizabethhawe.105

105

Du Plessis, 1999: 4.

159


1988: SAP Stormgans Kuswagklasvaartuig SAP Stormgans is aangekoop vir die watervleuel. 106

Richardsbaai / Richards Bay Richards Bay (Afrikaans: Richardsbaai) is a town in KwaZulu-Natal. It is situated on a 30 square kilometre lagoon of the Mhlatuze River, which gives it one of the country's largest harbours. Richards bay also has the deepest natural harbour in the Southern hemisphere.107

Map by Bruno Martin. Richards Bay harbour is built for the export of coal, it has since expanded into other bulk and breakbulk cargoes. Richards Bay is South Africa’s premier bulk port and the most modern. In 2005 the port handled 89 million tons of cargo. Richards Bay handles in excess of 80 million tons annually,

106 107

Du Plessis, 1999; 5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richards_Bay

160


representing 55% of South Africa’s seaborne cargo. This makes it the country’s largest port in terms of volumes handled. Richards Bay serves the coalfields of KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga as well as timber and granite exporters from as far away as the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape. The port is now handling an increasing variety of bulk and neobulk cargo in addition to breakbulk. Much of the general cargo has migrated away from Durban in recent years. Exports remain the main activity of the port.108 1979: Vink: Richardsbaai

Foto: Martins Botha

108

http://www.kzntransport.gov.za/public_trans/freight_databank/kzn/ports/Richards_Bay/index_xml.html

161


First Patrol Vessel launched: Date Unknown: Skipper: Sgt C Meintjies

162


1984: Robin Gedurende 1984 was “Robin” die boot in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Richardsbaai-hawe.109

1984: Beheergebied: Durban en Richardsbaai Durban en Richardsbaai was is dieselfde beheergebied van die SA Spoorwegpolisie.110

1984: ‘n Wakende Oog oor die waters… Beeld gedateer 1984 06 13 in ‘n bylaag berig soos volg:

109 110

Du Plessis, 1999: 4. Beeld: 19840613.

163


164


1986: SAP Pikkewyn Die polisieboot “Robin� word na die SAP se watervleuel oorgeplaas en word herdoop na SAP Pikkewyn. 111

Saldanha

Foto: Hennie Heymans (2003). Saldanha Bay (Afrikaans: Saldanhabaai) is a natural harbour on the south-western coast of South Africa. The town that developed on the northern shore of the bay, also called Saldanha, was 111

Du Plessis, 1999; 5.

165


incorporated with five other towns into the Saldanha Bay Local Municipality in 2000. The current population of the municipality is estimated at 72,000. Saldanha Bay's location makes it a paradise for the water sport enthusiast, and its local economy being strongly dependent on fishing, mussels, seafood processing, the steel industry and the harbour. Furthermore, its sheltered harbour plays an important part in the Sishen-Saldanha iron-ore project (connected by the Sishen-Saldanha Railway Line) at which Saldanha Steel takes centre stage.112

1984: Tobie Gedurende 1984 was “Tobie” die boot in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Saldanha-hawe.113

1986 Die boot “Tobie” word deur die SAP se watervleuel oorgeneem en herdoop na SAP Tobie. 114

1986 SAP Kormorant SAP Tobie word van Saldanha na Kaapstad met SAP Kormorant omgeruil. 115

1988 SAP Seeswael Diepseeklasvaartuig “SAP Seeswael” word deur die watervleuel te Saldanha in gebruik geneem. 116

Ingang na Hawe

Foto: Hennie Heymans (2003)

112

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saldanha_Bay Du Plessis, 1999: 4. 114 Du Plessis, 1999; 5. 115 Du Plessis, 1999; 5. 116 Du Plessis, 1999: 5. 113

166


Simonstad / Simons Town 1795

Photo: George McCall Theal.

167


Simon's Town (Afrikaans: Simonstad), sometimes spelled Simonstown, is a town near Cape Town, which is home to the South African Navy. It is located on the shores of False Bay, on the eastern side of the Cape Peninsula. For more than two centuries it has been a naval base and harbour (first for the Royal Navy and now the South African Navy). The town is named after Simon van der Stel, an early governor of the Cape Colony.117

Naval Base Simonstown Naval Base Simon's Town is the South African Navy's largest naval base, situated at Simon's Town, near Cape Town. The base provides support functions to Fleet Command.

