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BLACK BOOK UK HOSPITALITY 2012


AN IMPORTANT UPDATE ON THE USE OF FOREIGN SATELLITE SYSTEMS TO BROADCAST PREMIER LEAGUE FOOTBALL IN UK PUBS AND CLUBS FOLLOWING THE KAREN MURPHY RULING

Following the news that Karen Murphy’s appeal to the High Court has seen her conviction overturned the Premier League has made clear that this decision does not change the outcome or important legal implications of the QC Leisure foreign satellite case. The Premier League said:

“ In that judgment (QC Leisure), made on 3 February 2012, Lord Justice Kitchin was consistent with the ECJ ruling and made it clear that the law gives us the right to prevent the unauthorised use of our copyrights in pubs and clubs when they are communicated to the public without our authority.

“ That unauthorised use gives rise to both civil and criminal penalties. Therefore should Mrs Murphy, or any other publican, use European Economic Area foreign satellite systems to show Premier League football on their premises without our authority and outside the scope of our authorisation, they make themselves liable for us to take action against them in both the civil and criminal courts.” The Premier League has stated that no broadcasters other than Sky and ESPN are authorised to broadcast copyrighted material within Premier League matches to the public in the UK.

For more information on the Premier League’s response, please visit: www.premierleague.com And any pub or club wishing to discuss how it could benefit from live Premier League football should visit: ww.sky.com/business

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BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY UK 2012

Introduction

Editor Miles Quest Deputy Editor John Musson Art Direction/Design Daniel H Brown Business Development Managers Roy Glasspool Keith Dalton

Foreword Ufi Ibrahim Chief Executive British Hospitality Association

Publisher Sofia Priymak Black Book is published by: Henley Media Group Ltd. Trans-World House 100 City Road London EC1Y 2BP UK T: +44 (0) 20 7871 0123 F: +44 (0) 20 7871 0101 E: spriymak@henleymediagroup.com W: www.hospitalityblackbook.com (Hospitality Black Book is part of Henley Media Group Ltd www.henleymediagroup.com) Notices: The Hospitality Black Book is published annually. This is the second edition. Printed in the EU. ISSN: 2045-7537 Subscriptions: Single copies of the Black Book 2012 are available at a cost of £49.99 and delivered anywhere in the world at no extra charge. Copies are available by logging on to www. hospitalityblackbook.com Editorial Copyright: The contents of this book, both words and statistics, are strictly copyright and the intellectual copyright of Hospitality Black Book Ltd. Copyright or reproduction may only be carried out with written permission of the publishers, which will normally not be withheld on payment of a fee. Article reprints: Most articles published in the Black Book are available as reprints. Normal print run for reprints is 400 copies. Please contact us at: info@hospitalityblackbook.com

I am delighted to be able to welcome the 2012 edition of the Hospitality Black Book, published by Henley Media. With its many articles, looking both back and forward, facts and figures, and readily available – and updated - lists of sources of information, the Black Book is a comprehensive volume of reference for hospitality professionals everywhere and in every sector of the industry. The size and economic influence of the hospitality industry is often under-estimated. As the UK’s fifth largest by employment, hospitality has the potential to create jobs more easily than almost any other industry, providing the right framework is in place. That framework includes a reduced rate

of VAT for hotel accommodation and attractions (and for meals taken out-ofhome), more flexible visa controls, lower rates of Air Passenger Duty, fewer regulations. The BHA is currently lobbying on all these – and other - issues in order to enable hospitality businesses to grow and create more jobs. Rightly, the Hospitality Black Book highlights these concerns. I believe readers will find it informative, helpful and valuable to their business and I welcome its publication.

Ufi Ibrahim, Chief Executive British Hospitality Association

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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EVERY CASE YOU BUY HELPS TRANSFORM OUTDOOR SPACES


BLACK BOOK HOSPITALITY UK 2012

Contents

Contents 1 / Industry Trends What made the news in 2011?

5 / Technology 6

What new technology for the guest room? Patrick Mayock

112

Social Media – But what is it? Jeffrey Epstein

118

VAT rises to the top of the agenda Ufi Ibrahim

16

Tourism in England can now realise its potential James Berresford

18

Cash buyers hold the key to hotel and restaurant purchases Jeremy Hill and Simon Chaplin

22

6 / Statistics

Corporate hospitality recovers from the impact of the recession – and the 2011 Bribery Act David Goymour

26

Facts and Figures

7 / Sustainability

2 / Hotels Tough times – but Olympic Games hold out great promise Miles Quest

30

Successful sustainability needs careful planning and regular monitoring John Musson

Guiding Light at the AA John Musson

34

Sustainable policies make good business sense Mark Lineham

Hotel expansion belies the impact of the recession Miles Quest

38

Major hotel openings and new UK hotel brands in 2011

42

Britain’s Top Hotels

50

Hotel Design: Taking the Long View Conrad Smith

56

3 / Restaurants 68

UK’s Top Restaurants

74

The John De Stefano Interview John Musson

82

4 / Personalities Defying the odds – and gaining Michelin Stars John Musson

94

The Antony Worrall Thompson Interview John Musson

98

Master Innholders

102

Jason Hunt: Crazy Bear John Musson

108

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

138

142

8 / Information 100 Leading Hotel Groups

146

Inbound tourism: the potential for growth

154

The A – Z of new legislation Martin Couchman

159

9 / Directory

Lack of consumer confidence holds back the eating-out market Peter Backman

4

126

Hotel Groups

162

Restaurant Groups

171

Distinguished Hotels

181

Distinguished Restaurants

184

Organisations

193

Colleges

199

Suppliers

202

Catering Companies

205

Who’s who

206


1 / Industry trends 6

WHAT MADE THE NEWS IN 2011?

16

VAT RISES TO THE TOP OF THE AGENDA Ufi Ibrahim

18

TOURISM IN ENGLAND CAN NOW REALISE ITS POTENTIAL James Berresford

22

CASH BUYERS HOLD THE KEY TO HOTEL AND RESTAURANT PURCHASES Jeremy Hill and Simon Chaplin

26

CORPORATE HOSPITALITY RECOVERS FROM THE IMPACT OF THE RECESSION – AND THE 2011 BRIBERY ACT David Goymour

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

What made the news in 2011? Some key events in the year January ` Westfield sells long-term leasehold rights for two hotels to be constructed at Westfield Stratford City to ES Properties (a joint venture between Cycas Hotel Partners and Patron Capital): a 188-room Holiday Inn London Stratford City and 162-suite Staybridge Suites London Stratford City will be operated by Cycas Hospitality. The hotels are expected to open before the Olympic Games. ` Kew Green Hotels puts 218-room Courtyard by Marriott London Gatwick on the market. ` Accor announces ten more Mercures after signing franchise deal with Focus Hotels, adding 763 bedrooms to the brand. The hotels include Altrincham Bowden; Blackburn Ribble Valley; Chester North; Hatfield Oak; Hull Royal; Stafford South Penkridge; Swindon East; Telford; Wigan Oak and Wolverhampton. ` Heron International obtains planning permission for the 43-storey tower, Heron Plaza, in City of London which will be operated by Four Seasons as a 190-suite and 120-branded residence development to be called Four Seasons Hotel and Residence London at Heron Plaza. ` Bloc Hotels is to open a 73-room pod-style hotel in the Jewellery quarter of Birmingham. The group, which is planning to open a further ten properties in the next three to five years, is funded by private investors in Monaco who aim to offer boutique-style hotels at a budget price. ` A new tourism marketing fund reaches £100m after private sector companies pledge to match the government’s £50m

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public investment. BA, DFDS, lastminute. com, P&O and Radisson Edwardian are among those agreeing to back the fund. India-based conglomerate Sahara India Pariwar completes the acquisition of 494-room Grosvenor House in Park Lane from Royal Bank of Scotland for a reported £470m. Sahara will jointly run the property with Marriott International. Swimming pool, spa, restaurant and nightclub are to be added to facilities. Travelodge announces construction of 35 hotels (3,667 rooms) in 2011 creating 700 new jobs in an investment of £300m, boosting the company’s estate to 495 hotels and 35,841 rooms. The company plans to have 1,100 hotels and 100,000 rooms by 2025. Rezidor announces new 223-room, 20-storey Park Inn at London’s Excel exhibition centre, due to open in spring 2013. Royal Bank of Scotland sells four Hilton branded properties to Cowell Group Investors for a reported £100m: 334room Hilton Brighton Metropole, 170-room Hilton St Anne’s Manor, Wokingham, 180-room Hilton Warwick/ Stratford-upon-Avon and the 230-room Hilton Manchester Airport will continue to be operated by Hilton for 11 years with an opportunity to extend. Barclay brothers acquire a 24.8 per cent stake in the luxury Maybourne Group (Claridge’s, Connaught and Berkeley hotels in London). Immigration laws introduced by the government cause problems for UK’s ethnic restaurant sector.

Above right: Grosvenor House is acquired by Indiabased Sahara India Pariwar for £470m – Marriott retains operating contract. Right: Bloc’s first pod-style hotel opens in Birmingham.

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012


INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

February ` David Clarke announces his resignation from Best Western, as at September 2011. ` Britannia Hotels buys Pontins group for £20m. ` VisitBritain responds to 35.4 per cent reduction in its budget by shedding 70 staff, vacating its London visitor centre in Lower Regent Street and cutting overseas markets from 35 to 21. ` Charles Prew steps down as chief executive of Barcelo’s British operations after seven years. Raul Gonzalez, head of Europe, ME and Africa region, takes over British hotels as well. ` Lord Daresbury former chairman of DeVere becomes non-executive director of Bespoke Hotels. ` Village Hotels – part of De Vere – announce the opening of five new hotels in the next 18 months. ` Aramark switches all eggs to free range. ` Crowne Plaza brand to be revamped after IHG publishes a strong set of full year figures. Total gross revenue was up 11

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per cent to £11.7bn. Growth was largely due to the return of the business traveller, leisure visitors remained steady. IHG, with only 15 company-owned properties, puts the freehold of the 688-room InterContinental New York Barclay up for sale. Moto signs up 28 West Cornwall Pasty Company kiosks in its motorway service area outlets. Restaurant chain, D & D London, slashes fine wine prices to make fine wines more accessible to diners. Travelodge announces it sold 7.2m room nights in 2010 – 13 per cent more than in 2009. PwC forecasts the supply of luxury hotel rooms in London will increase by more than a quarter by the time of the Olympic Games – 18 luxury properties are under construction or being planned, adding 2,400 rooms to the inventory. Akkeron Hotels buys ten Butterfly Hotels out of administration.

March ` Charles Prew, formerly Barcelo Hotels, appointed chief executive of von Essen Hotels. ` Travelodge was the fastest growing of Europe’s top ten hotel chains in 2010, adding 58 hotels and increasing its number of bedrooms by 11 per cent, according to MKG Hospitality. ` Campbell Gray Hotels give up the management of One Aldwych, London. ` Andrew Cosslet steps down as chief executive officer, InterContinental Hotels Group, to be replaced by Richard Solomons, chief financial officer. ` Novus Leisure acquires 17 of the 19 Balls Brothers’ wine bars in administration. ` Hilton Worldwide claims it has 15,400 bedrooms in more than 90 hotels under development in Europe – the biggest pipeline in the region. ` Barclays and Lloyds acquire 45.5 per cent of 22-strong Kew Green Hotels group, which cuts its debt burden from £120m to £80m and secures a £3m refurbishment facility.

` Nigel Chapman (formerly Luxury Family Hotels and Alias Hotels) launches a new hotel group – Halcyon Hotels and Resorts. First hotel bought for £2.3m is Polurrian Hotel, Cornwall. ` Strathclyde Business School, Cornell University and Ecole Hotelière de Lausanne back the International Leadership School in Scotland for the hospitality and tourism industry. ` Duke Street Capital acquire Wagamama for £215m from Lion Capital. ` BHA refutes press reports that infer that London hotels are profiteering from the 2012 Olympic Games. ` Deloitte reports that European hotels are among the world’s top performers in 2010. ` TRI Hospitality’s HotStats claim that the branded budget hotel sector remains the most dynamic segment of the UK hotel industry – a total of 54 properties were added to the supply last year with 5,400 rooms. ` St Ermin’s Hotel, London reopens as Accor’s first MGallery in UK .

Top: David Clarke announces his departure from Best Western. Bottom: Richard Solomons succeeds Andrew Cosslet as chief executive officer, InterContinental Hotels Group.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

March (continued)

Above: Robyn Jones is named one of the top ten female entrepreneurs. Below: Noel Mahony is named chief executive, BaxterStorey. Bottom: Premier Inn celebrates its 600th opening.

` Punch demerges its managed and leased divisions and sells off leased businesses, reducing estate from almost 6,000 sites to 3,000. ` Robyn Jones, managing director of CH&Co, named one of the top 10 UK female entrepreneurs. ` VisitBritain and Emirates launch a new joint funded campaign aimed at UK’s growth markets of China, India, UAE and Singapore. ` Overseas investors dominate UK hotel market in 2009 and 2010 accounting for 37 per cent of all transactions. ` Travelodge becomes the largest hotel brand in London after opening 99-room hotel in Ealing; it now has 5,714 rooms and 40 hotels in the capital. ` Hilton announces it will open its first Hampton by Hilton franchise in London, next to Waterloo Station. ` Wagamama appoints Martin Robinson as chief executive to succeed Ian Neill who retires. ` New study by Melvin Gold shows that since 2008, UK budget hotel market has grown by 35 per cent adding 20,000 rooms. Total number of rooms of all

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grades in the UK stands at 729,000 and by 2030 should reach 830,000. BHA backs the Government’s Responsibility Deal. Cavendish Hotel, London recognised as one of the best small companies to work for by the Sunday Times – the only hotel to make the list. De Vere group plans to train 10,000 young people as chefs and service staff over the next three years; six centres have already opened. Government’s Tourism Strategy launched by John Penrose MP – BHA says it is ‘long on vision, short on implementation’. Costa Coffee acquires Coffee Nation for almost £60m and announces it will launch a new brand Costa Express targeting the self-serve coffee bar sector. Subway overtakes McDonald’s as the world’s largest restaurant chain – on 1st Jan 2011 Subway had 33,749 sites compared with McDonald’s 32,737. Lexington Catering takes 11th place in its first entry in the Sunday Times list of top 100 companies to work for.

April ` Rezidor extends the contract of Kurt Ritter, chief executive, by three years until 2015. ` Major chains promise to lend weight to calorie counted menus including Pizza Hut (400 outlets) and Yo Sushi (54) by September. Harvester and Real Greek have already agreed. ` Brian Turner launches family restaurant at Butlin’s Bognor Regis Holiday Park. ` Travelodge launches its budget hotel management apprenticeship programme. JuMP (Junior Management Programme) will offer 500 management apprenticeships. Ten properties in the south of England offer ten candidates the opportunity to undertake a 25-month training programme. ` BHA and BBPA win battle on food hygiene displays, preventing compulsory

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

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display of food hygiene ratings in London. Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, unveils new agency – London & Partners – combining Visit London, Think London and Study London. Noel Mahony is named chief executive of BaxterStorey; Alastair Storey retains his role as chairman; and chairman and chief executive officer of WSH (parent company). London hoteliers threaten to end 2012 LOCOG agreements which provided 40,000 discounted rooms to the Olympic ‘family’ because some were allocated to Thomas Cook for onward sale at a significant mark-up. Premier Inn celebrates the opening of 600th hotel with launch of 87-room hotel in Stratford-upon-Avon.


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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

May ` von Essen collapses into administration. Charles Prew remains as chief executive reporting to David Duggins of administrators Ernst & Young who takes over from Andrew Davies, von Essen’s founder. ` Alan Parker, BHA president, heads up Tourism Regulation Taskforce. ` Robin Hutson teams up with Jim Ratcliffe (Lime Wood) to open first hotel under The Pig brand after £3m conversion of Whitley Ridge Hotel, Brockenhurst. The group is to be called Home Grown Hotels. ` Gordon Innes, civil servant at Business, Innovation and Skills, is appointed chief executive of London & Partners. ` Industry leaders renew calls for a reduction in VAT rate following Ireland’s decision to drop the rate to nine per cent for hospitality sector. ` BHA report Health Works: A Look Inside Eating Out is launched by Earl Howe ` RBS announces it is selling off 900

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freehold pubs it acquired from Scottish and Newcastle ten years ago. Bill Toner to be new chief executive of Host group as founder Jerry Brand steps down. HM Revenue and Customs announces a taskforce to tackle tax evasion in restaurants. In letter to the BHA, the GLA apologises to hoteliers over Mayor’s criticism of 2012 hotel prices. Michael Caines launches new academy at Exeter College offering places to chefs and front of house students. National Skills Academy merges with People 1st. Chief executive David McHattie departs to develop Hospitality Benchmark brand. Thistle Hotel group announces £100m refurbishment of its 33-strong estate over next two years. Travelodge opens unique ‘metro’ hotel models, with between 20-40 rooms, to accelerate growth in prestigious UK locations and office blocks.

June ` Wong Hong Ren, chief financial officer, is appointed chief executive of Millennium & Copthorne replacing Richard Hartman. ` Restaurants, pubs and bars account for a third of all High Street shops – an increase of two per cent on 2008, according to Simply Business report. In London 11 per cent of businesses are restaurants. ` Cigarette machine ban upheld for restaurants and pubs – due to come into force in October. ` High level of VAT in the UK is a deterrent to the growth of the tourism sector, warns BHA in its annual report. ` Consumer research by American Express Business Insights suggests that recovery in

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

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the hotel sector is underway and that the UK is leading the way. Premier Inn sheds up to 120 general managers as Whitbread introduces cluster managers responsible for up to five hotels – each hotel will have an operations manager. Jamie Oliver launches second high street chain – Union Jacks. Wagamama’s new owners, Duke Street Capital, plan to expand to 300 restaurants in UK. Restaurant operators call on BHA to lobby government over ‘ridiculous planning laws’. Costa opens first of six drive-through coffee shops across UK.

Above: Alan Parker is named chairman of the Tourism Regulation Taskforce. Below: Jamie Oliver launches second restaurant chain – Union Jacks. Bottom: Wagamama’s new owners plan to expand to 300 restaurants in the UK.


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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

July ` Travelodge exchanges contracts for £165m development of 22 new hotels. ` Preferred Hotel Group launches a collection of 100 properties worldwide which claims to create the best welcome for the gay guest (Preferred Pride Collection). ` Brigid Simmonds succeeds Ken Robinson as chair of Tourism Alliance. ` Jeremy Reed is named chief executive officer of British Association of Leisure Parks, Piers and Attractions. ` InterContinental Hotels group announces it will increase its portfolio to 297 hotels in the UK with 28 new openings including

the InterContinental Westminster in 2013. Angela Brav, currently IHG’s chief operating officer in North America, is appointed chief executive Europe. ` More British residents continue to holiday at home with domestic overnight stays up five per cent in the first quarter of 2011. ` McDonald’s announces plans to open its biggest-ever restaurant at Olympic Park in east London – a two storey 3,000 sq metre outlet with capacity for 1,500 diners. ` Old Government House becomes Guernsey’s first five star hotel.

August Top: Brigid Simmonds takes the chair at the Tourism Alliance. Below: Wendy Bartlett: Bartlett Mitchell was the first contract catering company to receive a Green Tourism Business Award. Below right: Chewton Glen’s eco-friendly tree-house style rooms on stilts.

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

` Central St Giles London is to be site of first of Jamie Oliver’s Union Jacks brand. ` Britain is so saturated with coffee shops that Dunkin’ Donuts decides not to expand in the UK as it is more of a coffee shop than a donut chain. ` A total of 50,000 people came from abroad to watch Premier League football matches in 2010 spending £595m; almost seven per cent of UK visitors watch football while they are here. ` Bartlett Mitchell is first contract catering company to receive a Green Tourism Business Scheme accreditation. ` Youngs pulls out of brewing selling its 40 per cent shareholding in Wells & Youngs Brewing Company to Charles Wells for £15.1m. ` BHA opposes plans to extend car parking charges in Westminster until midnight

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on Monday – Saturday and from 1pm – 6pm on Sundays. Sustainable Restaurant Association launches a new campaign – Too Good to Waste – to offer diners doggy bags to take left-over food home. Hospitality operators express confidence that riots will not harm tourism. Surinder Arora (Arora Hotels) pledges to support a Dragon’s Den style competition for budding young entrepreneurs, offering £1,000 each year for the next ten years to the winner, in association with the Royal Holloway University of London. Chewton Glen to build 12 eco-friendly suites within six timber tree house-style buildings on stilts. Research from New York finds that one in six diners alters their eating habits because of calorie information.


INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

September

Top: Richard Balfour Lynn steps down as chief executive, De Vere Group. Second from top: Sandy Orr’s Mint group is sold to Hilton in a £600m deal. Below: Robert Cooke resigns from MWB group.

` Jim Cartwright’s Cygnet sells its education arm to Compass for £5m (£9.3m turnover) but retains its other businesses. ` Average price of a pint tops £3, partly due to tax increases in alcohol. ` McDonald’s introduces calorie labeling to all menus in 1,200 restaurants. ` Mint Hotels join the Hilton stable in a £600m deal after Sandy and David Orr fail to find backers to continue developing Mint as a private company. ` Richard Balfour Lynn steps down as chief executive of De Vere Group together with chief financial officer, Jag Singh. Andrew Coppel takes over chief executive responsibilities in addition to being executive chairman. Balfour Lynn continues his interests in the MWB Group: Malmaison, Hotel du Vin and MWB Business Exchange. ` Accor to spend €150m rebranding its economy products as Ibis Styles (was All Seasons) and Ibis Budget (was Etap) by early 2013. ` Tony Potter announces he will relinquish chief executive officer role at Corinthia in Jan 2012 to launch his own company Braveagle, in March 2012, with offices in Malta, London and New York.

` The Irish restaurant sector created 490 new jobs in July/August after VAT is cut to nine per cent, says Restaurant Association of Ireland. ` Best Western is split into three separate brands: Best Western (257); Best Western Plus (10), Best Western Premier (9). ` Taj Hotels secures new £50m debt facility from Barclays to refurbish its two properties at Buckingham Gate. ` Research from PwC suggests that London’s hotels enjoyed a successful summer with occupancy reaching 92 per cent in July. ` Ireland’s National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) sells €800m of loans made to Maybourne Group in 2005 by two Irish banks to Barclay Brothers. Irish developer, Paddy McKillen, still holds 36 per cent of the group. ` Jarvis Hotels falls into administration with 26 hotels to be rebranded as Mercure under a pre-pack administration deal; to a new company, Jupiter Hotels, a joint venture between RBS, West Register and Patron Capital. ` Richard Lewis is appointed chief executive of Best Western UK.

October ` Robert Cooke resigns as chief executive of the MWB Group but stays in post pending appointment of successor. ` Hospitality firms are to be set free from more than 60 regulations under new proposals by tourism minister, John Penrose MP, including – education in licensing requirements, location and design of no smoking signs, excess charges for inspection of private water supplies. ` A new GREAT campaign to attract 4m extra overseas visitors and generate at least £1bn Olympic business is launched by VisitBritain, using £3m of the Olympic budget to boost domestic tourism in 2012 and beyond. Visit England contributes a minimum of £2m with private sector match-funding, bringing the total to at least £10m.

` Westfield Stratford City opens, claiming to be the most complete hub of branded restaurant concepts the capital has ever seen with 72 eating places including new concepts and others which started at Westfield Notting Hill: Chip + Fish, Lotus Leaf, Rhythm Kitchen and Las Iguanas. ` Costa Coffee hits 2,000 sites in 25 countries. ` Restaurant chain, D&D’s new hotel, South Place, is to be the stepping stone to a new boutique hotel chain. The group is looking for a second site in London’s West End. ` Andrew Gill, former vice president development Europe at IHG, to become interim chief executive of new company, Jupiter Hotels. ` Yum announces it is to sell Pizza Hut UK.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Month by Month

November ` Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg MP announces the award of £19.8m from Regional Growth fund to finance Visit England’s promotional activities. ` Gondola Group buys Soho Pizzeria (one of the original owners was Peter Boizot who founded Pizza Express). ` Ruston Toms is the new chairman of Association of Catering Excellence. ` Barcelo Group threatens to pull plug on 21 British hotels operated by Puma Hotels if rents are not cut.

` von Essen’s Thorn Island, Pembroke sold to Kent Mushrooms; Greenway Hotel & Spa Cheltenham and Mount Somerset are sold to Eden Hotel Collection and Homewood Park Hotel & Spa is bought by Longleat Enterprises. ` BHA publishes Hospitality: Driving Local Economies which, for the first time, gives the number of hospitality employees and the GVA of every one of the 406 local authority areas in the UK.

December ` Six companies in Chez Gerard group, comprising 32 restaurants, go into administration: Chez Gerard, Craftbutton, Paramount, Café Uno Brasseries, Paramount Restaurants and Groupe Chez Gerard Restaurants. ` Neil Robertson leaves British Institute of Innkeeping after three years as chief executive. Treasurer Peter Thomas stands in as interim chief executive. ` Jonathan Sheard, director of operations Mercure UK, is appointed managing director operations of MGallery and Mercure, UK and Ireland. ` Lance Batchelor, deputy CEO Dominos UK & Ireland, and previously Chief Executive Tesco Telecom, takes over as chief executive officer, Dominos UK and Ireland. ` Harry Ramsden’s original restaurant in Guiseley faces closure after 83 years because it is losing money. There are currently 35 Harry Ramsden’s in the UK. ` Elior launches first hotel concession at Starwood’s Aloft London Excel. ` Outlook for UK hotel sector depends on availability of debt finance to fund hotel transactions and complete refurbishments, according to HVS report. ` Beetham Hotels Birmingham, the freeholder of Radisson Blu, Birmingham, falls into administration but the hotel continues to operate. ` von Essen Callow Hall, Derbyshire is sold

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` `

` `

`

`

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to private buyer and von Essen’s Hotel Verta, London goes to a private investor to be operated by Rhombus International Hotel Group – the group’s first UK hotel. Admiralty Arch is put on the market and could be converted to a hotel. Seven von Essen hotels are sold to Halcyon Hotels & Resorts/Patron Capital. Nigel Chapman, who heads up Halcyon, originally sold four of the hotels to von Essen in 2006 when he owned Luxury Family Hotels. BHA issues letter to its members urging them to campaign for a reduction in VAT for the hospitality industry to 5 per cent. Jean Jacques Dessors, presently chief operating officer, Accor UK and Ireland moves to the same position responsible for Middle East, Africa, Indian Ocean and Caribbean in January 2012. He is succeeded by Thomas Dubaere. Plans for a 583-room hotel near Heathrow on the site of the former Gate Gourmet production facility, agreed by Hounslow Borough Council. Morgans confirms it has agreed to open its first Mondrian hotel in Europe in Sea Containers House, London, due to open in 2014. BHA sends the proposals of the Tourism Regulation Taskforce, chaired by Alan Parker CBE, to John Penrose MP, minister for tourism.

Top: BHA publishes Hospitality: Driving Local Economies. Bottom: von Essen’s Hotel Verta, in Battersea, is sold to a private investor, to be operated by Rhombus International.


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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Surviving the Recession

VAT rises to the top of the agenda - as the industry’s campaign moves forward VAT has risen to the top of the industry’s agenda because it makes the UK uncompetitive with the rest of Europe, says Ufi Ibrahim, chief executive, British Hospitality Association. As every hospitality business leader knows, the high rate of UK VAT on this country’s hotels, restaurants and tourist attractions, compared with all but three of the 27 EU member states, makes the UK hugely uncompetitive with the rest of Europe. VAT on hotel accommodation in the UK is 20 per cent but France and Germany charge seven per cent, Spain charges eight per cent and Italy ten per cent. Many countries have a reduced rate for entry to attractions and meals out of home. If you add to this high rate of VAT the impact of high visa charges and Air Passenger Duty rates (placing the UK 135th out of 139 countries across the world on price competitiveness according to World Economic Forum), then you have one of the biggest anti-trade regimes for international tourism in the world. If Britain’s tourist industry is to grow and develop, a continuing VAT rate of 20 per cent will act as a decisive break on that ambition so the industry, through the BHA, is now engaged with the Treasury in a constructive and realistic dialogue in order to reduce it. A comprehensive independent report by Tourism Respect and Deloitte for Bourne Leisure and Merlin Entertainments provides us with specific facts and figures on the return on investment which would accrue in terms of jobs and exchequer receipts from a reduction to five per cent of the VAT rate on accommodation and attractions. This study suggests that reducing VAT to this level for the industry would create 64,000 jobs in the hotel sector and a further 14,000 jobs in visitor attractions. It also forecasts that reducing VAT on hotel accommodation and

visitor attractions would yield a net gain to the Treasury of £2.6bn over ten years Nor is the restaurant sector ignored. Last year, the BHA commissioned an independent report by Tourism Respect on the impact of VAT on the restaurant sector. While the impact on HM Treasury receipts was not positive, the impact on restaurant jobs was highly significant – and experience in France, where over 50,000 jobs were created when the French government reduced VAT on restaurant meals to 5.5 per cent, shows that is no mere forecast. We are now working on a new research model which will bring our economic analysis on VAT in line with that of the Treasury so that we can strengthen our dialogue with government and ensure that our numbers, our recommendations and our communications with the Treasury are meaningful and impactful, rather than just ‘noisy’. These discussions are shaping the industry’s campaign. We have started negotiations with HM Treasury and we believe that our arguments are powerful and persuasive. But we need to exert even more pressure to encourage government to act. Our aim now is to ensure that every MP in the country understands the importance of hospitality and tourism to his or her local economy. This is because we want MPs, in turn, to put pressure on the government to respond to our campaign so the more local businesses can highlight the uncompetitive nature of UK tourism to MPs, the more pressure will we be able to put on government. But VAT is not the only barrier to growth. We believe that visa controls and visa regulations are also holding back the industry’s development.

It will come as little surprise that the industry comes out as a key driver of almost every local authority area in the land. 16

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Surviving the Recession

There is continuing pressure on restaurants to introduce caloriecounted menus. While many restaurant chains, with standard menus, have already moved in this direction, it is far more difficult for independent restaurants which change their menus every day. One study suggests that 58,000 tourists to the UK cancelled their trip in 2009 because of slow visa processing and over 300,000 decided not to apply. These are significant numbers and represent an equally significant loss of revenue to the UK. Of course, there is a need for visa controls but government also has to understand that making them so difficult for potential visitors to implement restricts growth in the tourism economy and therefore jobs.

Deregulation We are also continuing to argue for deregulation wherever and whenever possible. Good regulations benefit both society and business but bad regulations are a blight that costs unnecessary time and money to introduce and implement. Too much new legislation costs time and money to introduce and is not suited to the industry’s many micro businesses and SMEs. Too many regulations from the EU are gold plated by Whitehall. The Tourism Regulation Taskforce – headed by Alan Parker, the BHA’s president – has already submitted a report with suggestions for cutting back red tape in the industry. The government is currently considering these recommendations.

Research During 2011, the BHA sponsored some ground-breaking research into the size and value of the hospitality industry to each local authority. This information, published in Hospitality: Driving Local Economies (see the BHA website) has never before been available. So now we know exactly the contribution that the industry makes to each local authority area in the UK in terms of employment and wages and profits. We now have the facts and figures to prove the relevance of the industry. It will come as little surprise that the industry comes out as a key driver of almost every local authority area in the land. While Westminster has the highest number of hospitality jobs of all local authority areas in the country (86,000), and is easily the

biggest in terms of wages and profits (GVA) (£2.4bn) the Isles of Scilly and areas in Cumbria and in the south-west are the local authorities most dependent on the success of the hospitality industry and on the tourism industry generally. Almost two in every ten employees in Kensington and Chelsea work in hospitality (16.8 per cent), but the percentage is almost as high in the Isles of Scilly (15.9 per cent), South Lakeland (15.7 per cent), Eden (15.6 per cent) and Scarborough (14.9 per cent). The figures show how dependent many local authority areas are on the hospitality industry. It is clearly a key contributor to every local authority’s job-creating and wealth-creating potential.

Local Enterprise Partnerships Following on from this report, we are now working to ensure that Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP), which have largely replaced Regional Development Agencies, understand the relevance of hospitality to their area. Losing RDA funding for tourism activities, which amounted to some £275m in total in the five years to 2011, is a major blow. With the abolition of the RDAs and the formation of the LEPs (which they replace), this money has been lost and tourism in England is a big loser. All the more important, therefore, to influence LEPs, but this cannot all be done from the centre. Whether LEPs support hospitality – as the industry needs them to do - or whether they ignore it, will depend largely on local pressure, so local hospitality businesses have a key role to play in influencing debate and decisions within their LEP.

Responsibility Deal Of particular interest to the food service industry is the Department of Health’s Responsibility Deal, which aims to encourage better health through healthy eating. It remains a government priority. As a result, there is continuing pressure on restaurants to introduce calorie-counted menus and while many restaurant chains, with standard menus, have already moved

in this direction, it is far more difficult for independent restaurants which change their menus every day. Many food service companies have also signed pledges to reduce their use of salt and artificial transfats – two other items that the government wants more consumers to forsake. The difficulties here are obvious: salt is a flavour enhancer and a preservative and caterers can only go so far – and slowly – in order to take public taste with them. Reducing artificial transfats is even more complicated as much of it is used in food manufacturing rather than in the kitchen. Major catering companies can put pressure on their food suppliers because of their purchasing clout but this is not a viable option for most independent caterers. Nevertheless, government pressure on these issues will not go away and, although the BHA believes that the Responsibility Deal should remain a voluntary scheme, there is always the statutory option open to the government if an insufficient number of restaurants sign up to the Deal’s pledges.

Olympics Of course, this is Olympic year and the industry has a golden opportunity to showcase its talent, its services, and its facilities to the world at large. Let’s take full advantage of this opportunity by providing great service and great value. The eyes of the world will be upon us. London in particular will be busy but the greatest advantage of the Games lies in subsequent years. We have to use the Games to encourage our 2012 visitors back in 2013 and 2014 and later in the decade. VisitBritain has received welcome additional funding to undertake more campaigns overseas while VisitEngland was awarded some £19m of Regional Growth Fund money to promote England as a holiday at home destination over the next few years. The success of these campaigns will be the real legacy of the Games. But it will only be fully realised if the industry provides great value to reinforce our message of Great Britain.

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Tourism

Tourism in England can now realise its potential This spring marks the third anniversary of the creation of VisitEngland as a national tourist board. Chief executive, James Berresford looks to the future. Charged with developing a new strategy for growing the value of England’s tourism industry and the resulting visitor economy, VisitEngland is now in its third year. The government’s Strategic Framework for Tourism (2010-2020) was launched two years ago into a very different political and operational landscape. The Framework was planned as a strategy which would be owned by all participants in England’s £97bn visitor economy - a document that was designed to provide a plan for expanding the domestic tourism economy and to help work towards ambitious growth targets through the decade. The Framework identifies four key focus areas: ` Increasing England’s share of global visitor markets ` Offering visitors compelling destinations of distinction Above: James Berresford: “With match-funding, there is potential for an extra £43m to support the promotion of England to the domestic market over the next three years.”

` Championing a successful, thriving tourism industry ` Facilitating greater engagement between the visitor and the experience. During its preparation, it was always understood that the Framework and its related action plans would be delivered within a new context, namely a period of change and transformation in the tourism delivery landscape. Two years on that transition process is still evolving. Many of the organisations that VisitEngland had previously worked with have changed beyond recognition while VisitEngland’s own role has developed in line with the changing environment and in response to the policies and priorities of government. It has been some time since the industry has had a government taking such a

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very close look at it and seeking to optimise its true potential. For many sectors of the industry, the past two years have been difficult but tourism is recognised as one of the key areas with the potential to help build the road towards the UK’s economic recovery. Now, through the painful transition of the publicly-funded tourism delivery structures, we have an opportunity to seek better, more effective ways of working together and to break down what some have regarded as a ‘silo’ mentality between the different specialisations in a highly fragmented industry. So VisitEngland is working across industry through a Strategic Industry Advisory Group, the Destination Management Forum, and an annual Visitor Economy Forum, in addition to an ongoing engagement and communication programme which is promoting cross-sector partnerships and the sharing of best practice and experience. England now has a tourist board that can compete on an international stage with a significant £5m “saturation” marketing campaign currently running. The Holidays at home are GREAT! campaign has coincided with a new-found energy and drive, experienced by many of the industry. This can be demonstrated through the exciting and unprecedented array of events planned for this summer: the Diamond Jubilee, The Torch Relay, the Olympic and Paralympic Games and the London 2012 Festival. We must capitalise on the rediscovery of domestic tourism and this once-in-a lifetime opportunity to showcase England to the world. But the legacy of the events of 2012 will not just raise international awareness of all that the UK has to offer. The chief legacy will be about how we feel about ourselves and a new self-confidence. The events of 2012 have the potential to spark something in the British psyche that will completely change the


INDUSTRY TRENDS

Tourism

way we see ourselves and the way we value our country’s visitor offer. With such an enormous range of places to visit, things to experience and secrets to discover, unlike many rival destinations, we have an almost infinite source of material that can feed the interest in discovering England and providing inspiration for visits. This change has already started. More and more people are choosing to holiday at home and for many young people, they are enjoying for the first time something that they had been unaware of: a host of treasures and previously new experiences available on their doorstep. VisitEngland’s research shows that many people are “staycationing” due to economic circumstances – but the research also shows that they like what they see. It exceeds their expectations and they are inclined to do it again. This ‘re-awakening’ of interest is a huge opportunity for the industry, underpinned by powerful support from the print and broadcast media through the wide range of programmes dedicated to exploring England’s country, coast, historic towns (and their stories), great countryside, heritage and national treasures. The post-2012 “legacy” period will present a new raft of challenges. We know that by raising the PR profile of the country in such a dramatic way, there will be a huge followup of people who have been inspired to explore England and who will want to keep on visiting. How do we ensure that we profit from this interest? We need to ensure that at the local level, we take a destination-wide approach. We have seen huge changes in the nature and structure of public sector tourism funding. We cannot

Above left: Julie Walters and Rupert Grint are among the stars in the VisitEngland Holidays at Home are Great television advertisements this year.

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Tourism

Left: VisitEngland’s Chairs Lady Cobham, HRH The Prince of Wales, and Millennium & Copthorne’s David Curtis-Brignell, Chairman of English Tourism Week, at the launch of the 2012 English Tourism Week.

afford to be anything other than lean and efficient, avoiding duplication and waste. Local authorities need to work with private sector partners (as many of them already do) to manage destinations that will benefit both visitors and residents. We need joinedup marketing and promotion that seeks to grow the market rather than enticing existing visitors from one place to another. There are various approaches being explored at the local level from BIDs (Business Improvement Districts) many of which are up-and-running throughout the country to the possibility of newly proposed TBIDs (specific ‘Tourism Business Improvement Districts’). But not every solution will be right for every area – the local dimension and decision-making aspect is vitally important. Destination Management Organisations (DMOs), which bring together public and private sector interests and businesses, are

geared towards destinations as perceived by visitors rather than following strict political boundaries. As such, they may encompass a number of local authority areas. Some are well-established and have been running for many years; some are newly formed whilst others are forming and evolving. Sub-national partnerships are critical to the future success and DMOs are key partners of the newly emerging Local Enterprise Partnerships, the majority of which have highlighted tourism as a key component of their growth strategies. With the demise of the Regional Development Agencies, new opportunities for funding have followed. The Regional Growth Fund, from which VisitEngland was successful in attracting a £19m bid, will enable some destinations to engage in new marketing activities based on the thematic marketing concept outlined in the agreed All-England

We need joined-up marketing and promotion that seeks to grow the market rather than enticing existing visitors from one place to another.

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Marketing Strategy launched in 2011. With match-funding, there is potential for an extra £43m to support the promotion of England to the domestic market over the next three years. This will be channelled through VisitEngland and has the potential to create the equivalent of an additional 9,500 full time jobs. The Strategic Framework for Tourism advocated the delivery of a range of specific three-year Tourism Action Plans. These plans, which cover the key drivers for growth, were developed by representatives from across the tourism sectors and endorsed by their industry bodies. We all therefore have a vested interest in ensuring they are a success. Altogether, we are working in an exciting industry at a very exciting time. The next three years are likely to present further challenges but we have the product and the determination to ensure that English tourism begins to realise its potential.


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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Hotel and Restaurant Purchases

Cash buyers hold the key to hotel and restaurant purchases Valuation is key as hotel and restaurant sectors face up to 2012, say Jeremy Hill and Simon Chaplin of Christie + Co

The market dynamic in the hotel sector changed quarter-by-quarter throughout 2011 — from hope and increased activity early in the year to uncertainty and confusion by year-end. Significant deals did take place in a transactional market dominated by distress all across Europe, while London again led trading performance. The year to date in 2012 has seen some reasonable activity as the banks have come to terms with their exposure in the hotel sector, while assets that have come to market have been more pragmatically priced. The rest of the year ahead could provide a windfall for cash buyers in an increasingly ‘come-and-buy-me’ marketplace in which the availability of cash in a debt-scarce environment will again be the most crucial influencing factor.

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The 5.1 per cent decline in average prices in the hotel sector in 2011 reported by Christie + Co in Business Outlook 2012 reflected prices settling at a lower level than the plateauing of 2010 led many to forecast. Alongside this came a growing realisation from owners of the need to value their assets more realistically.

Key time for valuation In general, this is a defining period for hotel values and valuation. Investors are increasingly recognising the importance of hotel businesses as a going concern and this places a huge emphasis on sustainable values, particularly when there is such a lack of debt finance available. Historic, ongoing and forward-looking capital expenditure is also crucial.

However, the debt problems and lack of stability in funding markets has raised questions over how historic transactional evidence can be interpreted to create meaningful values. The consensus view amongst people we deal with is that historic asset values are falling increasingly into conflict with the reality of achieving a deal. The dominance of cash buyers is also having its impact on values. The £615m deal that saw the Blackstone Group acquire Mint Hotels did achieve funding but there has to be a significant doubt as to whether funding of this level will be available in the near future. Year-on-year RevPAR growth cannot be suggested as a reliable indicator of future business profile. This means the valuer places greater emphasis on interpreting current performance, and the market view of value


INDUSTRY TRENDS

Hotel and Restaurant Purchases

Opposite page: Restaurants: Brunning & Price The Restaurant Group also instructed Christie + Co to find suitable ‘character properties’ to expand its Brunning & Price pub/restaurant business. The first find was The Little Manor in Thelwall, Cheshire. Originally built in 1642 for a General in Oliver Cromwell’s army, The Little Manor retains much of the original character – one of the distinct requirements of Brunning & Price. It was sold by Punch Taverns at its asking price. Right: Little Chef Christie + Co has been instructed by Travelodge to market 48 former Little Chef sites for letting in 2012 — Travelodge was one of a number of landlords to whom Little Chef sites reverted following a pre-pack administration. This follows the announcement by Little Chef earlier this year that it was closing 67 sites around the UK.

which that creates, to provide a valuation. The banks find themselves in a different position as we enter 2012. With most having concluded basic debt restructuring exercises, they are now in a period of monitoring how assets are performing, how they fit into the market and they are making decisions on whether to remain or exit. The ‘capex-timebomb’ has exploded for some operators, too, especially for those who chose not to invest when economic conditions were much better. They, particularly, are finding that money is no longer available to undertake capital expenditure, which is having a real effect on ongoing value and value realisation at sale. At the end of 2012 the feeling was that things ‘couldn’t get any worse’. However, our experience of previous recessions suggests that the recovery from the current one is already taking longer.

Transactions earmark quality and distressed assets In uncertain and recessionary markets, the only certainty is quality. The was typified by transactional activity in the hotel sector in 2011 and is more than likely to be once again in 2012. Whilst stock availability remains somewhat limited, distress is most probably

going to determine the level of activity in the sector in the year ahead. By the time this article went to print, all but four of the 26 UK luxury country house hotel assets of von Essen Hotels had been sold by Christie + Co. The sale saw the return to the sector of some operators, the growth of others in the country-house hotel sector and a plethora of acquisitions by others who saw the availability of quality at a more-thanreasonable price. Increasingly as 2011 progressed, cash became king in a market of limited supply. On that note, 2011 saw new hotel development plans being curtailed with those new developments that did enter the fray serving to disrupt an already fragile sector and depressing values on existing assets as a consequence. However, a longer-term effect of a dwindling pipeline could see operators reap rewards from a decline in the growth of competition. With the exception of London, which is always likely to see development, hotel operators could see a marginal increase in values and improvement in trading performance while the pipeline continues to be slow. An interesting development is the increasing appetite for serviced sites in London and other provincial cities. Christie + Co, acting as joint agent, sold the Atelier EC1

serviced apartment business in the Hatton Garden area of London. Already in 2012 it has sold the former residence of one of the Cambridge Spies in Mayfair’s Bentinck Street for conversion to serviced apartments.

The future The remainder of 2012 will see cash buyers dominate once more, and there will be a real opportunity for them to ‘fill their boots’, should distress force more property to the market. Investment in the sector is likely to come from an even more diverse international community, including investors from Russia, India and China, but this is likely to be very London-centric. Of course, 2012 is the year of the Olympics, not to mention the biennial Farnborough International Air Show and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, but with a concentration of visitors in the summer months there is certain to be a drop-off in demand and visitor numbers may fall sharply from an extraordinary peak. Concerns remain over funding, so accurate and considered pricing of assets is the key to success. Every deal this year and next year will be about price and this may create a fragile trading environment as the timid hang onto assets awaiting a recovery that doesn’t look

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Hotel and Restaurant Purchases

Right: Mint Hotels Christie + Co provided a formal loan security valuation of this portfolio, on behalf of a bank seeking to fund one of the bidders. The group comprised seven UK hotels and one in Amsterdam. Two of the UK hotels are in London and comprise approximately 1,000 bedrooms. The portfolio was eventually acquired by Blackstone Group (owners of Hilton Worldwide) for a reported £615m.

like coming for some time.

Restaurants Last year saw consumers reaffirm their appetite for eating and drinking away from home, despite the consistent strain on the pursestrings. The eating-out sector responded with an array of choice – all of which was good news for the diner. However, increasing competition, and price competition from the likes of foodled pubs, led many operators to struggle, bringing many restaurant opportunities, particularly amongst the independent sector, to the marketplace. Consequently, Christie + Co reported a decline in average prices in the restaurant sector of 4.1 per cent. The current year is shaping up in similar fashion, giving investors and consumers greater choice for their money, but making competition yet more fierce.

Recycling and distress to the fore The restaurant marketplace, like others, was not conducive to great lending activity. New developments were virtually non-existent and transactional activity was focused on the recycling of existing sites and distressed sales. London and top-end fine dining outperformed the rest of the sector, with those

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restaurants listed amongst the top-20s in the various restaurant magazines and newspaper supplements continuing to do well. In this Olympic year, London will continue to exploit its international context and benefit from tourist and visitor spend. However, for existing and budding restaurateurs, the year is likely to show peaks and troughs, even though there will be opportunities for sound investment. Competition to the traditional restaurant sector is growing from many quarters and consumers have never had a greater choice, especially with prices for dining on a par with 2005. New developments remain relatively thin on the ground but with larger operators recycling existing sites and rationalising estates, there are opportunities for potential investors and operators.

Independents day In 2011 newcomers, encouraged by some excellently-priced opportunities, came in at a simpler entry point. What we saw was perhaps the beginning of a trend which will continue into 2012 – and that is a greater opportunity for the local independent restaurant. It’s true, independents cannot match the strength of brand of the celebrity chefs or the corporate operators, but they do have many

potential qualities that cannot be equalled by their peers. Independent restaurants can provide the personal touch that brands cannot provide, and it is on this that they should focus. They can also deliver fine food (but not fine-dining) at a price that is affordable to a greater number of people. And with the personal touch comes the propensity for repeat business. The other element that’s likely to favour independent restaurants is their locality. There were indications in 2011 that ‘neighbourhood’ restaurants were making a return to favour. In addition to the personal service they were able to offer, they had the added advantage of being in the location that their customers increasingly demanded. With the purse-strings tightened, many consumers ditched the trip to the edge-oftown and out-of-town restaurant in favour of the restaurant down the road. Even where the restaurant chains offered voucher deals, the travelling cost increasingly made the offer redundant. It is likely, in a market that is still liable to suffer in the face of the poor economic climate, that 2012 will see yet more local restaurants springing up — offering existing and prospective restaurateurs affordable opportunities as values remain on the cautious side.


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INDUSTRY TRENDS

Corporate hospitality

Corporate hospitality recovers from the impact of the recession – and the 2011 Bribery Act Business entertaining is good for clients and hospitality companies. David Goymour investigates the effect of recession and other worries

Strawberries and cream, Champagne, the warm glow of a British summer afternoon and the buzz of excitement around Wimbledon’s Centre Court or the Winner’s Enclosure at Ascot: these are the classic ingredients of a day out for VIP guests. Corporate hospitality is an essential part of the art of cultivating customer loyalty. Until 2008, the ‘entry price’ for entertaining guests at the big sports events was typically £500 per guest, including one of the best seats to watch the event, silver service lunch and the rest. Part of the experience at these events is that guests rub

shoulders with celebrities, high-powered people from business, including banking, and probably the occasional Member of Parliament. The understanding is – unspoken, of course – that you are here this afternoon, at my expense, because I know I can rely on a percentage of your budget coming my way in the next year. The smiles have been a little less relaxed, and the sunny atmosphere has been chilled slightly by recession, by the banking crisis which triggered it and also by the scandal over MPs expenses. Companies are taking a more cautious approach to hospitality and they

Corporate hospitality remains big business though it suffered in the recession, falling by 13 per cent in 2010 compared with 2009. In contrast, 2011 started weakly, but strengthened as the year progressed. In part this reflected early activity on the 2012 Olympics. In total the market is believed to have grown by just two per cent to £950m. However, demand for corporate hospitality is projected to increase this year by a highly significant eight per cent mainly reflecting the impact of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Will the Games presage a permanent beneficial impact on the market? MCi, a consultancy, believes that with the 2014

Glasgow Commonwealth Games already on the horizon, the success of events in the London Olympics could be a major factor on the level of growth in 2014. If it was not for these specific events, MCi believes that growth in the corporate hospitality market would be very sluggish given the economic conditions. However, Eventia’s Green Shoots Forecast gave a rosy outlook of a 24 per cent growth for the corporate hospitality industry by 2014, GIA predicts the industry would grow to the value of £1.47bn by 2015, and MBD’s The UK Corporate Hospitality Market Development Report gives an 11 per cent development in the same time frame.

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certainly are wary of the Bribery Act which came into force last year. Hospitality companies are responding by offering a choice of packages, through which guests still get to see the big events, perhaps with more modest trimmings. Ted Walker, head of marketing at Keith Prowse, confirms that 2008 and 2009 were “very tough years for us”. Business has improved since then and 2011 was, he says, “one of our best years ever”. Hospitality, he adds, suffers the sharp end of any downturn, and when things improve is among the first to benefit from the recovery.


INDUSTRY TRENDS

Corporate hospitality

Opposite: Sodexo is the only provider of corporate hospitality at the 2012 Olympics. Right: Question and answer session after an international at Twickenham – part of the Keith Prowse corporate hospitality package.

Client companies looked at where they could trim expenditure as the recession started to bite, and many Christmas parties were cancelled at the end of 2008. This was not entirely for cost-saving reasons, though: if employers are having to make redundancies, and if customers are seeing taxpayers’ money (their money) pumped into keeping banks in business, the spectacle of those same companies spending heavily on staff parties doesn’t make for good public relations. Between 2008 and 2012, the nature of the corporate hospitality market has changed. “When I joined Keith Prowse in 2007,” says Ted Walker, “we would offer one product across the range: silver service lunch; great seats for a great event; a guest celebrity speaker; and a choice of venue. Now, you still get good seats for the event, but we have cheaper packages, perhaps offering a stand-up buffet.” At the top end of the Keith Prowse portfolio, four international rugby players will come into the Players’ Lounge at Twickenham and answer questions: the guests get the chance to be the sports correspondents at the postmatch media conference. This is still offered – and taken up – but in 2009 Keith Prowse introduced Experience Club, a less expensive, less formal package, in response to customer demand for less expensive options. At Wimbledon, typical bookings for the Gatsby Club would be for tables of 10 for lunch. Since 2008, the average has slipped to tables of six. While that reflects the caution that goes with recession, it’s not disastrous. Keith Prowse in 2010 involved Albert Roux

as the headline chef for the Gatsby Club. “There’s a need for hospitality providers to diversify,” comments Ted Walker. Corporate hospitality days at Wimbledon always include seats in the prime courts. Depending on which day of the tournament customers want to see, prices range from £475 a head during the first week to £3,950 on men’s final day. Albert Roux, of course, doesn’t come cheap. Walker doesn’t disclose what sort of fees the chef commands, but confirms: “We’ve done the sums, and we can pay for it from the profits.” Down the road at Twickenham, Jason Atherton is the celebrity chef working with Keith Prowse. Starting with this year’s Six Nations tournament, Atherton is masterminding the food offer at one of the suites at Twickenham. “Jason Atherton was brought in because we wanted to up our game at Twickenham,” says Walker. The Six Nations and Wimbledon are not the only sports events happening in 2012, of course. There’s also the Olympics and Paralympic Games, for which all classes of athletes have been warming up, trying out the new stadia in east London. Sodexo is the only official provider of corporate hospitality at the games, and Walker and his colleagues must bite their collective lip and join in the cheers for the UK team, on and off the field. Will the Olympics have a negative effect on bookings at Twickenham and Wimbledon this year? It’s “a bit of an unknown” for Walker. Alastair Scott, sales director of Sodexo Prestige, confirms: “We are the only official provider of corporate hospitality at the

Olympics.” (Like all big sports events, the Olympics will of course attract all kinds of caterers offering all kinds of food from all kinds of mobile outlets; but buyers are warned that if they buy a ticket-inclusive package from unofficial operators they may find their tickets are not recognised.) The 2012 Olympics and Paralympic Games have an official ticketing website, www.london2012.com: official hospitality providers all take their orders through this portal – which is the London 2012 Organising Committee’s way of controlling the hospitality market around the event, and protecting both the Games and providers. Customers can book hospitality for as few as two people, at prices starting at £295 (+ VAT) per person, for which they get London 2012 event tickets, access to the Prestige hospitality pavilion, fine dining and a complimentary bar. On the web site, the hospitality offer is branded as Prestige Ticketing, which is actually a joint venture between Sodexo Prestige and Burton Group (run by Mike Burton, an England rugby star of the 1970s). Burton is also Sodexo’s partner in catering for the Rugby World Cup. Scott claims that Prestige is achieving a first in delivering corporate hospitality services at the Olympics. “It’s acceptable in the UK to use sports events to build business relationships – it’s a British way of doing business,” he says. “In other parts of the world the market for corporate hospitality is not so well defined. We sold the idea of corporate hospitality for the Rugby World Cup in New Zealand. In

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Corporate hospitality

Above: Albert Roux – headline chef at The Gatsby Club - with guests.

the UK it’s a packaged product.” Like Walker, Scott has an open mind about whether the Olympics will take business away from other summer sports events. “We are at the Open Golf Tournament at Lytham St Annes in July. We were worried that people might opt out of the Open this year, but actually, we’re ahead on bookings for Lytham. And Royal Ascot? We’re working harder and we’re doing well.” In 2011 at Ascot, Sodexo Prestige found its top-priced packages were still selling well. “Some people didn’t use our corporate hospitality service, but our takings were up in the Champagne tent,” reports Scott. If people organize their own event tickets and do their entertaining ad hoc, Sodexo still benefits. Recession and the Olympics were two items Scott had on his list of challenging issues for this year. The other was corruption – an issue rather clouded by the MPs’ expenses scandal and the controversy over City bonuses, with

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the Bribery Act also coming into force. Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke said: “Bribery is one of those things we know when we see – it is a cynical attempt to manipulate someone’s judgment by financial or similar means. The guidance makes clear that no one is going to try to stop businesses getting to know their clients by taking them to events like Wimbledon, Twickenham or the Grand Prix. Reasonable hospitality to meet, network and improve relationships with customers is a normal part of business.” This statement notwithstanding, some of Sodexo’s clients have been seeking guidance, knowing that when they buy corporate hospitality the expenditure and the value of what is offered has to be proportionate. “In our planning we did wonder if the Act would have an impact. Some clients have asked us about the Bribery Act and we’ve reassured them,” says Scott. Last November, he recalls, Sodexo Prestige ran the corporate

hospitality at the Rugby World Cup in New Zealand. Taking guests there, clearly, was a different matter to an afternoon at Ascot or Wimbledon. “We didn’t invite many people, and we didn’t invite people’s partners. If a client wanted to pay for their partner to go, then that was up to them.” Sodexo, Keith Prowse (a division of Compass) and their competitors are among the brand leaders in corporate hospitality. There is evidence that hotels are modifying their approach to suit the economic climate, too. For example, Elite Hotels, which operates four proeprties including the Grand, Eastbourne and Tylney Hall in Hampshire, has been offering event organisers a £50 per delegate voucher to add value to events. Guests choose from golf on the courses at Ashdown Park and Luton Hoo; clay pigeon shooting, archery and hot air ballooning in the grounds of Tylney Hall; and powerboat rides at The Grand.


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TOUGH TIMES – BUT OLYMPIC GAMES HOLD OUT GREAT PROMISE Miles Quest

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GUIDING LIGHT AT THE AA John Musson

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HOTEL EXPANSION BELIES THE IMPACT OF THE RECESSION Miles Quest

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MAJOR HOTEL OPENINGS AND NEW UK HOTEL BRANDS IN 2011

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BRITAIN’S TOP HOTELS

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HOTEL DESIGN: TAKING THE LONG VIEW Conrad Smith

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UK Hotel Industry

Tough times but Olympic Games hold out great promise The hotel industry is beginning to emerge more confidently from the impact of recession but times are still tough, even though the Olympic Games holds out great promise for 2012, says Miles Quest

If 2011 was a year of contrasts for the UK hotel industry, hoteliers looked to 2012, and the excitements of the Olympic Games, with some degree of confidence. What impact will the Olympic Games have? With 40,000 rooms allocated to the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (LOCOG) – of which 8,000 were returned in February – the period of the Games itself looks set to be a success. In a survey by BHA at the end of January 2012, average occupancy (including LOCOG

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rooms) booked to date was 81 per cent; seven hotels were already 100 per cent full and no hotel was under 59 per cent full. More significantly, the average expected occupancy during the Olympic period was 96.8 per cent. Eight hotels expected to be 100 per cent full and no hotel expected to be less than 85 per cent full (average occupancy in London in August is 82 per cent according to TRI Hospitality). So the doomsters who forecast that London bookings would be well down because of

high Olympic prices look as if they will be confounded. Some displacement of regular traffic during the Olympics will be inevitable but no-one knows by how much. However, the European Tour Operators Association, which has been consistently gloomy about London’s prospects, calculated a loss of £3.6bn. Bearing in mind that the total turnover of the UK hotel industry in 2010 was only £12.5bn, this figure (in just 15 days of trading) seems wildly exaggerated. Nor is there any evidence to suggest (as


HOTELS

UK Hotel Industry

Left: Strada at Westfield Stratford City: one of over 70 catering outlets in one of Britain’s largest shopping malls. Opposite page: The Aquatic Centre at the Olympic Park: the Games will introduce new people to the UK who have never visited before.

ETOA does) that displaced visitors will not return in 2013 and later. The fact that London is very busy one year does not mean that people will not want to visit in later years as other Olympic host venues testify. But whatever the level of occupancy in London one of the key benefits of the Games is their long-term impact on the UK tourism economy which stretches far beyond this year. The Games will introduce new people to the UK who have never visited before; providing they get a good experience, it’s likely that many will want to return. Also, the worldwide television coverage for the Games and UK generally is worth infinitely more than anything that VisitBritain and others could possibly generate. This will be one of the Games’ most lasting legacies. Nevertheless, while hotels during the Olympic period will be full, BHA’s survey showed that the pre- and post-Games periods were relatively soft. London hotels will be hoping that they will fill through late bookings and strategic offers. Inevitably, prices have risen for the Games and it was to be expected that complaints about Olympic pricing would catch the imagination of the national dailies, as well as MPs. Few commentators appear to recognise that pricing in the hotel industry is demandled and prices will inevitably rise for what is the world’s biggest sporting event. But surveys comparing Olympic prices with

different times of the year are not valid; a truer comparison is to compare prices at the Olympics with major events like Farnborough or Wimbledon, when London prices reach their peak because of maximum demand. Looking back to 2011, London traded very strongly during the year, reaching over 92 per cent occupancy in July; provincial hotels lagged some 15 percentage points behind, as usual. Just as serious, many hoteliers in the provinces continued to struggle with rising costs and hesitant consumer demand. This did not prevent hotel developments from racing ahead – 11,939 new rooms opened in the UK in 2011, almost all branded properties and many of them franchised. During the year, major groups continued to offload their freehold assets to property and development companies in favour of sale and leaseback or management contracts. However, the government, while pledging its support for the tourism industry in a new Tourism Framework document, gave little ground in removing some of the most obvious barriers to tourism growth in the UK, such as a high and uncompetitive rate of VAT compared with European competitor countries, high visa costs and increasing Air Passenger Duty. Progress was only really made in the area of deregulation with the establishment of the Tourism Regulation Taskforce, chaired by Alan Parker, BHA president and the former

chief executive of Whitbread. The Taskforce reported its findings to government with at least 60 recommendations. Government is still considering the recommendations. And 2011 was the year when some of the industry’s biggest players found survival elusive. After bearing the worst of the recession, von Essen, Jarvis, Pontins, Mint and the Scotsman group – big names all – fell by the wayside. Recovery from the recession is clearly patchy. However, it was a marginally better year for the provincial hotel industry with occupancy, compared with 2010, up 0.7 per cent, average room rate up 0.8 per cent and RevPAR up 1.5 per cent according to TRI Hospitality. But pressure on wages and NI forced payroll costs up from an already worrying 31.9 per cent to 32.2 per cent (it was 24.5 per cent in 1997). Hoteliers in Scotland and Wales find wage costs particularly challenging. Contrast this performance with London, where in the same period – although occupancy fell by 0.7 per cent (to 81.4 per cent) – average room rate increased by 7.0 per cent and RevPAR by 6.1 per cent. Payroll increased, too, by 0.2 per cent to 23.9 per cent, but still significantly less than payroll costs in the provinces. The results show that London hoteliers were on the crest of a wave for most of 2011 except for the Royal Wedding when occupancy slumped into the

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UK Hotel Industry

25%

% Rate of VAT on Hotel Accommodation

20%

15% % Rate

10%

5%

0%

Denmark

Lithuania

United Kingdom

Slovakia

Hungary

Czech Republic

Latvia

Sweden

Italy

Austria

Romania

Ireland

Finland

Estonia

Bulgaria

Slovenia

Spain

Poland

Cyprus

Malta

Germany

France

Greece

Portugal

Netherlands

Belgium

Luxembourg

Country

Above: VAT on accommodation is lower in all but three of the 27 EU member states.

60 per cent range (and might do so again for the Diamond Jubilee). To complicate this happy scenario, a dispute with LOCOG centred around the 40,000 rooms that London hotels (through the BHA) had allocated to LOCOG for the ‘Olympic family’ in 2012. These were rooms provided at a specially discounted rate and which played a key role in bringing the Games to London. Against the spirit of this agreement, LOCOG released some of these rooms to Thomas Cook for onward sale to the public in packages which included Olympic tickets. These packages were at such high rates that they gave the impression that London hoteliers were profiteering when, in fact, the rooms had been provided at a discount. Discussions with LOCOG finally resolved the issue but not before ill-will had been generated and damage inflicted on the reputation of London hotels. Certainly, confidence is high – and not just in London – if the number of new hotel developments is anything to go by. BHA calculates that over 1,100 hotels (110,000 rooms) have been added to the industry’s stock in the last decade at an estimated

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£25bn investment. More hotels would have opened in 2011 if the recession had not forced projects to be put back, often due to developers suffering funding problems, or to continuing planning frustrations. As a result, the number of rooms due to open in 2012 – not all in time for the Olympic Games – is a record 21,000, the highest number ever in one year. A further 13,000 are planned or proposed for 2013. This has been the most sustained period of hotel development in the industry’s history, led principally by branded properties, many of which are being operated under franchise agreements. Budget properties chiefly Premier Inn and Travelodge – continue to be at the forefront of this expansion, but hotels have been built in all grades. Of course, brand growth will continue into the future as increasing cost and marketing pressures bear down on the independent owner-operator who so dominated the industry even into the 1980s. The best of the independents will survive profitably, through levels of personal service and individualism for which there will always be a market, but the corporate brand, with its consistent offer, known facilities, widespread availability and

considerable marketing firepower, is exerting significant counter-pressures. But name changes are becoming increasingly frequent, as franchisees change, and it would be understandable if consumers become confused. Indeed, we now have various brands within brands – Best Western now has both Best Western Premier and Best Western Plus sub-brands, while Accor is changing its All Seasons brand to Ibis Styles and its ETAP brand to Ibis Budget, while still retaining the Ibis brand. This may become a more significant challenge in the future. After all, it’s difficult for the same building to transform itself from, say, a Courtyard by Marriott to a Holiday Inn Express with just a name change. A fundamental redesign of the building is impossible so success depends on changing décor, furnishings and levels of service. Certainly, owners need to impose key brand identities on their new properties without much delay. All this activity comes at a time when, as the BHA pointed out, Britain is totally uncompetitive with the rest of Europe, its nearest competitor. With VAT on hotel accommodation at 20 per cent in the UK,


HOTELS

UK Hotel Industry

but at seven per cent in France and Germany and 10 per cent in Italy, it’s difficult to see how there can be significant growth in UK tourism without more positive action on the government’s part – and particularly on the rate of VAT for hotel accommodation and attractions. BHA reckons that if VAT is reduced to five per cent, and if less complicated and less expensive visa forms for residents from such key source countries as China and India are introduced, the hospitality industry could go a long way to creating a significant number of new jobs by 2015 onwards. This forecast is also predicated on continued public support for the various Visit agencies, a reduction in red tape, support from the Regional Growth Fund (a welcome £19.8m boost to VisitEngland was announced by the Fund in October 2011), and an enthusiastic embrace of the industry by the newly-formed Local Enterprise Partnerships. That’s a long list of provisos. So far, government response has been cautious. Talks between the BHA and senior officials at the Treasury on a possible reduction on the rate of VAT are based on an independent report produced for Bourne Leisure and Merlin Entertainments by Deloitte. All but three other EU member states have a reduced

rate of VAT for hotel accommodation and many have a reduced rate for attractions and meals out of home. The BHA is arguing that bringing the rate down will reduce prices and boost occupancy which will in turn create more jobs. This is indeed what has happened in France when it reduced its rate of VAT on restaurant meals to 5.5.per cent. There, in two years it is slated that over 53,000 jobs were created and 15,000 establishments saved from bankruptcy. Through its Adopt an MP programme, the BHA’s objective is to bring its influence to bear on MPs, MSPs and Welsh Assembly members so that they understand better the barrier that the UK’s high rate of VAT poses to the hospitality industry. Emphasising the critically important role that the hospitality industry plays in the national and local economy – a subject about which some MPs, even in resort areas, are surprisingly unaware – is also key. The UK’s restaurant industry – as Peter Backman points out on page 69 – also survived in better shape than might have been expected. Insolvencies, in a sector notorious for business failures, were actually down on 2010 and not much above that of 2008. There were changes of ownership for some brands, but most managed a modest

expansion and certainly the opening of Westfield Stratford City may be leading the sector into a new direction. Here, in what is claimed to be the largest urban shopping area in Europe (and bigger than Westfield in White City) over 70 food outlets opened ranging from fast food outlets with an average spend of some £5 to high profile Strada, Wagamama and Jamie’s Italian brands. Shopping Malls like this – though not so large as either Westfield White City or Stratford – continue to provide great opportunities for branded restaurant chains. Heavy footfall high street sites attract higher rents and demand a premium but at Westfield Stratford City, the sites are nil-premium and rents are linked to turnover, so less start-up investment is required. For the food and service management sector, figures for 2011 are not available. 2010, however, going into 2011, was a difficult year for operators. BHA’s own FSM survey for 2010 shows outlets, meals and turnover down during the year – mainly because of office and factory closures as a result of the recession. Here, recovery will be slow and will depend as much on the general state of business economy as on the ability of local authorities and the NHS to finance the catering services they have to provide.

Left: The UK’s restaurant industry survived 2011 in better shape than might have been expected.

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Interview

Guiding Light at the AA Taking over at the AA’s hotel services business in 2006, Simon Numphud is responsible for rating schemes which recognise over 10,000 UK hospitality establishments, the very best of which are acknowledged in the AA’s annual hotel and restaurant awards. He discusses developments within the industry over his fifteen-year tenure with the iconic institution and his reading of its future direction together with that of hospitality grading itself. Since you began at the AA fifteen years ago, what have been the major structural shifts in the composition of the hotel/guest house industry in the UK? We have certainly witnessed more groups developing and reiterations of groups and companies morphing into other companies, or being acquired by companies and developing into brands. A classic example of this is The City Inn project: growing into a nice collection of hotels, deciding to rebrand to Mint and now acquired by DoubleTree by Hilton. That’s an interesting scenario. And then you have companies which have demonstrated how to build a small hotel group whilst maintaining quality, Elite Hotels for example, growing gradually with consistency through cash flow and reinvestment. Of course we’ve also seen the bigger brands growing over the last fifteen years; the budget sector has been an area of major expansion. Look at the market penetration of Premier Inn, Travelodge and to a lesser extent Holiday Inn. This has certainly had an impact on the overall market, particularly the smaller hotel and guest accommodation market, the B&Bs. The independents have been squeezed to a degree in the play of market forces, and the weight of regulation and onus on selfassessment in particular certainly haven’t made their position any easier. Let’s talk about the trends that have emerged over the last fifteen years since you began with the AA which are significantly influencing the services that hotels provide or the way that they do business. Technology is constantly changing; at every conference I attend it seems to have moved

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on. One of the key challenges in hotels is about connectivity – I’m a firm believer that we’re all becoming media centres in our own right, each one of us supporting multiple devices – iphones, ipads and so on – and we look primarily to be able to connect these devices wherever we are, so whilst there will still be televisions and phones in hotel rooms do I really need a radio/stereo when I have my iphone/ipod with me? But one of the biggest room-based innovations that comes to mind is flat screen TVs – obviously they save so much space, and are so much easier to keep clean. Social media of course has been hugely innovative. Hotels’ use of it, as with all forms of marketing, is about being on the maximum number of distribution channels to get your awareness across to as many people as possible – that’s the simple fundamental, and if that means engaging with Facebook, Twitter and other social media then that’s great. I can clearly see the power of that but also the danger of addiction to social devices; the downside is that we have to a degree lost the art of social conversation, picking up the phone and speaking to each other. There is the danger of technology impinging on social interaction, so important in the hospitality industry. Sustainability is certainly an issue that has penetrated the public consciousness. People are more knowledgeable and more discriminating about it – not only surrounding the issue of food but also how businesses run, what their environmental policies are. There is also obviously an economic rationale behind hospitality businesses looking for best practice. I have seen some fantastic initiatives in hotels well above and beyond the staples of recycling and switch-off campaigns; the Lancaster in London, for example, with its rooftop beehives.

Another great example – and something we’re seeing for the first time – is the construction of purpose-built environmentally friendly hotels such as The Scarlet in Cornwall, where the whole ethos is built around sustainability. It’s a growing interest and certainly more and more hotels now have a green team based internally, encouraging staff to do more about these issues above and beyond the impacts controlled by senior management. So much is to do with changing habits. Have your assessment criteria evolved in response to these shifts? What are you rewarding in terms of provision now that wouldn’t have been on the hospitality radar a decade ago? We’re about to launch a reiteration of the common standards – quite a substantial review together with our colleagues at Visit England, Visit Scotland and Visit Wales. A key change in acknowledgement of the impact and prominence of sustainability will be the incorporation into quality standards of sustainability best practice. The AA has also incorporated Eco Hotel and Eco Group Hotel categories into our annual awards event. Similarly, in acknowledgement of the importance of connectivity, wifi is also being introduced into the standards. Obviously allowances need to be made for establishments in remote areas without the infrastructure to support wifi – it’s important the AA doesn’t become too prescriptive – but I can see wifi becoming standard across the board and more hotels not charging for the service. And at the risk of making you a hostage to fortune, what do you see as important trends/developments going forward?


HOTELS

Interview

Technology certainly is going to continue to evolve, although the specifics are very difficult to second-guess. Without question the future will be about getting your information on a mobile format – everything will be geo-based, consumers will digest their information on the move through mobile phones and tablets. The effects of other factors are equally difficult to predict. The influence of the emerging markets of China and India will depend on how accessible the UK becomes for these markets. There are certainly challenges around visas and costs. The effect of the Eurozone crisis is certainly being felt : where London has been so buoyant, concerns are just beginning to emerge again. And London very much enjoys its own economic micro-climate in the UK because of its unique mix of culture and heritage which many cities can’t realistically rival, so if London catches a cold you can be sure it’s going to be twice as serious in the provinces. But it’s very easy to get carried away in making predictions about trends and secondguessing important developments. What we have to remember in the hotel industry is the importance of good fundamentals: a good bed, user-friendly rooms. These are the things that can so easily be overlooked Hotel grading is always going to be a heavily disputed area. In the age of SatNav / iPhone apps /social media is there the same respect and need for these centralised guides? That’s a really good question. I would firstly say we have been and always will be a voluntary scheme and judged by that. Last year our numbers were actually up and it does seem that when times are tighter during a recession establishments do feel more compelled to focus on marketing and take a longer term view in associating themselves with quality. As long as quality is a part of consumers’ choice – which I believe it will always be – we will remain valued within the industry. Aviva did a study of SMEs in London recently and found that being quality assured meant on average businesses achieved higher rates and occupancy. This underlines the importance of independent verification. And of course there is a very tangible financial benefit to membership of the AA. We plough approximately £400,000 into the industry per year through our visits, which is not an insignificant sum; secondly the brand provides significant customer awareness opportunities and we are constantly building strategies to engage our AA motoring membership

Above: Simon Numphud: “What we have to remember in the hotel industry is the importance of good fundamentals: a good bed, user-friendly rooms. These are the things that can so easily be overlooked.”

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Interview

(currently 15 million) to touch our qualityrated establishments. Then, of course, the awards raise awareness. Finally there are the softer benefits, for example how establishments use their AA status to recruit quality staff. We certainly don’t discount the importance of the digital age however, and it’s something we’re working very hard to embrace. We’re still very much committed to producing our guide book – it’s a niche market – but whereas the membership scheme used to revolve around the guidebook, now it’s secondary within that purchasing decision. What are the pressures that prevent a statutory registration scheme so that we know exactly how many hotels and guest houses there are in the UK? Data collection in the first place and how you fund that. There is no definitive registration of businesses up and down the country that I’m aware of. And then enforcement is an issue. It’s a great idea which would allow for the creation of baseline standards. London in particular would benefit enormously – quality of establishment varies enormously in the capital and international customers’ perception of British hotel keeping will be formed by their experience which, far too often, does our industry no good at all. I can certainly understand however why the government lacks the appetite for this at the moment – it’s a huge task. How do you envisage the future of hotel grading? Is there the likelihood of a European-wide hotel grading scheme emerging, for example? A European-wide grading system would be an enormous challenge as you’re trying to bring together multiple organisations with culture differences and differences of perception. It would require a high percentage of buy-in from the industry or it wouldn’t be relevant. It would of course be a great step forward and I would certainly welcome the day. And in terms of the future of hotel grading, I would certainly hope it still has a place in ten, twenty years. The AA has been doing this for over a hundred years now and the challenge I think is to remain relevant to the industry, to provide a good partnership to the industry. Part of our role is to encourage the continual improvement of standards; this is certainly part of our service and an often-overlooked benefit of a quality scheme. We provide professional advice on improving the product, share our

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knowledge of developing trends and provide a context of what’s happening nationally. Without this you could argue standards may not have evolved at the pace they have. We have an amazingly robust industry with so much potential to grow further which you can’t say of many industries in the UK. This is why we support organisations such as the BHA in its attempts to make hospitality more recognised as a major contributor to the economy and to break down the hurdles that make it more challenging an environment in which to operate than it needs to be.

Simon Numphud was interviewed by John Musson at The Royal Horseguards Hotel, London. Photography by Gary Sherwood.

Above: Simon Numphud: “Part of our role is to encourage the continual improvement of standards; this is certainly part of our service and an often-overlooked benefit of a quality scheme.”


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HOTELS

Hotel expansion

Hotel expansion belies the impact of the recession Rapid continued expansion masked a small number of notable failures in the hotel industry is 2011. Left: Andy Harrison, chief executive, Whitbread: with its Premier Inn budget brand, Whitbread remains the largest hotel operator in the UK, Opposite page: In early 2012, the Mint Hotel in Leeds was rebranded Doubletree by Hilton Leeds.

During 2011, the hospitality industry continued to climb out of the recession. Whitbread, with its Premier Inn budget brand, remained the largest hotel operator in the UK, with InterContinental’s various brands second and Travelodge third. In spite of the impact of the recession, all three companies maintained their growth during 2011, with Premier Inn adding over 20 hotels (3,000 rooms), InterContinental adding 14 hotels (1,900 rooms) and Travelodge adding 25 hotels (3,000 rooms). After some years when its numbers were largely static, Accor, through franchises, gained 41 hotels and 3,800 rooms and Hilton, through the acquisition of Mint, added seven (2,230 rooms), plus a hotel in Amsterdam.. In all, over 11,800 rooms opened in 2011, more than in 2010 but fewer than the 21,500 rooms due to open in 2012. However, the year saw the demise of

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two well known hotel companies – von Essen and Jarvis Ramada both falling into administration. von Essen, after 12 years of bank-funded growth, finally succumbed in April 2011 and the company’s 28 hotels (741 rooms) were put on the market by Christie and Co with offers invited. The group’s prize asset – Cliveden – was acquired by London & Regional, which already owned Chewton Glen. Andrew Brownsword, of Gidleigh Park fame, acquired Amberley Castle, Buckland Manor, Lower Slaughter Manor and Washbourne Court for £32.5m while Nigel Chapman bought back the four Luxury Family Hotels which he originally sold to von Essen in 2005, plus three others including Thornbury Castle. Other hotels have been sold to the Eden Collection, Viscount Weymouth’s Longleat Enterprises and, in some cases, back to their original owners. Hotel Verta,

the only purpose-built hotel, is now with new owners and a new operator, Hong-Kong based Rhombus International Hotel Group. After some months of well publicised attempts to re-arrange its funding, John Jarvis’s 48-strong Ramada Jarvis group finally went into administration in September 2011. Nine hotels (1,316 rooms) are now being operated by BDL and 26 went in a pre-pack administration to a new company – Jupiter Hotels – which was set up by RBS West Register and Patron Capital; the properties have been rebranded as Mercure. The financial problems of the eight-strong Mint group – known until a month or two before its end as City Inns - must have been especially galling for its founders, father and son, Sandy and David Orr. They had carefully built up the group to over 2,230 rooms but the cost of financing the bank loans needed for such expansion (including its latest 553-room hotel in Amsterdam)


HOTELS

Hotel expansion

proved too much. The group was acquired for £600m by the US-based Blackstone group and the hotels are being run by Hilton and re-branded either as Doubletree by Hilton or Hilton Garden Inns Pontin’s, too, succumbed, its five sites going to Manchester-based Britannia Hotels for £20m; Britannia also rescued the 130room Russ Hill Hotel, Gatwick from administration and bought the 88-room Scarisbrook Hotel, Southport for £3.25m . Other companies to go under during the year included Menzies Hotels – 16 hotels, 1,700 rooms – which resulted in a management buyout and the formation of a new company – Cordial Hotels; five of the seven-strong Eton Collection went to Westmont Hospitality for £55m; three hotels in the Pederson group, which went under in 2010, were sold during the year. Nevertheless, despite these casualties, the number of failures in the hospitality sector is comparatively low compared with the size of the industry and the depth of the recession. Total insolvencies (including hotels, restaurants and pubs) reached 2,397 in 2010, less than in 2009 (2,429) though figures for 2011 suggest an increase on the

2010 performance. Very few (if any) hotels actually closed - indeed, other companies have benefited from these failures. Akkeron added ten hotels in 2011 (801 rooms) from the Butterfly group and BDL, Legacy and Bespoke both expanded through the acquisition of group and individual management contracts. Of the ten largest companies, only Whitbread and InterContinental remain in British hands (though InterContinental is a truly international company with strong links to the US). Hilton, Marriott, Carlson Rezidor and Wyndham are USbased and so is Best Western, though the UK franchise is a collection of quintessential British hotels. Travelodge has also moved into US ownership through the anticipated acquisition of debts from owner Dubai Investment Capital by two hedge funds. Guoman is based in Singapore though its largest collection of hotels is in the UK and Accor is French. Apart from Premier Inn and Travelodge, neither of which franchise in the UK, the majority of new developments by other hotel companies are franchise-led; in 2011 this included Holiday Inn and Holiday

Inn Express properties, Waldorf Astoria, Doubletree by Hilton Hampton by Hilton, and Days Inn. So, to this extent, the UK hotel industry continues to be strongly influenced by US styles and standards, only slightly amended for the UK market. Many new brands are now emerging or beginning to consolidate on the UK hotel scene including Hotel Indigo (four hotels), Staybridge Suites (two hotels), Radisson Blu (15 hotels), W Hotels (one hotel), Aloft (one hotel), Sandman (one hotel) and Residence Inn (one hotel). Independent owners will continue – and the best will thrive – but there’s no doubt that branded hotel groups are increasingly influencing the industry’s development. Accor expanded its Mercure chain by 38 principally through the decision of the newfound Jupiter group to move its 26 Jarvis Ramada hotels to the Mercure brand; ten Jarvis properties which were taken by Focus, also adopted the Mercure brand. Indeed, the introduction of franchising and their brands, as well as the eagerness of companies to change from hotel ownership to hotel operations, remain the most significant trends in the UK hotel industry

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

39


HOTELS

Hotel expansion

in the last decade or so. Splitting these two roles has brought in new developers, new money, new brands and new thinking and branding provides some assurance to the funding institutions. As a result of this trend, the sale of freehold assets continues. In September 2011, Whitbread completed the sale and 25-year leaseback on seven Premier Inns to LaSalle Investment Management for £53.8m, representing a net initial yield of under 5.5 per cent and a profit over book value, as at 3 March 2011, of £28.1m. The deal emphasises the remarkable change in hotel ownership and development in the last decade. Even until the turn of this century, most UK hotel companies owned and operated their properties – indeed, many still do. In doing so, they have traditionally used the rising value of their property to secure funds for future expansion. This business model is now being overturned as major hotel companies – urged on by their shareholders – are rejecting hotel ownership and instead looking to hotel operations and brand management. While Whitbread remains committed to having a substantial freehold asset base, its strategy now is to diversify its sources of funds in order to increase the number of Premier Inn rooms by half to at least 65,000 rooms, and to double the size of Costa Coffee. The deal is, in fact, an example of using the company’s properties as an alternative method of funding future growth. Hilton also continued its asset freehold sell-off with the £100m sale to the Cowell Group of the freeholds of the Hilton Brighton Metropole, the Hilton St Anne’s

Manor in Wokingham, the Hilton Warwick and the Hilton Manchester Airport, while retaining the management contracts. Similarly, the MWB Group sold the London Mal, in Charterhouse Walk, London, to Deka Immobilien GMbH for £31.5m and the three Malmaison properties in Birmingham, Manchester and Newcastle to Legal & General Property for £55.3m – again, retaining the management contract. Elsewhere, there were other significant transactions: Berners Hotel in London, with 193 rooms on which redevelopment stopped in 2010, was acquired by Marriott for £60m as an early addition to its new Edition brand (and the first in the UK, due to open in 2013); Peter Taylor’s Edinburghbased Town House Hotels group sold two landmark properties in Edinburgh – the 41-room Channings for £5.5m and the 18room Howard Hotel for £3.5m to private investors. The eight-strong Hallmark Hotels acquired the 109-room Aerodrome Hotel, Croydon and the 95-room Ramada Jarvis at Gloucester, both now operating under the Hallmark brand. NH Hoteles group sold the 212-room Hesperia London Victoria for £55m to Crimson Hotels, with plans for rebranding as a Doubletree by Hilton by early 2012 Marriott gave up the management contract of the 366-room Renaissance London Chancery Lane - now operated by the owners, New World Management; the 189-room Howard Hotel, operated by Swissotel, closed during the year as a result of development plans by the freehold owner Land Securities; Sarova bought the in-administration 95-room Sir Christopher

Wren’s House Hotel in Windsor for an undisclosed sum.. During 2011, the five star St Pancras Renaissance and the Corinthia both emerged, ironically as vastly updated versions of two hotels built in the Victorian era and later converted into offices. The Wellesley in Knightsbridge, currently being built by an Arab investment company, City and Country Hotels, and due to open at end-2012, is reputedly aiming at ‘six star’ standard. A new entrant to the London hotel scene also expanded its interests. Ian Schrager’s Morgans Hotel Group (which is also involved in the development of the Marriott Edition brand at the Berner’s Hotel site) acquired the 196-room Crowne Plaza Shoreditch with Westmont Hospitality and Grove International Partners with plans to open the first of the new Public brand, which is also expected to be the brand for the 208-room Hoxton Hotel in London, acquired for £60m plus. Morgans is also involved in the development of the former Sea Containers building on London’s south bank, where there are plans to develop another of Schrager’s brands – a 356-room up-market Mondrian. With the branded sector growing, the private sector is shrinking by comparison and would shrink further were it not for established consortia such as Best Western, Classic British Hotels, Small Luxury Hotels of the World, Pride of Britain, and new consortia like the US-based Magnuson Hotels which enable them to market on an international basis. But, of course, these are brands as well.

Left: A WOW suite at Starwood’s new W Hotel in London’s Leicester Square.

40

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012


PROMOTION

Ideal Standard International

Proven Solutions for Hotel Bathrooms Ideal Standard International is a leading provider of innovative and design-driven bathroom solutions, producing sanitaryware and baths, as well as brass fittings, shower enclosures, trays, valves, kits and bathroom furniture.

Top left: Contemporary Luxury – Strada basins with Synergy wet room panel Bottom left: Public Washroom – Contour 21 basins, Sensorflow mixers with Hygeniq urinal

With its long experience and history of design and innovation, Ideal Standard International continues to invest in advanced technology to ensure that their products are functional, yet aesthetically pleasing for both consumer and commercial sectors. Following in-depth market research, Ideal Standard has gained a comprehensive understanding of the specific needs of the hotel industry. The research has shown that there is a real demand for a company that can offer a complete solution to all areas of hotel bath rooms. Ideal Standard has therefore brought to market a new strategy based on the “one solution, one supplier, one maintenance package” approach. Ideal Standard has a range of tools, solutions and products developed specifically for the hotel market to make selecting the ideal bathroom easier. These are demonstrated in a tri-modular approach - Ideal Vision, Ideal Plan and Ideal Care. These three

platforms show how Ideal Standard supports hotels, architects and designers with a full holistic project package – from visualization, through project planning and specifications, to dedicated customer contact support and maintenance post-fit. Ideal Standard’s design studio, the Bath Room, in London offers hotel specifiers a chance to see and plan their bathroom and washrooms and provides a 3D visual design service as well as a free of charge mock up area. Tony Rheinberg, Ideal Standard Marketing Manager commented, “We understand what hoteliers want to include in a bathroom. There is no ‘one size fits all’ hotel bathroom solution and that is why it is important to be flexible. We can do everything from high-end guest rooms to spas to public washrooms. Our hotel brochure brings together everything you will need in one place, whether you are designing a 10 or 500 bedroom hotel.”