History A small dockyard facility was first established in Simon's Town by the Dutch East India Company in 1743; 275 years ago. This was taken over by the British Royal Navy (RN) in the 1790s, under whom the facility was further developed over the following century and a half. A pair of handsome stone storehouses dating from the 1740s stand on the seafront where they were built by the Dutch East India Company, marking the initial location of the Yard. Immediately adjacent is the earliest Royal Naval building on the site: a combined mast-house, boathouse and sail loft; dating from 1815, it now serves as the South African Naval Museum. Over the next few decades, the site was developed gradually, with steam engineering and coaling facilities being added mid-century. In 1885, the government of the Cape Colony transferred the assets of the Simon's Bay Dock and Patent Slip Company to the British Admiralty. By the close of 117

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon%27s_Town

168


the century, however, it became clear that more space would be needed to accommodate the requirements of a modern Navy. In 1898, a large site was acquired to the east of the original Yard for a dockyard extension. Sir John Jackson and Co Ltd. were chosen to do the work. Construction began in 1900. The new harbour encompassed an area of 11 hectares, with a breakwater of 914 metres (3,000 ft) in length. It also contained a drydock 240 metres (790 ft) long and 29 metres (95 ft) wide, with a sizeable steam factory constructed alongside. The drydock was named the Selborne Graving Dock after the Earl of Selborne, the High Commissioner of the Cape. Work on the Simon's Town dockyard was completed in 1910. The naval base was handed over to South Africa in 1957 under the Simonstown Agreement. The Dockyard was expanded in 1975, a large area of land was reclaimed and the harbour walls were extended to form a new Tidal Basin.118

Photo: Wayne Jamieson

118

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Base_Simon%27s_Town

169


• Simonstown Dockyard Police

170


Dockyard Police Simonstown As schoolboy I hitch-hiked a lot during school holidays. Twice I hitchhiked from Durban to Cape Town to Johannesburg and back to Durban. A Naval Officer, Mr. Denzell Farr, lived in our neighbourhood on the Bluff and I paid him a visit in Simonstown. It was here that I first came across the Dockyard Police. Being curious by nature I had a long chat to the dockyard police while waiting for permission to visit Mr. Farr. This inclusion sort of completes the picture of the “Water Police” as the Water Police in Durban – especially during WW1 – performed the same functions. A very interesting website may be found here which sheds some light on the Dockyard Police: http://home.mweb.co.za/re/redcap/navalpol.htm

1988 Gedurende 1988 stig die SA Polisie se watervleuel ‘n eenheid te Simonstad.119

1988 SAP Albatros Diepseeklasvaartuig “SAP Albatros” word deur die watervleuel te Simonstad in gebruik geneem.120 Elandsbaai

Foto: Hennie Heymans 119 120

Du Plessis, 1999; 5. Du Plessis, 1999: 5.

171


Walvis Bay / Walvisbaai

Map by Bruno Martin.

1984: Elsie Gedurende 1984 was “Elsie� die boot in gebruik deur die spoorwegpolisie in Walvisbaai-hawe.121

121

Du Plessis, 1999: 4.

172


SA Spoorwegpolisie: Patrollievaartuig: Elsie

Patrollieboot Elsie: Vernoem na JD van Heerden, Streekoffisier Walvisbaai se eggenote — in Walvisbaai (Loekie Jordaan)

1986: SAP Seeswael Die polisieboot “Elsie” word na die SAP se watervleuel oorgeplaas en word herdoop na SAP Seeswael. 122

122

Du Plessis, 1999; 5.

173


1989 SAP Seeswael: Walvisbaai

Photo: Hennie Heymans, 1989, Walvisbaai-hawe.