Ideal Standard The Bathroom Works National Avenue Hull HU5 4HS T. 01482 346461 www.thebluebook.co.uk

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

41


HOTELS

New Hotels

Major hotel openings and new UK hotel brands in 2011

Hotel

Rooms

Cost

Above left: Main foyer of St. Pancras Renaissance, London

LONDON Above right: Corinthia Hotel, London

45 Park Lane (Dorchester Collection)

46

Aloft London Excel (Starwood) – first in UK

252

£50m

Corinthia Hotel, Whitehall – first in UK

294

£305m

Grange Tower Bridge Hotel

370

£70m

Hilton London Heathrow Terminal 5

350

London St Pancras – a Renaissance Hotel (Marriott)

245

Montcalm London City

235

St Ermin’s – relaunch – now part of Accor’s MGallery Collection

331

£30m

W Hotel, Leicester Square (Starwood) – first in UK

192

£200m

Waldorf Astoria, London Syon Park (Hilton) – first in UK

137

£70m

Radisson Edwardian, Guildford

185

£60m

Sandman Signature, Newcastle-upon-Tyne – first in UK

175

£200m

ENGLAND

SCOTLAND Residence Inn , Edinburgh (Marriott) – first in UK

107

WALES Maldron Hotel, Cardiff (Dalata Hotels) – first in UK

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

216

Opposite page: London Hilton Heathrow Terminal 5 ground floor bar


HOTELS

New Hotels

Hotel openings 2012

Hotel

No of rooms

Cost

Hotels scheduled for 2012 opening

LONDON Ampersand Hotel, Harrington Road

110

Spring 2012

Apex Temple Court (Apex Hotels)

184

£60m

1 April 2012

Belgraves Hotel, Belgravia (Thompson Hotels/Harilela Group – relaunch – was Sheraton Belgravia)

85

First European property

Open

Bulgari Knightsbridge – relaunch - was Normandie Hotel

78

£350m investment

April 2012

Café Royal Hotel, Regent Street (Alrov Group)

160

£70m mixed Quadrant development

Mid 2012

Citizen M, Bankside

186

Mid 2012

Club Quarters, Kingsway

160

Early 2012

Dorset Square Hotel, Marylebone (Firmdale) – relaunch

37

May 2012

Doubletree by Hilton – relaunch – was Hesperia (Crimson/Hilton Worldwide)

212

Open

EasyHotel, Old Street

82

Open

Grosvenor House Apartments by Jumeirah Living (Park Lane Properties)

133

Early 2012

Hilton London Southbank (Boghani/Hilton Worldwide)

281

2012

Hilton, Wembley (Quintain/Sisk/Hilton Worldwide)

358

Sept 2012

Holiday Inn Express, London Heathrow Terminal 5 (Crimson Hotels/IHG)

300

Open

Holiday Inn Express London Harrow (Crimson Hotels/IHG)

130

Autumn 2012

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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HOTELS

New Hotels

Holiday Inn London, Commercial Road (Sleeptex/IHG)

137

September 2012

Holiday Inn London Stratford City (Cycas Hospitality/IHG)

188

July 2012

Holiday Inn Docklands London West India Dock (Key Homes Group/West India Dock Road Ltd/IHG)

252

Summer 2012

Holiday Inn Wandsworth (Eclipse/IHG)

122

Ibis London Blackfriars (McAleer & Rushe/Accor)

297

Summer 2012

Ibis London Shepherds Bush

128

Summer 2012

ME by Melia London, Aldwych (Melia)

173

June 2012

Novotel London Blackfriars (McAleer & Rushe/Accor)

182

Summer 2012

Park Inn by Radisson Wembley (Key Homes Group/Rezidor)

235

Late 2012

Premier Inn, Aldgate (Whitbread)

251

2012

Premier Inn, Heathrow Terminal 5 (Arora/Aviva/Whitbread)

400

Open

Premier Inn, York Road, Lambeth (Whitbread)

234

2012

Premier Inn Leicester Square (Whitbread) – relaunch - was Queen’s House Hotel

84

April 2012

South Place Hotel, Moorgate (D & D/Frogmore)

80

Staybridge Suites London Stratford (ES Properties/IHG)

162

July 2012

Travelodge, Bromley

92

2012

Travelodge Enfield (Frontier Estates)

132

2012

Travelodge, Harrow Lyon Road

98

2012

Travelodge, Harrow Sheridan House

114

2012

Travelodge London Balham

90

2012

Travelodge London Bethnal Green (Dam Estates)

131

2012

Travelodge London Bexleyheath

110

Travelodge London Clapham

84

2012

Travelodge London Crystal Palace

89

Open

Travelodge London Edgware

119

£6.2m

2012

Travelodge London Excel Centre

131

£7.4m

2012

Travelodge London Finchley

110

Travelodge, London Finsbury Park

96

£10.1m

2012

Travelodge, London Greenwich West

97

£5.5m

Open

Travelodge London Stratford

188

Open

Travelodge London Teddington

113

May 2012

Travelodge London Woolwich

120

2012

Travelodge Royal Docks, Newham (Citygrove)

131

May 2012

Travelodge Penge

89

2012

Travelodge Sutton

100

2012

Travelodge Twickenham

111

Open

Travelodge Vauxhall (with Waitrose) (Salmon Harvester)

148

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

£14m

First of small boutique chain.

£5.4m

December 2012

Summer 2012

2012

2012

£17.4m mixed development

September 2012


HOTELS

New Hotels

Right: St. Ermin’s Hotel, London relaunched in 2011 as part of Accor’s M Gallery collection

Travelodge Walthamstow (Solum Regeneration)

99

2012

Tune Hotel, Liverpool Street

183

Open

Tune Hotel Kings Cross

217

June 2012

Tune Hotel Paddington

137

June 2012

The Wellesley, Knightsbridge (City & Country Hotels)

36

Z Hotel, Victoria (Bev King)

106

First 6-star hotel in UK

November 2012 Spring 2012

ENGLAND Adagio Aparthotel, Lewis’s Building, Liverpool (Merepark)

129

£20m – first Adagio in UK

2012

Doubletree by Hilton, Edgbaston Mill, Birmingham (Calthorpe/Edgbaston Holdings/Hilton Worldwide)

200

East Midlands Conference Centre/University of Nottingham

200

£20m eco-friendly

November 2012

Edge Hotel School and Country House Hotel, Wivenhoe House, Colchester

40

£10m

Spring 2012

Gulliver’s Theme Parks, Warrington

50

£4m

Summer 2012

Hampton by Hilton, Gatwick North (Shiva/HMI/Hilton Worldwide)

192

Summer 2012

Hampton by Hilton, Broad Street, Birmingham (Sanguine/Hilton Worldwide)

285

Summer 2012

Hampton by Hilton, St George’s Park Burton-on-Trent (Football Association/Hilton Worldwide)

86

£105m**

Summer 2012

Hampton by Hilton, Exeter International Airport Sanguine/Hilton Worldwide)

160

£30m

Summer 2012

Hampton by Hilton Luton (Ability Group/Hilton Worldwide)

250

Hampton by Hilton, York (Avantis/Hilton Worldwide)

120

Heckfield Place, Hook (Gerald Chan)

70

Hilton, St George’s Park, Burton-on-Trent (Football Association/Hilton Worldwide)

146

Holiday Inn Express Snow Hill Birmingham (Sanguine/IHG)

224

End 2012

Holiday Inn Express Crewe - relaunch

70

Open

Holiday Inn Express Dunstable (Gateway Hotel/IHG)

120

2012

2012 £10m

August 2012 Winter 2012

£105m**

£6.5m

Summer 2012

2012

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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HOTELS

New Hotels

Left: Bar at the Maldron Hotel, Cardiff the first Dalata hotel in the UK

Holiday Inn Express, Hoylake (Sanguine/IHG) – relaunch – was Kings Gap Court

56

Spring 2012

Holiday Inn Express Wakefield (Cairn Hotels/IHG)

74

Spring 2012

Holiday Inn London Gatwick, Worth (IHG)

118

June 2012

Holiday Inn London Southend Airport (Stobart/Chardon/IHG)

129

Holiday Inn Walsall - relaunch (Kew Green/Hotel Operations/IHG)

156

Hotel la Tour, Eastside City Park Gate, Birmingham (Hotel de la Tour Group)

174

Hotel Indigo Manchester (Sanguine/IHG)

178

Hotel Indigo Newcastle (Sanguine/IHG)

148

Hotel Indigo, York (Sojourn/IHG)

101

Ibis Liverpool Dale Street

122

£10m

Winter 2012

Legoland Windsor

150

Part of £30m development

Open

Magdalen Chapter, Exeter (Chapter Hotels/Swire)- relaunch - was Hotel Barcelona

59

The Mere Hotel, Golf & Country Club, Cheshire (Mark Boler)

81

Old Palace Hotel, Lincoln

31

Premier Inn, Bristol Lewins Mead (Whitbread)

175

Premier Inn Camborne (Whitbread)

60

Open

Premier Inn Cambridge (Whitbread)

120

2012

Premier Inn Coventry (MCD Developments/Whitbread)

100

Premier Inn Dorchester (Whitbread)

76

2012

Premier Inn Exeter (Whitbread)

120

2012

Premier Inn Farnborough (Whitbread)

80

2012

Premier Inn Halifax (Whitbread)

100

Open

Premier Inn Harrogate International Centre (Paramount/Puma Hotels/Whitbread)

107

2012

Premier Inn High Wycombe (Whitbread)

120

Open

Premier Inn Hepworth House, Leeds (Whitbread)

131

2012

46

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

£10m

June 2012 Open

£24m

Spring 2012 Autumn 2012

£14m

Spring 2012 Summer 2012

Spring 2012 Part of £15m development

Open Spring 2012

£8m

£6m

Late 2012

Open


HOTELS

New Hotels

Premier Inn Kidderminster

Open

Premier Inn Leamington Spa (Whitbread)

82

2012

Premier Inn Liverpool One (Grosvenor/Whitbread)

186

Premier Inn Manchester (Whitbread)

193

2012

Premier Inn Newton Abbot (Whitbread)

60

Open

Premier Inn Paignton (Whitbread)

60

£4.5m

2012

Premier Inn Solihull (Whitbread)

112

£7.6m

2012

Premier Inn The Waterways, Stratford-on-Avon (ABD/Whitbread)

130

£10.3m

Open

Premier Inn Sunbury-on-Thames (Whitbread)

104

2012

Premier Inn Warwick (Whitbread)

122

Open

Premier Inn Weston-super-Mare (McLaren/Whitbread)

116

Premier Inn Weymouth (Whitbread)

60

2012

Premier Inn Widnes (Whitbread)

60

Open

Ramada Encore Gateshead Baltic (Quay Hotels/New World/Wyndham)

202

Sleeperz, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

98

Travelodge Aldershot

91

£4.3m

Late 2012

Travelodge Altrincham

91

£4.5m

Open

Travelodge Chantry Street, Andover

78

£3.2m

2012

Travelodge Aylesbury (with Waitrose)

80

2012

Travelodge Bedford

130

2012

Travelodge NEC, Birmingham

200

2012

Travelodge Boreham Wood

55

2012

Travelodge Bradford Central

69

April 2012

Travelodge Burton on Trent Central

68

2012

Travelodge Camberley Central

100

£4.9m

Open

Travelodge Cannock (Gallan)

60

£2.2m

2012

Travelodge Chesham

75

2012

Travelodge Cheshire Oaks

77

2012

Travelodge Darlington

60

2012

Travelodge Eastleigh

60

£3.3m

May 2012

Travelodge Egham (with Waitrose)

80

£8.2m

2012

Travelodge Epsom Station (Solum Regeneration)

64

Travelodge Felixstowe

54

Travelodge London Gatwick Central – relaunch – was Mercure

400

2012

Travelodge Glossop (with JD Wetherspoon)

62

2012

Travelodge Earls Way Halesowen

71

Travelodge Havant (with Greene King)

80

Travelodge Hemel Hempstead

108

£10m

Part of £35m development

£17m

Autumn 2012

2012

Spring 2012 Open

Spring 2012 £2.7m

£2.6m

2012

2012 2012

£6.5m

2012

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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HOTELS

New Hotels

Travelodge Ipswich (Investec)

87

Summer 2012

Travelodge Kidderminster (with Marstons)

53

Open

Travelodge Kings Lynn

60

2012

Travelodge, Exchange Street Liverpool (Aviva)

125

£3m

2012

Travelodge Strand Street Liverpool (F T Pattin)

141

£7.5m

Open

Travelodge Loughborough

87

June 2012

Travelodge Lytham St Annes

61

April 2012

Travelodge Malvern

52

Travelodge Newquay Business Park (with Marston’s)

66

2012

Travelodge Newton Abbot

61

2012

Travelodge Sidcup (with Waitrose

84

2012

Travelodge St Helens

64

Travelodge Sittingbourne

56

Travelodge Sunderland (Calmont/Kier)

82

£6m

2012

Travelodge Tamworth (with Lidl)

66

£2.3m

2012

Travelodge Woking

110

2012

Tune Liverpool

127

2012

Wood Norton Hall, Evesham (Bespoke Hotels) - relaunch

50

Spring 2012

The Wave Hotel, Bognor Regis (Butlins) (McAlpine/ Bourne Leisure)

215 £25m +29 apts

May 2012

Z Hotel, Liverpool (Bev King)

92

Summer 2012

£3m

£3.2m

Winter 2012

2012 2012

SCOTLAND The Caledonian – A Waldorf Astoria Hotel – rebrand – was Caledonian Hilton Edinburgh (Hilton Worldwide)

254

£24m

Grasshoppers Glasgow

30

Open

Hotel du Vin, St Andrews (MWB) – relaunch – was Golf Hotel

21

Summer 2012

Hotel Indigo Edinburgh relaunch – was Osbourne Hotel (Sojourn/IHG)

60

Open

Motel One, Edinburgh (Chris Stewart Group)

208

First UK hotel German budget hotel Group£25m – part of £45m mixed development

End 2012

Premier Inn Edinburgh Park, Edinburgh (Whitbread)

120

£2m

Open

Premier Inn, Princes Street, Edinburgh (Delamore Properties/Whitbread)

97

Part of £35m hotel/ retail development

Open

Premier Inn Glasgow Newton Mearns

2012

Open

Premier Inn, West Nile Street, Glasgow (Whitbread)

210

Part of £30m development

August 2012

Premier Inn, Inverness Centre (Ardmuir/Whitbread)

100

£17m

Open

Premier Inn Inverness South (Caledonian Canal) (Whitbread)

80

48

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

Open


HOTELS

New Hotels

Premier Inn Inverness West

Open

Staybridge Suites, Edinburgh (BDL/IHG)

121

Travelodge above Topshop, Princes Street Edinburgh

96

Travelodge Edinburgh Queen Street

85

Winter 2012 £10m

2012 April 2012

Travelodge Glasgow Airport

2012

WALES Brown’s Hotel Laugharne – relaunch

15

Spring 2012

Premier Inn, Innovation Quarter, Barry (Whitbread)

80

End 2012

Premier Inn Llanelli Central West (Whitbread)

28

Open

Travelodge Cardiff

72

Autumn 2012

Travelodge Llanelli

53

Part of £20m Sept 2012 mixed development

60

£6m

NORTHERN IRELAND Premier Inn, Londonderry (Whitbread)

2012

Source: Wordsmith and Company

Major hotel openings and new UK brands expected in 2013 LONDON Art’otel Hoxton (Park Plaza) – first brand hotel in UK

350

Corbin & King Hotels Mayfair – first hotel by leading restaurant group

75

Edition London by Marriott – first brand hotel in UK

193

InterContinental London Westminster –second InterContinental in London – first since 1975.

254

Shangri-La, Shard of Glass – first brand hotel in UK

195

ENGLAND Flaxbury Country Club, Harrogate

300

Millenium Hotel Central Village, Manchester

180

Park Inn by Radisson, Old Trafford, Manchester

226

WALES Wyndham Cardiff – flagship hotel will be the tallest building in Wales Source: Wordsmith and Company

200

Above: Bedroom in the Residence Inn, Edinburgh, which opened in 2011

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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HOTELS

Britain’s Top Hotels

Britain’s Top Hotels The AA’s collection of 92 five-star hotels represent Britain’s top hotels, with the red star establishments singled out as being the inspector’s choice – ie: of the highest standard. This list, however, is not entirely comprehensive as some hotels are not included in the AA scheme and some four red star hotels may be of as high a standard and quality but may not have all the facilities of a five star property. Nevertheless, this list includes the country’s finest hotels although the inclusion of some, and the omission of others, continues to generate constant controversy.

Location

Name of Hotel

ASCOT

Coworth Park

*****

AUCHTERARDER

Gleneagles Hotel

*****

BAGSHOT

Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa

*****

BALLANTRAE

Glenapp Castle

*****

BALLOCH

Cameron House on Loch Lomond

*****

BATH

The Royal Crescent Hotel

*****

BATH

Bath Priory Hotel

*****

BATH

Macdonald Bath Spa

*****

BELFAST

The Merchant Hotel

*****

BY OBAN

Isle of Eriska

*****

CARDIFF

St David’s Hotel & Spa

*****

CHAGFORD

Gidleigh Park

*****

CHESTER

The Chester Grosvenor & Spa

*****

COLERNE

Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa

*****

DARLINGTON

Rockliffe Hall

*****

DOGMERSFIELD

Four Seasons Hotel Hampshire

*****

EASTBOURNE

The Grand Hotel

*****

EDINBURGH

The Balmoral

*****

EDINBURGH

The Howard

*****

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012


HOTELS

Britain’s Top Hotels

EDINBURGH

Hotel Missoni

*****

EDINBURGH

Prestonfield

*****

EDINBURGH

The Scotsman

*****

EDINBURGH

Sheraton Grand Hotel & Spa

*****

ENNISKILLEN

Lough Erne Resort

*****

FORT WILLIAM

Inverlochy Castle Hotel

*****

GLASGOW

Blythswood Square

*****

GREAT MILTON

Le Manoir Aux Quat’ Saisons

*****

LONDON

51 Buckingham Gate, Taj Suites and Residences

*****

LONDON

ANdAZ Liverpool Street

*****

LONDON

Athenaeum Hotel & Apartments

*****

LONDON

Baglioni Hotel

*****

LONDON

Brown’s Hotel

*****

LONDON

Chancery Court Hotel

*****

LONDON

Corinthia Hotel

*****

LONDON

Claridge’s

*****

LONDON

Dukes

*****

LONDON

Four Seasons Hotel Canary Wharf

*****

LONDON

Four Seasons Hotel Park Lane

*****

LONDON

Grosvenor House, A JW Marriott Hotel

*****

LONDON

Hyatt Regency London - The Churchill

*****

Opposite page: Coworth Park, Ascot Above left: Corinthia Hotel, London Above right: Blythswood Square, Glasgow

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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HOTELS

Britain’s Top Hotels

Left: St. Pancras Renaissance, London, Grand Staircase

LONDON

Jumeirah Carlton Tower

*****

LONDON

Le Meridien

*****

LONDON

London Marriott Hotel County Hall

*****

LONDON

London Marriott Hotel Park Lane

*****

LONDON

London Marriott West India Quay

*****

LONDON

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, London

*****

LONDON

Metropolitan London

*****

LONDON

Milestone Hotel

*****

LONDON

No 41

*****

LONDON

Plaza on the River - Club & Residence

*****

LONDON

Royal Garden Hotel

*****

LONDON

Sheraton Park Tower

*****

LONDON

Sofitel London St James

*****

LONDON

St James’s Hotel and Club

*****

LONDON

The Berkeley

*****

LONDON

The Capital

*****

LONDON

The Connaught

*****

LONDON

The Dorchester

*****

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from our team of buyers to the best industry suppliers Are you paying too much? Times are tough. We’re all under pressure to cut costs, maximise efďŹ ciencies and get the most from every pound we spend. So do you ever wonder if you’re paying too much for the goods and services you buy? Are you sure that you’re getting the most value out of the money you spend?

Need some advice? beacon are purchasing specialists. We’ve been reducing costs and increasing margins for thousands of businesses just like you for over a decade.

So, how does beacon work? 1. We undertake an initial audit of your current purchasing 2. We provide a benchmark report to identify savings by category 3. We price check your existing supply base and implement savings 4. We agree and implement new suppliers with improved terms 5. We develop a purchasing plan as part of our account management

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The level of service from beacon is excellent. They take away all the hassle of searching for and negotiating with new suppliers which allows us to spend more time on running our business.

email all@beaconpurchasing.co.uk visit www.beaconpurchasing.co.uk

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to book your free purchasing audit

or www.beacongreenhotel.co.uk for advice on being a ‘greener’ business

$%"!"!$$&  '  

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HOTELS

Britain’s Top Hotels

LONDON

The Draycott

*****

LONDON

The Egerton House Hotel

*****

LONDON

The Goring

*****

LONDON

The Halkin

*****

LONDON

The Landmark London

*****

LONDON

The Lanesborough

*****

LONDON

The Langham, London

*****

LONDON

The Ritz London

*****

LONDON

The Royal Horseguards

*****

LONDON

The Savoy

*****

LONDON

The Stafford London by Kempinski

*****

LONDON

The Westbury Hotel

*****

LONDON

Wyndham Grand London Chelsea Harbour

*****

LOWER BEEDING

South Lodge Hotel

*****

LUTON

Luton Hoo Hotel, Golf and Spa

*****

LYNDHURST

Lime Wood

*****

MALMESBURY

Whatley Manor

*****

MANCHESTER

The Lowry Hotel

*****

NEW MILTON

Chewton Glen Hotel & Spa

*****

NEWBURY

The Vineyard at Stockcross

*****

NEWPORT

The Celtic Manor Resort

*****

OXFORD

Macdonald Randolph Hotel

*****

READING

The Forbury Hotel

*****

RICKMANSWORTH

The Grove

*****

SEAHAM

Seaham Hall Hotel & Serenity Spa

*****

ST ANDREWS

The Old Course Hotel, Golf Resort & Spa

*****

ST ANDREWS

Fairmont St Andrews, Scotland

*****

ST HELIER

Grand Jersey Hotel & Spa

*****

ST SAVIOUR

Longueville Manor Hotel

*****

STOKE POGES

Stoke Park

*****

TAPLOW

Cliveden

*****

TURNBERRY

Turnberry Resort, Scotland

*****

WARE

Hanbury Manor A Marriott Hotel & Country Club

*****

YORK

Cedar Court Hotel

*****

Top: Lime Wood Hotel, Lyndhurst Middle: Cedar Court Hotel, York Bottom: Cliveden, in Buckinghamshire

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PROMOTION

Electrolux

Save Money with OPL from Electrolux For hotels of any size, a major concern is sourcing laundry services that combine excellent hygiene and cost efficiency. Electrolux Professional offers hoteliers the option of On Premise Laundry (OPL) facility, which has been proven to reduce costs by up to £87,120 per annum. The benefits of an OPL include significant savings compared with outsourcing to a third party. By taking into account factors such as hotel occupancy, number of wash cycles per week, amount of laundry per room, utility and detergent costs, not to mention cost of installation and labour, a typical 200 room hotel can save £87,120 every year, based on a five year lease, simply by installing an OPL from the extensive Electrolux range. After the first five years and the lease is paid, the payback and return will increase, offering even more savings.

With the reputation of supplying a comprehensive range of commercial washing machines, dryers, ironers and finishing equipment to the hotel trade, Electrolux assures the highest quality of equipment, all designed, delivered, installed and commissioned to the establishment’s individual needs.

An OPL offers onsite quality control and the flexibility to effect considerable annual savings. Electrolux Professional Laundry operates a flexible leasing scheme, with the options of monthly quarterly or annual payments, over 1-7 year periods. Furthermore, there is no large capital outlay or deposit and the company will match the hotel’s laundry requirements to provide the best machines for the job, with all staff trained onsite. Electrolux Professional has an excellent customer care package, and as standard provides an interest free warranty and tax breaks for profitable companies under the leasing scheme. At the end of the lease, there is the option to purchase the equipment outright. An OPL is cost efficient with options available for any size of hotel. Compared with

outsourcing, which brings with it the hazards of lost laundry and long contracts savings for a small 30 room hotel with just one Quick Wash and one Quick Dry machine can amount to almost £2,000 per year. Electrolux Professional has been supplying the hotel trade for many years, from the Craws Nest Hotel to the prestigious group of Elite hotels including Luton Hoo. Every machine installed is maintained to the highest levels throughout the contract and the result is cost savings, control over quality and faster turnaround. To find out more information on how Electrolux can help you save on your outsourcing costs and provide you with a no obligation survey please contact us on T: 08444 631 261 or email els.info@electrolux.co.uk* www.electrolux.co.uk/laundrysystems *Subject to information provided.

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HOTELS

Hotel Design

Hotel Design: Taking the Long View The priorities for hotel architects are changing as a result of a number of factors; the way hotels were designed 10 years ago probably would not be acceptable today, says Conrad Smith, managing director of ReardonSmith Architects.

The past decade has witnessed significant change in the way that the design and refurbishment of hotel buildings is approached. Cost and legislation have been factors, as have changing guest expectations. Rapid innovations in technology have fuelled change and new building techniques have enabled change but, above all, the imperative for change has come about as the mantra of ‘fit for purpose’ has morphed into the concept of ‘fit for longevity’. This is the new sustainability. In certain respects, this evolution has taken those who design hotels back to more traditional ways of working – back to a degree of common sense, one might argue. In the Noughties, virtually everything installed in a hotel had to demonstrate ecosomething, often ignoring the energy used to produce it or the road miles run to deliver it. New technologies and materials were confidently seen as the green salvation but now their limitations are being recognised while some of them are simply too expensive to use in many hotel building projects.

Below: Conrad Smith - Managing Director of Reardon Smith Architects

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HOTELS

Hotel Design

Opposite page and right: Savoy Hotel, London – the building was the star and the task was to rejuvenate it, not reinvent it. The hotel foyer and lounge area (overleaf) look much the same after the £200m renovation as they did before.

At the same time, the new Part L regulations, which came into force last October with a focus on reducing heat loss through the building envelope, are increasing construction costs by over 12 per cent On the face of it, designing for longevity might not be the most attractive approach at this time of increased costs, especially when you consider the depressed room rates in locations outside London, Edinburgh and a handful of other UK destinations. Won’t building for longevity translate into greater capital costs? Probably. However, several of our recent projects have illustrated that a commitment to the ideal of longevity creates sustainable benefits for our clients. Simply expressed, if ‘fit for longevity’ is achieved, then the life cycle of the product is automatically extended. This eliminates both the capital costs of frequent refurbishments and revenue loss caused by building works within an operating hotel. Hotel architects need to plan differently from the outset to achieve ‘fit for longevity’. At ReardonSmith, we have taken a model whereby we prepare a strategic briefing document as part of our pre-concept proposals for a project. This evaluates the client’s plan thoroughly and establishes design and other fundamentals that need to be resolved prior to concept design commencing. For example, as part of this exercise, we investigate road traffic movements likely to result from servicing the building to give us a broad view of the impact of what we

are proposing on the project’s immediate environment. The preparation of the strategic plan is also a valuable opportunity to encourage the client to adopt a pro-active stance towards energy saving. This is the point at which a decision to go for a high BREAAM rating, for instance, should be taken because its farreaching performance standards affect all aspects of the design and cannot, without cost, risk and delay be introduced to the architectural scheme further down-theline. BREEAM is the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method for buildings. It sets the standard for best practice in sustainable design and has become the de facto measure used to describe a building’s environmental performance. Flexibility is key in the plan; spaces that can readily be adapted for change of use clearly equate to a longer-life building. Suites are a case in point. As the London hotel market has polarised between the luxury hotels and the budget sectors, the requirement for more and larger suites in high-end hotels has grown. Broadly, the ratio was 15 per cent suites to bedrooms a decade ago; now it is more likely to be at least 25 per cent if not 50 per cent of the guestrooms. Many luxury overseas resorts are now all-suites. The challenge is to create a matrix that allows for the sub-division of these suites so that they can also be let out as individual rooms during certain seasons. The structural, fire compartmentalisation and servicing

implications of creating flexible large guestrooms need to be considered before the initial design commences. If it is not, the chances are that all sorts of room types and solutions will be generated as part of the ongoing design process and these will have significant cost and time implications for design, construction and ongoing maintenance. A key objective of our recent project at the Four Seasons London at Park Lane was to increase the percentage of suites to bedrooms. In this case we were fortunate that the interior of the hotel was to be totally stripped out, enabling us to completely re-plan the guest floors and increase the number of suites from 20 to 45 flexible one-, two- and threebedroom suites to accommodate different permutations of occupancy. Our advice to clients undertaking a major renovation is always to strip the building back to basic structure. This reduces risk and programme length as well as, in all likelihood, cost. This is not , however, an argument for disregarding the inheritance of building. On the contrary, where the property has historic significance, we tend to return to the original design, by-passing decades of piecemeal refurbishments, to re-create a building that expresses its historic legacy. Only then can we put it back as a whole with restored features as well as new elements and with an infrastructure fit for the 21st Century. In this way, the latest building standards can be introduced and the long-term future of the property is better secured.

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HOTELS

Hotel Design

Architects should (but do not always) design from the inside out. This was our approach at The Savoy Hotel in London. Some of the areas were refurbished but many of the spaces were stripped back leaving only the protected elements; new materials and fittings were introduced, there was a new lift core and several entirely new spaces. In all this work, our overriding aim was to enhance the unique and glamorous spirit of The Savoy. The building was the star and our task was to rejuvenate it, not reinvent it, so when we heard the returning guests say how much they liked the result because “nothing had changed”, we felt our job had been well done. New-build hotel design is in many respects less complex. Here, form can, and should, clearly follow function and it is more feasible to build efficiently in volume as well as in plan. Architects should (but do not always) design from the inside out and, by working collaboratively with the local authorities, should be aiming to achieve the best volumes to release maximum space for the optimum operational arrangement. It is a mathematical as much as a design exercise. When the Travelodge Waterloo opened in the summer of 2010, we calculated that the

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hotel was set to make in excess of £900,000 additional revenue per year over and above what was first thought possible. The reason for this was that we had managed to capture space for an additional floor in the extension where most of the bedrooms were located, creating five floors where it had been thought that only four could be constructed. Developing a new hotel requires vision, determination and a budget that matches the aspiration. It has probably never been more challenging, given the current economic climate, and many projects, even when initial funding has been obtained, fail to get beyond the drawing board. Clearly, specialist hotel architects bring knowledge, instinct and a creativity born out of many years’ experience. Most importantly, extensive relevant experience means they are also able to identify potential for asset improvement in a building or site. Many times, this can mean a potential of which the client is unaware. No surprise, then, that the name of a specialist architect on the drawings tends to bring credibility to the project and reassurance to potential investors.

Quite often, clients come to us without a complete brief. They have a general idea of what they want to achieve but expect ReardonSmith to define the design solution. This is absolutely fine with us; indeed, we relish such opportunities. There are many issues to consider. There is the all-important spatial relationship between front-of-house and backof-house areas. How, or will, the fine dining restaurant be served from the central kitchens six floors below? Where will luggage be stored once guests have checked out but are still in the hotel? How should housekeeping goods be moved through the hotel? Then there is the equally important issue of maximising revenue generation through careful space planning. Where should the main bar be located to encourage guests into its space? How many guestrooms can be planned into a floor while meeting internationally recognised operational standards? In addition, there is the matter of managing many, potentially conflicting, groups of people. Hotel guests, for example, should not clash with conference delegates,


HOTELS

Hotel Design

Above: A key objective of the recent project at the Four Seasons London at Park Lane was to increase the percentage of suites to bedrooms.

Below: Restaurateurs Jeremy King and Chris Corbin are converting what was a listed Avis Rent-a-Car garage into a small, luxury hotel in London’s Balderton Street, just off Oxford Street.

so their circulation and servicing routes should not intersect. I realise, of course, that there are owners and developers who feel that they will only achieve originality and media headlines for their project if they employ design teams from outside the sector who will offer ideas that are not constrained by the way in which hotels and resorts have been designed in the past. In my experience, however, the truly inspired ideas emerge from specialist knowledge and the confidence gained by having ‘done it’ many times before. This means that the architect is better placed to introduce the new without sacrificing the quality of hospitality or the long term success of the development. The next 12 months are likely to prove an interesting period for those of us who work in and care about the UK hotel industry. Clearly, the picture is tough in many parts of the country but hopefully, the Olympics will ensure a bubble of summertime wellbeing and their legacy will include some benefit for London’s hotels at least. Certainly there is likely to be a brief period of quite astronomical rates achieved in the Capital.

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HOTELS

Hotel Design

But will there be life after the Games? I think so. In London, the signs are very strong with investment flowing in from around the world, much of it in search of a hotel, and there are some great buildings to buy. Admiralty Arch is the latest to be marketed as an iconic building suitable for conversion into a hotel and, working for the Government Property Unit, we have prepared studies to illustrate the options for conversion. There is a palpable buzz and a prevailing attitude that is seeking to do new things and do them properly so they are not headlinegrabbing fads here today and gone tomorrow, but are developments that will last well into the future – longevity again!

We are currently working on three major hotel projects in Mayfair. One of these will be the first hotel for restaurateurs Jeremy King and Chris Corbin – a conversion of what was a listed Avis Rent-a-Car garage into a small, luxury hotel. The artist Antony Gormley has designed “Room”, a piece of public art which is integral to the scheme. It is in the form of a habitable sculpture which will ‘crouch’ on the front façade of the building and is surely destined to become one of London’s most sought-after guest rooms when the hotel opens in 2014. It is this kind of thinking and the willingness of the relevant authorities to countenance such concepts that is helping to set a pace in London that is leading the world.

Above: At the Travelodge Waterloo, £900,000 additional revenue every year was gained by capturing space for an additional floor in the extension where most of the bedrooms were located, creating five floors where it had been thought that only four could be constructed.

Indicative UK hotel construction costs per bedroom (2012) Budget Cost Range £/key

Mid-Market Cost Range £/key

Upscale Cost Range £/key

Construction

34,000 - 50,000

50,000 - 100,000

115,000 - 300,000

Fees

4,000 - 6,000

7,000 - 12,000

15,000 - 40,000

Furniture, fittings & equipment

4,000 - 6,000

8,000 - 18,000

20,000 - 35,000

Total £/key

42,000 - 62,000

65,000 - 130,000

150,000 - 375,000

Costs include a nominal allowance for external works but exclude utility connections, land cost, pre-opening and finance costs and VAT. The above costs are typical for new build hotels but exclude the micro-budget/capsule market. The range of costs will vary due to many factors, the key drivers being: ` Bedroom sizes, mix and suite ratio ` Configuration, size and efficiency of floor plans ` Extent of public facilities (restaurants, bars, function & conferencing, leisure facilities) ` Back of house facilities (kitchens, offices, staff changing & welfare rooms, laundry) ` Quality and degree of control of the internal environment (air-conditioning, energy use, sustainability) ` Elevational treatment (quality and materials used for external facades, extent of glazing) ` IT / communications (internet access, connectivity, etc) ` Entertainment systems (satellite / cable TV, DVDs, films on demand) ` New build or conversion, contemporary or traditional ` Ownership, operation and individual hotel brand standards ` Location / site constraints (city centre v green field, ground conditions) London projects would attract a premium of between 10% - 25% Source: Gleeds Worldwide, international management and construction consultants.

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HOTELS

Association Profiles

British Hospitality Association The British Hospitality Association, with The Restaurant Association, celebrated its centenary in 2007. Little would the founders of the association in 1907 have realised how big the industry would have become 100 years later, nor that an association designed to support the hotel industry would now comprehensively encompass restaurants, food and service management, motorway service areas and clubs, with well over 45,000 establishments in membership. The association’s main purpose is to lobby government in Whitehall (as well as Edinburgh, Cardiff and Brussels) on behalf of the industry. Lobbying covers a wide variety of subjects – from the high rate of VAT on hotel accommodation, attractions and meals out of home to the availability of work visas, from changes in the licensing law to caloriecounted meals. Members (in, fact, the whole industry) benefit from this kind of lobbying, which cannot be undertaken successfully on an individual basis. The aim is to raise awareness across government, media and the general public of the importance of hospitality and the critical role it plays in the UK’s economy. In August 2010, the association commissioned Oxford Economics to evaluate the impact of the industry on the country’s economy and the additional contribution it could make. The research provided firm evidence that hospitality accounts for 2.44m jobs, placing the industry as the fifth largest in the UK. Further research showed that – given the right framework – it could create an additional 236,000 jobs within five years – almost a 10 per cent increase. With this evidence, it set out a partnership proposition for government which was launched in the House of Commons. More recently, the association commissioned research on the value of the industry to each of the country’s 406 local authorities. The

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results, published in Hospitality: Driving Local Economies, (available on the BHA’s website www.bha.org.uk) shows that the industry is a key economic driver of most local authority areas in the UK and contributes some £34bn in tax revenues to the Treasury. These initiatives have established a platform on which the association is able to argue for positive and sustained government action on key concerns of the industry, including: * VAT: The high rate of VAT on hotel accommodation, attractions and meals out of home, compared with all but three of the 27 EU member states, makes the UK highly uncompetitive (see graph on page 32). Ongoing discussions with the Treasury centre on the BHA’s arguments that VAT for the hospitality sector should be reduced to 5 per cent so that it can can create some 78,000 new jobs. * Visa costs and controls: Visa control procedures, while remaining important, should be applied with more understanding of the needs of applicants so that they are easier to obtain and complete. Application forms, which are not in the appropriate language, need biometric details, and require a personal visit to a UK consulate.. The delay in visa processing by the UK is identified as that most likely to cause potential visitors to give up on their travel plans. * Rising cost of Air Passenger Duty which is making outward bound travel by visitors to this country increasingly expensive. * Establishing a cross-cabinet committee for tourism and hospitality, so that policies affecting the industry can be co-ordinated. This would result in greater co-operation across all the many different government departments on issues that affect the industry.

* To encourage the government to admit hotel operations as a qualifying activity under the Enterprise Investment Scheme. The BHA is also working closely with the Department of Health on its Responsibility Deal. It has a seat on the board of the Deal and, as the voice for ‘out-of-home’ food service, the association is working on a voluntary proposal for the industry to help reach government targets to reduce obesity and improve the nation’s health. In this way, it hopes to avoid any unnecessary legislation in this area. The association’s five areas of focus are: ` Health and its work on the Responsibility Deal and the Food Standards Agency. ` Economy where it is lobbying on behalf of the industry for a number of fiscal measures, including reducing VAT. ` Employment, education and skills so that talent and careers within hospitality can be developed, supported by a realistic education policy which takes advantage of the government’s apprenticeships programme. ` Sustainability, focusing on carbon reduction commitments and other proposed legislative changes affecting hospitality businesses, ` Competitiveness of the UK as a destination attracting domestic and international customers, but also as a place to do business. A further area of focus in this area is on ensuring a level playing field for the food and service management industry, which currently has to compete with public agencies on an unequal basis for procurement services, such as catering. The association encourages all its members to actively engage in all its lobbying activities.


HOTELS

Association Profiles

The Restaurant Association British Hospitality Association President: Alan Parker CBE Chairman: Chris Davy Chief executive: Ufi Ibrahim Deputy chief executive: Martin Couchman OBE

The Restaurant Association President: Robert Walton MBE Chairman: The Earl of Bradford Queens House 55/56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 F: 020 7404 7799 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk Left: Winners of the 2011 Young Chef Young Waiter competition – Sophie Henderson (Coworth Park, Ascot) and Chris Kenny (Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons) with Bob Walton, chairman of the competition and president of The Restaurant Association.

The Restaurant Association was formed in 1967 specifically to look after the interests of the independent restaurateur; this remained its purpose until 2003 when it amalgamated with the British Hospitality Association, while retaining its own identity. It now represents and promotes the interests of the wider restaurant industry with both independent and group-owned establishments in membership. One of its main aims is to provide professional guidance to members and to actively promote education and training in the industry. It does this through its annual Young Chef Young Waiter competition, now in its 28th year, in which young people cook and serve a meal to diners in a reallife situation. With a line-up of some of the industry’s top professionals as judges

including leading chefs Angela Hartnett (Murano), Bruce Poole (Chez Bruce), Gary Jones (Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons) and Theo Randall (Hotel InterContinental) and top restaurateurs including Jean-Claude Breton (Gordon Ramsay), Joel Claustre (Searcy’s) and Jeremy Rata (Bovey Castle), the competition encourages and rewards the industry’s most talented youngsters. Past chef winners include Marcus Wareing, now chef patron at Marcus Wareing at the Berkeley and Mark Sergeant who was head chef with Gordon Ramsay for many years (and remains associated with his publishing interests) while carving out a television career for himself. Simon Girling, restaurant manager at The Ritz, London and Simon King, front of house operations manager at The Fat Duck, are

among the distinguished finalists in the waiters’ competition. Robert Walton, president of the Restaurant Association chairman of the Young Chef and Young Waiter competition believes that Young Chef Young Waiter is more than just a competition. “It is an education”, he says. “Few who enter do not emerge wiser and more skilled”. Away from Young Chef Young Waiter, members of the association also enjoy a calendar of networking, social and sporting events, including the annual Bessborough Golf Trophy. They are further supported by a range of preferred suppliers and partners who provide benefits and services that include free helplines and major cost savings on goods and services.

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PROMOTION

Roof Revive

Roof Revive A unique conservatory insulation system enabling hospitality businesses to make year-round use of their conservatories, orangeries and sun lounges whilst significantly reducing their energy overheads. Throughout hospitality the mantra of energy efficiency is being shouted from the (thermawrapped, solar-panelled) rooftops. Surging utility prices, currently consuming between 3 and 6% of total hospitality expenditure, represent the industry’s fastest-growing operating cost and congruent to this quest for constraint on purely economic grounds there’s the relatively recent phenomenon of clients actively vetting the sustainability credentials of preferred businesses.

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Aware of the growing industry need for innovation in the area of energy efficiency James Hogg, MD of Roof Revive, has employed his architectural background to develop an insulating system for conservatories which works to ameliorate temperature extremes whilst reducing heating costs. This unique system, recently awarded a full patent ensuring exclusive UK supply and installation rights, has proved so energy efficient that James has seen his business

expand exponentially year on year for the past five years. Energy conservation hasn’t been the sole motivational driver however. His experience of hotel and restaurant conservatories, orangeries and sun lounges no doubt matches that of many hotel and restaurant managers across the country who during the summer months find themselves battling kitchen-like temperatures and the querulous demands of perspiring customers for increased shade


PROMOTION

Roof Revive

and ventilation whilst conversely in the winter experiencing the outdoors being brought far too literally in as a result of poor insulation, often leaving these areas effectively abandoned. Science explains everything. Whereas the standard polycarbonate roof system used in most UK conservatories has virtually no insulating properties, ergo most of the solar heat is conducted in summer and in winter warming these areas is a practical impossibility ( cue cartoon image of all that expensively-heated air rising unutilised into the stratosphere tracked by irate hotelier/ restaurant manager, optional shaking of fists or waving of kitchen implements ) the Roof Revive system ( and here’s the science bit ) uses a light 28mm high-performance composite ceiling insulation, combining 19 layers of reflective and insulating materials, reducing heat conductance from an average

of 1.61 to 0.43 W/M2K, making it almost 200% more efficient in matching the temperatures found in the rest of your establishment. Temperatures in summer are reduced by up to 75% whilst 90% of heat is retained in winter. It’s an innovation which seems particularly well placed for the hospitality cohort for whom heating costs represent on average more than 40% of energy use rising to an alarming 50% in older premises. The system allows for the optimum harnessing of natural daylight ( long- shown to enhance atmosphere and part of an accelerating trend for hotels in particular to incorporate natural light into their new era ‘social hubs’) whilst minimising the traditional negatives. By ameliorating extremes of temperature and reducing glare and rain noise clients have been able to revitalise underutilised spaces, experience significant energy savings

and reduce their carbon footprint, in recognition of which the product qualifies for the government incentive 5% VAT rate. Additional advantages of the system include no alteration of the existing roof profile, a maximum 5% light loss as ambient light is delivered through the windows and doors of the conservatory and rapid installation ensuring minimum disruption to business. For further information visit www.roof-revive.co.uk or call 0800 612 8540

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PROMOTION

Activeion

Activeion technology boosts asepsis, makes toxic cleaning products unnecessary Many hotel housekeeping teams use multiple cleaning products and detergents, all designed to deal with specific surfaces and hygiene-related challenges. Not only are these expensive to buy and difficult to store, but many are toxic to the person using them, can induce allergic responses from people coming into contact with them and are harmful to the wider environment. The revolutionary Activeion cleaning technology, introduced to Europe and the UK during spring 2010, is a chemical-free cleaning system that helps hotels, restaurants and bars to reduce cross-infection risks, dramatically improving cleaning standards and safeguarding staff health. Available in Britain and Europe, Activeion chemical-free cleaning also cuts costs dramatically, because not only do you not have to buy as many cleaning products, you don’t have to store or mix them either. The award-winning handheld Activeion ionator EXP™ cleaning tool is a proven approach to chemical-free cleaning, converting ordinary tap water, with nothing added, into ionised water that lifts grease and soil from non-porous surfaces so that it can simply be wiped away. It cleans as effectively as most of the chemical-based cleaning materials it replaces. Independent third-party lab results certify that, when used as directed, the Activeion ionator kills 99.9% of harmful common bacteria such as E. Coli, E. Coli 0157:H7, VRE, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Staph, MRSA, and Listeria, and eliminates the 2009 H1N1 influenza A swine ‘flu virus in just six seconds.

Activeion technology cleans and removes pathogens from all kinds of hard surfaces in hotels - front and back of house

Cleaning using Activeion technology, instead of chemical cleaning products, saves hotels money, improves the health of staff and guests, and helps the environment. Eliminating chemical cleaning reduces the level of chemicals discarded to the environment, and helps alleviate allergies, asthma and other respiratory and dermatological problems that can be triggered or made worse by the presence of toxic or allergenic cleaning chemical residues.

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To learn more, go to www.activeion.co.uk or contact Activeion (Europe) GmbH, at Stadtturmstrasse 18, CH-5400 Baden, Switzerland, phone +41 22 533 00 30.


3 / Restaurants 68

LACK OF CONSUMER CONFIDENCE HOLDS BACK THE EATING-OUT MARKET Peter Backman

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UK’S TOP RESTAURANTS

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THE JOHN DE STEFANO INTERVIEW John Musson

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RESTAURANTS

Consumer confidence

Lack of consumer confidence holds back the eating-out market By Peter Backman, managing director, Horizons FS Left: A breed of new operators, such as Chop’d has opened up in wealthier areas, with a large lunch time population. Opposite: A bright spot during 2011 was the emergence of a clearly defined, casual dining sector – which can be broadly defined as offering a meal for £10-20, and probably more realistically £14-17. This sector of the market, populated by the likes of Pizza Express (pictured) has been remarkably resilient, offering, as it does, a meal of known quality by a recognised brand.

The last two years have been tough for the eating-out market but, as we review the difficult current trading environment it is worth bearing in mind that the sector has survived in reasonable shape. True, there has been a real overall decline in business but many operators have been able to buck the trend and the sector has toughened itself up by exiting sectors and operations that weren’t producing results.

But first the gloomy picture. Over two years ago, many were predicting that by the end of 2010 the sector would begin to clamber out of the recession which was represented by a real fall in business since 2008. By the summer of 2010 things certainly looked as if they may be going to plan and that a new government would possibly get the economy growing again. However, within six months, it was clear that was not going to happen. Consumers started to express concern by, for instance, not going out to eat

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quite as often as they had been. The start of 2011 was promising but echoing what was being said at the start of 2010, there were hopes that the second half of the year would begin to see some growth, based on the feeling that it was about time things started to get better. Indeed, the first few months of the year turned out quite well, helped by excellent weather over the last week or so of April when an unusually long break of ten days was taken by many at the time of the Royal Wedding and Easter. But even here the picture was mixed. Pubs with outdoor spaces for customers to enjoy the fine weather did well but restaurants, as a whole, suffered as their customers preferred to eat elsewhere. From then on the picture started to turn sour. The good numbers of April were not repeated in the next few months. There was even some disruption of travelling plans from an Icelandic volcano – for the second year in a row. And further bad news came in the form

of riots which directly affected significant parts of London and other cities. The overall results were tragic for some businesses which were forced to close, and bad for many others whose business was badly disrupted for a few days at least. And the national mood meant that even areas not directly affected by the riots suffered from knock-on effects. The summer also suffered from fairly dismal weather and although there was a very good spell in late September and early October, the overall effect on the eating-out market was to lower comparisons on a year earlier. But despite all this, consumers were still eating out and the year ended on a good note when the weather stayed relatively mild. This allowed operators to show greatly enhanced sales figures in December compared with the snow-hit pre-Christmas in 2010. But while the increases looked good on paper they were still not enough to bring the market back to where it was in 2007.


RESTAURANTS

Consumer confidence

Nevertheless, the first half of 2011 was ahead of 2010 in most commercial sectors although the growth was due in part to the increase in VAT back to 20 per cent. This added over two per cent to the average bill although many operators mitigated the increase by changing their menu mix and, in extremis, absorbing some of the increased VAT themselves. Such actions were made somewhat more difficult by the re-emergence of inflation especially of food and fuel. Over the year as a whole, operator food prices were, on balance, 3.5-4 per cent higher than they had been a year earlier, adding yet more pressure to already stretched balance sheets. At the start of 2011, many operators took a view about the discount vouchers that many of them had been using to drive their business – in many cases successfully – since 2008. There was a drop-off in the numbers of offers made in the first six months but, as the year progressed, it was clear that they were coming back. By mid-summer their use was climbing rapidly and by the end of the year they were at levels higher than the year before.

So, consumer reluctance to spend, combined with rising costs and falling prices, seem to paint an exceptionally dismal picture for 2011.

And yet there were many bright spots. London, not just the centre, moved ahead, as if there had not been a downturn in the rest of the country. High-spending visitors from overseas helped, as did re-hirings in the financial sector. But restaurant operators, too, played their part with new offers. Another bright spot was the emergence of a clearly defined casual dining sector – which can be broadly defined as offering a meal for £1020, and probably more realistically £14-17. This sector of the market, populated by the likes of Pizza Express, Nando’s and Wagamama, has been remarkably resilient, offering, as it does, a meal of known quality by a recognised brand – important to unsure consumers who want the certainty of knowing that they won’t be disappointed when spending on eating out. The difficult economic environment meant that traditional quick service and home delivery

operators, such as McDonald’s, Domino’s, and Subway, focused on value offers and their prices tended to cluster around a price point somewhat below £5. This opened up a market, certainly in wealthier areas with a large lunch time population, for a breed of new operators such as Chop’d, Wasabi and Chilango. These new brands have taken advantage of growing consumer trends towards Mexican, Japanese and healthy food. And other operators have started to open up totally new markets – for example Snog and Froo with frozen yogurt. Meanwhile the coffee shop segment, still a relatively small part of the eating-out market, continued to power ahead, with new store openings by Costa especially, bringing in additional business around the country, and further afield. Nor has the action been only at the lower price points. Jamie’s Italian has shown what can be done at above £20 although this sector as a whole has been suffering for the last three years and during 2011 saw the demise of Chez Gerard.

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RESTAURANTS

Consumer confidence

Above: Managed pub operators – especially those with brands to develop – have seen food becoming an increasingly important part of their mix. For Mitchells & Butlers, it was approaching 50 per cent by the end of 2011,

Eating in pubs continued to be important but the fragility of some business models has thrown up in sharp relief the role of food in reshaping this sector. Managed pub operators – especially those with brands to develop – have seen food becoming an increasingly important part of their mix. For Mitchells & Butlers it was approaching 50 per cent by the end of 2011, and for the likes of Greene King and JD Wetherspoon it was comfortably above 40 per cent. Part of this increase was due to the declining performance of alcohol, beer particularly, but it was also due to a determination to expand the food offer. This was epitomised during 2011 with the investment by Spirit Group in its food-based Flaming Grill concept which was designed to breathe life into wet-led community pubs. Food in hotels and the leisure sector generally benefited from improving overseas

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Consumers still lack confidence and are reluctant to spend, because they want to conserve what cash resources they can in uncertain economic times, especially while the threat of redundancy remains.

visitor numbers, staycationing Britons and some expansion in the corporate market. London, again, was a particular beneficiary of these trends over what was otherwise a poor period for this sector. Like for like figures were boosted by inflation for the whole of 2011. But the overall outlook for 2012 for the eating-out market is not at all positive. Consumers still lack confidence and are reluctant to spend, because they want to conserve what cash resources they can in uncertain economic times, especially while the threat of redundancy remains. Despite this, and the generally very difficult financial environment, the foodservice sector has performed remarkably well during the recession. It has kept volumes up and thrown up some innovative brands while, hopefully, making itself fit for the upturn – when it arrives.

Horizons Horizons helps its clients make better business decisions by providing accurate and detailed information about the foodservice market, its trend, and opportunities. The company provides consultancy services, workshops and statistical information based on its model of the sector and database of key accounts across Europe. T: 020 8349 0162 W: www.hrzns.com


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HWYL.

THE WELSH WORD FOR SPIRIT, ENJOYMENT AND AND SO SOMUCH MUCH MORE MORE. The spirit of the people of Wales Put simply, we love good, honest food! We pride ourselves on being innovators always on the hunt for fresh and creative foodie ideas, never swayed by the latest fads and fashions. Our award-winning producers and chefs work closely together making sure that we stay true to our name and that taste reigns supreme. You see, we don’t just want to feed people’s appetite; we want to feed their imagination too.

The spirit of the land of Wales Welcome to the land of plenty. With such great produce to choose from, it’s no surprise that Wales is home to a vibrant food and drink culture. The enthusiasm and dedication of the people who produce, sell and champion Wales’ culinary scene are essential ingredients that we want to shout about. Our food and drink is more than just provenance and authenticity, it is infused with the personalities of their makers. People with a true passion for great food.

The cultural spirit of Wales We’ve always liked to push boundaries and True Taste is no exception. We want to challenge the conventional thinking that Welsh food is simply lamb, leeks and laver bread and get everyone excited about Welsh food and drink. We want to share our wonderful foodie stories and help people discover the abundance of products that are there for the taking. It’s fun, surprising and eye-opening.

ENJOY THE SPIRIT OF FOOD AND DRINK FROM THE PEOPLE OF WALES. WWW.WALESTHETRUETASTE.CO.UK Department for Rural Affairs Welsh Government Rhodfa Padarn, Llanbadarn Fawr, Aberystwyth, SY23 3UR t : 0300 062 2000 w : www.walesthetruetaste.co.uk


RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

UK’s Top Restaurants Although lists of top restaurants still attract much controversy, it’s generally recognised that the Michelin ratings are acknowledged by chefs as the bible of a country’s top restaurants.

RESTAURANTS WITH ONE MICHELIN STAR

LONDON

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Belgravia

Amaya

Belgravia

Apsleys (at the Lanesborough Hotel)

Belgravia

Petrus

Belgravia

Zafferano

Bethnal Green

Viajante

Bloomsbury

Hakkasan Hanway Place

Bloomsbury

Pied à Terre

Chelsea

Rasoi

Chiswick

La Trompette

Clerkenwell

North Road

Clerkenwell

St John

City of London

Rhodes 24

City of London

Club Gascon

Fulham

The Harwood Arms

Hammersmith

River Café

Kensington

Kitchen W8

Knightsbridge

Dinner by Heston Blumenthal (at Mandarin Oriental, Hyde Park)

Marylebone

L’Autre Pied

Marylebone

Rhodes W1

Marylebone

Locanda Locatelli

Marylebone

Texture

Mayfair

Benares

Mayfair

Galvin at Windows (at London Hilton on Park Lane)

Mayfair

Hakkasan Mayfair

Mayfair

Kai

Mayfair

Maze


RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

Mayfair

Murano

Mayfair

Nobu (at the Metropolitan Hotel)

Mayfair

Nobu, Berkeley Street

Mayfair

Pollen Street Social

Mayfair

Semplice

Mayfair

Sketch (The Lecture Room and Library)

Mayfair

Tamarind

Mayfair

The Greenhouse

Mayfair

Umu

Mayfair

Wild Honey

St James’s

Seven Park Place (at St James’s Hotel & Club)

Soho

Arbutus

Soho

Gauthier - Soho

Soho

Yauatcha

Spitalfields

Galvin La Chapelle

Victoria

Quilon

Wandsworth

Chez Bruce

Opposite page: The team at Sir Charles Napier, Chinnor. Above left: Christoffer Hruskova at North Road Restaurant. Above right: Dominic Jack, chef patron at the Castle Terrace, Edinburgh.

ENGLAND Bagshot

Michael Wignall at The Latymer, Pennyhill Park Hotel

Baslow

Fischer’s at Baslow Hall

Bath/Colerne

The Park (at Lucknam Park)

Birkenhead

Fraiche

Birmingham

Purnell’s

Birmingham

Simpsons

Birmingham

Turners

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RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

Blakeney

Morston Hall

Bodiam

Curlew

Bolton Abbey

The Burlington (at The Devonshire Arms Country House)

Bourton-on-the-Water/ Upper Slaughter

Lords of the Manor

Bray

Royal Oak

Bristol

Casamia

Cartmel

L’Enclume

Castle Coombe

Manor House Hotel and Golf Club

Chester

Simon Radley at The Chester Grosvenor

Chew Magna

Pony & Trap

Chinnor

Sir Charles Napier

Clipsham

The Olive Branch and Beech House

Cranbook

Apicius

Cuckfield

Ockenden Manor

Dorchester

Sienna

Eldersfield

Butchers Arms

Emsworth

36 on the Quay

Farnborough

Chapter One

Faversham

Read’s

Horsham

The Pass (at South Lodge Hotel)

Hunstanton

The Neptune

Ilkley

Box Tree

Jersey

Atlantic Hotel

Jersey

Bohemia (at Club Hotel & Spa)

Jersey

Tassali (at Grand Hotel)

Kew

The Glasshouse

Kington

The Stagg Inn

Langho

Northcote

Ludlow

Mr Underhill’s at Dinham Weir

Marlborough

The Harrow at Little Bedwyn

Marlow-on-Thames

Adam Simmonds at Danesfield House

Murcott

The Nut Tree

Oakham

Hambledon Hall

Oldstead

Black Swan

Pateley Bridge, N Yorks

The Yorke Arms

Petersield

JSW

Portscatho

Driftwood Hotel

Reading

L’Ortolan

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RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

Richmond-on-Thames

Petersham Nurseries Café

Ripley

Drake’s

Royal Leamington Spa

The Dining Room (at Mallory Court)

Seasalter, Kent

The Sportsman

Sheffield

Old Vicarage

South Molton

The Masons Arms

Torquay

Room in the Elephant

Ullswater

Sharrow Bay Country House

Ventnor

The Hamborough

Welwyn Garden City

Auberge du Lac

Winchcombe

5 North St

Winchester

The Black Rat

Windermere

Holbeck Ghyll

Woburn

Paris House

Above: Chef Matt Gillan at The Pass, South Lodge Hotel, Horsham. Opposite page: Adam Jackson, head chef at The Black Swan, Oldstead.

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RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

SCOTLAND Ballantrae

Glenapp Castle

Balloch

Martin Wishart at Loch Lomond

Dalry, Ayrshire

Braidwoods

Edinburgh

21212

Edinburgh

Castle Terrace

Edinburgh

Kitchin

Edinburgh

Martin Wishart

Edinburgh

Number One, Balmoral Hotel

Elie, Fife

Sangster’s

Fife

The Peat Inn

Fort William

Inverlochy Castle

Isle of Skye

Kinloch Lodge

Lochinver

The Albannach

Nairn

Boath House

Portpatrick

Knockinaam Lodge

WALES Abergavenny

The Walnut Tree

Llandrillo

Tyddyn Llan

Montgomery

The Checkers

Monmouth

The Crown at Whitebrook

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Above left: Tassili Restaurant at the Grand Hotel, Jersey. Above right: Adam Stokes, head chef at Glenapp Castle


a29949 Black Book Hospitality ad_Layout 1 27/02/2012 10:51 Page 1

Finding the finest ingredients is never easy. Finding the finest payment solution is. Innovative solutions to make lighter work of taking card payments.

business. easier.

To find out more. Visit: www.barclaycard.co.uk/business/hospitality Email: acceptingpayments@barclaycard.co.uk Call: 0800 158 5150* *Calls may be monitored and recorded for training and security purposes. Calls made to 0800 numbers are free from a UK landline. Barclaycard is a trading name of Barclays Bank PLC. Barclays Bank PLC is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority and subscribes to the Lending Code which is monitored and enforced by the Lending Standards Board. Registered in England. Registered No. 1026167. Registered Oce: 1 Churchill Place, London E14 5HP.


RESTAURANTS

Britain’s Top Restaurants

RESTAURANTS WITH TWO MICHELIN STARS

LONDON Covent Garden

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

Kensington

The Ledbury

Knightsbridge

Marcus Wareing at the Berkeley

Mayfair

Hélène Darroze at The Connaught

Mayfair

Hibiscus

Mayfair

Le Gavroche

Mayfair

The Square

ENGLAND Cambridge

Midsummer House

Chagford, Devon

Gidleigh Park

Cheltenham

Le Champignon Sauvage

Great Milton, Oxfordshire

Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons

Malmesbury

The Dining Room, Whatley Manor

Marlow-on-Thames

Hand and Flowers

Nottingham

Restaurant Sat Bains

Rock

Restaurant Nathan Outlaw

SCOTLAND Auchterarder, Perthshire

Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles

RESTAURANTS WITH THREE STARS

Bray

The Fat Duck

Bray

The Waterside Inn

London

Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester

London

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay

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Above: Tom Kerridge, chef patron at the Hand and Flowers, Marlow - gained a second star in 2011.


PROMOTION

Barclaycard

Barclaycard Barclaycard’s Marc Pettican discusses the evolution of Merchant Services and the ‘contactless’ revolution with John Musson

Barclaycard Global Payment Acceptance formerly Barclaycard Merchant Services - was founded in 1966, a year perhaps forgivably more associated with a certain British sporting success. This summer’s 2012 London Olympics will underline just how much the world has moved on since then, the changes no more evident than in how we all do business. Unprecedented technological advance has made possible what was unimaginable only a few years ago : financial transactions have evolved from exclusively face-to-face to multichannel environments and the challenge this presents, according to Marc Pettican is ‘to help customers keep pace with and fully benefit from these developments whilst maintaining the business fundamentals of a seamless and secure service.’ Marc Pettican, Director of Sales and Account Development, Barclaycard Global Payment Acceptance (formerly BMS) , approaches this challenge in a fairly unique way: rather than working with generic payments experts he develops dedicated payments teams with expertise in specific industry areas. His hospitality team, led by Wendy Warren, Segment Manager for Leisure, Entertainment and Hospitality, work with a portfolio of customers exclusively drawn from the hospitality sector, listen to their concerns and develop real insight into their requirements. This industry knowledge, alongside the leverage of Barclaycard’s ubiquity, (12 million UK cardholders, 90,000 customers accepting

payments, hospitality industry events hosted at the O2) helps Marc Pettican to ‘create solutions going forward which will allow customers to optimise business efficiency and bring in new revenue streams from additional services.’ Contactless payment, presently limited to £15 , is one of the exciting innovations available through this approach, allowing for payments to be taken in a fraction of the time of the conventional chip and pin environment (500 milliseconds, or quite literally the blink of an eye). The process itself, card tapped onto reader, couldn’t be more straightforward and recent Visa Consumer Research has highlighted that 90% of consumers find it makes life simpler. Marc Pettican elucidates the benefits: ‘In an age where customers are massively ‘time-poor’ transactions are expedited, queues reduced, revenues maximised and customer experience improved. Additionally, the process allows the customer the freedom to trade up (from a coffee to a coffee and croissant for example) in a way they may not be able to with a finite quantity of cash in their pocket.’ To date 61,000 contactless terminals have been successfully launched into the marketplace at outlets such as Eat, Pret à Manger and Subway, with growth in 2011 of 138% and according to Marc Pettican, ‘in the run-up to and during the Olympics, where speed and efficiency of service will be paramount, we expect exponential growth to continue as Contactless really comes into its own’, supported by an approved increase of transaction limit from £15 to £20, effective from June 2012. Terminals of course have been a core product offering from Barclaycard since 1966. Two new products recently launched into the marketplace Marc Pettican describes as ‘exactly what our hospitality customers have been asking for over a number of years.’ A terminal with GPRS capacity and roaming SIM allows restaurateurs to take the facility to the customer, perfectly meeting the hospitality industry’s need for a fast, flexible and secure payment facility; a fixed terminal using IP allows customers to plug into a broadband solution. Both support contactless payments. Creative development of new revenue

streams, which Pettican sees as increasingly important in a challenging business environment, is implicit in Barclaycard’s pre-paid gift cards and Dynamic Currency Conversion (DCC) facility. The pre-paid cards, available as standard via the Barclaycard terminal, can be used to market the hotel and its services to new customers. These customers can then use the cards as payment for restaurant, hotel and spa services with zero hassle. Dynamic Currency Conversion, perfect for customers seeing a high tourist or business customer footfall, allows the customer to pay for services in a choice of currencies with instant exchange rate conversion and in so doing allows for a stronger customer service whilst providing a percentage cut of foreign exchange commission. Security will always though remain Marc Pettican’s primary concern. In response to the migration of fraudulent activity towards internet and telephone transactions (a result of the efficacy of chip and pin and secure contactless payment), Barclaycard’s unique Fraud Reporter system has been developed to provide customers with real-time issuer alerts, invaluable in analysing fraud trends and reducing associated costs. Similarly PCI DSS, the standard customers need to adhere to in order to secure their data, is recognised by Pettican as vital to any business’ security but also as challenging for some customers to implement. Barclaycard’s response has been to offer a team and service to help customers with these issues. For more information visit www.barclaycard.co.uk/business/acceptingpayments/corporate Barclaycard is a trading name of Barclays Bank PLC. Barclays Bank PLC is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority and subscribes to the Lending Code which is monitored and enforced by the Lending Standards Board. Registered in England. Registered No. 1026167. Registered Office: 1 Churchill Place, London E14 5HP.

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RESTAURANTS

Interview

The John De Stefano Interview The owner of The London Fine Dining Group, one of the capital’s most exclusive restaurant portfolios, talks to John Musson about Michelin stars, great service and the curse of celebrity restaurant culture John De Stefano likes heights. It’s clearly a passion his wife Juliet, a qualified helicopter pilot, shares. I’m interviewing him at their penthouse apartment in Monaco where they spend six months of every year (he also likes travel although that’s less germane to this particular article). The apartment looks out over the glittering harbour crammed with bobbing yachts and the more lugubrious superyachts so beloved of the oligarchs. It’s a stunning view although De Stefano confesses it was chosen more for its proximity to the chequered start line of the Monaco Grand Prix whose circuit wends its way around this tiny principality (he also likes fast cars) than for its view out to sea, surely one of the most spectacular in the world. As he wryly comments, ‘There’s no rule that you can’t have your office in a nice place.’ John De Stefano liking heights, as I’ve hinted, is actually quite relevant. We discuss it as a metaphor for his strategic management of his London Fine Dining Group, bastion of high-end dining in the capital. He likes to be high up, observing at a slight remove, allowing for an overview which provides, as he puts it, ‘the opportunity of a much broader brush, thinking outside the box, which has been my strongest asset over the years. I’m not one to rush decisions, and it’s something I try to instil at Head Office. If in doubt it’s so often better to wait. ’ His restaurants’ data is sent to him daily from London HQ and from this he extrapolates patterns and trends and considers strategies. ‘It’s an overview I don’t think I would be able to give the boys in London if I were there all the time. On the

rare occasions John is in London he admits, ‘I have a tendency to enjoy the business a little too much.’ De Stefano discovered the hospitality industry late, which possibly goes some way to explaining his wariness of over-enjoyment. In the late seventies he founded a retail agency business in South Molton Street ; by the mid eighties he had started his own property company, the London & Henley Group as it became, building up a tight portfolio of commercial real estate in the south of England (‘never north of the M40’); it wasn’t until 2004 that he moved into the fine dining arena, purchasing the established A to Z restaurant group which included within its portfolio the Michelin-starred Aubergine and Zafferano. Initially the group was purchased with two partners who were subsequently bought out. ‘I’ve never been a great partnership man’ he confesses. ‘I like to keep ownership sacrosanct, it’s much easier to run a business that way.’ What was it that attracted a solid property man to the notoriously volatile restaurant industry? ‘Well, when the A to Z group initially came up for sale, I realised I used to eat in pretty much all of their restaurants and so it seemed like an opportunity to cut out the middle man and keep myself well-fed’ he (partly) jokes. ‘What I love about it though is that it’s such a different business to commercial property, which most people see basically as a cure for insomnia. Property’s not a people business. My property business has a capital value probably ten times that of my restaurant group and yet I have ten people working in it.

In my restaurant business I have 420.’ De Stefano’s enjoyment of this relatively new fork in his business career is palpable in the enthusiasm with which he discusses his restaurants and their clientele and staff, many of whom he has forged strong relationships with. There’s the sense that the peopleoriented nature of the industry has allowed him to develop a gregariousness too long held in check by the more austere world of property. He confesses that at dinner parties if he describes himself as a restaurateur rather than a property man ‘the conversation will suddenly be far more dynamic, everyone has an opinion about their favourite restaurant : it makes me realise I’m actually a part of the entertainment business.’ I wonder how much he knew about the industry and, for that matter, about the A to Z group prior to its purchase. ‘Well, I had no direct experience, but if you’re asking me if I did a detailed analysis of the turnover of A to Z, I did and I didn’t. But as I’ve said, I knew the restaurants. They were obviously very established; we weren’t buying into a new concept. Zafferano had been going for twenty odd years, Ken Lo’s Memories of China had been around for over thirty so risk was certainly minimal.’ Any accusations of dilettantism predicated on his sheer enthusiasm for LFDG, his lack of hospitality grounding and the slightly gung-ho nature of the company’s acquisition would be well wide of the mark. Under his hegemony LFDG has opened two new restaurants, E11even Park Walk and Aubergine at the Compleat Angler – and it’s

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RESTAURANTS

Interview

My property business has a capital value probably ten times that of my restaurant group and yet I have ten people working in it. In my restaurant business I have 420.

evident that his background in commercial property has been significant. ‘We know what we’re doing with property.’ he explains. ‘We know better how to run rental arrangements than many of our landlords, which can come as quite a surprise to them when we’re negotiating a rent review or lease renewal. So many people are paying astronomical, crazy rents for restaurant properties in London at the moment and it’s something we’ve managed to avoid.’ It remains a frustration however that he hasn’t been able – with one exception – to expand his property empire by merging ownership of the properties with the tenancies as most, being in such good locations, are owned by

institutions or large trusts. I’m interested to know what provoked the change of name from A to Z to London Fine Dining, and why he felt the need at all to group this diverse selection of fine dining establishments (Chinese, French, Italian, Sardinian, Spanish and English) under a single umbrella. ‘Well, the name now describes the brand in a way it didn’t before. And we don’t advertise the individual restaurants as being part of a group but we do advertise the larger umbrella. The group works because of the economies of scale at head office; technical things such as websites and databases can be run more efficiently; and then the buying power that the group presents is very useful.

I was at Perrier Jouët last week, we’re perhaps their biggest client in London and they obviously prefer to deal with one person. Landlords also like to know they’re getting a strong covenant, a strong tenant.’ So how would he define The London Fine Dining Group as a brand? ‘Simply I would say we represent top end dining with the benefit of variety : a single identity but a variety of experiences within that.’ He characterises the archetypal London Fine Diner as somewhere between thirty-five and fifty who ‘knows what they’re looking for and isn’t too scared of the wine list, tends to dive down a bit further. We’re not a trendy group I suppose, I’m not a fan of the hype surrounding celebrity hang-outs and

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Interview

So many people are paying astronomical, crazy rents for restaurant properties in London at the moment and it’s something we’ve managed to avoid. celebrity chefs. Chefs should be in the kitchen, not the television studio. PR-led restaurants come and go very quickly, are successful for six months then disappear. For me the proof of a good restaurant is in its consistency, which always comes down to good food, great service, making people feel a part of something.’ His distaste of the media-led restaurant culture in the capital notwithstanding, I wonder how far he feels a fine dining brand relies upon the high-octane publicity of AA rosettes and Michelin stars. ‘People certainly notice Michelin restaurants, in London I’d say tourists particularly. I take the Michelin guide when I travel through France, so of course it’s something I can understand. Within our group we certainly have destination restaurants : Zafferano is one of only a couple of Italian restaurants in the capital with a Michelin star and we guard that, it’s very important to us. However, when Aubergine lost its star three years ago we didn’t notice an appreciable difference in covers and I think once a restaurant has an established clientele they’re likely to be loyal regardless of industry accolades. I have to say though that some of

the more recent Michelin stars bemuse me. When a gastro pub can gain two stars I feel the system has cheapened itself.’ How far has he noticed the effects of the economic downturn impacting upon his own group? ‘We’re not seeing a lack of covers – we’re not a trendy group as I’ve mentioned and so our customers tend to be less fickle - but there is a drop in spend per head certainly, and that’s wine basically. In my Chinese restaurants there’s perhaps a reduction in spend of twenty percent, they’re the lowest spend of the group but then kids love Chinese. The most volatile of my restaurants is L’Oranger, you really don’t know what to expect from day to day. The average customer will spend around ninety pounds, but you never really know how many of those will turn up during the week. We had a chap from Kazakhstan in the other day who spent £26,000.’ Analysing the data and thinking outside the box as is his wont, De Stefano has instigated slightly longer opening hours (‘opening at six rather than six-thirty is making a difference) and is working with his staff to encourage greater wine sales.

My final question, before we drift into anecdotes about his second home in Barbados where he bases himself five months of the year overseeing a construction company and his passion for long-distance rallying with Juliet, apparently an ace navigator, is about his perception of the health of fine dining generally in the capital. The overview he presents is classic De Stefano : analytical, cautious and wryly equivocal. ‘Broadly I suppose, if you compare The London Fine Dining Group with groups such as Richard Caring’s, the trends are roughly the same. He’s opening new restaurants of course, and good luck to him, I’ll be very interested to see how he does. The fact that there are new openings in London suggests people are prepared to invest in the sector, however difficult it may be to get financing. You could argue that’s a very positive sign. You could also argue of course that there’s more money than sense in the restaurant business.’ John De Stefano was interviewed at his Monaco home by John Musson. Photography Gary Sherwood

For me the proof of a good restaurant is in its consistency, which always comes down to good food, great service, making people feel a part of something.

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PROMOTION

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Wedgwood and Royal Doulton Hospitality Ranges WWRD draws on a wealth of experience both in design and manufacturing to create beautiful, classic, timeless Wedgwood and Royal Doulton products. The Wedgwood brand was founded in 1759 and has since become an international brand recognised the world over for its heritage, quality, creativity and craftsmanship. Royal Doulton has been producing ceramics and tableware for over 200 years. As far back as

1815 the company founder, John Doulton began producing practical and decorative stoneware from a small pottery in London. From the 1920s onwards the name Royal Doulton became synonymous with the finest English china across the world.

Top left: Connaught Bone China by Wedgwood Bottom left: Fusion Bone China by Royal Doulton

Contact information: www.wedgwoodhotelware.com

Connaught is Wedgwood’s best selling hospitality range. Simple, elegant and with over 75 different items in the range, it allows you to create a traditional or contemporary feel. All items are dishwasher and microwave safe and made from bone china - the strongest ceramic body known to man. Wedgwood’s Connaught pattern can be personalised to suit any stylish, contemporary or traditional setting. Connaught can be found in some of the most prestigious 5 star hotels worldwide.

Fusion is a blending of different elements into a unified whole. Simple serenity and clean lines adapt to all environments. Fusion meets your needs, matches your mood, creates the moment. It is pure white and translucent, Fusion has a delicacy that belies its inherent strength. Fusion is durable, whilst maintaining the lightness and beauty required for successful fine dining and banqueting.

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RESTAURANTS

Association Profiles

Academy of Culinary Arts

Founded in 1980, the Academy of Culinary Arts is Britain’s leading professional body of head chefs, pastry chefs, restaurant managers and suppliers. Its members, spanning across the UK from Cornwall to Wick, are united in a common purpose: to support the future of the industry through thorough and extensive education and training of young chefs, pastry chefs and waiters.

the menu. The campaign is jointly run by the Academy of Culinary Arts and the Pastoral Alliance.

Academy of Culinary Arts Chefs Apprenticeship: a three year vocational course aimed at aspiring young chefs aged between 16-19 years. It is a pioneering approach to deliver comprehensive training whilst enabling the apprentices to work in the finest establishments in the UK. Since the first programme began, over 350 have graduated and some 85 per cent are still in the industry.

Chefs Adopt a School Founded in 1990, Chefs Adopt a School is a national charity under the umbrella of the Academy, which teaches (mainly) primary children about food in a holistic way, focusing on food provenance, food growing and the environment, healthy eating, nutrition, hygiene and cookery, and the impact of food on our lives – as well as improving the image of hospitality as a profession. Currently it reaches over 20,000 children every year. Despite the association’s (and other) continued efforts over the past decade, the Department of Education stubbornly refuses to take seriously the benefits to and the positive affect on children of learning about food in a holistic way from plant to plate starting at primary level. In an attempt to make a stronger case, in addition to lobbying at every opportune moment, the ACA is pioneering a fiveyear pilot curriculum at an inner London school for 5-11 year olds. Children will receive a regular lesson in cookery and food appreciation and where it comes from. At the same time, they will learn about the impact of food on their lives and how to understand the social and practical consequences of sitting around a table and sharing the eating experience.

Annual Awards of Excellence: Begun 1983, this recognises and encourages the most talented emerging chefs, pastry chefs and waiters between 20-26 years. The underpinning purpose of the Awards is to inspire and motivate them to achieve the highest possible standards in their chosen career. Over 450 have won this award. Master of Culinary Arts was launched in 1987 as the Meilleur Ouvrier de Grande Bretagne (MOGB) – now the Master of Culinary Arts. The MCA is a lifetime achievement and only 32 professionals have been able to achieve this distinction. The Mutton Renaissance Campaign was conceived in 2003 by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales and officially launched in November 2004. Mutton Renaissance is the campaign to restore high quality mutton to

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FEAST (Food Education At School Today) Started in 2007 by Chefs Adopt a School, FEAST is the campaign to improve the amount of food education and practical cookery in primary schools.

With this pilot curriculum and plan for growth, the project will have influenced a number of children and their parents who will be better informed and who may consider hospitality as a worthwhile profession.

Patron: HRH The Prince of Wales Honorary President: Richard Shepherd CBE President: Brian J. Turner CBE Chairman: John Williams MBE Chief Executive: Sara Jayne Stanes OBE Academy of Culinary Arts 53 Cavendish Road London SW12 0BL Tel: 020 8673 6300 E: info@academyofculinaryarts.org.uk www.academyofculinaryarts

Top left: HRH The Prince of Wales is Patron of the Academy of Culinary Arts and visited St George’s Primary School in London as part of the 20th anniversary celebrations of the Adopt a School scheme. St George’s was the first school to be adopted by the Academy. In the picture is chef Michael Coaker. Top right: Sara-Jayne Stanes is chief executive of the Academy of Culinary Arts.


PROMOTION

Milk Link

Milk Link provides for the growing health agenda Left: Nick Zeale, one of Milk Link’s farmers, on his farm in North Devon. As one of the dairy co-op’s founder Members, he has been with Milk Link since 2000.

Milk Link is the UK’s most progressive dairy business. We are entirely owned by 1,600 British dairy farmers and are passionate about producing the very best cheeses and dairy products. Milk Link produces a range of value-added dairy products, targeted at the hospitality sector – from cheese and butter through to long life milk and creams. At Milk Link, we pride ourselves on having an in-depth understanding of the complex needs of our hospitality and catering customers. As such, by working closely with them, we are constantly striving to develop and improve our products specifically for the sector. Not only are we focused on producing great tasting cheeses full of flavour and goodness, we also understand that they need to be available in a range of formats that work perfectly for caterers. Milk Link is also committed to developing products that respond to the growing health agenda of the consumer by developing for example a range of ‘lighter’ reduced fat dairy products. With the advent of the Government’s Responsibility Deal, it is also increasingly important for pubs, hotels and restaurants to work closely with their suppliers not only to reduce the amount of saturated fat in the dishes on their menus but also the levels of salt and sugar. The challenge, of course, being to achieve this without losing the all important taste and texture of the food being served. If caterers opt to use ‘healthier’ ingredients in

their dishes in combination with highlighting these as ‘lighter choices’ on their menus, they can do more to attract customers who may be more concerned with the nutritional profile of the food they eat. Milk Link is working closely with customers to develop alternative healthier products, an example being Bladen Lighter – a ground breaking cheese, endorsed by the Craft Guild of Chefs, which contains 30% less fat than standard Cheddar. The Craft Guild of Chefs’ endorsement means Bladen Lighter has been trialled and tested against strict criteria to ensure it delivers on taste, flavour and cookability. We also work to develop solutions for our customers to help them get the best out of all of the products we supply. For instance, we encourage our customers to use Bladen Lighter Mature Cheese as even though mature costs more than mild, less mature cheese is needed to achieve a good flavour in many dishes. This simple change is beneficial for the customer and the consumer alike as it reduces both the calorie and fat intake, as well as cuts the overall cost of the dish.

To see how the foodservice team at Milk Link can make some positive changes for your business, simply contact one of the team on 0870 2408341 or visit the website: www.milklinkfoodservice.com

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Association Profiles

Hospitality Guild

The Hospitality Guild was launched in January 2012. and operates under the umbrella of People 1st, the industry’s Skills Sector Council, and is funded by BIS (Business Innovation and Skills). It brings together a ‘hard core’ of founding members who are committed to the same interests and raison d’etre – British Institute of Innkeeping, Institute of Hospitality, Springboard UK, Association of Front Office Managers, Academy of Culinary Arts, Academy of Food and Wine Service, Professional Association of Catering Educators and Worshipful Company of Innholders. Skills development and career progression are at the heart of the endeavour, underpinned by a keen emphasis on making the sector more competitive and attractive to new recruits. The Guild is determined to build up

the professional self-confidence of people working in the hospitality industry and their pride in craft, technical and management skills and in delivering outstanding customer service as well as pride in improving the reputation of the sector. Above all, the Guild will provide a louder, stronger voice on hospitality skills to government. A published strategy of how this will be achieved is currently underway. One of its concerns is a near disastrous edict from the government which is threatening colleges with the loss of funding for full-time hospitality training. This will jeopardise the future of the industry’s workforce. As the 2012 Olympics leave town in September 2012, the government is planning significant cuts from the current 900 hours to 540 hours.

Even more worrying is that the Food and Beverage Service qualification may be dropped altogether. This means that many college restaurants where the food, cooked by the student chefs is served and sold, will be closed. Where is the joined-up government thinking here? As the hospitality industry grows it needs more graduates and college leavers, not fewer. Director Martin-Christian Kent People 1st 2nd Floor, Armstrong House 38 Market Square UXBRIDGE UB8 1LH Tel: 01895 817000 www.people1st.co.uk

Above: The Escoffier Room at Westminster Kingsway College, scene of the Young Chef Young Waiter annual finals. Government cut-backs threaten the existence of college training restaurants – vital for giving students front line experience.

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PROMOTION

Burco and Lec appliances

A pie with your pint? Food for thought from Burco & Lec Left: Left is the Burco compact countertop convection oven that is perfect for smaller kitchens, alongside the new Burco PC20 that is ideal for displaying pies, pasties and pastries at suitable temperatures. When the pies run out, this model can even hold and store 12” pizzas. Below: A selection of models from Lec Commercial’s new ‘Platinum’ range that includes under counter and freestanding refrigerators and freezers and boasts the ultimate in design, performance, energy efficiency and low running costs.

The pressure to create new and profitable streams of revenue grows ever stronger as UK pubs continue to be hard-hit by dwindling customers and fierce competition. Sadly, many are often deterred from introducing food to their menus due to a lack of culinary competence, rising costs and the lack of available finance. Yet, it can become one of the easiest and most profitable ways to boost revenue. Don’t be fooled into thinking that everyone wants Michelin star food and service – a piping hot pie and a pint is still considered the perfect lunch by many. So why not take advantage of boosting the bottom line and

start to offer a pie with every pint? Put a hold on the peanuts and crisps - a pie with every pint could become just as popular and be much more profitable. For those pubs looking to expand into food or extend their repertoire further, the catering range of ‘plug and go’ countertop appliances from Burco and the commercial refrigeration range from Lec provide a complete food solution. Whether it’s to keep food frozen or refrigerated, or to cook and keep it warm – Burco and Lec appliances are the number one choice for pubs. Stay chilled: The new ‘Platinum’ range from Lec includes under counter and freestanding refrigerators and freezers that

boast the ultimate in design, performance, energy efficiency and low running costs. Featuring three sizes - 200L, 400L and 600L - this range offers a choice of solid or glass doors in a white or stainless steel finish, as well as great storage capacity. Plug & Go: For those with limited menus and kitchen space, Burco’s range of countertop cooking solutions is ideal. From an electric oven/hob and grill, to microwaves and convection ovens, these models take the heat out of smaller kitchens. But don’t be fooled by size, they pack a powerful punch and offer versatility by cooking different food types in less time. Keep it warm: The addition of a heated pie cabinet to a bar top is simple to adopt, takes up very little space and requires minimum outlay. Choose Burco for displaying pies, pasties and pastries at suitable temperatures, and when the pies run out, the PC20 model can even hold and store 12” pizzas. Burco and Lec appliances are renowned for simplicity, performance, reliability and durability and come complete with a comprehensive parts and labour warranty. For further information visit www.burco. co.uk or www.lec-commercial.co.uk or contact 0844 815 3742.

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RESTAURANTS

Association Profiles

Institute of Hospitality The Institute of Hospitality is the professional membership organisation for individual managers and aspiring managers working in the hospitality industry. It promotes the highest professional standards of management and education and its membership spans more than 100 countries worldwide from students to ‘captains of industry’. Members are found at every level and in every discipline, a diversity and range which makes it a unique organisation. Established as an educational charity within the UK, the Institute is directed by a board of trustees (the Executive Council) and managed by a full-time chief executive, supported by a head office team based in Sutton, Surrey. It has a non-executive president, currently Sir David Michels.

Professional development The Institute focuses on the professional development of its members. Activities include the hosting of topical regional seminars, networking events, round-table discussions and a comprehensive range of information services. A brand-new Google-beating online search platform now provides members with highly targeted research results from a catalogue of e-books and specially selected e-journals. The Institute also publishes its own management guides and provides librarian and HR support. In addition, it operates an Education Membership Scheme, which provides free affiliate membership to hospitality, leisure and tourism students. More than 40,000 worldwide currently have access to the library and information service, greatly complementing their study needs. In the UK, it has initiated a popular annual student debating competition, known as Passion 4 Hospitality. In 2012, six university teams put their research and presentation skills on show in front of a live audience during Hotelympia.

Qualifications

News and communications

The Institute’s role as an awarding body remains a prime focus. Following its reaccreditation as an awarding body by the UK government in 2008, it launched an entirely new suite of awards and qualifications, which are designed to be highly flexible and accessible, not only for learners but also for employers and training providers. Built on a foundation of individual modules, each of which can be studied and assessed as a ’stand alone’ certificated programme, the three-level framework enables individuals to use its flexibility to support their continuing professional development, as well as providing clear progression pathways for those seeking relevant hospitality management qualifications. This flexibility and accessibility is being widely used by businesses and colleges across the UK. The Institute’s management diplomas are also available through approved centres in Hong Kong, Abu Dhabi and Dubai.