WATER POLICE: SOUTH AFRICA: INLAND • Vaal Dam: 1935 to 1950 Police patrolled the Vaal Dam from 1935 to 1950 in the vicinity of Denysville. South Africa had an international airport on the Vaal Dam at Denysville. Solent Aircraft on international routes landed on the dam. 123 •

Barrage

The police had to patrol the Vaal River near the barrage. 124 •

Roodeplaat Dam

It is known that SAP Kameeldridt had a boat to patrol the Roodeplaat dam.125 •

Hartebeespoort Dam

It is known that SAP Hartebeespoort had a boat to patrol the Hartebeespoort dam.126

123

Du Plessis, 1999: 2. Du Plessis, 1999: 2. 125 Heymans – personal knowledge. 126 Heymans – personal knowledge. 124

174


• Enquiries on Facebook: SAP Hall of Fame: Pretoria & Victoria Falls Pieter Henning Die Polisie duik-eenheid van Pretoria het in die 70's 'n Jetwing boot gehad. Die boot was toegerus met 'n Holden Monaro V8 enjin en ek onthou dat daar herstelde koeëlgate aan sy kant was wat my laat glo het dat die boot op die grens gebruik was. Sover ek weet was daar 'n soortgelyke boot deur Vic Valle se SAP veiligheidstak gebruik vir diens vanaf Vic Valle na Impalela eiland. Hennie Heymans Dankie Pieter Henning. Het jy dalk meer info.? Pieter Henning Ek was deur sers. Alf Virtue van BMS in 1975 opgelei as skipper en onderhoudsman van die boot. Hennie Heymans Wat is BMS? Het jy dalk foto's? Ek skryf 'n artikel. Pieter Henning Hennie Heymans Benoni Meganiese Skool. Hennie Heymans Pieter Henning - dankie! Pieter Henning Ek het ongelukkig geen verdere inligting of foto’s nie. Jammer.

Foto’s: Besonderhede onbekend

Onbekend waar foto geneem is. Miskien Vaalrivier? Foto: Beeld. 175


Onbekend waar foto geneem is. Miskien Valsbaai? Foto: Beeld.

Valsbaai: Hennie Heymans 176


1966 – 1989: COUNTER INSURGENCY: RHODESIA AND SWA The SAP on Counter-insurgency duty also had fast and powerful motorboats for use on the rivers of Rhodesia and in SWA.

Photos: Lt Gen JG Le Roux Stemmet.

177


• Enquiries Facebook: Nongqai Tubby Myburg Hennie daar was ‘n bootsman Zeelie wat baie van die vaartuie nagesien het. Ons het ‘n "Bartch" op Katima gehad wat tot by Impalila Eiland gegaan het. Van die vaartuie/bote kan ek onthou het Volvo masjiene gehad, ek onthou een die platbome het ‘n V8 masjien in gehad. Tubby Myburg een van die platbome Christo Lombaard - Snr Ek onthou ook van die platboom motorboot (Volvo Penta V8 inboard motor) waarmee ons in 1971 baie rivier patrollies tot so vêr as Manapools gedoen het. Daar was ook 'n spesiale bootsman in die Kompanie Egbert Du T. Botha Oom Hennie probeer ‘n lid Carstens, hy was ‘n ' bootsman op Impaleleeiland waar ons 3 X patrollie bote en ‘n barge. Hennie Heymans Baie dankie! Ek waardeer opreg almal se bydrae!

• Enquiries: Facebook: SAP Hall of Fame Hennie Heymans Wie kan my iets vertel van SAP-vaartuie in die bosoorlog, asb.? Gert Els Wie het nog ‘n sinkbad agter daardie boot vasgemaak op ʼn Sondagmiddag dan sleep hulle jou op die Zambezi rond Pieter Henning Ek onthou die enjin was Hoden Monaro V8 en die aandryfstelsel was Jacuzzi jet propulsion. Daardie jare het Hartebeespoort SAP 'n soortgelyke boot gehad maar hulle boot het 'n 3.0 L Ford V6 ingehad met 'n Hamilton jet aandryfstelsel. Hennie Heymans Ek weet Kameeldrift het ook 'n boot gehad vir Roodeplaatdam. Paul Greyling Ons het in 1971 te Impalile-eiland ook 'n Jetwing gehad wat ons op rivierpatrollies gebruik het. Ford enjin gehad. Sover ek kan onthou was die bote in Vereeniging gebou. Ek glo nie ek het nog foto's nie. Op beslag gelê tydens 'n inbraak jare gelede. Paul Greyling Foto nie so duidelik nie. Op Choberivier. 178


Paul Greyling Romp van uitgebrande boot voor basis. Boot het blykbaar uitgebrand tydens die vorige drie maande se dienstyd. Beskik nie oor verdere inligting nie.