The Institute communicates with its members and the wider industry through its website, quarterly magazine Hospitality, monthly e-newsletter, Insight, and the bi-monthly continuing professional development e-newsletter, Know-How. The Institute operates a Business Partner scheme that enables service and product providers with direct marketing access to its entire or targeted membership. Through its regular presence on a variety of forums such as the UK’s Sector Skills Council and the British Hospitality Association’s Employment, Education & Skills Network, as well as its participation at conferences across all sectors, both in the UK and internationally, the Institute contributes to the development of policy and initiatives of benefit to the hospitality industry, Chief executive Philippe Rossiter comments: “The Institute occupies a unique position, providing support to managers throughout their careers. Its legacy of quality in education and information provision, as well as its constant promotion of best practice in many fields enables it to make a valuable contribution to professional hospitality management around the globe. In this way, the Institute of Hospitality is assisting manager and businesses to face the challenges of the 21st century.”

Customer service benchmarking Hospitality Assured (HA) is the quality standard for business and service excellence, which is owned and operated by the Institute. The HA process encourages businesses to look at their operation from the customer’s perspective and see where improvements can be made. There are nine steps to achieving accreditation which cover key areas of business planning and service delivery. The programme is focused on helping businesses establish a culture of continuous improvement. The versatility of the HA programme means it is used by a variety of operators. Through the Caribbean Tourism Organization, nearly 50 tourism businesses across the region are currently engaged in the HA process, including a provider of submarine tours. In the UK, recent new HA accreditations include the famous golf resort The Belfry, ISS at the Open University, and the entire UK portfolio of Guoman and Thistle hotels.

Institute of Hospitality President: Sir David Michels Chief Executive: Philippe Rossiter Trinity Court 34, West Street Sutton Surrey SM1 1SH United Kingdom Tel: +44(0)20 8661 4900 www.instituteofhospitality.org

Members are found at every level and in every discipline, a diversity and range which makes it a unique organisation. 90

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4 / Personalities 94

DEFYING THE ODDS – AND GAINING MICHELIN STARS John Musson

98

THE ANTONY WORRALL THOMPSON INTERVIEW John Musson

102 MASTER INNHOLDERS

108 JASON HUNT: CRAZY BEAR John Musson

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Interview

Defying the odds - and gaining Michelin stars Head chef of the three Michelin star Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, Clare Smyth has worked at some of the world’s greatest restaurants including Alain Ducasse’s Louis XV in Monaco. Firmly established at the pinnacle of the British restaurant scene, she talks to John Musson about industry accolades, sexual stereotypes and where gender fits into the culinary equation.

I meet the formidable Clare Smyth at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay in Chelsea. It’s only ten o’clock and yet she’s arriving from Ramsay HQ where she has been taking meetings since eight. This year’s Michelin published just eleven female head chefs in its list and Clare Smyth is the only British woman in history to have been awarded three stars. There’s a relaxed, quietly productive feel about the venue at this time of morning – deliveries being taken in the kitchen and tables being set in the sunlit restaurant – which seems strangely at odds with the clichés of the Ramsay brand. As with many interviews with successful women, it’s a difficult one to gauge. I want to discuss Clare’s career in its own stellar light but inevitably gender is a focus in a way it wouldn’t be were I interviewing Gordon. Ramsay, of course, famous for his kitchen machismo, ignited the gender debate over a decade ago with his incendiary claim that ‘women can’t cook to save their lives’ and has spent much of the time since having that opinion revised for him by his own group of outstanding women chefs, most notably Smyth herself and Angela Hartnett. So my opening remarks come with a whiff of apology. I remind her that Hartnett, the original Ramsay chatelaine, once claimed in interview that she’d been asked about sexism in the industry so many times she was almost bored with the question. “I feel pretty much the same,” she sighs, whilst admitting that in every professional kitchen she has worked in she has been “judged straight away in a way a man wouldn’t have been. “Most guys in a kitchen think that girls haven’t got what it takes, aren’t strong enough

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to do the job and are going to quit.” So how does she set about tackling that level of prejudice? “If you’re passionate about what you do and you’re good,’ she avers, “then people will follow you and those opinions usually tend to last about five minutes.” Smyth acknowledges the irony though that asserting her right to be treated as an equal to her male colleagues has often involved having to be better than the men, concealing any response that might be tolerated in a man (think stress-related hissy fits) but perceived as a sign of weakness in a woman. And she cites occasions (for example when Ramsay would try to send her home earlier than her colleagues because he was concerned about her personal safety travelling alone at night; or when former head chef Simone Zanoni contemplated promoting a less experienced male chef to the sauce section because he considered it was too dirty a job for a woman) where she needed essentially to make a stand against her male colleagues’ good intentions. Proof, if it were needed, that the path to equality is far from simple. In contrast, the trajectory of Smyth’s own rise to culinary prominence appears pretty much seamless. At twelve she was helping her mum in local restaurants in her native Northern Ireland; at fourteen she was reading every book about cooking she could get her hands on and by the time she was sixteen she knew several talented Michelin chefs, had ‘a huge amount of knowledge without really realising it’ and was already passionately committed to the ambition of leading her own Michelin-starred kitchen. After training at college in England followed by stints with leading chefs, including Heston Blumenthal and the Roux

brothers, she arrived at the age of twentythree as the only woman in the Restaurant Gordon Ramsay kitchen. Taking time out to gain experience in several of the world’s most prestigious restaurants, including Thomas Keller’s French Laundry in California and Alain Ducasse’s Louis XV in Monaco, she returned to become head chef there in 2007. Gordon kept her promotion under wraps for months, fearful of head-hunters. Angela Hartnett famously termed the kitchen atmosphere at Ramsay’s legendaryAubergine as ‘psychological warfare’ and it was referred to by those who worked there as ‘Vietnam’ because of its high attrition rate: only one in ten who started out, it was reputed, would last more than a week. I wonder what qualities it takes to be a part of that culture, whether she feels her own experiences under Ramsay accord her the status of ‘Vietnam vet’ and how far this macho culture persists in her own kitchen. “I’ve always loved the atmosphere of the kitchen, the hierarchy of command, the discipline of the service,” she says diplomatically, “but it’s different now. It’s a much quieter kitchen than it used to be. There’s a bond with my team now, we’d do anything for each other whereas before the atmosphere was much more cut-throat and competitive. Guys can be very aggressive.” So has the nineties/noughties era of the testosterone-fuelled professional kitchen been consigned to culinary history? “Absolutely,” she says emphatically. “I certainly don’t want my kitchen to be like that. If I think of the last ten years of my career and the things I went through that were totally unnecessary, so much of it really wasn’t about the food at all. Chefs in the past


PERSONALITIES

Interview

Above: Clare Smyth: “I’m very influenced by nature, I have a feeling for particular ingredients and that’s certainly what drives me.”

were really pushed to their limit and, yes, it produced a generation of phenomenal chefs but I spend a lot of time in my kitchen. It’s basically my home and I want to enjoy it.” For Smyth, the shift in attitudes is less about gender and more generational. She talks of younger chefs defining their professionalism in terms other than being ‘hard or bullying’ and also having different expectations. “We have more of a life. We have nights off – which is so important for the longevity of careers. My sous chef got married last year; it’s important he sees his wife sometimes. It also means he’s more likely to stay. It builds a more stable team which is better for everyone.” Interestingly for someone who has been fairly outspoken about the shortcomings of her male contemporaries – she was once quoted as saying men could be ‘dumb as donkeys’ in the kitchen and it’s a comment she stands by – Smyth is at present the only woman in hers, although keen to confirm that female chefs have come and gone. Doesn’t she feel a responsibility to have a gender balance to her team? Glass ceilings have been high on the media agenda over recent months and Natalie Bickford of Women First, amongst others, has highlighted the issue’s particular urgency within the higher ranks of hospitality. “If someone’s good enough to do the job here they do it regardless of gender,”’ she says, “If they’re not, they don’t. I think positive discrimination is just undermining and breeds resentment.”. There’s an irrefutable logic to the meritocratic argument. I’m keen though to get Smyth’s take on the ‘covert barriers’ conspiring to slow women’s rise within hospitality, highlighted in research such as People First’s 2009 State of the Nation Report. Gender stereotyping – notions of what women are good (and more importantly bad) at – is high on that list and something we’ve discussed in terms of stereotypical kitchen attitudes. But what about persisting stereotypes surrounding the style of food men and women typically produce? Within the industry there’s a theory, articulated by both sexes, that men and women cook differently. Hélène Darroze has been quoted as saying “I cook with my emotions. Men think about technique first and then emotion.” And Derek Bulmer, former editor of the Michelin Guide, has commended women chefs’ ‘lightness of touch’ whilst, many felt, rewarding the perceived technical complexity of their male counterparts.

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Interview

Smyth demurs. For her the arguments are an over-simplification. “I don’t think style has anything to do with gender; it boils down to personality. I don’t think I could sit down to a meal and be able to tell whether it had been cooked by a man or woman. I’m quite a technical chef but my dishes are simple and natural at the same time as being incredibly complex. “I’m very influenced by nature, I have a feeling for particular ingredients and that’s certainly what drives me – smelling the first asparagus which is just coming through now for example – and I’ve been heavily influenced by my time working in Monaco with Alain Ducasse and with Thomas Keller, who both share my preoccupations.” So we’re obviously not talking about an exclusively female sensibility. Interestingly Smyth goes on to describe Keller as a very strict chef, but also a very quiet one (“The guys in the kitchen there would say Keller was worse than Gordon – he’d criticise your work quietly, and it would hurt twice as much”) again confounding the gender stereotyping to which the industry seems prone. We talk about the informal networks that women are setting up within hospitality to rebalance the networking opportunities they are too often excluded from, such as the Leading Ladies of London group co-founded by Anne Marie Dowling, general manager of the five star Royal Horseguards Hotel. Smyth says she socialises almost exclusively with chefs, both male and female, “which is maybe a little bit sad, as mostly we end up talking about food”, and admits that although she is often approached to join female networking groups of this kind and is keen to do so, it’s difficult to find the time for an active commitment. “I was at a Members’ Club recently though and the experience infuriated me. Women were excluded from certain rooms, not allowed in wearing trousers, and it made me realise the extent of the old boys’ networks we are excluded from and I thought, you know

what, women can do that, too!’ We move on to the paucity of female role models for young women entering the profession. Revealingly Smyth says she’s never had the opportunity to work for a female head chef and struggles to pinpoint female TV chefs of consequence. “I discuss this with friends. There are no professional female chefs on TV: women tend to be more housewife cooks. I think Delia’s brilliant and very necessary. Delia’s cookbooks have given everyone a recipe for a Victoria Sponge that works, but it would provide a nice dynamic to have a woman of the stature of Jamie, Hugh, Heston, or Gordon in the media mix. “What we seem to have instead is painted-up former models making cupcakes with no real understanding or feel for food, which is such a missed opportunity. I’d like to be inspired by a woman on TV as I am by those guys.” Opportunely, at this point in the interview, a snake of hospitality students – seventeen and eighteen year olds impeccably attired but painfully quiet – trail into the restaurant and both Clare and her restaurant manager talk to them encouragingly, quizzing them about their ambitions. She clearly takes her own responsibilities as a role model very seriously. “I’m in contact with a girl of sixteen who writes to me, wants to be a chef; I mentor a couple of kids like that. Having never had that, I can see how important it is,” she says. ‘There will always be people who take delight in telling kids that their ambitions are unrealistic, for whatever reason, so it’s really important they have contact with people who show them what is possible.” Time’s almost up, but we can’t really finish the interview without coming full-circle to address Gordon’s infamous comments. Did he ever really mean them, or were they just fuel for the media fire? ‘ “I think he just hadn’t met any good female chefs at that point.” she smiles. “It was the same when I came into this kitchen: the male chefs here just hadn’t met any good ones. There

I don’t think I could sit down to a meal and be able to tell whether it had been cooked by a man or woman. I’m quite a technical chef but my dishes are simple and natural at the same time as being incredibly complex. 96

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are still only a handful, not enough certainly.” She talks about how their relationship has evolved. “When I first started in the kitchen I was terrified” she admits. “Now he’s like a coach, there in a supporting role. He’s always incredibly positive and I feel very lucky to have him behind me.” Does she feel now though that their relationship has evolved to the point where he’s learning from her as well? “Yes and no. He’s there more as a support and I’m there with the details, showing him new things, but that’s my role. And he’ll either like them or he won’t. But generally he always does.” Has she considered her post-Ramsay career? “It’s definitely something I’m thinking about.” she admits (I’m hoping Gordon isn’t handling sharp knives when he arrives at this part of the interview). “‘I can imagine going back to Monaco certainly, maybe opening a restaurant there. It’s an important step in terms of future security.” In the meantime though, it seems that despite all of the industry accolades, she has her feet very firmly on the ground here in Chelsea. She recounts being presented with a gift on leaving Alain Ducasse with the inscription ‘Failure awaits she who rests on the success made yesterday’, which she says encapsulates her professional philosophy. “The pressure of maintaining the three stars is there of course but after five years I’m comfortable with it as I think I’m continually evolving and becoming better. But every day is stressful. Every guest who comes to this restaurant expects a three star experience and it’s that that drives me on - our guests’ faith in us; the fact they may have saved for six months to be able to afford the experience, may have travelled hundreds of miles. “That’s why the pressure’s on in the kitchen. We need to live up to our reputation.” And, defying all the odds, quite a reputation it is, too.


PERSONALITIES

Interview

The Antony Worrall Thompson Interview

One of an exclusive band of chefs to have won the Mellieur Ouvrier de Grande Bretagne, restaurateur Antony Worrall Thompson is a grand seigneur of the British restaurant scene. Credits from a career spanning five decades embrace the early eighties founding of Princess Diana’s reputedly favourite restaurant, Ménage à Trois; managing directorship of the Simpsons of Cornhill Group behind the launch of nineties icons Zoe, Atrium and 190 Queensgate and the later evolution of his AWT restaurant portfolio. Concurrently he has built a media stronghold as one of the country’s most recognisable TV chefs, headlining cookery shows for both the BBC and ITV alongside more political turns on Question Time and its satirical counterpart Have I Got News for You. Recent challenges – the financial difficulties experienced by his restaurant holding company, a diagnosis of Syndrome X and ‘that headline’ – find him in reflective mood and increasingly passionate and politicised about the industry that defines him.

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PERSONALITIES

Interview

The level of austerity in the country is quite extraordinary, there’s an almost post-war feel.

I’m here to talk to Antony Worrall Thompson about the state of the (food) nation : the evolution of the restaurant industry; the challenges of recession; countering the obesity timebomb; the responsibilities of celebrity chefdom - but firstly there’s something he wants to get off his chest, an apology ‘to all those who have supported me over the years – an awful lot of people in the industry who have written me fantastic letters – for letting them down. I did a stupid, embarrassing thing for which I take responsibility and am very sorry.’ He is seeking professional help to explain his ostensibly inexplicable actions in taking low-cost items from a local supermarket, analysing his desire to take risks for risk’s sake and is looking to move forward. OK. Done. Though I think AWT overestimates the censure of the industry and the Great British public and undervalues their ability to contextualise a ‘stupid action’ performed by a complex, charismatic man who seems to inspire fierce loyalty amongst colleagues and friends. But let’s get on with the meat and drink of the interview. It’s a challenging time for the restaurant industry with recent high profile stories of operations struggling with current market conditions – AWT’s and Gordon Ramsay’s to name but two. He characterises the current downturn as ‘undoubtedly the toughest in my lifetime. It’s the uncertainty, the lack of confidence that’s so debilitating at the moment, so the first thing people do is cut back on unnecessary spending – we’re (the hospitality industry) first out and often last back when a recession kicks off.’ If London appears to be bucking this trend,

riding the wave of its relative affordability compared to other European centres it is, according to AWT, a weak current: ‘ The best places are still full but if you look at waiting lists – there used to be a six week wait for The Ivy and The Wolseley and now it’s two or three days. And as you work your way down the pyramid many restaurants in the capital are finding it very tough.’ And in the regions? ‘Well, in this area’ (Henley on Thames) ‘eight pubs have closed since Christmas. The Michelin people stick it out – look at Tom Kerridge at The Hand and Flowers in Marlow, since he got his second star he’s packed, but generally it feels like a return to the 60s and 70s. People have gone back to eating out just on special occasions. The level of austerity in the country is quite extraordinary, there’s an almost post-war feel. And the frightening thing is there’s no obvious end in sight. We could well be looking at another five or six years of this.’ But what’s to be done? A dyed-in-the-wool ‘true blue’ Tory, AWT doesn’t pull his political punches :‘The government has got to stop being so pigheaded and listen and then act on the industry’s concerns’ he fumes, detailing a wish list of measures which includes following the French lead in reducing VAT on hospitality (he wholeheartedly endorses the work being done by the BHA and other hospitality organisations in lobbying on this issue); more controversially, looking at the blanket ban on smoking in pubs which he considers has left the industry ‘dying on its feet’; and then there’s the issue of deregulation and the mountains of red tape currently threatening to strangle the

independents: ‘After my current refurb (at his Greyhound restaurant in Oxfordshire, where we’re conducting our interview amidst a sea of dustsheeted furniture and noisy waves of makeover activity) ‘I have to spend £3,000 on an additional Vac Pac Machine for the kitchen – I’ve been told I need one for raw, one for cooked ;inspectors won’t trust me to wash between applications.’ It’s this sort of regulation he feels is squeezing the lifeblood out of the independent operator, alongside ‘the self-assessment paperwork we’re forced to complete ; boxes to tick to confirm other boxes have been ticked – there’s enormous scope for deregulation.’ And then there’s the thorny issue of bank lending to SMEs. Although AWT concedes it’s very difficult to force private enterprise to lend money he feels there does need to be more consistency to bank operation. When in 2008 he looked to increase the relatively modest overdraft facility for his six restaurants he was refused despite significant business equity and a strong brand. ‘Had I wanted to borrow a year earlier they’d have given me whatever I wanted because they wanted to be attached to the name but suddenly there was blind panic and the reins were pulled in. That sort of kneejerk reaction doesn’t help anyone’ To review AWT’s career is to review many of the major trends of the British restaurant scene over the last five decades. In the seventies the British ‘were still living in the pockets of the French, chained to their style of cooking, the food very grey but the service superlative’, a state of affairs he describes as ‘ the antithesis of where we are at today.’ Ménage à Trois, with its starters and desserts-only menu,

The government has got to stop being so pigheaded and listen and then act on the industry’s concerns.

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PERSONALITIES

Interview

Celebrity chefs have undoubtedly driven people away from cooking. People feel inadequate; we make it look easy and our recipes become an aspiration, unobtainable. playful nouvelle cuisine and fun, glamorous environment (it’s a bizarre footnote given the restaurant’s name that Princess Diana made her first visit with Camilla Parker Bowles and another that The New York Times credited Menage’s international franchise with inventing ‘grazing’) ended French hegemony, even if it was French influenced itself. ‘They went back into their escargot shells and we stayed out, became increasingly adventurous as they headed back to regional cooking’. Fast on the heels of Ménage came the organic movement, perhaps in reaction to the excesses of nouvelle cuisine where it was almost held as an article of faith that ‘everything had to be the best, ingredients were flown in from all over the world; food miles were an irrelevance’. AWT set up a deli in Battersea voted best food shop in London and ‘organic’ became a passion. Much of his restaurants’ produce is organic, some of which he grows himself. He is nowadays a passionate locavore, faithful to sustainability and makes serious commitments to reducing packaging and waste in his businesses. Prince Charles, whom AWT considers unfairly maligned by the press for ‘ideas which have actually proved to be both substantial and sensible’, is an organic ally. He sees the restaurant industry today as decisively split, one wing captivated by the possibilities of seasonal, organic, local cuisine (Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Rick Stein and Jamie Oliver his top triumvirate of TV chefs) : the other under the spell of molecular gastronomy. ‘I love Heston (Blumenthal) but don’t think putting science - xanthum gum and stabilisers - into cooking is really what it’s all about. There’s a science to cooking certainly

but that’s something entirely different. I mean, egg and bacon ice cream? Heston’s really the Harry Potter of the cooking world, a magician, a genius but eating in his flagship restaurant is an experience, not a meal.’ If he’s aware of the British public’s growing culinary sophistication as adduced by the growth in farmers’ markets, organic produce and the increasingly cosmopolitan restaurant scene (‘in the 70s when we served snails in our restaurants I remember a customer eating the shells, some would eat from the wrong end of the asparagus’) he’s also painfully aware of the dichotomy of soaring obesity levels and the near exponential increase in consumption of ready meals. How successful have TV chefs been in encouraging the UK in eating better and more healthily? ‘Celebrity chefs have undoubtedly driven people away from cooking,’ is the disarming response. ‘People feel inadequate; we make it look easy and our recipes become an aspiration, unobtainable.’ It’s the ‘food porn’ argument expounded by Molly O’Neill in The New York Times a decade ago: food presented as voyeurism rather than nourishment. Reservations about the efficacy of the breed notwithstanding (he does concede their role in evolving the nation’s culinary expertise), AWT seems genuinely surprised to have become a part of the celebrity chef-restaurateur phenomenon and delighted by his twenty year media career, most notable for lengthy stints appearing on Ready, Steady, Cook and hosting Saturday Kitchen; that ‘ a short, fat boy with a smashed up face’ got on to TV. Performing was always in the blood of course: his parents were actors, his godfather Richard Burton (‘lovely, a great booming voice, although Elizabeth

Keith Floyd spawned us all. He was brilliant. Delia was a school ma’am, the Roux were too complicated, but Floydy introduced entertainment.

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Taylor was a little precious’) and he has an intuitive understanding of the essence of the genre: ‘To be honest, Keith Floyd spawned us all. He was brilliant. Delia was a school ma’am, the Roux were too complicated, but Floydy introduced entertainment.’ And yet despite the obvious enjoyment of his media career it’s evident he’s very much enjoying getting back to basics and being master in his own kitchen ( our interview had to be postponed for a week due to his chefing commitments). After the loss of several of his restaurants back in 2009 he asked himself the obvious questions about where he had come from, who he was and felt the urge to get back to doing what he did best. Now he’s proud of the fact he’s making percentages 15% higher than when he was perhaps enjoying the trappings of TV a little too much and imagining the restaurants would take care of themselves. His ‘back to basics’ attitude may also account perhaps for the cooling of his wellpublicised celebrity spats : over with Delia; even on speaking terms with Michael Winner; only Gordon – ‘the most foul-mouthed TV chef’ – remains an irritant although his often caustic analysis of Ramsay is tempered with generosity and humour: ’he’s talented, sexy to a lot of women (though god knows why), has produced some excellent head chefs, has done a lot right but when you compare him to Jamie who reinvents himself and really cares, it doesn’t paint him in a particularly flattering light.’ AWT is certainly increasingly showing he cares, doing his bit to ameliorate what he characterises as the deleterious effect of the celebrity chef on the nation’s dietary habits. Since his diagnosis with Syndrome X (a


PERSONALITIES

Interview

pre-diabetic state) in 2003 he seems to have undergone a Damascene conversion in his attitude to healthy eating (this from the man once credited with creating as a one-off treat the most calorific dessert in history, Snickers Pie at 1250 calories per slice). Post diagnosis he researched available diabetes cookbooks (‘complete rubbish’), experimented with creating good low fat dishes and produced a series of books (Healthy Eating with Diabetes, The GI Diet) which he modestly describes as ‘well-timed’ and which sold approaching a million copies. He’s now considering incorporating some of these recipes into the fare of the Greyhound and his two grill restaurants in Kew and Windsor. On the thorny issue of providing calorie information on menus - the government believes calorie counting at the point of sale will make consumers more aware of the energy content of food and curb excess - he agrees there’s a practical application for fast food restaurants selling formula product but argues that ‘in restaurants there will always be a spontaneity mitigating against exact calorie counting.’ He is though beginning to symbolise food more – gluten free etc – and now has ‘free from’ products in the shops in an attempt to do his bit to counter accelerating allergy trends. Interestingly, as our interview draws to a close, he says of his commitments to the industry and the nation’s health: ‘In life you need a mountain to climb’, before adding wryly ‘the trouble is that too often I create the bloody mountains.’ He may be the joker in the pack, avuncular, self-deprecating, but when it comes to the food industry he’s passionate (whether you agree with all of his passions or not), massively knowledgeable and there’s the sense that there’s something indefatigable about him, that there will always be serious work to be done, always more mountains to climb.

John Musson interviewed Antony Worrall Thompson at The Greyhound, Oxfordshire Photography by Gary Sherwood

Page 98 and above: Antony Worrall Thompson at The Greyhound

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PERSONALITIES

Master Innholders

Master Innholders The formation of the Master Innholders in 1978 was the first step taken by the Worshipful Company of Innholders towards renewing its old links with innkeeping. In common with many other Livery Companies the Company had few links with the modern day industry. The award of membership is open to practising hotel general managers by application each year. Candidates have to undergo an interview where they have to clearly demonstrate not only their innkeeping

ability but also continuing support for improving standards within the industry. With the full support of the Worshipful Company of Innholders and the Institute of Hospitality, the Master Innholders have slowly grown in number and have increased their influence and charitable activities within the hotel industry.

Active Master Innholders as at February 2012

Stas Anastasiades

Operations Director

Milsom Hotels Ltd

Gun Hill, Dedham, Colchester, Essex C07 6HP

Ivan Artolli

General Manager

The Balmoral Hotel

1 Princes Street, Edinburgh EH2 2EQ

Richard Ball*

Managing Director

Calcot Manor

Nr Tetbury, Gloucs GL8 8YJ

Graham Bamford

General Manager

Royal Garden Hotel

Kensington High Street , London W8 4PT

Craig Bancroft

Managing Director

Northcote Group

Northcote Road, Langho, Blackburn BBT 8BE

Graeme Bateman

Managing Director

Elite Hotels

Ashdown Park, Wych Cross, East Sussex

Willy Bauer OBE

Chairman

A B Hotels

50-60 Great Cumberland Place, London W1H 8DD

Laurence Beere

Proprietor

The Queensbury Hotel

4-7 Russell Street, Bath, Somerset BA1 2QF

Colin Bennett

General Manager

Park Lane Sheraton Hotel and area manager, England

Piccadilly, London W1J 7BX

Michael Bevans

Managing Director

Linthwaite House Hotel

Crooks Road, Bowness on Windermere, Cumbria LA23 3JA

Stuart Bowery

General Manager

Grosvenor House

Park Lane, London W1K 7TN

James Bowie

Managing Director

Belmont House Hotel

De Montfort Street, Leicester LE1 7GR

Paul Brackley

General Manager

Crowne Plaza London The City 19 New Bridge Street, London EC4V 6DB

David Broadhead

Secretary

The Travellers Club

106 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5EP

Beppo Buchanan-Smith

Proprietor

Isle of Eriska Hotel & Spa

Ledaig, Oban, Argyll and Bute PA37 1SD

Patrick Burke

Managing Director

The Atlantic Hotel

Mont de la Pulente, St Brelade, Jersey JE3 8HE

Stephen Carter OBE*

Chairman

De Vere Cameron House on Loch Lomond

Dunbartonshire G83 8QZ

David Clarke

Director

Bespoke Hotels

The Old Rectory, Windsor End, Beaconsfield, Bucks HP9 2JW

Barry Cole

Managing Director

Riviera International Conference Centre

Chestnut Avenue, Torquay, Devon TQ2 5LZ

*Former hotelier of the year

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PERSONALITIES

Master Innholders

Stephen Coupe Christopher Cowdray

Chief Executive

The Dorchester Collection

Park Lane, London W1A 1QA

Jeffrey Crockett

Managing Director

Boutique Hotels Management Ltd 9 Georgian House, Duke Street, Bath BA2 4AQ

Peter Crome*

Managing Director

The Carnegie Club

Skibo Castle, Dornach, Sutherland IV25 3RQ

Christopher Davy

Proprietor

The Rose and Crown

Romaldkirk, Barnard Castle, Co Durham DL12 9EB

Anna Dowling

General Manager

Royal Horseguards Hotel

2 Whitehall Court, London SW1A 2EF

Peter Egli

General Manager

Whatley Manor

Easton Grey, Malmesbury SN16 0RB

Patrick Elsmie*

Managing Director

The Gleneagles Hotel

Auchterarder, Perthshire PH3 1NF

Ciaran Fahy

Managing Director

The Cavendish London

81 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6JF

Roland Fasel

General Manager & Regional Director UK

The Dorchester

Park Lane, London W1A 1QA

Mark Godfrey

Managing Director

Harbour Hotels

95 Mudeford, Christchurch, Dorset DH23 3NT

Michael Gray*

General Manager

Hyatt Regency London The Churchill

30 Portman Square, London W1A 7BH

Francis Green

General Manager

The Landmark London

222 Marylebone Road, London NW1 6JQ

Jason Harding

General Manager

The Palace

The Old Town, Old Town Island PO Box 9770 Dubai, UAE

Timothy Hassell

General Manager

Ilsington Country House Hotel

Ilsington Village, Nr Newton Abbot, Devon TQ13 9RR

Greg Hegarty

Regional General Manager Park Plaza Hotels

18 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7TJ

Terry Holmes*

Executive Director

Red Carnation Hotels

35 Charles Street, London W1J 5EB

Tim Howard

General Manager

Judges Country House Hotel

Kirklevington Hall, Yarm, North Yorkshire TS15 9LW

Amanda Hyndman

General Manager

Mandarin Oriental Hotel

1330 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington DC 20024, USA

Matthew Johnson

Director & General Manager

Bodysgallen Hotel & Spa

Llandudno, Conwy LL30 1RS

Stuart Johnson

General Manager

Brown’s Hotel

Albermarle Street, London W1S 4BP

Klaus Kabelitz

General Manager

The Berkeley

Wilton Place Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7RL

Stephen Kyjak-Lane

General Manager

Lancaster London

Lancaster Terrace, London W2 2TY

The Gleneagles Hotel

Auchterarder, Perthshire PH3 1NE

Simon Hirst

Peter Lederer CBE/OBE* Chairman Thomas W Lewis Jeremy Logie OBE

Executive Secretary

The Master Innholders

15 Heath Way, Totnes, Devon TQ9 5GP

Theresa Maw

General Manager

County Hall Marriott Hotel

Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7PB

Kenneth McCulloch*

Dakota

1- 3 Parklands Avenue

Eurocentral Business Park, Motherwell ML1 4WQ

Andrew McKenzie*

Managing Director

The Vineyard at Stockcross

Newbury, Berkshire RG20 8JU

Ian Merrick

District & General Manager

Oakwood United Kingdom

44-48 Paul Street, London EC2A 4LB

Brian Miller

General Manager

Danesfield House Hotel & Spa

Henley Road, Marlow-on-Thames, Bucks SL7 2EY

Paul Milsom

Chairman

Le Talbooth

Dedham, Colchester, Essex CO7 6HP

*Former hotelier of the year

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PERSONALITIES

Master Innholders

David Morgan-Hewitt

Managing Director

The Goring Hotel

Beeston Place, London SW1W 0JW

Tony Murkett

Managing Director

The Sloane Club

Lower Street, London SW1W 8BS

Harry Murray MBE*

Chairman

Lucknam Park Hotel

Colerne, Wiltshire SN14 8AZ

Philip Newman-Hall

General Manager

Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons

Church Road Great Milton, Oxon OX44 7PD

Ricci Obertelli*

Chairman

Ricci Obertelli Consulting

4 Heritage Gate, 4 North Park Road, Gerrards Cross, Bucks SL9 8JB

Michael O’Dwyer

Managing Partner

HGS Partnership

34 Arlington Road, London NW1 7HU

Thomas Orchard

Regional General Manager The Metropolitan Hotel

Old Park Lane, London W1K 1LB

Duncan R Palmer

Managing Director

The Langham, Hong Kong

8 Peking Road, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Daniel Pecorelli

Managing Director

Pennyhill Park and Spa

London Road, Bagshot, Surrey GU19 5EU

Andrew Phillips

Secretary

Boodle’s

28 St James’s Street, London SW1A 1HJ

John Philipson

Area Director - Maldives

Six Senses Resorts & Spas

Soneva Fushi & Six Senses Spa, Kunfunadhoo Island, Baa Atoll, Republic of Mandives

Derek Picot

Regional General Manager Jumeirah Carlton Tower Hotel

On Cadogan Place, London SW1X 9PY

Michael Purtill

General Manager

Four Seasons Hotels

Westferry Circus, Canary Wharf, London E14 8RS

Jonathan Raggett*

Managing Director

Red Carnation Hotels

35 Charles Street, London W1J 5EB

Jeremy Rata

Managing Director

Bovey Castle

North Bovey, Devon TQ13 8RE

Jane Renton

Estate Manager

Greville and Thoburn Houses

Kinerton Street, Belgravia SW1X 8EY

Nicholas Rettie*

Director

MRMD

20b Upper Richmond Road, London SW14 8AH

Paul Sadler

General Manager

Calcot Manor Hotel & Spa

Nr Tetbury, Gloucestershire GL8 8YJ

Michael Shepherd

General Manager

The London Hilton on Park Lane 22 Park Lane, London W1K 4BE

Jonathan Slater

Managing Director

The Chester Grosvenor & Spa

Eastgate Street, Chester, Cheshire CH1 1LT

Stewart Spence

Proprietor

Marcliffe Hotel and Spa

North Deeside Road, Pitfodels, Aberdeen AB15 9YA

Rupert Spurgeon

General Manager

South Lodge Hotel

Lower Beeding, Sussex RH13 6PS

Jonathan Stapleton

General Manager

Lough Erne Resort

Belleek Road, Enniskillen, N Ireland BT93 7ED

John Stauss*

General Manager

Four Seasons Hotel

Hamilton Place, Park Lane, London W1J 7DR

Andrew Stembridge*

Managing Director

Chewton Glen Hotel/ Cliveden

Christchurch Road, New Milton, Hampshire BH25 6QS

Peter Taylor OBE

Chairman

The Town House Company

35 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH4 7RN

Debbie Taylor

President, Hospitality & Real Estate

The Old Course Hotel

St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SP

Jonathan Thompson

General Manager

Hartwell House

Oxford Road, Aylesbury, Bucks HP17 8NL

Paul Uphill

Managing Director

The Palace Hotel

Babbacombe Road, Torquay, Devon TQ1 3TG

Jonathan Webley

General Manager

Grand Hotel

King Edward’s Parade, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 4EQ

Sue Williams

Group General Manager

The Bath Priory Hotel

Weston Road, Bath BA1 2XT

David Wilkinson

Chief Executive & Secretary

Royal Automobile Club

Woodcote Park, Epsom, Surrey KT18 7EW

*Former hotelier of the year

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Black Book 2012.pdf 1 20/10/2011 12:31:36

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PERSONALITIES

Master Innholders

Peter Wood

General Manager

Grayshott Spa

Headley Road, Grayshott, Nr Hindhead, Surrey GU26 6JJ

Dagmar Woodward*

General Manager

Jumeirah Frankfurt

14 Rue du Marche, St Honore 75001 Paris, France

Francis Young

Proprietor

The Pear Tree at Purton

Church End, Purton, Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 4ED

Richard Young

Managing Director

Great Fosters

Stroude Road, Egham, Surrey TW20 9UR

*Former hotelier of the year

Retired Master Innholders John Alderman

Trevor Forecast

Ann Murray-Smith

Richard Baker MBE

Franco Galgani

Arthur Neil

Neil Bannister

George Goring OBE *

David Nicholson

TIG Barrasford

Edward Gray

John O’Carroll

David Beswick

Anthony Green

Ramon Pajares OBE *

Alan Blenkinsopp

Ronald Jonesw OBE *

Ingrid Philip-Sorensen

Malcolm Broadbent

Ken Kaminski

Rev Malcolm Reed

David Brockett

David Locket

Chrsitoher Rouse OBE *

James Brown

Christopher Longden

Nicholas Ryan *

Christopher Cole

Christopher Mander

Philip Taylor

William Cowpe

John Mawdsley

The Viscount Thurso MP

Richard Davis

Pat Masser

Anne Voss-Bark MBE

Craig Drummond

Hilary Metcalfe

Martin Williamson

Richard Edwards OBE *

Diane Miller-Brooks

Peter Yarker

*former hotelier of the year

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PERSONALITIES

Interview

Jason Hunt: Crazy Bear From taking ownership of a derelict pub in the early nineties knowing ‘next to nothing’ about the hospitality industry, Jason Hunt has marshalled his Crazy Bear Group to Iconic British Brand status. The Crazy Bear Beaconsfield has been recognised by Conde Nast in their definitive guide to the best new hotels in the world and labelled by The Times ‘a new hotel for rock stars’; and not to be outdone, his London venues Crazy Bear Fitzrovia and Crazy Bear Covent Garden Members Club have between them swept the capital’s awards board, picking up Best Members Club, Best Restaurant and Best Bar accolades. John Musson meets the originator of ‘cool meets country’ to discuss the fundamentals of learning a business, developing a brand and being prepared to make mistakes along the way. It’s fitting that I’m interviewing Jason Hunt at his Beaconsfield ‘hotel for rock stars’. There’s definitely something of the rock star about Mr. Hunt as he saunters over to introduce himself. Think a young Bono without the sunglasses: casually stylish; definite presence. And the hotel itself is undeniably very cool. The photographer, spoiled for choice, has been ricocheting between the walnut and copper bar, the chandeliered and gold-leafed restaurant (the chandeliers 1930s originals from Alain Delon’s Paris apartment), the airily exotic Moroccan lounge and the zen calm of the poolside area before settling on a white leather banquette studded with Swarovski crystals where Jason informs him Peter Andre has just been shot for his latest album. And then of course there are the private dining rooms, which include The Hunting Lodge with its wall-mounted animal heads and the fabled bedrooms with their copper baths and gold rococo beds lifted straight out of the pages of The Great Gatsby. Hotel for rock stars indeed. The Crazy Bear Group has come a long way since Jason bought The Bear And Ragged Staff, a Stadhampton pub with a caved-in roof and boarded-up windows, less than twenty years ago. At the time he confesses to knowing very little about the hospitality industry and knowing very few people who did, prompting the inevitable question : what on earth possessed him? ‘I was inspired by the venue.’ He smiles. ‘Luckily I didn’t ask anyone’s advice; the only

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advice I have ever received has been not to buy the venues I’ve bought.’ And yet he went ahead anyway and thus The Crazy Bear brand was born. What was it, beyond youthful brio (he was twenty-nine at the time) that prompted such a leap into the unknown? ‘I’d worked hard in my former career and been successful. I couldn’t see any reason why the same hard work wouldn’t pay dividends with a bar, restaurant or hotel. For me the most important qualifications for undertaking any business venture have always been common sense and application; pushing yourself and everyone along with you; understanding there will always be a huge amount to learn and setting about learning it’. But a successful brand doesn’t just happen. He must have had a very clear vision of what he wanted to create? ‘I was a young man, single, with a disposable income and I’d go to great bars, clubs and restaurants in London, receive really good service, dine well and it was still fun and informal. At that time fine dining restaurants outside of London tended to be very serious and stuffy. I wanted to bring that same quality and fun hand in hand to the country.’ Which all sounds very commendable, but what about the specifics of medium or longterm planning? ‘The first ten years were all about the Stadhampton site. We started out as a bar, added food after about six months, added rooms by buying up surrounding buildings, brought in Thai food after four years (at the time there weren’t really any Thai restaurants

outside of London) then we bought the farm six years ago. By necessity we had to do everything slowly which in retrospect was a blessing because I didn’t have any formal training, wasn’t a chef, had no experience of managing a restaurant, so I was learning my trade, often by making mistakes.’ And simultaneously he was working on developing his very particular brand, discovering where and what his market niche was and how it could be developed. It was only when Stadhampton was up and running smoothly and he’d found the answers to some of these questions that he realised he was ‘a little bored and it was time to try something else.’ In fairly quick succession The Crazy Bear brand opened in Fitzovia in 2004, Beaconsfield in 2008 and in 2009 the Members Club in Covent Garden. I’m interested to know how he will describe the brand he’s worked so assiduously over nearly twenty years now to evolve. In past interviews he has described The Crazy Bear concept as ‘Disneyland for grown-ups’ with ‘a surprise around every corner’ and both Beaconsfield and the original Stadhampton venue with its double decker bus reception and Ben Hur plinths and statuary more than live up to the hype. His response today though seems more considered: ‘It’s definitely unique, flamboyant and I hope fun. I’ve always tried to create a venue I’d want to visit. There’s certainly an eclecticism, a real attention to detail and to quality but I hope the feel is relaxed and informal.’ The Stadhampton site has had two AA


PERSONALITIES

Interview

For me the most important qualifications for undertaking any business venture have always been common sense and application; pushing yourself and everyone along with you; understanding there will always be a huge amount to learn and setting about learning it.

rosettes for over ten years and his opinion is that the team wouldn’t have to do much to get a third but that the necessary changes would impose an element of homogeneity detrimental to the venue’s unique atmosphere. ‘The Crazy Bear has a certain feel, attracts a certain type of person, it’s almost like a club. There’s no sign above the hotel entrance indicating we’re here – we’re not looking to attract passing trade. It’s important it’s kept exclusive to the right people, who are responsive to its ambience and add something to it. Our members’ club is very much the same. Small. Discrete. Pretty much only advertised by word of mouth. And that’s how we want to keep it.’ So who is the archetypal Crazy Bear customer? ‘Our clientele isn’t as defined in terms of age and profession as in many establishments. Our members’ club is slightly different but again not as stratified as many clubs. Members come from different walks of life, not simply media or fashion. We’re not too niched, there are no committees to impress in order to join and I think it’s this wide-ranging group of personalities which helps to create its eclectic atmosphere.’ The club feel is very important to Jason and he encourages Crazy Bear club membership with hotel discounts and invitations to exclusive events. Although Jason believes all brands are fundamentally different (‘you can’t compare Gap and Microsoft’) he does concede there will be fundamentals underlying successful businesses. Attention to detail as a conduit to quality is something he considers core to his own success. From initial design through food procurement to serving a cup of coffee, he oversees every element of The Crazy Bear experience. ‘I’m around most days. I visit all my sites at least once a week. If I own a business, I need to be involved in every part of it, whether in a big or a small role. I have regular meetings with our operations director. I don’t micro-manage but I do have an opinion on most decisions. I’ll encourage people to come to me with ideas as they’re on the shop floor every day and they see what works and what doesn’t. Nine times out of ten we’ll run with those and if they don’t work we’ll change them. I don’t have partners. We don’t need board meetings to make decisions. If things aren’t right we can change them very quickly which has been really beneficial over the years. It’s a very fast-moving industry, these are tough times, it’s important to get things right.’ Jason’s influence is imprinted all over The Crazy Bear brand. The properties’ distinctive aesthetic is largely down to him. ‘We approach design differently. I tend to source interesting

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Interview

pieces and work around them. The panelling for the main bar and some of the bedrooms here at Beaconsfield for example was salvage from a Cathedral. It provided a fabric to work from and a visual continuity for the property which sets us apart as a brand.’ He is heavily involved in the group’s 80 acre farm and its farm shop, listing from memory its closed herds of Hereford and Highland cattle, its pedigree Gloucestershire Old Spot pigs, Welsh Badger Face Sheep, Welsummer X Maran chickens (which apparently lay distinctive green eggs), its ducks and quails, reindeer, llamas and alpacas. The last few items in the list may be ‘just for fun’ but there’s a seriousness of purpose underlying the enterprise, as with everything he does. ‘Our produce is local, fresh and traceable – direct from the field to the fork - and this has a huge impact on food quality. That’s the kind of attention to detail that makes all the difference’ Similarly, he is heavily involved in staff training and development, looking to evolve long-term staff relationships by nurturing rather than head-hunting talent. ‘We have great managers. My operations director has been working with me for seven years; the manager of my Farm Shop began working for me over a decade ago as a cleaner; two of our Thai chefs have been with the company for fifteen years and one is now the group executive chef. Everyone knows what they’re doing and I like to think they share the values of the organisation.’ So that’s the story of The Crazy Bear: an established, eclectic British brand, garnering awards, defying the recession and it would seem doing very nicely. Which leads me to wonder out loud whether he’s not just starting to get a little bored once again. He smiles. Imminently a new restaurant is being opened at the Beaconsfield site along with an extra thirty rooms. Even so, he sees the Crazy Bear brand as very much in its infancy, still growing and evolving. ‘We’re well-known in the UK but there are definite plans to take the brand further afield. We’re in discussions to expand into the Middle East and Russia, either as a franchise or a full involvement. I’m confident we have the infrastructure to be able to control that sort of expansion and they’re definitely interesting markets.’ So next time you’re heading to Moscow or Dubai you should perhaps travel expecting the unexpected : there may well be a surprise awaiting you around every corner.

Jason Hunt was interviewed by John Musson at The Crazy Bear, Beaconsfield. Photography by Gary Sherwood

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5 / Technology 112 WHAT NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR THE GUEST ROOM? Patrick Mayock

118 SOCIAL MEDIA – BUT WHAT IS IT? Jeffrey Epstein

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Hotel Technology

What new technology for the guest room? The future of technology may hold infinite possibilities, but within the hotel guestroom, experts say that the focus is still on the basics: fast, free Internet; connectivity with devices and hotel services; and, of course, the TV. Six hotel industry technology gurus from around the world share their thoughts on topics ranging from advances on the horizon to the most important tech upgrades for the present. What follows is a sample of their responses.

Above: London’s Z budget style hotel in Soho provides satellite TV channels, free WiFi and an ipod docking station in all rooms.

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This article, by Patrick Mayock, International News Editor, HotelNewsNow.com, originally appeared in HotelNewsNow.com

Q1: What is the most exciting technological advance in guestroom technology?

Gustaaf Schrils, VP, global technology, the Americas, InterContinental Hotels group “… the guest may feel that the hotel, based on the room rate, should provide a superior experience and look for high definition DTV or iPad-like devices in their rooms, allowing them to control their heating, cooling, inroom food menus or other concierge services.”

John Burns, president, Hospitality Technology Consulting “Vastly improved TV hardware (even better when equipped with high definition).”

Don O’Neal, president, O’Neal Consultants “Interactive possibilities between guests’ personal devices and in-room devices, (e.g., to TV, to lock, to in-room controls, to Wi-Fi, to


TECHNOLOGY

Hotel Technology

sound system, to telephone, to staff personnel via video).” Michael Levie, Chief operating officer, citizenM “A focus on functional technology versus toys; and IP-based technology and associated networks.” Bob Bennett, HITEC Board of Directors; president, Starr Technology Consulting “I am very impressed with the potential of some new energy management devices. These controls can be installed without adding any new wiring to the guestroom and do not need to have batteries replaced. For a very reasonable cost a property could achieve significant savings.” Kermit Littlefield, VP, guest technology, Marriott International “In the past two years the increased use of tablets and smartphones, and the mobile applications they use, has been extraordinary. These devices will become ubiquitous for business travellers within the next two-three years and will result in customers who want to interact with us using them.

Q2: What is one future guestroom technology that hoteliers need to keep on their radar? Bennett: “Providing access to all the content on the Internet, both informational and entertainment, and on the TV set is still evolving. It is possible today to connect guestrooms TVs to the Internet, but the experience can often be difficult to use for the guest or expensive to implement for the hotel. New revenue opportunities for the hotels will emerge when these systems operate more seamlessly.” Littlefield: “Today, the most exciting technological advance in guestroom technology is the ability to provide interactive technology solutions that allow more customer access and control of in-room entertainment and environmental controls such as: the thermostat, television, telephone, high-speed Internet network, remote controls, minibars, even the guestroom lock.” Levie: “IP-based technology and associated networks—they will control all rooms centrally for the guest and company.”

Schrils: “3-D movies are still on the radar. However, movie studios are still not sure if the investment and delivery methods can be achieved. Guest check-in and check-out via their mobile devices is being explored, and the use of tablet devices as menus in restaurants is interesting and could be a way of providing visual enhancements to the items being offered.”

Q3: Excluding a strong Internet connection, what is the most important piece of guestroom technology? Burns: “This is a split decision between a flatscreen TV and a ‘usable’ clock radio (with usability declining as the devices become more and more elaborate and complex).” Bennett: “It is still the TV set. We take HDTV with many HD channels for granted in our homes, but it is still not common enough in hotels. … Just getting this basic requirement operational will impress the guest more than a lot of extra technology features in the room.”

it is very unlikely he will choose to pay extra to use the hotel Wi-Fi when that amount of bandwidth will likely not be available and could be iffy at best. This also brings into question the 4G signal level strength within a hotel. When a guest is paying a carrier to achieve high bandwidth, weak signal strength in the hotel will create numerous guest complaints. Weak cellular voice signal generates many complaints today but will be a drop in the bucket compared to the complaints if a guest is prevented from using the primary source of his Internet connection. It can be costly to a hotel to enhance the cellular signal to make sure the guest is happy, but the burden will be on the hotel to do so.” Levie: “citizenM provides it all for free, including video on demand. Phone rates are ‘Skype’ and the industry will have to move there shortly. No more charging, which is simply not accepted by guests!”

Littlefield: “… our guests are experiencing high quality, crisp, clean pictures in their homes and expect at least a similar, if not better, experience while at a hotel. At Marriott, we feel that providing a high definition LCD television paired with highdefinition content is a very important piece of guestroom technology.”

Bennett: “Money is still being made with movie systems that are in-place, but it is hard to justify making a big new investment in this area. Many hotels report improved F&B revenues from the ability to order room service or make restaurant reservations on the TV set because of the ability to add pictures and videos to enhance the sales process. Ordering entertainment content from the Internet or selling services in the community over inroom devices such as the TV or a tablet will present new revenue opportunities.”

Schrils: “We do know that the room may need to be compatible with both 3G and 4G or (long term evolution) networks. The strong Internet connection needs will have to be defined as there is possibly a stronger or tiered Internet platform that could support the guest desire for streaming video or gaming.”

Littlefield: “For Marriott the guestroom technologies that generate the most revenue vary greatly from brand to brand and from market to market. Each of the Marriott brands evaluates the overall pricing strategy of the technology products and services that it provides to our customers.”

Q4: What guestroom technology generates the most revenue? Is there an advance on the horizon that could change this? O’Neal: “In the upscale market with whom we work, it is Internet access. 4G cellular… Hotels/owners will not be able, or willing, to keep up with the ever-increasing bandwidth demand of guests and match the design speed of 4G (e.g., 10-15 meg per person). If a guest is already paying for 10-15 meg of bandwidth,

Schrils: “Guests have grown very savvy and today carry many different forms of technology with them, such as laptops and mobile devices, and thus are able to avoid guestroom technology that generates revenues for hotels. A guest today can enjoy voice, data and video services without paying a hotel for these services. We are still looking for opportunities on the horizon which might generate revenue.” Burns: “The television, possibly through niche pay-per-view options.”

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Hotel Technology

Above: Communications via the in-room television can provide guest information on local weather, local events, but can also upsell hotel services like movies.

Q5: When renovating a guestroom, what is the most important technological upgrade/addition hoteliers should make? Littlefield: “When renovating guestrooms, it is important to carefully consider the cabling needs of the entire property. The purpose is to ensure that you are able to accommodate the wired and wireless needs of today’s technology and are prepared to support the future technologies needs of both guests and associates.” Bennett: “First is wiring. This includes enough electrical plugs and placement of those plugs in convenient locations. It also includes wiring to connect various in-room devices,

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control panels, HVAC, lights, doors, etc. in the room and to central control systems. Many of these devices can be connected wirelessly to save costs but, of course, when doing a room renovation it is a good time to confirm there are enough wireless access points to provide good signals and bandwidth to all points in the room.” Burns: “Improved communication network to/with the guestrooms.” Schrils: “The most important focus should be the wiring and cabling of rooms especially in older properties. There is also the challenge of making rooms wireless accessible via either Wi-Fi or cellular.”


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Streamline

The Table Café speeds up its service with a little help from Streamline Digital they’re busy they can open nine tills to keep people moving. It’s vital to my business that I can offer our customers the same speed and quality of experience,” he concludes. “And, over the long-term, Streamline Digital is cheaper, too. That’s just good business sense.” Streamline Digital is a payment terminal that connects via broadband, speeding up transactions*. Payments can be processed in just a couple of seconds, which means it could be up to four times faster than dial-up terminals.

The benefits of Streamline Digital: ` Speed: take card payments in as little as two seconds ` Savings: a broadband connection means you could save over £300 on a dedicated phone line for your terminal** ` Simple: easy to set-up and install, and with ongoing UK-based support

To find out how Streamline Digital could help your business grow, please call 0800 01 01 66 and quote SDH1 or visit streamline.com/digital

It’s all about service Located just a short walk from tourist hotspot Borough Market, The Table Café specialises in creative cuisine, made with responsibly sourced ingredients from local suppliers. The Table has enjoyed glowing reviews from some of the most reputable critics in the capital. It’s little wonder that growth has been so rapid for the increasingly busy restaurant. Shaun Alpine-Crabtree, who runs The Table, picks up the story: “Our business was growing fast. We were starting to get seriously busy, and found that just about everyone who came in wanted to pay by card. For me, it’s really important that when a customer has eaten and is ready to leave, it’s quick and easy for them. We know they don’t want to hang around. “The Table also offers take-away meals,” continues Shaun. “So it was vital that we didn’t

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have long queues in the restaurant. The last thing you want when you’re dropping in for your morning coffee is a 10-minute wait to pay.”

Speed is of the essence At the time, The Table was using a number of ‘dial-up’ card machines, terminals that connected using a dedicated phone line. “We just kept adding more and more lines, and eventually we ran out,” notes Shaun. “It was also costing us a fortune on line rental. So when I spoke to Streamline and they suggested their broadband terminal, I didn’t have to think twice.” Not only has Streamline Digital helped The Table to improve the customer experience, but, according to Shaun, it has also helped it stay competitive. “We’re located opposite a major food retailer, and when

*High-speed broadband internet connection within the premises is required, along with a high speed router with open Ethernet port for each payment terminal, or Hub, if all ports are in use. **Based on 12 months BT business line rental at £16.52 and £106 installation cost. Figures correct as of 14/02/12 † Nilson report 2011, by volume and value WorldPay (UK) Ltd., Mansell Street, London, E1 8AN. Registered in England No. 07316500. WorldPay (UK) Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority under the Payment Services Regulations 2009 (Register No. 530932) for the provision of payment services.


PROMOTION

Heatrae Sadia Heating

Save time, energy and costs with the Aquatap hot and cold drinking water unit Leading water heating specialist Heatrae Sadia offers a range of drinking water and hand washing products suitable for catering establishments including restaurants, cafés and hotels. Left: Instant chilled water. Right: Instant boiling water.

The company’s latest offering is the Aquatap drinking water unit, available in three versions; boiling, boiling/chilled and boiling/ambient.

Boiled over Aquatap provides a constant supply of boiling water for tea, coffee and other hot drinks, providing an alternative to kettles, urns and drinks machines. The product is also ideal for cooking; kitchen staff can have a supply of boiling water literally on tap, saving time and energy when blanching or cooking vegetables or preparing sauces, rice, pasta or couscous. Aquatap also eliminates the safety hazards associated with kettles and urns. Boiling water units are securely mounted onto a wall or counter top, so they can’t be knocked over. The easy-to-install, five litre capacity stylish Aquatap is based on Heatrae Sadia’s

market leading Supreme boiling water unit, and includes similar built-in safety features, a lime-scale inhibitor and Intelliboil™Plus technology. This effectively and efficiently manages the boiling cycle by regularly bringing the contents of the water container to the boil in response to ongoing user demand. A ‘temperature ready’ LED indicator advises when the product is ready for use. Aquatap is energy efficient, only delivering the amount of water required and replacing it as it is used.

Additional extras include drip trays for counter mounting, water filters and an extension piece to enable flasks, cafetieres, water bottles and jugs to be filled. Aquatap is manufactured in the UK and benefits from pre- and after-sales support from Heateam.

For further information contact 01603 420220 or visit www.heatraesadia.com.

Chilled out As well as providing boiling water, Aquatap can also deliver a constant supply of refreshing, chilled drinking water, or can be fed directly from the cold mains supply to deliver ambient cold water.

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TECHNOLOGY

Social Media

Social Media - but what is it? - asks Jeffrey Epstein, founder of Best Loved Hotels. Today, no single topic is more often heard in meetings with principals of the hospitality businesses than the topic of social media. It is not the size of the social network that matters, but the influence these social contacts possess when affecting sales decisions that matters, he says.

Left: Jeffrey Epstein: Regardless of what social media may be, how it influences sales, or how the hotel will measure results, there is a general consensus among hospitality executives that we must do something.

At one end of the spectrum there are those hoteliers who, like ostriches with their heads buried in the sand, proudly refuse to acknowledge that something different is happening in the way their products and services are being discussed, considered, and ultimately sold. Then there are those, slightly less curmudgeonly, who grudgingly accept that the pre-dominant social media platforms: Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn exist and that a lot of people are using them, though for what they perhaps are not sure. These folks tend to shuffle down the path of reluctant acquiescence of this new paradigm, first divorcing themselves from the conversation but all the while acknowledging that someone within their organisation must understand it (usually the youngest and least experienced member of staff), and through delegation absolve their need to know any

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more about social media. They will, however, stand in judgement of anyone who spends time tweeting, posting and updating and then measuring success without any clear defined strategy or objectives in place. Finally, there are the last group of hotel professionals, the ‘early-adopters’, who race to engage, be a part, and sense that times are changing – but they tend to be no more selfassured than the other two types. However, they embrace change and wait and see where the chips may fall!

Lacks definition One of the biggest problems is that social media lacks a coherent well-articulated definition. If you Google the keyword, “social-media definition” your search result will contain in excess of 20m entries. If you go to Wikipedia, you find that Social Media is defined as: “...

web-based and mobile technologies used to turn communication into interactive dialogue.” Andreas Kaplan and Michael Haenlein define social media as, “a group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, and that allow the creation and exchange of user-generated content.” For reasons of brevity, for our purposes, social-media is any active way we engage with past, current, and future clients, as well as with people who aspire to stay or associate with the product and service we offer. Using this broad definition means that any pro-active way we, as hoteliers, can engage and speak to our audience plays a part in the hotel’s social media plan. What distinguishes social media from traditional social engagement is the fact that you do not necessarily control your message; it is shaped by your customers and potential customers.


TECHNOLOGY

Social Media

What you can do, at least, is be a constructive and benevolent part of the conversation.

Key factor So, in short, one of the key factors is trying to figure out what exactly is social media. After that, you can decide what will be the best way to successfully deploy its tools and activities across the whole of your hotel’s guest interactions. Each day more and more hotels are dipping their toes into the social media pool. It is now generally accepted that a successful hotel’s electronic marketing strategy must include a website, a blog, a direct electronic newsletter campaign, a search engine/pay per click strategy, and an 24/7 active presence on at least Facebook and Twitter. Regardless of what social media may be, how it influences sales, or how the hotel will measure results, there is a general consensus

among hospitality executives that we must do something. We find that the hotelier, whether he be the principal or owner, the sales and marketing team or through third parties like PR firms and brand management companies, are beginning to establish their presence on the most predominant social media platforms which are Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Linkedin. What characterises most of these engagements is the degree of uncertainty and the lack of guidance in determining what it takes to be successful. Another important trend over the past year, and now definitely picking up steam, is the rise of the social media expert and of third parties promising to manage your brand. There is no doubt that there are some very knowledgeable individuals out there who have built up very large networks of followers, likers, and +1s (Googlespeak), but I am not

sure this, in itself, constitutes an expertise. As social-media is a subset of marketing and sales, and to a great extent is similar to many public relations functions, it is easy to find hoteliers looking for people to assist them by coming up with a social media strategy.

Major caveat There is no doubt that this can be helpful, but it comes with a major caveat. The success of any social media engagement is dependent on the authenticity of the person in question and their relationship to the hotel. For example, someone tweeting on behalf of a hotel in real time but actually sitting in an office in a far-away location who has never worked in the hotel, or for that matter any hotel, is going to be caught out pretty quickly and will undermine the best efforts. To be successful in social-media is to understand that it is real people in real time

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Social Media

commenting about what is real that fosters success in social media engagement. It is important to find partners, friendly hoteliers and suppliers to support and extend your effort, but be wary of those purporting to be able to generate real sales or simply get you followers. I take the view that in 2012 we will see the expansion and innovation of new social media platforms. There is no doubt that the upcoming Facebook public offering will raise a lot of money to be used for innovation. Do not be surprised when they acquire other social media-related companies. Twitter will continue to refine its offerings as it attempts to aggressively find a profitable business to support its growing global influence and burgeoning audience. But the major concern for hotels will be trying to cope with the already suspect labour intensity of managing social-media activities with an every growing number of platforms. Each month there appears to be a new social media concept or platform, each sucking up more and more time and energy from the hotel’s marketing and sales executives. In the last six months, these new platforms, including Google’s Google+, set to rival Facebook in sheer numbers and influence, have been met by smaller niche players like Pinterest, a photo based social platform, to Quora, a content sharing platform, to pure social connecting and discovery sites like Tagged. There appears to be an insatiable need to provide the consumer with the ability to meet like-minded people and share content. To what degree these connections will dominate all of a person’s social life still remains to be seen. When you ask hotels who are engaged in social media (mainly working with Facebook,

Twitter, or Google+ presentations) to gauge their level of success, they often couch their responses not so much in clear-cut monetary sales but by simply the size of their social networks. These vary depending on the medium: Facebook (likes), Twitter (followers), and Google+ (+1s). However, what we are learning is that it is not only the size of the social network that matters, but the influence these social contacts possess when affecting sales decisions. There is no doubt that a celebrity tweeter, like Stephen Fry with over four million followers, when he tweets about his wonderful stay at your hotel, will have a significant public relations affect. The marvellous result is no different than when Mr Fry might have mentioned your hotel in a newspaper article or on TV. Yes, Mr Fry has influence, but the question is how many hotels can successfully engage with tweeters with such a widespread network and corresponding influence?

Not just sheer numbers So it is not sheer numbers that count. On Facebook we increasingly observe a disconnect between someone “liking” your Facebook brand page and actually having any intention of reading your regular updates on your hotel’s events, offers, and news or actually booking or recommending your hotel to a friend or colleague. This is to say the use of social-media for direct sales is still in its infancy. We have learned that there is far more to social media than posting ‘unsocial’ endless offers and deals seen by far too few people to have any real impact on sales. The main reason for this situation is a lack of clear key performance indicators (KPIs)

for validating and monetising social media in the hospitality industry. Sure, we know how much time those engaged in the social media process are spending, and this can be equated to cost. However, when it comes to matching this to sales generated in a given period there are few hoteliers that can point to clear-cut overall success. This is not say that there is not plenty of anecdotal information suggesting positive effects on sales and the quality of networking connections that have been made using social media. I believe, like Paul Mallett, managing partner at Brass, that “the biggest challenge I hear is – ‘what exactly is social doing for me? Yes it’s there, yes everyone’s doing it, but how does it fit with my other digital activity and what should I spend?’ 2012 will be the year of the Total Digital ROI model, where social media realises its true value.” Hospitality as an industry is by its very nature a socially engaging, communitybuilding business sector. It takes its very strength from the power of those working in hotels to be empathetic, caring, and giving. These are the same qualities at the very heart of successful social media engagement. To be sure, hospitality and tourism occupy a benevolent and positive planet within the social media universe. To what degree these tools will become staples in how we talk to future customers is truly down to each of us engaged in the marketing and sales process.

Jeffrey Epstein is the founder and publisher of Best Loved Hotels, a marketing services company which includes the website bestloved.com, direct e-mail, print directories, blogs, and social-media brand management for hotels in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Regardless of what social media may be, how it influences sales, or how the hotel will measure results, there is a general consensus among hospitality executives that we must do something.

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PROMOTION

Softbrands Ltd.

Towards an integrated future for Hotel Management SoftBrands Opens New Horizons in Hotel Technology Left: Infor10 Softbrands HMS a complete new management system to revolutionise the way work is done in Hospitality Below: Wolfgang Emperger, Regional Vice President of Sales Europe and Africa, SoftBrands

SoftBrands, an Infor affiliate, provides global software solutions for the Hospitality industry and has redefined hospitality management software to begin a new era in hotel technology. Technology has moved at an incredible pace over the last few years and as a reaction to this, SoftBrands has invested a lot of time and energy to develop the next generation in hospitality management software to complement current trends and hotelier expectations.

The next generation solution for the hospitality industry Infor10 Softbrands HMS helps to ensure that hoteliers know their customers’ needs and understand the value of the guest. It is a complete new management system to revolutionise the way work is done in the industry. As the first complete hospitality solution to unify numerous hotel functions, Infor10 SoftBrands HMS enables users to manage everything from availability and rates to guest profiles and in-house services, all within a

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single application. By providing a complete snap shot of guests and business performance, it allows greater information sharing and visibility across the organisation.

Available both on-premise and in the cloud as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), the solution provides the flexibility to meet any business’ needs, whether a five-star resort chain or an independent city centre hotel

Hotel Software Powering Profitability About SoftBrands for Hospitality: Infor10 SoftBrands HMS makes it easy to ‘make it your own’ with customisable screens to perfectly fit your hotel processes and save on operational and administrative costs. Key results can be seen in one location so you can analyse performance and build strategies. Direct interaction with social media feeds such as Twitter, Facebook and Trip Advisor means you can always be one step ahead, offer high-quality guest services and boost profits. “The needs of our clients are absolutely central to our development strategy. Our mission is to do what other providers to the hospitality industry cannot, and that is to offer a complete, unified solution that enables hotels to see information from any area of the business, when and where they need to,” says Wolfgang Emperger, Regional Vice President of Sales Europe and Africa, SoftBrands.

SoftBrands is an Infor affiliate with more than 10,000 properties worldwide using its hotel management software solutions. Infor is a leading provider of business software and services, helping more than 70,000 customers in 164 countries improve operations and drive growth.

Contact us solutions@infor.com +44 (0) 1252 556 543 www.infor.com/hospitality


PROMOTION

VeriFone

Serve up a better POS experience with VeriFone As the world’s leading supplier of payment devices, VeriFone has long championed innovation within the hospitality sector. With features such as colour and touch screens, contactless/NFC capability and advanced processing power, VeriFone’s latest payment devices are easy to use and create new opportunities for hospitality organisations to sell, add value and engage with the customer. “It’s all about creating POS solutions that offer new levels of speed, integration, and functionality, whilst delivering the most positive payment experience possible – whichever way the customer wants to pay. Today, that means being able to accept contactless cards. Looking ahead, it means NFC and mobile payments,” states Alan Moss, VP of Marketing for VeriFone’s Western Europe, Middle East and Africa region. Paving the way to NFC VeriFone is committed to helping hospitality companies satisfy growing customer demand for alternative payment options. “Quick service retail outlets already use contactless payments and it won’t be long before it becomes a prerequisite for convenience-orientated bars, cafes and restaurants. Our latest VX Evolution devices already accept contactless cards and are able to accommodate NFC payments via mobile phone; paving the way to a more convenient and valuable consumer experience across the hospitality sector.” Moss adds, “Indeed, many venues are currently upgrading their POS estates as part of PCI compliance and are looking to include contactless capability. It makes sound commercial sense to also ensure that any investment made now is able to accommodate the future deployment of NFC-enabled mobile phones.” Next Generation POS Devices As attitudes change and consumers become more technology-savvy, VeriFone confirms that it is changing the way they interact with payments devices. According to Moss, “Merchants and consumers alike increasingly expect payment devices to be intuitive, fast and able to deliver more than just payments. This is why they like our VX 680 which is specifically designed

for hospitality use. The world’s smallest, fullfunction, portable handheld payments device, the product is packed full of high performance features such as a 3.5” full-colour display ideal for image-conscious venues.” With touch screen interactivity and extended memory, the VX 680 can deliver terminal-based applications such as loyalty, coupons, advertising and upsells – to help businesses boost revenue at the POS – in an engaging way. PCI PTS 3.0 compliant, the VX 680 also offers multiple connectivity options WiFi, Bluetooth and GPRS - so it can be used from the table and bar to the counter and even to the customer’s car for takeaway service.

“And the VX 680 is highly durable – for hospitality it has to be,” concludes Moss. “With an illuminated, blue backlit keypad, spill and drop resistance, the VX 680 performs perfectly in even the most demanding hospitality environments.” www.verifone.com +44 (0)1895 275275 info-emea@verifone.com

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PROMOTION

ASP

EPoS Evolution: ASP’s Adrian Chynoweth discusses tailored hospitality solutions with John Musson

Our best EPOS solution for your company will be as unique as your business.

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What does the hospitality industry want from its Point of Sale technology? It’s an important question and one for which most hotels and restaurants will have a core checklist: functionality, reliability, sophisticated reporting and good value all key considerations. The question though, according to Adrian Chynoweth, deserves to be addressed from another perspective. He argues that as every hospitality organisation is unique in its workflows and processes, so it is overly simplistic to create a software solution adapted to the hospitality industry in general rather than to hotels and restaurants individually. EPOS systems, vital to the delivery of these workflows and processes, should facilitate rather than define them for clients. Chynoweth is uniquely placed to comment. As Business Development Manager of ASP Systems Ltd, a forward-thinking company with a growing global reputation for providing EPOS solutions to the hospitality industry, over ninety percent of his colleagues have worked directly in hospitality and the company’s management team has operated many of the UK’s most recognisable hotels, bars and restaurants and can therefore claim to have been first-hand users of the technology they design and implement. It is this insight built of experience which lies behind the development of ASP’s own Commander software which provides an unmatched degree of flexibility and customisation. Chynoweth’s personal business philosophy of ‘listen first, advise later’ is practically implemented by experienced ASP consultants who work closely with clients to build cost-effective IT infrastructures responsive and adaptive to the business’ evolving needs. The company’s holistic approach – ASP also provides a wide range of EPOS hardware and 365 days a year support services – reduces operational risk as does the use of the latest Microsoft Windows SQL architectures. The software platform itself incorporates all the features you would expect from a

state of the art EPOS hospitality technology system : front of house features include intuitive touch screen processing, fast screen navigation, simple bill-splitting/merging functions and kitchen display module ; back of house features full managers’ functions incorporating security, staff performance, revenue reports and menu/stock management. Constantly evolving, the system’s innovations include customisable and virtual table plans, integration with leading PMS and banqueting systems and from the end of 2012 their own PMS solution. However, Chynoweth’s vision of an effective EPOS system is that it should be capable of doing so much more. ‘It’s too easy to see the beginning and end of the system as its ability to speed up operations, giving customers what they want in a concise, error-free manner whilst providing accurate reporting. Our encouragement is not only for our client to achieve repeat business through customer satisfaction but also to see their system as a facility for development of this customer base,’ he comments. To this end Commander software incorporates functionality for e-gift and loyalty cards, SMS to existing customers within a specified vicinity of any outlet and a Facebook reservation application which enables viral marketing. Asked for a concluding list of company principles, Chynoweth’s considered response is in keeping with ASP’s ethos: ‘I would say that our key principles are your key principles just as our best EPOS solution for your company will be as unique as your business’.

For further details visit http://www.asp-epos.com


6 / Statistics 126 FACTS AND FIGURES

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the size and structure of the industry. How big is the tourism and hospitality industry? The industry takes in all forms of catering, serviced and self-catering accommodation, food and drink consumed away from home, shopping on holiday, sports, gambling and domestic air travel (but not other transport costs associated with UK holidays). Drinking accounts for about one-third of the market as does eating-out and overnight accommodation combined. But the strength of the sector is also demonstrated by the range of other significant activities, such as gambling and shopping, that form a part of this important sector of the UK economy.

Size of hospitality industry

Tourism - inbound tourists (£bn)

Domestic holidays UK residents (£bn)

Leisure - UK residents (£bn)

Total (£bn)

Overnight accommodation

2.8

9.7

-

12.5

Eating out-of-home

1.3

4.5

17.4

23.4

Drinking out-of-home

0.4

5.9

27.3

33.6

Air travel within UK and from start points outside UK to destinations within UK

1.5

1.4

-

2.9

Rail, car, coach, taxi, cab travel for leisure and tourism

1.4

2.1

1.2

4.7

Cinemas, theatres, museums, zoos, historic properties, theme parks, gardens

0.9

-

3.0

3.9

Social clubs, leisure classes, bingo, dances, discos, social events

-

-

5.6

5.6

0.3

-

0.8

1.1

-

-

1.3

1.3

4.2

-

-

4.2

-

-

5.0

5.0

Business-related expenditure

4.7

-

8.3

13.0

TOTAL

17.5

23.7

70.0

111.1

Sports - spectating Sports - participating Shopping on holiday, shopping by overseas visitors Gambling

Source: Horizons/British Hospitality: Trends and Development 2011

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

How many outlets are there?

Number of outlets

There are over 250,000 separate outlets in the hospitality industry, hotels (with private hotels, guest houses and B&Bs) being the largest sector after pubs.

Left: Unlike the rest of the industry where the number of outlets is increasing, the number of pubs is declining every year there were 51,267 in 2004

2010

Hotels

45,840

Ethnic restaurants

10,836

European restaurants

5,523

Other restaurants

11,380

Restaurants

27,739

Quick Service

31,368

Pubs

45,863

Leisure

19,552

TOTAL PROFIT

170.361

Business and Industry

19,259

Healthcare

31,928

Education

34,428

Ministry of Defence

3,078

TOTAL NON-PROFIT

88.693

TOTAL

259,054

Source: Horizons

How many meals are served every year? About 8.3bn in 2010 – slightly more than in 2009 but fewer than in 2005. Number of meals (m)

2003

2005

2009

2010

Hotels

627

644

624

633

Restaurants

702

734

716

734

Quick Service

1,962

2,006

2,001

2,064

Pubs

1,081

1,104

971

966

Leisure

523

533

533

544

PROFIT

4,895

5,021

4,875

4,941

Business and Industry

1,064

1,063

985

947

Healthcare

1,021

1,047

1,057

1,051

Education

1,275

1,246

1,136

1,124

Ministry of Defence

234

244

261

258

COST

3,594

3,600

3,439

3,380

TOTAL

8,488

8,620

8,314

8,321

Source: Horizons

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

And how much are these worth?

Sales of food and drink

Sales of food and drink in the commercial sector have increased significantly since 2003, though inflation will have eroded some of the increase.

2003 (£m)

2005 (£m)

2009 (£m)

2010 (£m)

Hotels

6,292

6,893

7,903

7,998

Restaurants

7,170

7,975

9,033

9,023

Quick Service

8,616

9,201

10,608

10,951

Pubs

5,288

5,702

5,876

5,761

Leisure

2,667

2,921

3,462

3,319

PROFIT

30,033

32,692

36,882

37,252

Business and Industry

2,383

2,534

2,620

2,632

Healthcare

790

861

958

914

Education

1,130

1,184

1,252

1,313

Ministry of Defence

198

216

268

265

COST

4,501

4,792

5,098

5,124

TOTAL

34,535

37,486

41,980

42,376

Source: Horizons All values at current prices

What is tourism worth to the UK?

Value of tourism to UK (£bn)

Since 2005, spending by overseas visitors has risen consistently but spend by UK residents on UK holidays has declined.

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Overnight stays by UK residents

22.7

20.9

21.2

21.1

21.9

20.8

Spending by overseas visitors

14.3

15.8

16.0

16.4

16.6

16.7

Day trips by UK residents

44.3

44.3

45.4

45.4

47.6

49.05

Fares to UK carriers

3.5

2.8

2.7

2.7

2.9

2.9

TOTAL

84.7

83.8

85.3

85.6

89.3

89.4

Source: ONS All values at current prices

Right: Tourism will be given a long-term boost by the 2012 Olympic Games. Picture shows the crowds in Trafalgar Square celebrating the announcement of London’s winning bid.

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

Where do most visitors to the UK come from - and what do they spend? The principal change in source countries for UK tourism in recent years has been the inclusion of Poland in the list of the ten leading visitor countries – a direct result of the country’s accession to the European Union. The most noticeable other change is the drop in the number of US visitors in the decade – from over 4m to 2.6m, with a consequent decline in revenue. European visitors traditionally spend far less per head than visitors from the US, which emphasises the importance of the US market to UK tourism.

Most important UK source countries

2000

2010

Rank

Country

Visits

Spend (£)

Visits

Spend (£)

1

France

3,086

604

3,610

1,140

2

Germany

2,757

887

2,994

1,190

3

USA

4,096

2,752

2,671

2,101

4

Irish Republic

2,082

570

2,637

894

5

Spain

848

409

1,804

821

6

Netherlands

1,435

374

1,460

715

7

Italy

946

472

1,214

590

8

Belgium/Luxembourg

1,047

234

1,136

402

9

Poland

180

60

1,098

312

10

Australia

776

517

976

941

Source: IPS

And how much do we earn from overseas visitors? During 2010, visits by overseas residents to the UK declined by just under one per cent while expenditure rose marginally. Particular increases were recorded from Germany, Italy and the Netherlands which hid a continuing decline in the number of visitors from the USA. Figures for 2011, however, show total visits up by three per cent with spend up by five per cent, with visits from the USA up from 3.4m to 3.6m.

......but is the imbalance of tourism payments increasing? Until 2009, yes. But the imbalance (the difference between what UK residents spend abroad and what overseas visitors spend in the UK) declined in 2009 as fewer Briton travelled overseas, and spent less, discouraged by the low value of the pound. This continued into 2010 when the imbalance dropped to £14.2bn.

Overseas visitors and earnings

1995

2000

2005

2010

2011

TOTAL

23,537

25,209

29,971

29,637

30,600

SPEND (£m)

11,763

12,805

14,259

16,724

17,760

Source: ONS

Imbalance of tourism payments

1995

2005

2009

2010

2011

Overseas visitor spending in UK (£m)

11,763

14,259

16,592

16,727

17,760

Spending by UK residents abroad (£m)

15,386

32,154

31,694

30,933

31,097

Spending by UK residents in UK (£m)

12,775

25,802

22,200

20,835

n/a

Source: ONS All values at current prices

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

How important are short holidays? They remain critical. Although the corporate market is important, particularly to London and other major cities, the holiday market remains by far the largest for the hotel industry in general and the growth of the short-break market remains critically important, amounting to 66 per cent of all holiday trips and 51 per cent of all holiday spend (in 1989 short breaks accounted for only 23 per cent of all holiday expenditure.) But the number of long holidays, though declining in recent years, increased in both 2009 and 2010 and the trend is believed to have carried on into 2011.

How UK residents spend their holidays

2007

Visits (m) 2008 2009

2010

2007

Spend (m) 2008 2009

2010

Short (1-3 nights)

32,838

32,286

37,979

35,720

5,377

5,866

6,188

6,215

Long (4+ nights)

20,883

19,671

22,718

20,856

6,089

5,522

6,424

5,857

TOTAL HOLIDAY

53,722

51,958

60,657

56,576

11,465

11,388

12,612

12,072

Visiting Friends & Relatives/ Visiting Friends & Relatives as a holiday

47,814

44,096

44,430

42,765

4,835

4,750

4,509

4,434

Business

19.217

18.199

17.950

16,914

4,451

4.483

4,336

3,885

TOTAL

126.293 117.715 126.006 119,434

21,238

21,109

21,881

20,835

All values at current prices Source: Tourist boards

Where do UK residents stay and how much do they spend? The most popular holiday regions - the south-west, south-east and north-west – attract most visits, although London still earns over £2bn from domestic visitors. The capital, however, earns far more (£8.7bn) from overseas visitors; Scotland (£1.45bn), the north-west (£1.02bn) and the south-east (£1.7bn) are the most popular other regions for overseas visitors.

Where UK residents stay on holiday

2008

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

2008

Spend (£m) 2009 2010

London

27.4

23.8

24.8

2,366

2,230

2,515

West Midlands

20.7

20.1

20.9

1,149

1,214

1,088

East of England

29.1

31.5

27.9

1,362

1,409

1,306

East Midlands

22.3

21.9

21.8

1,060

1,051

1,029

North-West

36.6

38.1

34.5

2,338

2,420

2,260

North-East

12.2

11.7

10.9

697

600-

627

South-East

47.5

52.8

46.1

2,350

2,595

2,232

South-West

71.7

82.0

73.8

3,639

4,124

3,606

Yorkshire & Humberside

26.5

29.6

26.2

1,397

1,540

1,478

ENGLAND

320.1

312.9

288.1

17,358

17,183

16,210

SCOTLAND

43.6

46.1

44.6

2,793

2,736

2,628

WALES

31.2

32.9

32.9

1,046

1,413`

1,450

TOTAL

394.9

391.9

365.5

20,197

21,332

20,288

Source: Tourist boards

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Nights (m) 2009 2010


!"! !"#




STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

Is Britain’s new VAT rate high? At 20 per cent, it’s actually about average. However, more significantly for the hospitality industry, most countries provide a reduced rate for hotel accommodation and many have a reduced rate for meals. These include the UK’s key European competitors – France, Spain and Italy. However, VAT rates are not permanent. An increase in the VAT rate in France for hotel accommodation and meals from 5.5 per cent to seven per cent was introduced in 2012; at the same time, Lithuania increased its VAT rate from nine per cent to 21 per cent. The campaign to reduce VAT for hotel accommodation and entry to attractions, as well as meals away from home, led by the British Hospitality Association, argues that lower rates in Europe disadvantage UK tourism and that a reduced rate would encourage lower prices and greater consumer demand, thus creating more jobs. The BHA says that if UK tourism is to grow and develop, a continuing rate of 20 per cent will act as a decisive brake on that ambition.

Rates of VAT (%) in EU countries

VAT at standard rate (%)

Rate of VAT for hotel accommodation (%)

Rate of VAT for meals in restaurants (%)

Austria

20

10

10

Belgium

21

6

12

Bulgaria

20

9

20

Cyprus

15

8

8

Czech Republic

20

10

20

Denmark

25

25

25

Estonia

20

9

20

Finland

23

9

13

France

19.6

7.0

7.0

Germany

19

7

19

Greece

23

6.5

23

Hungary

25

18

27

Ireland

21

9.0

9.0

Italy

20

10

10

Latvia

21

12

22

Lithuania

21

21

21

Luxembourg

15

3

3

Malta

18

7

18

Netherlands

19

6

6

Poland

22

8

8

Portugal

21

6

23

Romania

24

9

24

Slovakia

19

20

20

Slovenia

20

8.5

8.5

Spain

18

8

8

Sweden

25

12

12

UK

20

20

20

Norway

25

8

25

Switzerland

7.6

3.8

7.6

Iceland

25.5

7

7

Croatia

23

10

23

Macedonia

18

8

18

Non-EU countries

VAT in Ireland will rise to 22 per cent in 2013 and 23 per cent in 2014. As at January 2012

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

How many jobs in the hospitality industry? More than many might think – and the industry is growing. The British Hospitality Association, in its report - The Economic Contribution of the Hospitality Industry – calculates 2.44m, rather higher than most previous estimates. Since 1998, this number has increased from 2.2m. Given a favourable economic and political climate, the BHA reckons that a further 236,000 jobs can be created by 2015.

Where the jobs are

1998 (‘000s)

2010 (‘000s)

Hotels and related

364

403

Hotels and similar accommodation

284

301

Holiday and other short stay accommodation

45

50

Camping, vehicle parks and trailer parks

19

29

Other accommodation

4

8

Temporary employment (est)

12

16

Restaurant and Related

1,136

1,263

Licensed and unlicensed restaurants and cafes

426

558

Takeaway food shops

104

134

Licensed clubs

51

45

Public houses and bars

516

475

Temporary employment (est)

39

50

Catering

220

754

Event catering activities

260

254

Other food service activities

27

23

In-house catering

351

377

Temporary employment (est)

83

100

Event Management

13

20

Convention and trade show organisers

13

19

Temporary employment (est)

1

1

HOSPITALITY TOTAL

2,234

2,441

Source: ABI, Oxford Economics/The Economic Contribution of the Hospitality Industry (BHA)

Right: With over 2.4m employees, the hospitality industry’s skill needs are never-ending. Picture: Courtesy of Aramark

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STATISTICS

Facts and Figures

Are hotel operating costs increasing? Undoubtedly. The percentage of energy, property maintenance and payroll costs to total revenue has risen since 2004 – and will keep on rising. As a result, gross operating profit is declining, especially in the provinces and in Scotland and Wales, but London continues to outperform, with GOP at 43.1 per cent.

Where the money comes from – and where it goes

UK 2004

UK 2010

London 2010

England Scotland Wales 2010 2010 2010

Rental and other income

0.3

3.0

3.0

3.0

3.3

2.4

Other departments

6.3

9.2

5.6

13.0

8.8

15.8

Beverage

10.6

8.5

6.3

10.4

10.3

11.5

Food

27.0

18.1

13.5

22.4

20.8

22.8

Rooms

55.8

61.3

71.7

51.2

56.9

47.4

Energy

2.9

3.7

2.6

4.7

4.3

5.5

Property operations and maintenance

2.7

2.5

2.1

3.0

2.5

2.9

Sales and marketing

2.9

3.2

3.3

3.2

3.0

3.2

Beverage

2.4

1.9

1.3

2.5

2.5

2.9

Administration and general

4.2

5.3

4.7

5.9

6.1

5.6

Food

6.0

5.1

3.6

6.4

6.1

7.0

Departmental expenses

10.4

9.8

9.4

10.0

10.0

10.3

Other department COS

-

1.4

1.0

1.7

1.6

2.0

Payroll and related expenses

29.9

28.3

24.3

32.0

31.0

33.6

Gross operating profit

38.6

38.8

47.8

30.5

32.8

27.0

REVENUE

EXPENSES

Source: TRI Hospitality Consulting

How much is a hotel room worth? Hotel room values reached a peak in 2007 (€623,309 in London) but have fallen back to 2005 levels as a result of the recession. Nevertheless, London remains one of the most high-value cities in the world. Hotel room values have recovered from the depths of the recession but are still below those of 2005.

Hotel values per room (€)

2000

2005

2009

2010

London

564,730

528,685

483,946

525,414

Edinburgh

247,901

270,269

207,560

213,362

Manchester

183,000

205,929

148,116

141,580

Birmingham

175,882

188,794

133,092

117,104

Source: European Hotel Valuation Index, HVS International

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7 / Sustainability 138 SUCCESSFUL SUSTAINABILITY NEEDS CAREFUL PLANNING AND REGULAR MONITORING John Musson

142 SUSTAINABLE POLICIES MAKE GOOD BUSINESS SENSE Mark Lineham

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PROMOTION

EDF Energy

EDF Energy EDF Energy’s Mike Capper discusses an innovative energy efficiency solution for the hospitality industry

The CBI estimates that businesses waste around £8.5 billion per year through energy inefficiency. So it’s alarming how many businesses in the hospitality sector are only now getting to grips with energy use across their portfolio, with many still unsure of their actual energy spend. Alarming, but perhaps not altogether surprising. Given the demands of creating a great customer experience, many hotel and restaurant managers inevitably lack the resources to fully grasp the energy nettle. Even at a time when mounting cost and sustainability pressures should make energy use a priority issue. A practical answer lies in the form of an Energy Performance Contract (EPC) model which radically rethinks the relationship between energy provider and consumer. Mike Capper, EDF Energy’s B2B Energy Services Sales & Product Development Manager, characterises EPCs as ‘a package of energy efficiency measures which can be financed from the energy savings we guarantee over the life of the contract’ As such, they provide a solution to investing in energy saving initiatives in an economically constrained climate and are a practical embodiment of EDF Energy’s commitment to help its customers reduce their carbon emissions. Capper elaborates on the concept: ‘We commit to delivering an end outcome. Every

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energy conservation measure we propose and implement is backed up with a business case – this is how we’ll implement a saving, with this cost and this payback. As we analyse the energy saving opportunities, develop the package of appropriate energy saving measures and project manage their implementation, we can underwrite the savings that will be delivered. You could say we put our money where our mouth is, backing our promises with a financial commitment.’ So how does the process work? ‘We come into your business, look, listen and audit to gain an understanding of your facilities, how you operate, what works and what doesn’t. We look at your governance, what your ground rules are and from there build an energy saving plan that complements your business and its commitments’. For the plan to really work, it needs to be sympathetic to the specific circumstances of the business. The type of measures recommended must not only work technically on paper, the way they are implemented and the way results are measured and reported must also consider the needs of customers, employees front and back of house, the management team, and the business’s strategy. As Mike explains, ‘We focus on your organisational driver: is your lead priority cutting energy bills? Or reducing CO2? This affects the payback timeframe that we work to which influences which measures we might build into the plan. A longer payback requirement enables us to consider a wider set of measures. Similarly, how flexible is your operation? It’s normally cheaper to undertake installations during normal working hours which improves the payback, but installations can be completed out of hours too. Whatever the mix of measures, they should always enhance - or at least not harm - the experience for customers, the working conditions for employees, the information available for management.’ The substance of the contract is a package of integrated, complementary initiatives that address some or all of the three key areas of energy waste : processes, for instance reprogramming lighting, heating and cooling

settings; equipment, for instance replacing outdated lighting; and people by ensuring that employees have an understanding of sound energy practices within the context of the organisation’s operations and values. In Capper’s experience energy savings can be achieved simply: ‘It’s certainly not all about installing new kit. Optimising what’s already on site should come first. Ensuring heating and cooling systems aren’t fighting each other for example, or that a temporary change to settings hasn’t inadvertently become permanent. Reprogramming building management systems can often make savings of 20 – 30% with little outlay and no noticeable difference for staff and customers.’ When it comes to installing new technology, many hotels and restaurants are cautious, but with the requisite technical expertise on call, they are enabled to make informed decisions and significant savings. ‘Take LED technology as a great example,’ he comments, ‘it can offer very healthy paybacks which make it a fantastic energy efficiency investment in lighting, but many venues worry about the effect replacing lamps has on ambience. We can assure them the technology has evolved so there is no discernable forfeiture.’ The best energy saving programmes are based on a thorough understanding of how a business operates, its concerns and the technological advances available to it. Energy Performance Contracts simply provide an easier and more reliable way for hotels and restaurants to access these savings. For Capper, the EPC model is key to enabling hotels, restaurants and other hospitality venues to provide their desired service, but with lower energy costs and carbon emissions. For more information visit www.edfenergy.com/saving-energy


Top-up your bottom line Energy contracts guaranteed to cut your costs.