179


Pieter Henning Ek onthou nou dat Katima Mulilo twee patrolliebote gehad het . Hulle het onderdak by my hulpmotorhawe gestaan. Een was toegerus met Suzuki buiteboord enjins en die ander een met Yamaha buiteboord enjins. Sal kyk of ek foto’s kan opspoor. Pierre Johan Prinsloo Ons het by Mana Pools ‘n metaal boot met twee Evinrude 50 pk buite boord masjiene gehad, by Kosi-meer was daar op ‘n stadium ook ‘n Jetwing . Pieter Henning Katima 1984.

Pieter Henning

Hennie Heymans Baie dankie! Ek waardeer opreg almal se bydrae!

Van Ovamboland tot Masjonaland: Louis Lubbe Ons het bietjie met Louis Lubbe gesels en hy het die volgende met ons gedeel 180


181


Naand Hennie, Ek stuur die fotos wat ek belowe het - gerieflikheid onthalwe so een- een tesame met die relevante byskrif/onderskrif en wie die fotograaf was. Ofskoon al die foto's nie spesifiek "bootpolisie" is nie stuur ek foto's waar die polisie se werksaamhede verband hou met water en/of waar dit uit 'n geskiedkundige oogpunt dalk kleurvol genoeg is om te oorweeg vir jou tema. Gebruik daarom na goeddunke. Louis Lubbe

• Kwandorivier

Byskrif: Gedurende 1961 het konstabel Stoffel Visser (later kaptein) wat op Runtu, Suidwes-Afrika gestasioneer was die opdrag gekry om toe te sien dat 'n geskikte plek identifiseer word om 'n pont oor die Kwandorivier, Oos-Caprivi, te plaas word sodat die polisie ongehinderd vanaf Runtu (destyds so gespel) tot by Katima Mulilo kan patrolleer. Die ekspedisie het twee weke geneem. Die foto hierbo is tydens die tog geneem terwyl een van die voertuie met 'n alreedsbestaande pont oor die Okavangorivier getrek word op pad na hul bestemming. Foto: Stoffel Visser.

• Kazungula Op die plek waar die Oos-Caprivi, Botswana, Zambië en Zimbabwe mekaar ontmoet sluit die Choberivier en die Zambezrivier by mekaar aan. Op hierdie plek het 'n pont elke dag heen en weer gevaar oor die Zambezirivier tussen Botswana en Zambia. Gemiddeld slegs drie, vier keer per dag. Gedurende die Bosoorlog het die SA Polisie 'n basis gehad op Kazungula (1968 - 1975) aan 182


die RhodesiĂŤ kant en een van hul pligte was om die voertuie wat met die pont oor die rivier vervoer is te monitor en 'n detailed beskrywing en registrasienommer aan te stuur na Hoofkantoor. Of daar enige verdagte voertuie identifiseer is sou die manne nooit weet nie. Sieldodende dagtaak.

Foto deur: Louis Lubbe.

• Katima Mulilo Op 18 Mei 1967 het drie lede van die Veiligheidstak op Katima Mulilo 'n veerboot wat op die Zambezirivier gevaar het bestyg op 'n roetine besoek. 'n Opgeleide gewapende terroris van ZambiÍ wat een van die passasiers was op pad na die Caprivi het onverwags opgespring vanaf sy sitplek en 'n skoot geskiet na adjudant-offisier Grobler. 'n Geveg het ontstaan waartydens die terroris doodgeskiet was. In die skermutseling is Grobler in die bors gewond en konst. Chaka in die kop. Die derde lid konst. Jacobs het egter ernstige beserings vrygespring. Chaka en Grobler het nooit ten volle van hul beserings herstel nie.

183


Die foto hierbo is 'n van die veerboot wat op die Zambezirivier tussen Katima Mulilo en Impalilaeiland gevaar het. Foto deur Hennie Stander.

• Mana Pools

SAP-lede besig om hul boot gereed te kry vir 'n patrollie op die Zambezirivier te Mana Pools, RhodesiĂŤ tydens die Bosoorlog, 1972. Foto deur: Gerrit Bruwer. 184


• Pont: Impalila-eiland

Pont (barge) wat deur die SAP gedurende die Bosoorlog gebruik is om voertuie en voorrade oor die Choberivier te vervoer na Impalila-eiland waar die SAP 'n basis gehad het. Circa 1968. Foto deur: Andre van Nieuwenhuis.