Now you can bring energy into your long term cost control strategy with an Energy Performance Contract. With access to the right skills and delivery expertise all under one roof, our Energy Performance Contract guarantees CO2 reductions and verifiable cost savings. Why settle for less?

Now is a great time to find out more about Energy Performance Contracts: 0845 300 9146 edfenergy.com/saving-energy We’ll make sense of energy for you.

EDF_BLKBOOK.indd 1

28/03/2012 11:39


SUSTAINABILITY

Hotel Sustainability

Successful sustainability needs careful planning and regular monitoring Ciaran Fahy, managing director of the Cavendish Hotel, London, discusses with John Musson the challenges and rewards of embedding sustainable practice. Stirring a Fair Trade cappuccino in the sustainably-lit ambience of the lounge of London’s Cavendish Hotel, Ciaran Fahy is describing the significance of his hotel’s recently implemented ‘green’ fifth value. The sustainability paradigm has evolved so rapidly over the past decade that its reach progressively threatens to exceed the grasp of many hospitality businesses. The latest research undertaken by the respected Two Tomorrows sustainability agency suggests that the large hospitality chains are only beginning to structure their responses to the challenge presented. But according to Fahy, his hotel’s “commitment to reducing its impact on the environment”, as he puts it, should be core to any hospitality business serious about becoming a brand. This belief is no PR bandwagoning of latest trends. Although Request For Proposals are increasingly asking for information on environmental policies, he’s no advocate of the box-ticking brand of sustainability. “Most sustainability initiatives are low cost other than in time and commitment and the benefits of both reducing business impact on the environment and reducing business costs are significant”, he says. It’s a practical commitment (“sustained sustainability” he calls it), a dovetailing of environmental accountability and pragmatic economic initiatives achieved through clearly-set objectives, strong leadership and the nurturing of core values.

Left: Ciaran Fahy: “Most sustainability initiatives are low cost other than in time and commitment.”

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SUSTAINABILITY

Hotel Sustainability

Where to begin? Establishing policies aimed at reducing waste may well be the litmus test of a willingness to connect with sustainability issues but, increasingly, an entire science-set seems required to benefit fully from a concept that can be applied to almost every area of hospitality operations from design via procurement to marketing. The Cavendish took advantage of the expertise provided free of charge by The Carbon Trust and Envirowise, whose audits provided a detailed analysis (“figures in black and white”) of the key areas of opportunity (energy, water, recycling and waste, procurement), clear arguments for changing mindsets and countering potential management intransigence which, says Fahy, ‘represent one of the most significant obstacles to be overcome.’

The plan (and who’s responsible for it?) In response to the audits, the property manager, supported by the general manager (Fahy at the time) and operations manager, were given the responsibility of drafting an action plan – a full corporate responsibility commitment with targets and actions for each of the key audited areas. A timeframe was created for implementation. Rigorous and consistent management-led compliance checks and monthly assessments allowed the hotel to monitor progress and ensure actions committed to were carried out. Fahy is not an advocate of more junior Green Teams pushing sustainability practices unilaterally – he believes they lack the authority to lead change, citing the example of a junior manager looking to persuade a head chef to reduce food miles. “If the chef isn’t buying into it then nothing will happen. Good intentions aren’t good enough and initiatives need to be led by senior management to be impactful,” he says.

Making it work (and making it matter)

If Fahy’s model is top-down – he’s adamant that the greatest sustainability benefits will come from changes imposed by the property manager – “low-energy light bulb installation will have more impact than switch-off policies” – he’s also mindful of empowering every department to evolve their sustainability practices and to establish a workforce of green ambassadors driving sustainability. Core values are nurtured. The hotel is continually educating staff to ensure decisions are aligned to its Green policy. All corporate

social responsibilities are communicated at induction; monthly staff meetings include a dedicated section on environment and sustainability actions; all staff are given paid leave to work with a local charity as a part of a ‘Giving Something Back’ initiative and actions are detailed on a board in the staff restaurant. There’s also an environment suggestion scheme with financial rewards for implemented suggestions, while managers explain why certain ideas won’t work. Good ideas are fed into the system quickly. The hotel’s green ‘fifth value’ for example was the suggestion of a junior member of management; and it was one of the chefs who suggested the hotel made its own marmalade using the skins of their juiced oranges something Fahy enthusiastically describes as “a sustainability triple whammy, simultaneously reducing waste and improving quality whilst communicating a tangible advertisement of the hotel’s sustainability actions.” The hotel’s award-winning Petrichor Restaurant is a prime example of how sustainability practice is implemented and evolved. Initial sustainability impacts driven by the property manager were infrastructure-based (for example, push taps, energy efficient dishwashers) together with the action plan expectation that all food would be sustainably sourced from the UK. But the kitchen is autonomous, with accountability resting squarely on the shoulders of the head chef who is committed to evolving his sourcing of local, seasonal, sustainable produce as well as reducing waste and packaging. However, monitoring still occurs from time to time to ensure action plan compliance on the part of both the kitchen and their suppliers. Making sustainability matter to the Cavendish’s guests is communicated with what Fahy describes as “a lightness of touch”. Guests are provided with information only according to their expressed interest. “The Cavendish is, after all, a luxury hotel”, he explains, “and although many guests will have chosen it for its eco reputation, many will not. So there’s not the same leverage as there would be for us at, for example, a specifically eco resort.” “It’s important that information is presented discreetly. If guests are interested in learning more there’s a responsible guest charter on the website, there’s a Cavendish leaflet in all guest rooms and other sources of information are available. But sustainability is

much more about what’s being done behind the scenes than an expectation placed upon the guest.”

What’s to be gained? Cost savings have been significant: in-house bottling of water has saved (in addition to the CO2 and landfill implications) £14,500 per year for an initial investment of £2,000 and with no negative customer feedback; there has been a 40 per cent reduction in waste, saving £12,000 per year, and energy savings yearon-year run at 30 per cent. The most recent innovation – low energy lighting throughout the hotel – saved £4,500 in January alone this year; as with all of the hotel’s sustainability initiatives, it is set to recoup the initial outlay in less than twelve months. Fahy is keen to stress that potential gains extend beyond the financial. He says sustainable food procurement has driven significant improvement in overall food quality and guest response to free range and local foods being advertised on the menu alongside exact provenance has been positive. The hotel has become renowned as the market leader in sustainability offering up new interest to like-minded businesses. Corporate RFPs are starting to ask for environmental and sustainability actions and commitments as part of their procurement process which places the hotel in a prime position to capitalise on business. Being recognised as an ‘eco hotel’ supports the overall communications strategy on quality with an increase in positive customer feedback due to greater trust and understanding. The hotel was listed in the Sunday Times’ Top 100 companies to work for, scoring highly on staff engagement, another genuine benefit. Students want to work at the hotel and its reputation is a great source of pride amongst the staff. It matters to Fahy that the hotel’s sustainability strategy has implications for the wider local community, supply chains and the industry generally. “Even over the last five years I’ve noted how much easier it has become to find sustainable suppliers. Initially, many of the larger suppliers didn’t have any Fair Trade food items but more and more hotels are now demanding this service. “We’ve made links with many local suppliers, in addition to actively talking on sustainability issues at hospitality colleges and encouraging communication between hotels and businesses in connection with Considerate Hoteliers and the BHA Sustainability Committee. All of this

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SUSTAINABILITY

Hotel Sustainability

can only be positive,” he says.

Where from here? (and do prizes matter?) For the Cavendish, awards have never been an end in themselves but rather a yardstick of progress towards sustainability goals and an objective for the team to stretch towards. The important question according to Fahy, is “‘Have we done enough to be considered?” He joined Considerate Hoteliers to learn more about sustainability and later entered for their award; the Green Tourism for London Gold Award was the culmination of an eighteen-month process of sustainability innovation. The Visit London Sustainable

Tourism Gold Award represented another two years of implementing the “less lowhanging fruit” of sustainability initiatives. The Cavendish continues to monitor the implementation of its sustainability policy by carrying out periodic audits of compliance and, when appropriate, introducing remedial measures to ensure continuous improvements. All employees receive regular training to ensure they act in accordance with the hotel’s policy and are aware of the environmental effects of their duties. Quarterly WIN plans (‘What’s Important Now’) for every manager always include at least three green initiatives to drive sustainability change. Progress on these is assessed monthly. Fahy is currently

mooting implementing voltage optimisation, and is looking for other opportunities as new technology makes this viable. He points to a team fully engaged in sustainability which has reduced the hotel’s costs by approximately £50,000 per year with minimal outlay in terms of investment. He is proud of the fact that the efforts of his staff have established the hotel’s reputation as being “serious and passionate about sustainability”. In the last two years, at least half a dozen hotels have come to him looking for best sustainability practice. “I can use what we and the hotel have achieved as an inspiration to others to go out and also make a difference.”

Sustainable initiatives implemented at The Cavendish Hotel, London Energy management ` High efficiency condensing boilers ` Heat recovery extraction system ` Building Management System optimising temperature settings ` VRV air conditioning with occupancy sensors ` Low energy lightbulbs/ LCD emergency lights ` Motion sensors on all corridor lighting ` Dyson Blade driers ` Energy efficient lifts fitted with invertors

` Donations of equipment to registered charities ` Juiced orange skins used to make hotel marmalade Supply chain

Marketing ` Sourcing of sustainable– and seasonal – food ` Fair trade ingredients ` Menus planned around seasonal ingredients from local markets ` Encouragement of local suppliers to reduce packaging ` Commitment to fair-trade purchasing

Water management Environment awareness ` Low volume showers,taps, toilet flush ` High efficiency dishwasher with heat recovery ` Envirofresh urinal control Waste management ` Zero non-hazardous waste to landfill ` All areas of waste recycled including food ` Waste compacted and bailed to reduce collections ` In-house PURE water bottling systems ` No admin office bins – recycle point only

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Envirowise ` 1 day per year pledge for managers to work for charities ` Staff given 1 day paid leave to work for charities

` 50% reduction in parking charges for ‘green’ cars ` Hybrid cars available for airport collections ` Advice/maps for pedestrian routes around London ` Bicycle hire and cycle tours locally ` Support of hospitality charities - £5k per annum pledge ` Support of local church foundation ` Benchmarking with Hospitable Climates ` External audits from Carbon Trust and

` ` ` ` ` `

Responsible Visitor Charter Sustainable meeting rooms Information leaflets Labelling of provenance of food items Hosting sustainability conferences Working in association with organisations such as SRA, Considerate Hoteliers, BHA Sustainability Committee

Awards ` Considerate Hotel ` Green Tourism for London Gold Award ( first hotel in London to gain the award ) ` Sustainable Restaurant Association Sustainable Champion, 3 Stars ` Visit London Sustainable Tourism Gold Winner ` Sunday Times top 100 Best Small Companies To Work For


PROMOTION

SCA

Hospitality goes green with hygiene in mind SCA, manufacturer of Tork paper hygiene products, has achieved a place in global sustainability indices around the world. Hospitality Black Book asks SCA’s away from home hospitality segment manager Julie Ray what makes Tork products so sustainable. What impact has the green revolution had on SCA’s business? At SCA there hasn’t really been a “green revolution” since sustainability has been an important part of our business for around 80 years. We first introduced Life Cycle Assessments to monitor the environmental impact of our products from creation to disposaI in the 1990s. An increasing number of customers are actively choosing suppliers like us with strong sustainability credentials. In these difficult economic times we believe our sustainability focus has added value for our customers and it’s certainly reflected in our business growth. What strides has SCA taken to further its global environmental credentials? Independent assessments of our environmental efforts are very important to us and our customers. A large number of Tork products now hold the EU and Nordic Swan ecolabels, and SCA has been named among the world’s most ethical companies by the Ethisphere Institute for the past four years. This summer SCA was included in the latest Dow Jones Sustainability Europe Index - one the most prestigious sustainability listings in the world. You have made a large investment in your Tyne Valley plant. What are the changes? The investment at our Tyne Valley production site will improve logistics while further reducing our carbon footprint. The project involves a new production line plus a deinking plant which will increase the capacity of recycled tissue fibre in the UK. The new line will produce some hand towels in the UK for the first time thus reducing transport emissions. How is single sheet dispensing beneficial? Single-sheet dispensing controls and reduces consumption resulting in lower cost in use. It also improves hygiene since it ensures that

each sheet is touched only by the user. A good example is the Tork Interfold Napkin system which prevents diners taking out handfuls of napkins. The system has been proven in tests to reduce napkin consumption by at least 25 per cent compared with traditional wide mouth dispensers. Customers who understand the principle of cost in use versus comparing case prices are able to get better value out of their budgets with the added benefit of reducing environmental impact. Where does SCA stand in the argument over hand drying with textile towel rolls and warm air dryers? Research has shown that paper hand towels offer significant advantages over both warm air dryers and linen towels. A study by the University of Westminster revealed that warm air dryers increased the number of bacteria on people’s hands by 254 per cent, whereas high-speed jet air dryers increased bacteria by an average of 42 per cent, and textile towels reduced the bacteria count by only four per cent. Paper towels, on the other hand, reduced bacteria by 77 per cent. All types of hand drying systems have an impact on the environment, but thorough drying of hands is as important as washing them. Paper towels are the most hygienic option. Are SCA’s hand washing products of hospital quality? Yes. Tork products have been used in NHS hospitals since 2002 and have therefore undergone rigorous assessment with infection control in mind. One of the less hygienic practices we frequently see is the refilling of dispensers with bulk liquid soap – research has shown that 25% of refillable soap dispensers in public washrooms are contaminated with harmful bacteria. Tork liquid soaps come in a single use sealed soap cartridge to protect the soap and therefore the user’s hands from contamination.

Tork Interfold Napkins are certified with the EU Ecolabel, the most rigorous sustainability accreditation in the EU.

What are the benefits of hygiene systems in school washrooms? Lockable hygiene systems in school washrooms prevent contamination, pilferage and vandalism while also controlling consumption and improving hygiene. They also help to avoid the issue of soap, hand towel and toilet tissue running out while also preventing the school washroom from becoming messy. Children tend to avoiding using unsanitary, poorlystocked washrooms, and this could have negative implications for their health. Overall, washroom hygiene systems in schools improve hygiene standards and have a positive impact on sickness rates and budgets. www.tork.co.uk Tel: 01582 677 570

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SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainable Restaurants

Sustainable policies make good business sense Sourcing, environment and society are the three areas in which hospitality businesses can make a sustainable difference, says Mark Lineham of the Sustainable Restaurant Association. Eating out is about enjoyment but, while sustainability is not always foremost in the mind of diners, does it also figure highly on the list for many? The answer is yes. Research has shown that 70 per cent of diners would be more likely to eat at a restaurant that has good sustainability credentials. In other words, for nearly three-quarters of people, eating out is more enjoyable when they can do so with a clear conscience. Sustainability clearly makes good business sense. In the past, there have been barriers for restaurants and hotels trying to improve their sustainability – principally a dearth of clear, concise readily available information. Lack of time and few resources have also been cited as reasons that have prevented change in the past. Change is afoot, however. More and more hospitality businesses are recognising that they must respond to consumer demand and are taking advantage of the help that is now available to effect real change. There’s a lot talked about sustainability and, understandably, there are concerns about ‘greenwash’. For businesses genuinely aiming to be more sustainable, there’s a small but real fear of looking as if they are jumping on a hybrid bandwagon. Customers aren’t easily fooled, however, and can usually tell the difference between those who are just talking about doing something and those who are actually implementing sustainable policies.. For restaurants willing to take the leap, the long-term benefits can be far more meaningful than a cosy image makeover. Sustainability can mean very real savings for restaurants. Take food waste as an example. It is estimated that if the average restaurant reduced its food waste by 20 per cent it could generate savings of at least £2,000 annually from avoided food purchase costs. When the UK hospitality industry spends £10bn annually on food purchasing, those avoided costs run into many millions. And cutting food waste by a fifth also means cutting the bill for the four tonnes of waste that the restaurant would otherwise have to dispose of.

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So, while it’s easy to view sustainability as a luxury, a desirable addition but not one that is essential to the survival of a business, the fact is that financial sustainability is actually more readily achievable by taking a responsible attitude to the three key areas: sourcing, environment and society. One restaurant that has noted the difference that tackling waste has made to its bottom line is The Modern Pantry in London’s Clerkenwell: “We have saved between 35 – 40 per cent of our costs for rubbish collection since we opened by compacting card and paper waste, by sending back packaging to our suppliers and bottling our own water to reduce glass waste,” says Candy Giachetti, general manager. “Separating our food waste has also helped to reduce rubbish removal costs, and carefully monitoring internal waste practices has given the restaurant bargaining power to renegotiate a more cost-effective waste management contract.”

In another area – energy – The Carbon Trust estimates that the average small business in the UK loses £7,000 every year using more energy than is necessary. Reducing usage by 20 per cent could mean the same to a restaurant’s bottom line as a five per cent increase in sales. In the midst of an economic recession, savings like these can be the difference between success and failure. But how realistic are such reductions in energy usage? One straightforward way of cutting consumption is by swapping standard lighting for LED replacements. Of course there is an initial outlay to be met, but restaurants which have done this, can expect to save 90 per cent of the energy they were once spending just on lighting. The attention given to the sustainability or otherwise of fish in the last year, largely thanks to the efforts of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and his Fish Fight campaign, means that awareness of these issues is now at an all-time high among consumers.


www.tork.co.uk

                 

complete. proof Tork provide complete paper systems for kitchen, washroom and tabletop – reaching new heights of style, hygiene and functionality. Made with care by SCA, a global leader in sustainability, Tork systems are the perfect partners for you and your guests. Be better. Informed by Tork

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02/11/2011 09:04


SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainable Restaurants

Opposite page: Mark Lineham: “It is estimated that if the average restaurant reduced its food waste by 20 per cent it could generate savings of at least £2,000 annually from avoided food purchase costs.” Left: “We worked to ensure the Icelandic cod in our fish finger wrap comes from a sustainable source. The customer response has been really positive and it has quickly become our number one seller’ – Georgie Sanderson, head of marketing, Leon Restaurants. Below: Anna Hansen, proprietor of Modern Pantry, with chef Bruno Loubet at the launch of their Too Good to Waste campaign, which encourages diners to use doggy bags to prevent food waste on the plate.

Georgie Sanderson, head of marketing at the healthy fast food chain Leon, claims that addressing the sustainability of sourcing has resonated with customers with a consequent increase in takings: “We worked to ensure the Icelandic cod in our fish finger wrap comes from a sustainable source. The customer response has been really positive and it has quickly become our number one seller.” Leon’s experience shows that diners want to make choices when eating out that tally with the way they buy at the supermarket or farm shop. Those who buy a free-range chicken to roast on a Sunday are going to prefer to eat similarly high-welfare chicken in a restaurant. In fact, sales of sustainable fish rose 16.3 per cent between 2009 and 2010. The sales growth of ethical food and drink, dubbed ‘guilt free’, can hardly be ignored. For example, sales of Fairtrade goods increased by 36 per cent in just a year and, because it sells, supermarkets are turning over more shelf space to sustainably-sourced produce, despite the economic downturn. The same trend is taking place in restaurants and across the hospitality sector, which is why so many businesses are seeking help to make their operations leaner and greener. Establishments can certainly become more sustainable in terms of sourcing and the environment, but what of the third category

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of sustainability for hospitality: society? In practical terms this means good staff welfare, supporting charities and a fair deal for producers. But it also means engaging with customers and the wider community. By responding to the increasing calls for a more responsible industry, that’s exactly what

a growing number of restaurants, pubs and hotels are doing. The net result is sustainability in terms of both the environment and the restaurateur’s pocket. It needn’t be painful and it certainly needn’t cost more. And with diners demanding it, sustainability is the future of the industry.


8 / Information 146 100 LEADING HOTEL GROUPS

154 INBOUND TOURISM: THE POTENTIAL FOR GROWTH

159 THE A – Z OF NEW LEGISLATION Martin Couchman

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INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

100 Leading Hotel groups by room numbers

Groups

No of hotels

No of rooms

Brand

website

1

Whitbread Hotel Company, London

605+

45,496

Premier Inn

www.whitbread.co.uk

2

InterContinental Hotels Group, Buckinghamshire

269

37,804

InterContinental (1) *Crowne Plaza (22) *Holiday Inn (127) *Holiday Inn Express (113) *Staybridge Suites (2) *Hotel Indigo (4)

www.ihg.com

3

Travelodge, Oxfordshire (Dubai International Capital)

466+

32,898+ Travelodge

www.travelodge.co.uk

4

Accor Hotel, London

185

24,465

*Sofitel (3) *Novotel (31) *Mercure (71) Ibis (55) Etap (17) Formule 1 (5) *All Seasons (2) *MGallery (1)

www.accor.com

5

Hilton Worldwide, London

100

21,145

*Doubletree (14) *Garden Inn (5) *Hilton (69) *Hampton by Hilton (9) *Waldorf Astoria (1) Unbranded (1)

www.hilton.co.uk

6

**Best Western, York

276

15,550

Best Western Plus (10) Best Western Premier (9)

www.bestwestern.co.uk

7

Marriott Hotels, London

58

11,943

JW Marriott (1) Renaissance (3) Marriott (50) Courtyard by Marriott (1) Residence Inn (1) Grand Residences (1) Executive Apartments (1)

www.marriott.co.uk

8

The Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group, USA

48

10,601

*Radisson Blu (15) *Park Plaza (9) *Park Inn (23) *Missoni (1)

www.carlsonrezidor.com

9

Wyndham Worldwide, USA

124

8,613

Wyndham Grand (1) *Ramada (20) *Ramada Encore (16) *Days Hotel (14) *Days Inn (43)

www.wyndhamworldwide.com

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INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

10

Guoman Hotels Group, London

37

8,119

Guoman (5) Thistle (32)

www.thistle.com

11

DeVere Hotels & Resorts, London DeVere Venues, Ascot

68

7,815

De Vere Hotels (13) Village (26) Venues (29)

www.deveregroup.co.uk

12

Britannia Hotels, Manchester

37

7,365

www.britanniahotels.com

13

Jurys Inn, Dublin (Quinlan Private/ Oman Investment Fund)

25

6,229

www.jurysinns.com

14

**Classic British Hotels

90+

5,880

www.classicbritishhotels.com

15

BDL, Glasgow

42

5,100+

†Crowne Plaza(3) †Holiday Inn (1) †Express by Holiday Inn (6) †Ramada Encore (10) †Ramada (9) Whitehouse (3) Select (6) Unbranded (4)

www.bdlmanagement.co.uk

16

Millennium & Copthorne, London

20

4,496

Copthorne (13) Millennium (7)

www.millenniumhotels.com

17

Macdonald Hotels, Glasgow

51

4,300

Resorts (6)

www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

18

Shearings Hotels, Lancashire

50

4,000

Bay Hotels (33) Coast & Country Hotels (17)

www.shearings.com

19

Somerston Hotels, Warwickshire

33

3,975

†Holiday Inn Express (32) †Hampton by Hilton (1)

www.somerstonhotels.co.uk

20

Principal Hayley, North Yorkshire

22

3,494

Hotels (10) Associate (1) Venues (11)

www.principalhayley.com

21

Imperial London Hotels, London

6

3,355

22

Chardon Management, Glasgow

30

3,280

†Doubletree by Hilton (1) †Holiday Inn (7) †Hotel Indigo (1) †Holiday Inn Express (17) †Quality (1) Best Western (1) Unbranded (2)

www.hotelmanagementservices.com

23

Choice Hotels International, London

41

3,163

†Clarion (3) †Quality (15) †Quality Crown (2) †Comfort Hotels (9) †Comfort Inn (11)

www.choicehotelsuk.co.uk

24

QHotels, Leeds

21

2,966

25

QMH Hotels, Essex

18

2,870

26

Barceló Hotels & Resorts, Hinkley, Leicestershire (Puma Hotels)

21

2,861

www.imperialhotels.co.uk

www.qhotels.co.uk †Holiday Inn (12) †Crowne Plaza (3) Best Western (3)

www.qmh-hotels.com

www.barcelo-hotels.co.uk

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

27

Starwood Hotels & Resorts, London

10

2,709

28

Warner Holidays, Hertfordshire (Bourne Leisure)

13

2,704

29

Jupiter Hotels (bought Jarvis hotels out of administration)

26

2,664

30

Radisson Edwardian Hotels, London

14

2,652

31

Kew Green Hotels, London

22

2,467

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (13) †Express by Holiday Inn (3) †Days Hotels (3) †Courtyard by Marriott (1) Unbranded (1)

www.kewgreen.co.uk

32

Akkeron Hotels, Surrey

37

2,447

Akkeron (8) Forestdale (17) Associates (3) †Ramada (5) †Ramada Encore (1) †Holiday Inn Express (1) Best Western (2)

www.akkeronhotels.com

33

Arora International Hotels, London

6

2,200

Arora (4) †Sofitel (2)

www.arorahotels.com

34

Grange Hotels, London

16

2,018

www.grangehotels.com

35

Legacy Hotels, Warwickshire

34

2,000

ww.legacy-hotels.co.uk

36

Malmaison Group, London (MWB)

26

1,925

37

**Small Luxury Hotels

35

1,850

38

Greene King, Suffolk

70

1,800

Old English Inns (55) Milsoms (4) Hungry Horse (5) Hardys (1) Greene King Inns (5)

www.greeneking.co.uk

39

Oxford Hotels & Inns

36

1,730

Hotels (34) Inn (2)

www.oxfordhotelsandinns.com

40

Menzies Hotels, Derbyshire (Cordial Hotels)

16

1,648

www.menzieshotels.co.uk

41

**Pride of Britain

44

1,600

www.prideofbritain.com

42

Louvre Hotels, France

19

1,588

43

Shaftesbury Hotels, London

18

1,558

www.shaftsburyhotels.com

44

Cairn Hotel Group, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

19

1,552

www.cairnhotelgroup.com

45

Welcome Break, Buckinghamshire

27

1,500

†Days Inn

www.welcomebreak.co.uk

46

Crerar Hotels, Scotland

20

1,470

Crerar (11) Swallow (9)

www.crerarhotels.com

47

Alfa Leisureplex, Lancashire

19

1,459

148

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

St Regis (1) Sheraton(4) Luxury Collection (2) Le Meridien (1) Aloft (1) W (1)

www.starwoodhotels.com

www.warnerleisurehotels.co.uk †Mercure

www.jupiterhotels.co.uk www.radissonedwardian.com

Hotel du Vin (14) Malmaison (12)

www.mwb.co.uk www.slh.com

Campanile (18) Premiere Classe (1)

www.louvrehotels.com

www.leisureplex.co.uk


INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

48

Centre Island, Liverpool

9

1,400

†Crowne Plaza (3) †Holiday Inn (3) †Holiday Inn Express (2) Unbranded (1)

49

morethanhotels, Middlesex

12

1,399

†Express by Holiday Inn www.morethanhotels.com (management contract – Chardon)

50

Focus Hotels, Hatfield

14

1,321

†Mercure (10) †Ramada (2) Unbranded (2)

51

Brook Hotels & Leisure, Surrey

21

1,272

www.brook-hotels.co.uk

52

Bespoke Hotel Group, Buckinghamshire

31

1,200

www.bespokehotels.com

53

Firoka Group, Oxfordshire

6

1,199

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (1) †Holiday Inn Express (2) Best Western (1) Unbranded (1)

54

The Lancaster Landmark Hotel Company, London

4 apts)

1,136

The Landmark, London www.lancasterlondon.com Lancaster, London K West, London Basil Street Apartments,London

55

Corus Hotels, Buckinghamshire

10

1,058

56

Crimson Hotels, Berkshire

7

1,263

†Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (2) †Comfort (2) †Doubletree by Hilton (2)

www.crimsonhotels.com

57

Hyatt International, London

3

1,030

Andaz (1) Hyatt Regency (2)

www.hyatt.com

58

Cola Holdings, London

3

966

59

Redefine International Group, Isle of Man

8

964

60

Apex Hotels, Edinburgh

7

960

www.apexhotels.co.uk

61

Hand Picked Hotels, Kent

17

947

www.handpickedhotels.co.uk

62

Four Pillars Hotels, Oxfordshire

6

879

www.four-pillars.co.uk

63

Ability Group, London

5

794

www.abilitygroup.com

64

Shire Hotels, Lancashire

13

824

65

**Design Hotels

13

820

66

Moran Hotel Group, Dublin

4

792

67

Good Night Inns, Burton-on-Trent (Punch Taverns)

31

775

www.goodnightinns.co.uk

68

Hastings Hotels, Northern Ireland

6

773

www.hastingshotels.com

69

Doyle Collection (Doyle Hotels) Dublin

4

747

www.doylecollections.com

www.centreisland.co.uk

www.focushotels.co.uk

www.corushotels.com

www.kingswayhall.co.uk †Crowne Plaza (1) †Holiday Inn (2) Holiday Inn Express (5)

www.redefinehotels.com

Inns (6) Lodge (1)

www.shirehotels.co.uk

Moran (2) Bewleys (2)

www.moranhotels.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

149


INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

70

Sanguine Hospitality

8

736

71

Peel Hotels, London

9

734

72

The Ascott Group, London

6

716

73

Strathmore Hotels, Scotland

7

711

74

Elite Hotels, Sussex

4

705

75

**Relais & Chateaux

27

700

76

Mitchells & Butlers, Birmingham

42

700

77

Club Quarters, USA

3

693

78

Cordia Hotel Group (Andras House), Belfast

5+apts

688

†Days Hotel (1) †Ramada (1) †Holiday Inn Express (1) †Ibis (2) Apartments(1)

www.cordiahotels.com

79

EDC Hotels, Aberdeen

5

660

†Holiday Inn Express (3) †Holiday Inn (2)

www.edchotels.com

80

Eclipse Hotels

7

652

†Easyhotels (2) †Holiday Inn (2) †Holiday Inn Express (3)

www.eclipsehotels.co.uk

81

Hallmark Hotel Group, Leeds

7

637

www.hallmarkhotels.co.uk

82

Brend Hotels, Devon

11

617

www.brend-hotels.co.uk

83

Cedar Court Hotel Group, Wakefield

5

601

www.cedarcourthotels.co.uk

84

JD Wetherspoon, Hertfordshire

23

601

www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk

85

Marston’s Inns & Taverns

50+

600

www.marstonsinns.co.uk

86

Red Carnation Hotels, London

9

595

www.redcarnationhotels.com

87

Ralph Trustees Group, London

4 (inc apts)

586

The Grove, Watford; Runnymead, Egham; Athenaeum Hotel & Apartments,London

www.thegrove.co.uk

88

Martyn Leisure Resorts & Hotels, Somerset

5

581

Resorts(1)

www.martynleisurebreaks.co.uk

89

Melia Hotels, Palma de Mallorca

1

581

Melia White House,London

www.solmelia.com

90

Grand UK Hotels

12

574

91

Lowy Group (was Vienna Group), London

8 (inc apts)

562

Best Western (2) Umi (2) Unbranded (4)

www.lowygroup.co.uk

92

Fullers Hotels, London

24

553

Inns (17)` Hotels (7)

www.fullershotels.com

93

Choice Hotels, Blackpool

5

550

150

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

†Doubletree (2) †Days Hotel (2) †Holiday Inn (1) †Hotel Indigo (2) Unbranded (1)

www.sanguinehospitality.com

www.peelhotels.co.uk †Citadines (4) Ascott (1) Unbranded (1)

www.the-ascott.com

www.strathmorehotels.com Ashdown Park, Wych Cross Grand, Eastbourne Luton Hoo Tylney Hall, Hook

www.elitehotels.co.uk

www.relaischateaux.com Innkeepers Lodge

www.mbplc.com www.clubquarters.com

www.granduk.hotels.com

www.choicehotels.co.uk


INFORMATION

100 Leading Hotel Groups

94

Maybourne Group, London

3

539

95

Portland Hotels, Edinburgh

5

536

Best Western (2)

www.portland.co.uk

96

Sonoma Hotels, Newbury

8

536

Vineyard Collection (2)

www.sonomahotels.co.uk

97

Sarova Hotels, London

4

514

98

Feathers Hotel & Catering Group, Liverpool

8

507

99

Seymour Hotels, Jersey

3

504

www.seymourhotels.com

8 (inc 6 apts)

502

www.premgroup.com

100 Prem Group, Dublin

www.maybourne.com

www.sarova.com Best Western (8)

www.feathers.uk.com

As at January 2012

Source: Wordsmith and Company * Some or all franchised to another operator and may be included in other company listing. ** Consortium of independently owned hotels † Franchised hotels (also included in franchise listings)

Leading Restaurant groups UK restaurant groups with over 100 outlets Brands

No of restaurants

Company

Website

Harvester, Toby, Vintage Inns, Sizzling Pub Co.

940 (food-led)

Mitchells & Butlers

www.mbplc.com

Pizza Express, Ask, Zizzi, Byron

655

Gondola

www.gondolaholdings.com

Frankie & Benny’s, Garfunkel’s, Chiquito

389

Restaurant Group

www.trgplc.com

Beefeater, Brewers Fayre, Top Table, Taybarns

383

Whitbread

www.whitbread.co.uk

Nando’s, Gourmet Burger Kitchen

303

Nando’s

www.nandos.co.uk

Bella Italia, Café Rouge, Strada, Brasseries

289

Tragus

www.tragusgroup.com

Chef and Brewer, Flaming Grill, Fayre & Square

261

Spirit Pub Company (was Punch Taverns)

www.spiritpubcompany.com

Loch Fyne, Eating Inn, Hungry Horse, Cloverleaf

216

Greene King

Prezzo (160) Ultimate Burger (2) Chimichanga (13)

175

Prezzo

www.prezzorestaurants.co.uk

Little Chef

162 (67 to close early 2012)

RCapital

www.littlechef.co.uk

Wimpy

130

Famous Brands

www.famousbrands.co.za

As at January 2012

Source: Horizons/Wordsmith and Company

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

151


INFORMATION

Leading Quick Service Groups

Leading Quick Service/Take Away groups Quick Service/Take Away groups with over 100 outlets Brand

No of outlets

Company

Website

Subway

1,399

Subway

www.subway.co.uk

McDonald’s

1,270

McDonald’s

www.mcdonalds.co.uk

KFC, Taco Bell

810

Yum

www.yum.com

Burger King

660

Burger King

www.burgerking.co.uk

Upper Crust, Millie’s Cookies

650

SSP

www.foodtravelexperts.com

Domino’s

619

Domino’s

www.dominos.co.uk

Ben and Jerry’s

241

Unilever

www.benjerry.co.uk

Pret à Manger

238

Bridgepoint

www.pret.com

Baskin Robbins

150

Baskin Robbins

www.baskinrobbins.co.uk

Perfect Pizza

110

Perfect Pizza

www.perfectpizza.co.uk

EAT

109

EAT

www.eat.co.uk

As at January 2012

Source: Horizons/Wordsmith and Company

Leading Coffee Shop groups Coffee shop groups in UK with over 50 outlets Brands

No of outlets

Company

Website

Costa Coffee

1,217

Whitbread

www.whitbread.co.uk

Starbucks

731

Starbucks Corp

www.starbucks.co.uk

Caffè Nero

440

Rome Bidco

www.caffenero.com

The Café

160

Marks and Spencer

www.corporate. marksandspencer.com

Café Ritazza

118

SSP

www.ritazza.sspweblive.com

Coffee Republic

440

Arab Investments

www.coffeerepublic.co.uk

AMT Coffee

59

AMT Coffee

www.amtcoffee.co.uk

As at January 2012 Source: Horizons/Wordsmith and Company

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012


INFORMATION

Leading Pub Groups

Leading Pub groups UK pub groups with over 300 sites Owner

2011

Website

Enterprise Inns

6,361

www.enterpriseinns.com

Punch Taverns

5,000+

www.punchtaverns.com

Marstons

2,000+

www.marstons.co.uk

Admiral Taverns

1,480

www.admiraltaverns.com

Greene King

1,415

www.greeneking.co.uk

S&NPC

1,380

www.snpubs.co.uk

Wellington Pub Company

850

www.wellingtonpubcompany.co.uk

JD Wetherspoon

800

www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk

Stonegate Pub Company

548

www.stonegatepubs.com

Spirit Pub Company

542

www.spiritpubcompany.com

Mitchells & Butlers

512

www.mbplc.com

Trust Inns

500+

www.trustinns.co.uk

Fuller, Smith & Turner

367

www.fullers.co.uk

Robinsons

360

www.frederic-robinson.co.uk

Daniel Thwaites

350+

www.thwaites.co.uk

Shepherd Neame

322

www.shepherdneame.co.uk

As at January 2012 Source: Horizons/Wordsmith and Company

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

153


INFORMATION

Tourism

Inbound tourism: the potential for growth This article, adapted from VisitBritain’s Foresight, explores the latest projections for the number of inbound visitors that could be travelling to Britain over the coming years, as estimated by Tourism Economics, based on its analysis of the latest macroeconomic and demographic projections for countries around the world. Analysis undertaken by Deloitte in 2010 revealed that the long-run GVA (Gross Value Added) growth rate of the visitor economy is forecast to be 3.5% per annum over the period 2010 to 2020, well ahead of the 2.9% forecast for the economy as a whole. The report indicated that expenditure by inbound visitors to Britain could, in aggregate terms, grow by 4.4% per annum during the decade to 2020.

How many more visitors can the UK attract?

At the outset it is vital to convey a health warning as forward-looking figures can lend themselves to misinterpretation. The following is how Tourism Economics describe the ‘model’ (known as Tourism Decision Metrics) that sits behind the figures presented here. “The model driving Tourism Decision Metrics travel forecasts is built on Oxford Economics’ global macroeconomic model. In this structure, forecasts of origin market economic growth and exchange rates drive outbound spending and trip projections. The model identifies the relationships between the economic and price indicators and travel demand. Company investment and profits are strong indicators of business travel demand while exchange rates

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

and real disposable income explain much of the changes in leisure travel. Destination forecasts are then predicted on the basis of the performance of origin markets and a “tourism competitiveness index” developed by the World Economic Forum and adjusted by Tourism Economics. The result is a global balance of inbound and outbound travel, forecasted by rigorous econometrics and also rooted in the real world.” Although the model does set a ceiling on the amount of outbound travel that an origin market can generate, it does not explicitly allow for any ‘blocks’ to growth over the longer-term, for example infrastructural constraints (such as airport capacity), changes in how easy or difficult

entering a destination might be (for example whether or not there is a visa requirement) or a shift in the relative ‘marketing effort’ being made by each destination. What all of this means is that the figures presented here should be thought of as showing the ‘potential’ level of visits to Britain from each market over the years ahead, on the assumption that the underlying macroeconomic forecasts prove accurate, the modelled historical relationship between various economic variables and travel remain intact, and as many visitors who wish to travel from Market A to Market B are able to do so without constraint. The figures are not forecasts of what will happen; they are projections of the potential that exists.


INFORMATION

Tourism

Chart 1 shows the number of visits by overseas residents to Britain since 2000, with projections through to 2020. As can be seen the number of visits to Britain increased by some 10m between 2001 and 2007, demonstrating just how quickly the sector can grow with a strong economic tailwind. Clearly, had this rate of growth been sustained, visitor numbers might have been heading towards 40m in the current year, but the global economic downturn has intervened. The projections indicate that there will be steady growth in visits between now and 2020, with the symbolically important 40m threshold being reached by 2020.

45,000

40,000

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000 2000

2004

2008

2012

Actual

2016

2020

Forecast

Chart 1: Historic and projected visits to Britain (000s)

Origin of region growth Chart 2 reveals the number of visits to Britain by world regions in 2011 alongside the projection for the number by 2020. It is immediately evident that Western Europe is, and is set to remain, the dominant source market for visits to Britain.

Africa Middle East North America South America

Origin of market growth There are many ways to present statistics, and Chart 3 shows the estimated share of visits to Britain by world region in 2020, were the projections to be accurate, alongside estimates for the share of visitor spend from each world region. These figures are based on assuming that the typical spend per visit to Britain by world region in 2010 remains stable throughout the next decade, although of course this assumption is almost guaranteed to be wrong. The analysis clearly illustrates that Western Europe is a lot less dominant when looking at the projected share of visitor spend in 2020 than when looking at visits, accounting for 45 per cent of spend rather than 63% of visits. The only other world region whose share of spend is less than its share of visits is ‘Emerging Europe’, with all other regions hitting above their weight when focusing on spending. Around one-fifth of spending by 2020 is set to be generated by visitors from North America, with a similar proportion represented by spending from markets across Asia Pacific.

Emerging Europe Western Europe Oceania Northeast Asia Southeast Asia South Asia 5,000

10,000

15,000 2020

20,000

25,000

2011

Chart 2: Visits to Britain (000s) by world region

Africa Middle East North America South America Emerging Europe Western Europe Oceania Northeast Asia Southeast Asia South Asia 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Spend

Visits

50%

60%

70%

Chart 3: Potential share of visits and spend in 2020

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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INFORMATION

Tourism

The following sections examine the projections for potential growth from different source markets between 2011 and 2020.

Americas From Chart 4 it is fairly clear to see that the USA is the market within the Americas that generates by far the most visits to Britain and that the number has the potential to grow to more than four million by 2020 from its current annual tally of around 2.9m. Growth is on the cards from both Canada and Brazil, though after a period of very rapid growth in the past few years the figures would tend to indicate a more modest trajectory in the next few years for the South American market.

Asia Pacific and Middle East The market currently generating the most visits from this region is Australia (Chart 5) and there is the potential for further growth in the decade ahead. However, perhaps the most notable findings from the chart are the indicated number of visits from China, India and even Japan in 2020, with each having the potential for a considerable uplift.

Brazil

Canada

United States

-

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2020

2,500

3,000

3,500

4,000

4,500

2011

Chart 4: Potential visits from the Americas (000s)

Australia

China

Hong Kong

India

Japan

United Arab Emirates -

200

400

600

800

2020

2011

1,000

1,200

1,400

Chart 5: Potential visits from Asia, Pacific and Middle East (000s)

Central Europe By 2020 there is the potential for very nearly four million annual visits to Britain from Germany (Chart 6) thanks to substantial growth, while a rather more modest trajectory is on the cards for both Netherlands and Austria.