• Bagani: Okavangorivier Gedurende die Bosoorlog het die SA Polisie 'n basis gehad op Bagani, naby die oewer van die Okavangorivier, Caprivi. Benewens daaglikse patrollies was een van hul pligte om die pont heen en weer oor die rivier te trek wanneer 'n voertuig opdaag. Vandag is daar 'n moderne brug oor die rivier en geen teken van die pont meer nie. Foto deur: Jaap von Molendorf.

185


• Impalila-eiland SAP patrollieboot vasgemeer op Impalila-eiland, Caprivi tydens die Bosoorlog gedurende 1968. Destyds was daar nie sprake van gekamoefleerde vaartuie nie. Verleë om te bieg maar hierdie was die enigste patrollieboot waaroor die SAP beskik het op daardie stadium op die eiland en was buite aksie vir drie maande...maar hy is elke dag en nag opgepas deur twee lede. Soos die foto bevestig was daar op daardie stadium ook nog nie kamoefleur-uniforms aan die SAP uitgereik nie. Lede het met kaal bolyf, in kortbroek en" flip-flops" diens patrollie gestap en diens gedoen. Foto deur: Louis Lubbe.

• Choberivier SAP-bootpatrollie op die Choberivier (1969) tydens die Bosoorlog naby Impalila-eiland. V.l.n.r. op die foto: Sers Heunis (met bril), konst. Katzke (middel) en adj-off Westraat. Foto verskaf deur: Petro Engelbrecht.

186


NS. Ek verstaan adj-off Westraat het later afgetree as generaal.

• Zambezirivier, Kanyemba Lede vertrek op 'n bootpatrollie op die Zambezirivier, Kanyemba-omgewing, RhodesiÍ,1973. Foto deur: Gerrit Bruwer.

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SAPS: 2018: Gauteng Water Wing: Gauteng Watervleuel: Gert Visage

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AO Gert Visage vat die stange vas!

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SERVAMUS ARTICLES 1998: Gauteng Watervleuel

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Water vleuel

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Watervleuel

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2009: North East Rand: Water Police

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North East Rand: Water Police

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North East Rand: Water Police

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2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team

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2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team

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2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team

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2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team

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2013 Limpopo: Water Search & Rescue Team

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2000: German Water Police: Wasserschutspolizei 1957: Rhine between Mainz and Koblenz

Source.127

2000: Berlin We went on patrol on the River Spree and passed the “Bridge of Spies”. This is where the late Gen. Mike Geldenhuys handed over KGB spy Yuri Loginov in exchange for Western pies held by the East. We were shown the house of Heinrich Ernst Göring (31 October 1839 – 7 December 1913). He was a German diplomat who served as colonial governor of German South West Africa. He was the father of five children including Hermann Göring, the Nazi leader and commander of the Luftwaffe. The house was a Water Police station.

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The Nongqai, 19570713

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Fltr: HBH, two members of the Water Police and Gen. Le Roux Stemmet.

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Water Police: Danube River: Austria

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INDEMNITY & © | VRYWARING & ©

End / Slot Dear reader Please note that in this quasi-historical document we make use of various sources and consequently it is obvious that the document contains various diverse and personal opinions of different people and the author of the Nongqai cannot be held responsible or be liable in his personal capacity. Geagte leser Vir hierdie kwasiehistoriese dokument maak ons van verskeie bronne gebruik en bevat die dokument uiteraard uiteenlopende en diverse persoonlike menings van verskillende persone en die opsteller van die Nongqai kan nie in sy persoonlike hoedanigheid daarvoor verantwoordelik of aanspreeklik gehou word nie. Brig. Hennie Heymans: No 43630 (M) © HB Heymans 2018.

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Profile for Hennie Heymans

Nongqai Vol 9 No 11B = "Water Police" - WORK IN PROGRESS  

The Nongqai is an electronic magazine that focuses on South Africa's police-, military- & national security history. This edition focuses on...

Nongqai Vol 9 No 11B = "Water Police" - WORK IN PROGRESS  

The Nongqai is an electronic magazine that focuses on South Africa's police-, military- & national security history. This edition focuses on...

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