Austria

Belgium

Germany

Netherlands

Switzerland -

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

2020

2011

3,000

3,500

4,000

Chart 6: Potential visits from Central Europe (000s)

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

4,500


INFORMATION

Tourism

North and East Europe Only rather modest growth potential is seen for the Scandinavian trio of markets shown in Chart 7, while after having seen declines in the past few years a return to growth is anticipated for visits from Poland. By contrast the number of visits from Russia is expected to remain at levels close to their current tally, with the resident population of Russia forecast to decline.

Denmark

Norway

Poland

Russia

Sweden -

300

600

900

2020

1,200

1,500

2011

Chart 7: Potential visits from North and East Europe (000s)

Western Europe Finally in Chart 8 the potential number of visits from markets in the west of Europe is shown and it is evident that France is projected to be the leading generator of additional visits among the trio of markets shown, while despite their current economic woes there is still potential for growth from both Italy and Spain. Were these projections to prove accurate the number of visits from France could be around one million higher by 2020 than now.

France

Italy

Spain

-

500

1,000

1,500 2,000

2,500 3,000

2020

3,500 4,000

4,500 5,000

2011

Chart 8: Potential visits from Western Europe

Growth potential by market: absolute and relative The potential for each market to grow can look very different depending upon the lens through which it is viewed, and Chart 9 presents both the absolute and relative growth potential, for each of VisitBritain’s priority markets, between 2011 and 2020. The chart may at first sight look a little daunting so a few words of clarification are in order; the red bars show the potential growth in visits from each origin market measured in thousands of visits (the bottom axis of the chart) and the blue bars show the potential relative (or percentage) growth over the same period from the base year of 2011 (the top axis of the chart). It is plain to see

that depending on which lens we are looking at the growth potential through the ‘top performing’ markets can be rather different. Looking at the red bars the USA is set to see the largest absolute increase in visits over the course of the decade, with a jump of nearly 1.3m, with France the only other market that could increase by more than one million over the period. However, when looking at the blue bars (percentage growth) for these two leading markets it is clear that while substantial growth potential exists (44 per cent from the USA and 27 per cent from France), certain other markets offer up greater ‘relative’ growth potential.

China, potential to grow by 113 per cent Hong Kong 82 per cent and India 80 per cent, are of particular note, but so too is the potential for 60 per cent more visits from Japan in 2020 than in 2011. While the outlook is for growth it is clear that two of the BRIC markets that have enjoyed strong growth in the past couple of years (Brazil and Russia) are expected to see rather more modest growth during the coming decade. However, as noted earlier, these projections make no allowance for destinations enhancing their efforts to attract more visitors, for example the British Government’s GREAT campaign.

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

157


INFORMATION

Tourism

Record-breakers? From Chart 9 it can be seen that all of the markets have the potential to grow in the years to come, but as Chart 1 demonstrated the number of visits can go down as well as up, so in Chart 10 figures show the number of potential visits from each market in 2020 compared with the best ever year for visits from that market. While for some markets, for example Brazil, 2011 was a record year in terms of number of visits, for others, for example the USA and Japan, we need to look back through the archives to find the record year; for the USA 2000 saw more visits to Britain than any year before or since, whereas for Japan it was 1995. The chart shows that despite forecast growth from each market, for some markets this growth is insufficient to be delivering record numbers of visitors. By 2020 the number of visits from each of Belgium and Poland could still be 250,000 down on the best year for these markets, while the number of visits from Japan looks set to be 200,000 shy of the record year, despite the potential 60 per cent growth between 2011 and 2020 (Chart 9). Even the 1.3m extra visits projected from the USA only takes the annual tally for 2020 to 131,000 higher than it was back in 2000.

Conclusions VisitBritain’s forecast is for the number of visits in 2012 to be around the same as in 2011, but the analysis presented here demonstrates the scale of the opportunity on offer, with both emerging source markets such as China, along with more mature markets such as Japan, France and the USA, all having enormous potential to be generating more visits, and thereby greater visitor spending, in 2020 than is currently the case.

0%

10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 110% 120% 130%

Australia

13%

140

Austria

27%

Belgium

75 41%

Brazil

376

21

8%

Canada

46%

43

China

113%

Denmark

2%

14

France

27%

Germany

29%

Hong Kong

82%

India

80%

Italy Japan

60%

Netherlands

11%

Norway

16%

Poland

Switzerland

152

3 554

33 43%

United Arab Emirates

304

209

30% 4%

116

204

Spain Sweden

887

114

21% 1%

1,013

133

8%

Russia

163

40%

338 104

United States

44%

-

1,299

100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 000s

%

Chart 9: Potential growth 2011 to 2020 in absolute (00s of visits) and relative (%) terms

The analysis demonstrates the scale of the opportunity on offer, with both emerging source markets, such as China, along with more mature markets, such as Japan, France and the USA, all having enormous potential to be generating more visits and thereby greater visitor spending in 2020 than is currently the case.

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012


INFORMATION

New Legislation

The A-Z of new legislation Here’s a run-down of the major items of new legislation, already agreed or under discussion, and areas where government is keen to encourage change on a voluntary basis (these are marked V).

C

ountry of origin labelling (V)

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is keen to promote the country of origin labelling on menus/websites to consumers. The BHA is working with DEFRA on guidance for hospitality businesses.

E

mployment

Government is starting to move on the reform of employment law, with consultations now closed on (a) collective redundancy consultations, (b) the Transfer of Undertakings Regulations (‘TUPE’) and (c) the introduction of fees to be paid by Employment Tribunal claimants. As an example of one option for fees, an employee issuing a claim relating to unpaid wages might pay £150; a discrimination claim and Tribunal hearing could cost up to £1,500, subject to a form of means-testing. The losing party would eventually bear these costs.

F

ood Hygiene Rating (Wales) Bill

The Welsh government is intending to use new legislative powers to make the display of Food Hygiene Rating Scheme scores on the premises compulsory, to require Welsh local authorities to operate the FHRS scheme and to charge any food business requesting a re-inspection. Consultation on the Bill has closed. Having successfully opposed compulsory display in London (provisions for this have been struck out of the London Local Authorities Bill as a result), the BHA is doing the same in Wales on the basis that it is premature to legislate in a part of the UK until the Food Standards Agency has decided whether to press for compulsory display wherever the FHRS is in operation. Such a decision will depend on consumer research (yet to be carried out) and has been delayed until late 2012. It now seems likely that all local authorities in England and Wales will have joined the FHRS by the end of 2012.

L

icensing in England and Wales

The Home Office has launched consultation on implementing the provisions of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act relating to Early Morning Restriction Orders (EMRO) and the late night levy*. Only those foodservice premises open and serving alcohol between midnight and 6.00 a.m. are affected. The Home Office is looking at implementing the Act’s provisions for raising licence fees, perhaps by 20 per cent** while a new mandatory provision from October 2012 will require minimum pricing for alcohol of “excise duty plus VAT on the duty” (the BHA has effectively secured exemption for such offers as “free wine included in your meal”). * Maximum proposed annual cost for a licensed premises is £1,493. ** This will work out to under £100 a year for most premises.

attractions and for the campaign’s Stage 2 focus on out-of-home meals.

V

oluntary code on waste (V)

The Tourism Regulation Task Force, chaired by BHA President, Alan Parker, submitted its report to the Tourism Minister John Penrose MP for publication on 24 January. Recommendations cover visas, planning, fire safety, health and safety, package travel, migration, maternity leave, fit notes, employment issues, equality and licensing.

WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) is working for the four UK governments on a voluntary ‘Responsibility Deal’ code to reduce food and associated packaging waste. There have been various concerns about this initiative, since Scotland is already moving down more of a regulatory route. The Scottish Parliament’s Rural Affairs and Environment Committee inquiry into the Zero Waste policy has generated serious doubts about the financial and infrastructure implications, for example, of banning nondomestic waste disposal units.

V

W

R

egulations

AT

Following meetings with Treasury ministers and officials on the case for reducing VAT on tourism services, with the initial focus on accommodation and attractions, based on an independent Deloitte report, the BHA’s VAT campaign group, working under the chairmanship of Graham Wason, has commissioned further work to look at how the Treasury’s own economic model would assess the case both for accommodation and

orking Time Directive

Negotiations on revising the Working Time Directive between the EU equivalents of the CBI and TUC have started, with predictable positions: the unions want to negotiate on the 48-hour opt-out and work/ life balance, the employers only on on-call time and annual leave. (With thanks to Martin Couchman, deputy chief executive, British Hospitality Association)

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9 / Directory 162 HOTEL GROUPS

171 RESTAURANT GROUPS

181 DISTINGUISHED HOTELS

184 DISTINGUISHED RESTAURANTS

193 ORGANISATIONS

199 COLLEGES

202 SUPPLIERS

205 CATERING COMPANIES

206 WHO’S WHO

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DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

UK Hotel Groups A A B HOTELS Abraham Bejerano Chairman Sopwell House Hotel Cottonmill Lane, Sopwell St, Albans AL1 2HQ T: 01727 864477 E: enquiries@abhotels.co.uk W: www.abhotels.co.uk ABACUS HOTELS Howard Darking Managing Director Whitelion House 20 Station St, Swafham PE37 7LH T: 01760 725725 E: enquiries@abacushotels.co.uk W: www.abacushotels.co.uk ABILITY GROUP Andreas Panaylatou Chief Executive 5th Floor, 175 Oxford Street London W1D 2JS T: 020 7580 1234 E: info@theabilitygroup.com W: www.theabilitygroup.com ABODE HOTELS Nick Halliday Managing Director 4 Queens Square, Bath BA1 2HA T: 01225 303480 E: headoffice@abodehotels.co.uk W: www.abodehotels.co.uk ACCOR HOTELS Thomas Dubaere Managing Director 245 Hammersmith Rd, London W6 8SJ T: 020 8237 7474 E: enquiries@tiffanyshotel.co.uk W: www.accorhotels.com/gb/ home/index.shtml AGELLUS HOTELS LTD Mark Harrod Manager Vale House, 2 Kings Mill Lane, Stamford, Lincolnshire PE9 2QS T: 01780 767086 E: info@agellushotels.co.uk W: www.agellushotels.co.uk AKKERON HOTELS Matthew Welbourn Managing Director 152-158 Richmond Hill, Surrey TW1D 6RP E: matthewwelbourn@ akkeronhotels.com W: www.akkeronhotels.com

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ALEXANDER HOTELS Peter Hinchcliffe Managing Director Rowhill Grange, Wilmington, Dartford DA2 7QH T: 01322 615136 E: admin@alexanderhouse.co.uk W: www.alexanderhotels.com

ASHDALE HOTELS Martin Wicks Proprietor Kings Head Hotel, Market Place, Richmond DL10 4HS T: 01748 850220 E: martinwicks@ashdalehotels.com W: www.ashdalehotels.com

BASE2STAY LTD Robert Nadler Chief Executive 2 Babmaes Street, London SW1Y 6HD T: 020 7491 2948 E: info@base2stay.com W: www.base2stay.com

ANGEL GROUP Julia Davey Managing Director The Angel House, 225 Marsh Wall, London E14 9FW T: 020 7536 8688 E: info@theangelgroup.com W: www.theangelgroup.com

ASHLEY HOTEL GROUP Karim Herji Proprietor Quality Hotel, 234 London Rd St Albans AL1 1JQ T: 01727 857858 E: enquiries@ashley-hotels.co.uk W: www.ashley-hotels.co.uk

BROWNSWORD HOTELS Sue Williams General Manager Bath Priory Hotel Weston Rd, Bath BA1 2XT T: 01225 331922 E: marketing@thebathpriory. co.uk W: www.thebathpriory.co.uk

APEX HOTELS LTD Norman Springford Executive Chairman 32 Hailes Avenue, Edinburgh EH13 0LZ T: 01314 410441 E: events@apexhotels.co.uk W: www.apexhotels.co.uk

ASTON HOTELS LTD Paresh Kotecha Proprietor Newton Park Coatham, Mundeville, Darlington DL1 3NL T: 01325 329600 E: enquiries@astonhotels.co.uk W: www.astonhotels.co.uk

ARENA LEISURE PLC Mark Elliott Chief Executive 408 Strand, London WC2R 0NE T: 020 7632 2080 E: contact@arenaleisureplc.com W: www.arenaleisureplc.com ARKELL’S BREWERY LTD J R Arkell Chief Executive Hyde Rd, Upper Stratton Stratton St Margaret, Swindon SN2 7RU T: 01793 823026 E: arkells@arkells.com W: www.arkells.com ARLINGTON HOTEL GROUP July Esworth Managing Director Arlington Lane, Newmarket Rd, Norwich NR2 2DA T: 01603 617841 E: july@arlingtonhotelgroup. co.uk W: www.arlingtonhotelgroup. co.uk ARORA INTERNATIONAL LTD Surinder Arora Chairman Arora International Hotel, The Grove, Bath Rd, West Drayton UB7 0DG T: 020 8759 7777 E: enquiries@arorainternational. co.uk W: www.arorainternational.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

B BALLANTRAE HOTELS Peter Sharma Proprietor 8 York Place, Edinburgh EH1 3EP T: 01314 784748 E: info@ballantraehotel.co.uk W: www.ballantraehotel.co.uk BANNATYNE HOTELS Nigel Armstrong Managing Director Power House , Houghton Rd, Darlington DL1 1ST T: 01325 356677 E: reception@bannatyne.com W: www.bannatyne.co.uk BARCELO HOTELS & RESORTS Raul Gonzalez Chief Executive Watling St, Hinckley LE10 9JA T: 01455 631122 E: stay@barcelo-hotels.co.uk W: www.barcelo-hotels.co.uk BARCLAY BROTHERS GROUP David Barclay Chairman Ritz Hotel, Piccadilly, London W1J 9BR T: 020 7493 8181 E: enquire@theritzLondon.com W: www.theritzLondon.com

BDL HOTELS Steward Campbell Managing Director 40 Brand Street Glasgow G51 1DG T: 01414 194567 W: www.bdlhotels.co.uk BECK CONROY CONSULTING Hermann Beck General Manager Holiday Inn Sheffield Victoria Station Rd, Sheffield S4 7YE T: 01142 768822 E: stay@holidayinnsheffield.co.uk W: www.holidayinnsheffield.co.uk

BESPOKE HOTELS Haydn Fentum Chief Executive Bespoke House, The Old Rectory, Windsor End, Beaconsfield HP9 2JW T: 08708 903740 E: info@bespokehotels.com W: www.bespokehotels.com BEST WESTERN HOTELS Richard Lewis Chief Executive Consort House, Amy Johnson Way, Clifton Moor, York YO30 4GP T: 01904 695400 E: admin@bestwestern.co.uk W: www.bestwestern.co.uk BOURNE LEISURE GROUP John Cook Director 1 Park Lane, Hemel Hempstead HP2 4YL T: 01442 230300 E: carole.hayman@bourneleisure.co.uk W: www.bourneleisuregroup.co.uk BREND HOTELS LTD John and Peter Brend Group Directors Park Hotel, Taw Vale, Barnstaple EX32 9AE T: 01271 372166 E: sales@brend-hotels.co.uk W: www.brend-hotels.co.uk

BEDFACTORY HOTELS Cosmo Fry Proprietor Big Sleep Hotel. Bute Terrace, Cardiff CF10 2FE T: 02920 636363 E: admin.cardiff@ thebigsleephotel.com W: www.thebigsleephotel.com

BRITANNIA HOTELS LTD Alex Langsam Managing Director Halecroft, 253 Hale Rd, Hale, Altrincham WA15 8RE T: 01619 048686 E: marketing@brittaniahotels.com W: www.britanniahotels.com

BENIT HOTELS Richard Breen Director Castelton Hotel 164/168 Sussex Gardens, London W2 1UD T: 020 7706 4666 E: info@castletonhotel.com W: www.castletonhotel.com

BROOK HOTELS Barry Evenson General Manager Redwood Hotel Beggar Bush Lane, Falland, Bristol BS8 3TG T: 01275 393901 E: redwood@brook-hotels.co.uk W: www.brook-hotels.co.uk/

BENMORE GROUP David Burrow Chief Executive Rushmere House, 46 Cadogan Park, Belfast BT9 6HH T: 02890 666471 E: admin@benmoregroup.com W: www.benmoregroup.com

BUCCANEER HOLDINGS LTD Timothy Ruthven Managing Director 37 Rodney Rd, Cheltenham GL50 1HX T: 01242 239383 E: tim@buccaneer.co.uk W: www.buccaneer.co.uk


DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

BULLDOG PUB COMPANY Kevin Charity Managing Director 1-5 High St, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE21 8SH T: 01205 355522 E: office@bpcmail.co.uk W: www.bpcgroup.com

CASTLEWOOD HOTELS Angelo Sangiuseppe Proprietor Burlington Hotel, Earls Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2HR T: 01303 255301 E: info@theburlingtonhotel.com W: www.castlewoodhotels.com

C

CAVE CASTLE HOTELS Mel Hogarth Proprietor Church Hill, South Cave HU15 2EU T: 01430 422245 E: info@cavecastlehotel.com W: www.cavecastlehotel.com

CAIRN HOTEL GROUP A Handa Director 31-40 West Parade, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 7LB T: 01912 725788 E: enquiries@cairnhotelgroup. com W: www.cairnhotelgroup.com CAMPANILE (UK) LTD Mark Aldridge Head of UK Operations Campanile Northampton, Loake Close, Grange Park, Northampton NN4 5EZ T: 01604 662599 E: northampton@campanile.com W: www.campanile.com CAPARO HOTELS Ambar Paul Manager Caparo House, 103 BakerSt, London W1U 6LN T: 020 7486 1417 E: ambar.paul@caparo.co.uk W: www.caparo.co.uk CAPITAL GROUP David Levin Chairman 22-24 Basil Street, London SW3 1AT T: 020 7591 1220 E: marketing@capitalhotel.co.uk W: www.capitalhotel.co.uk CAPRICORN HOTELS Sudhen Bhayani Managing Director The Blandford Hotel 80 Chiltern St, London W1U 5AF T: 020 7486 3103 E: blandford@capricornhotels. co.uk W: www.capricornhotels.co.uk CARILLION PLC Richard Howson Chief Executive 24 BirchSt, Wolverhampton WV1 4HY T: 01902 422431 E: vzarb@carillionplc.com W: www.carillionplc.com

CEDAR COURT HOTELS George Costa Demetriou Managing Director Cedar Court Hotel, Denby Dale Rd, Calder Grove, Wakefield WF4 3QZ T: 01924 276310 E: enquiries@cedarcourthotels.co.uk W: www.cedarcourthotels.co.uk CENTER PARCS UK GROUP Martin Dalby Managing Director 1 Eddison Rise, New Olerton, Newark NG22 9DP T: 08700 673000 E: simon.kay@centerparcs.co.uk W: www.centerparcs.co.uk CENTRE ISLAND HOTELS Martin Griffiths Managing Director 62 Castle Street, Liverpool L2 7LQ T: 01517 052680 E: mark.sutton@centreisland.co.uk W: www.centreisland.co.uk CHAMPNEYS HEALTH RESORTS Alex de Carvalho Managing Director Champneys, Henlow SG16 6DB T: 01462 811111 E: amcleghorn@champneys.co.uk W: www.champneys.com CHANNEL HOTELS & LEISURE LTD R G Lapidus Managing Director Hotel De Normandie, Havre Des Pas, St Helier, Jersey JE4 8WZ T: 01534 619600 E: rory@ch.je W: www.channelhotels.com CHAPMAN GROUP LTD Chris Chapman Chief Executive The Offices, Avenals Farm Water Lane, Angmering, Littlehampton BN16 4EP T: 01903 856744 E: boardroom@ thechapmansgroup.co.uk W: www.chapmansgroup.co.uk

CHARDON MANAGEMENT LTD Maurice Taylor Chief Executive Albert Chambers, 13 Bath Street, Glasgow G2 1HY T: 01413 330545 E: info@ hotelmanagementservices.com W: www. hotelmanagementservices.com CHARTRIDGE CONFERENCE COMPANY Peter Darnell Managing Director Chartridge Lane, Chartridge, Chesham HP5 2TU T: 01494 837484 E: info@chartridge.co.uk W: www.chartridge.co.uk CHELSFIELD PARTNERS LLP Sir Stuart Lipton Deputy Chairman 67 BrookSt, London W1K 4NJ T: 020 7290 2388 E: enquiries@chelsfield.com W: www.chelsfield.com CHOICE HOTELS EUROPE Duncan Berry Chief Executive 67/74 Saffron Hill, Farringdon, London EC1N 8QX T: 020 7061 9600 E: infouk@choicehotels.com W: www.choicehotelsuk.co.uk CHOICE HOTELS LTD Edward Nelder Managing Director Choice House, 107 Dickson Rd, Blackpool FY1 2ET T: 08454 584222 E: reservations@choicehotels. co.uk W: www.choicehotels.co.uk CHRISTIAN GUILD HOTELS Kevin Mantle Managing Director Derwent House, Cromford, Matlock DE4 5JG T: 01629 580551 E: enquiries@christianguild.co.uk W: www.christianguild.co.uk CITADINES APART’HOTEL Rebecca Hollant Regional Manager Apart’Hotel Citadines, 7-21 Goswell Rd, London EC1M 7AH T: 020 7566 8000 E: barbican@citadines.com W: www.citadines.com

CITYLODGE HOTELS Mark Bowley Chief Executive Citylodge Bridge House Hotel, 2 Ringwood Rd, Ferndown BH22 9AN T: 01202 578828 E: bournemouth@citylodge.biz W: www.citylodge.biz CLASSIC BRITISH HOTELS Len Louis Chief Executive Suite 113, The Mayford Centre, Mayford Green, Woking GU22 0PP T: 01483 747480 E: ceo@classicbritishhotels.com W: www.classicbritishhotels.com CLASSIC HOTELS Tom Daffurn Chief Executive Dumbleton Hall Hotel, Dumbleton, Evesham WR11 7TS T: 01386 882621 E: simon@pofr.co.uk W: www.classic-hotels.net CLIFTON HOTELs GROUP Rachel Gifford General Manager The Clifton Hotel, St Pauls Rd, Bristol BS8 1LX T: 01179 736882 E: enquiries@cliftonhotels.com W: www.cliftonhotels.com CLUB QUARTERS Michael Bray UK Regional Manager 8 Northumberland Avenue , London WC2N 5BY T: 020 7839 9333 E: mbray@clubquarters.com W: www.clubquarters.com COLA HOLDINGS LTD Phil Gregg Chief Operations Officer Kensington Close Hotel, Wrights Lane, London W8 5SP T: 08707 517770 E: info@kensingtonclosehotel.com W: www.kensingtonclosehotel.com COMO HOTELS Thomas Orchard General Manager 19 Old Park Lane, London W1K 1QT T: 020 7447 1000 E: info.lon@metropolitan.como.bz W: www.comohotels.co.uk CONTESSA HOTELS Craig Baker Chief Executive Hillbark Hotel, Royden Park, Frankby, Wirral CH48 1NP T: 01516 252400 E: enquiries@hillbarkhotel.co.uk W: www.contessahotels.com

CORDIA HOTEL GROUP Lord Diljit Rana Managing Director 60 Great Victoria Street, Belfast BT2 7BB T: 02890 878787 E: dsrana@cordiagroup.co.uk W: www.cordiahotels.com CORUS HOTELS David Westerby Managing Director Corus House, Rossway Park, Berkhamsted HP4 3TZ T: 01442 285070 E: marketing@corushotels.com W: www.corushotels.com COSTLEY AND COSTLEY HOTELIERS LTD William Costley Chairman Lochgreen House Hotel, Monktonhill Rd, Southwood, Troon KA10 7EN T: 01292 313343 E: lochgreen@costley-hotels.co.uk W: www.costley-hotels.co.uk COTSWOLD INNS & HOTELS LTD Paul Davies Operations Director Orchard House, Crabapple Way Vale Business Park, Evesham WR11 1GE T: 01386 769100 E: bookings@cotswold-innshotels.co.uk W: www.cotswold-inns-hotels. co.uk CRERAR HOTELS LTD Paddy Crerar Chief Executive 1 Queen Charlotte Lane, Edinburgh EH6 6BL T: 01315 547173 E: enquiry@crerarhotels.com W: www.crerarhotels.com CRIMSON HOTELS Stuart Hardy Managing Director London Rd, Colnbrook, Slough SL3 8QB T: 01753 684001 E: tracyarabas@crimsonhotels.com W: www.crimsonhotels.com

D DAISH’S TRAVEL George Brown Managing Director Parkhill Rd, Torquay TQ1 2DY T: 08448 464680 E: info@daishs.com W: www.daishs.com

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

DE VERE GROUP Andrew Coppel Group Chief Executive Gloucester Building, Sunningdale Park, Larch Avenue, Ascot SL5 0QE T: 08708 803020 W: www.devere.co.uk

DISTINCT HOTELS GROUP Michael Pearcey Managing Director Oaklands Hotel, 89 Yarmouth Rd, Norwich NR7 0HH T: 01603 434471 E: info@distincthotels.co.uk W: www.distincthotels.co.uk

DE VERE VENUES Tony Dangerfield Chief Executive Gloucester Building, Sunningdale Park, Larch Avenue, Ascot SL5 0QE T: 08708 803020 E: customerservices@ deverevenues.co.uk W: www.deverevenues.co.uk

DOLAN HOTELS Bill Dolan Proprietor Somerville Hotel, Mont du Boulevard, St Aubin, Jersey JE3 8AD T: 01534 741226 E: somerville@dolanhotels.com W: www.dolanhotels.com

DECKERS GROUP Max Brearley Manager Director Unit F, Royal Pennine, Tr Est, Lynroyal Way, Rochdale OL11 3EX T: 01706 522262 E: info@thedeckersgroup.com W: www.thedeckersgroup.com DESBOROUGH HOTEL GROUP Douglas Gordon Managing Director Church Square, Shepperton TW17 9JZ T: 01932 242972 E: recwarren@desboroughhotels. com W: www.desboroughhotels.com DEVONSHIRE HOTEL GROUP Ian Shelton Managing Director Devonshire Arms Hotel, Bolton Abbey, Skipton BD23 6AJ T: 01756 718111 E: carol.holt@thedevonshirearms. co.uk W: www.devonshirehotels.co.uk DHILLON GROUP Tej Dhillon Chairman Stoke Place, Stoke Green, Stoke Poges SL2 4HT T: 01753 534790 E: enquiries@stokeplace.co.uk W: www.dhillongroup.co.uk DI POPOLO HOTELS LTD Alphonso Di Popopolo Managing Director European Hotel, 11/15 Argylle Square, London WC1H 8AS T: 020 7837 7159 E: info@europeanhotelLondon. co.uk W: www.hotelsLondon.me.uk

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DORCHESTER COLLECTION Christopher Cowdray Chief Executive 3 TilneySt, London W1K 1BJ T: 020 7629 4848 E: ccowdray@ dorchestercollection.com W: www.dorchestercollection. com DOYLE COLLECTION Gareth Walshe Chief Executive Marylebone Hotel, 47 Welbeck Street, London W1G 8DN T: 020 7486 6600 E: marylebone@doylecollection. com W: www.doylecollection.com DREW HOTELS Bryn Drew Chief Executive Cheltenham Regency Hotel, Gloucester Rd, Staverton, Cheltenham GL51 0ST T: 01452 713226 E: info@drewhotels.co.uk W: www.drewhotels.co.uk DUCHY HOTELS Steve Furness Palace Hotel, Esplanade Rd, Paignton TQ4 6BJ T: 01803 555121 E: info@palacepaignton.com W: www.duchyhotels.com DURHAM INNS LTD Malcolm Walker Gibside Arms Hotel, Front St, Whickham, Newcastle upon Tyne NE16 4JG T: 01914 889292 E: enquiries@gibside-hotel.co.uk W: www.gibside-hotel.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

E ECLECTIC HOTEL COLLECTION Eamonn O’Loughlin Proprietor 11 Didsbury Park, Manchester, M20 5LH T: 01614 487711 E: enquiries@elevendidsburypark. com W: www.eclectic-hotel-collection. com ECLIPSE HOTELS Sameer Damji Managing Director 39/41 East Hill, WoodwellSt, London SW18 2QZ T: 020 8874 0304 E: info@eclipsehotels.co.uk W: www.eclipsehotels.co.uk ELEGANT ENGLISH HOTELS Selvaraj Ambrose General Manager The Gallery Hotel, 8/10 Queensbury Place, London SW7 2EA T: 020 7915 0000 E: reservations@eeh.co.uk W: www.eeh.co.uk ELITE HOTELS LTD Graeme Bateman Managing Director Ashdown Park Hotel, Ashdown Park, Wych Cross, nr Forest Row RH18 5JR T: 01342 824988 E: g.bateman@elitehotels.co.uk W: www.elitehotels.co.uk ELVETHAM HOTELS Philip Waldon Managing Director Elvetham Hotel, Hartley Witney, Hook RG27 8AR T: 01252 844871 E: enq@elvethamhotel.co.uk W: www.elvethamhotel.co.uk ENGLISH LAKES HOTELS LTD Simon Berry Managing Director Low Wood, Windermere LA23 1LP T: 01539 433773 E: simon.berry@englishlakes. co.uk W: www.elh.co.uk ENTERPRISE INNS PLC Ted Tuppen Chief Executive 3 Monkspath Hall Rd, Solihull B90 4SJ T: 01217 337700 E: enquiries@enterpriseinns.plc.uk W: www.enterpriseinns.com

EURO HOTEL GROUP Gauhur Nawab Managing Director 54 Clapham Common, Southside, London SW4 9BX T: 020 7720 5005 E: office@europroperties.co.uk W: www.eurohotelsLondon.co.uk

FIELDHOUSE HOTELS Qian Zheng Proprietor Seafield Hotel, 23 Seafield Rd, Hove BN3 2TP T: 01273 777740 E: admin@fieldhousehotels.co.uk W: www.fieldhousehotels.co.uk

EXCLUSIVE HOTELS Danny Pecorelli Managing Director Pennyhill Park, London Rd, Bagshot GU19 5EU T: 01276 471774 E: danny@exclusivehotels.co.uk W: www.exclusivehotels.co.uk

FINE INDIVIDUAL HOTELS Clive Wilson Chief Executive Lakeside Hotel, Newby Bridge, Ulverston LA12 8AT T: 01539 531207 E: clive.wilson@lakeside.co.uk W: www.fihotels.com

EXETER HOTELS GROUP Vincent Blackshaw Proprietor Clock Tower Hotel, 16 New North Rd, Exeter EX4 4HF T: 01392 424545 E: reservations@clocktowerhotel. co.uk W: www.exeterhotels.com

FINESSE HOTELS LTD James Blick Managing Director Lace Market Hotel, 29/31 High Pavement, Nottingham NG1 1HE T: 01158 523232 E: jblick@finessehotels.com W: www.finessehotels.com

F F J B HOTELS LTD J Butterworth Managing Director Chine Hotel, 25 Boscombe Spa Rd, Bournemouth BH5 1AX T: 012023 96234 E: enquiries@fjbhotels.co.uk W: www.fjbhotels.co.uk FAIRMONT HOTELS Kiaran MacDonald General Manager The Savoy, 100 Strand, London WC2R 0ET T: 020 7836 4343 E: savoy@fairmont.com W: www.fairmont.com FEATHERS HOTELS LTD Stuart Hunter Managing Director Cater House, 113 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool L3 5TF T: 01517 092020 E: suewilson@feathers.uk.com W: www.feathers.uk.com FESTIVAL INNS Stefan King Chief Executive Central Edinburgh Hotels, 36-38 Blair Street, Edinburgh EH1 1QR T: 01316 226800 E: hotels@ centraledinburghhotels.co.uk W: www.festival-inns.co.uk

FIRMDALE HOTELS PLC Tim Kemp Managing Director 21 Golden Square, London W1F 9JN T: 020 7581 4045 E: timkemp@firmdale.com W: www.firmdale.com FIROKA GROUP Firoz Kassam Proprietor 1 Kings Cross Rd, London WC1X 9HX T: 020 7917 6166 E: shirley.anderson@ holidayinnLondon.com W: www.holidayinnLondon.com FOCUS HOTELS Peter Cashman Chief Executive Forest House, Hatfield Oak Hotel, Hatfield AL10 9AS T: 01707 266156 E: enquiries@focushotels.co.uk W: www.focushotels.co.uk FOUR PILLARS GROUP Charles Holmes Chief Executive Olney House, Ducklington Lane, Witney OX28 4EX T: 01993 700100 E: charles.holmes@four-pillars.co.uk W: www.four-pillars.co.uk FOUR SEASONS HOTELS & RESORTS John Stauss Regional Vice President and General Manager Four Seasons Hotel, Hamilton Place, Park Lane, London W1J 7DR T: 020 7499 0888 E: john.stauss@fourseasons.com W: www.fourseasons.com


DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

FRASERS HOSPITALITY UK LTD Guss Bakker Chief Operating Officer 81 Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BW T: 020 7341 5595 E: guss.bakker@frasershospitality. com W: www.frasershospitality.com FREDERIC ROBINSON LTD Peter B Robinson Chief Executive Unicorn Brewery, Stockport, SK1 1JJ T: 01614 806571 E: brewery@frederic-robinson. co.uk W: www.frederic-robinson.co.uk FULLER, SMITH AND TURNER PLC Michael Turner Chief Executive Griffin Brewery, Chiswick Lane South, London W4 2QB T: 020 8996 2000 E: reception@fullers.co.uk W: www.fullershotels.com FUTURE INNS Del Brett Managing Director Future Inn Cardiff Bay, Hemingway Road, Cardiff CF10 4JY T: 02920 487111 E: dbrett@futureinns.co.uk W: www.futureinns.co.uk

G GARDEN ISLE HOTELS Clare Farrelly Managing Director Luccombe Hall Hotel, Luccombe Rd, Shanklin PO37 6RL T: 01983 869000 E: enquiries@luccombehall.co.uk W: www.gardenislehotels.co.uk GEMINEX HOTEL & LEISURE Rajesh Sharma Chief Executive Units 1&2 Newbury Central Royal Crescent, Newbury Pk, Ilford IG2 7JW T: 020 8554 9933 E: info@geminex-hotels.com W: www.geminex-hotels.com GOODNIGHT INNS Mike Tie Chief Executive Spirit Pub Company, Sunrise House, Ninth Avenue, Burtonon-Trent DE14 3JZ T: 01283 498400 E: sales@goodnightinns.co.uk W: www.goodnightinns.co.uk

GOODWOOD GROUP Jennifer Carmichael Managing Director Royal Garden Hotel, 2-24 Kensington HighSt, London W8 4PT T: 020 7937 8000 E: switchboard@ royalgardenhotel.co.uk W: www.royalgardenhotel.co.uk GOUGH HOTELS LTD Robert Gough Managing Director Angel Hotel, 3 Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds IP33 1LT T: 01284 753926 E: enquiries@theangel.co.uk W: www.theangel.co.uk GRAND UK HOTELS LTD Paul Bennett Managing Director The Old Bakery, Queens Rd, Norwich NR1 3PL T: 01603 886700 E: info@theukholidaygroup.com W: www.grandukhotels.com GRANGE HOTELS LTD Rajma Matharu Chief Executive 58 Rochester Row, London SW1P 1JU T: 020 7630 2000 E: L rajma@grangehotels.com W: www.grangehotels.com GREENCLOSE HOTELS LTD J Leach Managing Director Pennington House, Lower Woodside, Pennington Lymington SO41 8AA T: 01590 675855 E: sarahboullier@greenclose. co.uk W: www.greenclose.co.uk GREENE KING PLC Rooney Anand Chief Executive Abbott House Westgate Brewery, Bury St Edmunds IP33 1QT T: 01284 763222 E: information@oldenglish.co.uk W: www.greeneking.co.uk GUOMAN Heiko Figge Chief Executive Guoman Hotel Management (UK) Ltd. PO Box 909, Bath Road, Uxbridge UB8 9FH T: 020 7138 0000 W: www.guoman.com

H H F HOLIDAYS LTD Brian Smith Chief Executive Catalyst House, 720 Centennial Court, Centennial Park, Elstree WD6 3SY T: 020 8732 1220 E: info@hfholidays.co.uk W: www.hfholidays.co.uk HALLMARK HOTEL GROUP Arnold Schnegg Managing Director 12 Bruntcliffe Way Fountain Court, Morley, Leeds LS27 0JG T: 01133 076760 E: info@hallmarkhotels.co.uk W: www.hallmarkhotels.co.uk HAMMERSMITH HOTELS MANAGEMENT Khurram Saba Managing Director Royal Guest House, 47 Shepherd Bush Rd, London W6 7LU T: 020 7603 4528 E: info@royalguesthouse.co.uk W: www.royalguesthouse.co.uk HAND PICKED HOTELS Julia Hands Chief Executive The Stables, Crathorn Hall Hotel, Crathorn, Yarm, nr Yorks T515 OAR T: 08454 580901 W: www.handpickedhotels.com HARBOUR HOTELS COLLECTION Mark Godfrey Managing Director 95 Mudeford , Christchurch BH23 3NT T: 01202 483434 E: christchurch@harbourhotels. co.uk W: www.harbourhotels.co.uk HART HAMBLETON PLC Tim Hart Chairman Old Hall Cottage, MainSt, Market Overton, Oakham LE15 7PL T: 01572 768145 E: info@hambletonhall.com W: www.hambletonhall.com HASTINGS HOTELS GROUP LTD Howard Hastings Managing Director 1066 House Upper, Newtownards Rd, Belfast BT4 3LP T: 02890 471066 E: h.hastings@hastingshotels.com W: www.hastingshotels.com

HATTON HOTELS LTD Darren Hiscox Proprietor Hatton Court Hotel Upton St Leonards, Gloucester GL4 8DE T: 01452 617412 E: res@hatton-court.co.uk W: www.hatton-hotels.co.uk HAZLITTS Peter McKay Proprietor Rookery Hotel, Peters Lane, London EC1M 6DS T: 020 7336 0931 E: reservations@rookery.co.uk W: www.hazlittshotel.com HERITAGE PROPERTIES & HOTELS Andrew Hughes Managing Director Park House Hotel, Park St, Shifnal TF11 9BA T: 01952 460128 E: reception02@parkhousehotel. net W: www.parkhousehotel.net HIGHLAND HERITAGE LTD Ian Cleaver Managing Director Dalmally Hotel, Dalmally PA33 1AY T: 01838 200444 E: info@highlandheritage.co.uk W: www.highlandheritage.co.uk HILLBROOKE HOTELS LTD Christoph Brooke Managing Director 16 St Peters Square, London W6 9AJ T: 07770 268359 E: christoph@hillbrooke.co.uk W: www.hillbrookehotels.co.uk HILTON WORLDWIDE Simon Vincent Area President (UK & Europe) Maple Court Central Park, Reeds Crescent, Watford WD24 4QQ T: 020 7850 4000 E: simon.vincent@hilton.com W: www.hilton.co.uk HISTORIC HOUSE HOTELS LTD Jonathan Thompson General Manager Hartwell House Hotel Oxford Rd, Aylesbury HP17 8NR T: 01296 747444 E: info@hartwell-house.com W: www.hartwell-house.com HISTORIC SUSSEX HOTELS Sandy Goodman Proprietor 3 Albourne Court, Henfield Road, Albourne BN6 9FF T: 01903 723511 E: bailiffscourt@hshotels.co.uk W: www.hshotels.co.uk

HOBY HOTELS LTD Jeremy Walsh Managing Director Lincolnshire Oak Hotel, East Rd, Sleaford NG34 7EQ T: 01529 413807 E: hobyhotels@hotmail.com W: www.hobyhotels.com HOLDSWORTH HOTELS LTD John McMillan Managing Director 1-5 Park Road, Shanklin PO37 6BB T: 01983 861111 E: info@holdsworthhotels.co.uk W: www.holdsworthhotels.co.uk HOLLYBOURNE HOTELS LTD David Knights Managing Director Bellcroft, Vicarage Hill, Alton GU34 2BT T: 01983 861111 E: mail@hollybournehotels.com W: www.hollybournehotels.com HUGGLER HOTELS Lawrence Huggler Managing Director PO Box 38,Trading Estate St Saviour, Jersey JE4 9NA T: 01534 735581 E: lph@huggler.com W: www.huggler.com HUNTS HOTELS Michael Douch Manager Wessex Royale Hotel, 32 High St, West Dorchester DT1 1UP T: 01305 262660 E: info@wessexroyalehotel.co.uk W: www.wessexroyalehotel.co.uk HYATT HOTELS & RESORTS Andrew Ashmore Vice President Global Sales 6th floor, 7 Francis Grove, Wimbledon SW19 4DW T: 020 8971 9780 E: diana.schappeler@hyatt.com W: www.hyatt.com

I IMPERIAL LONDON HOTELS LTD Steven Walduck Chairman 60 Guildford St, London WC1N 1DB T: 020 7837 8844 E: info@imperialhotels.co.uk W: www.imperialhotels.co.uk

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INNS & LEISURE LTD David Clark Managing Director 20/24 Leicester Rd, Preston PR1 1PP T: 01772 252917 E: admin@innsandleisure.co.uk W: www.innsandleisure.co.uk

JURYS INN John Brennan Chief Executive 146 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, Ireland T: +253 (0) 607 5048 W: www.jurysinns.com

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP Richard Solomons Chief Executive Broadwater Park, North Orbital Rd, Denham UB9 5HR T: 01895 512000 E: reservations@ichotelsgroup. com W: www.holidayinn.co.uk

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INTERNATIONAL LUXURY HOTELS J Sanger Managing Director Surejogi Group Ltd. 30 Poland St, London W1F 8SQ T: 020 7434 9900 E: info@thebentley-hotel.com W: www.thebentley-hotel.com

KEW GREEN HOTELS LTD Paul Johnson Managing Director Second Floor, Dome Building The Quadrant, Richmond TW9 1DT T: 020 8334 4830 E: paul.johnson@kewgreen.co.uk W: www.kewgreen.co.uk KHANNA ENTERPRISES Anil Khanna Managing Director 312 Mansfield Rd, Nottingham NG5 2EF T: 01159 555000 E: anil@khanna-enterprises.com W: www.khanna-enterprises.com

LAKE DISTRICT HOTELS LTD Kit Graves Managing Director Lodore Falls Hotel, Borrowdale, Keswick CA12 5UX T: 01768 777285 E: info@lodorefallshotel.net W: www.lakedistricthotels.net

LEVENTIS HOTEL GROUP Michael Leventis Managing Director Leigham Court Hotel, 18 Leigham Court Rd, London SW16 2PJ T: 020 8677 7171 E: admin@leventishotels.co.uk W: www.leventishotels.co.uk

LAKE DISTRICT INNS & COTTAGES Derek Sweeney Managing Director Kings Head Hotel, Thirlmere, Keswick CA12 4TN T: 01768 772393 E: info@lakedistrictinns.co.uk W: www.lakedistrictinns.co.uk

LIME WOOD GROUP Robin Hutson Managing Director Lime Wood Hotel, Beaulieu Rd, Lyndhurst SO43 7FZ T: 02380 287177 E: info@limewoodgroup.co.uk W: www.limewoodgroup.co.uk

LANCASTER LANDMARK HOTEL CO Jatuporn Sihanatkathakul Managing Director Landmark Hotel, 222 Marylebone Rd, London NW1 6JQ T: 020 7631 8000 E: reservations@thelandmark. co.uk W: www.landmarkLondon.co.uk

ISLES HOTEL GROUP Stephen Peteranna Proprietor Isle of Benbecula House Hotel Creagorry, Isle of Benbecula HS7 5PG T: 01870 603046 E: darkislandhotel@msn.com W: www.isleshotelgroup.co.uk

KINGS HOTELS Lynne King Managing Director 12 The Esplanade, Weymouth DT4 8EB T: 01305 760100 E: enquiries@kingshotels.co.uk W: www.kingshotels.co.uk

LATONA LEISURE LTD Nick Gray Managing Director Limpley Stoke House, Lower Limpley Stoke, Bath BA2 7FZ T: 01225 722369 E: sabrina@latona.eclipse.co.uk W: www.latonahotels.co.uk

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J D WETHERSPOON PLC John Hutson Chief Executive Wetherspoon House Central Park, Reeds Crescent Watford WD24 4QL T: 01923 477777 E: customerservices@ jdweatherspoon.co.uk W: www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk/ home/hotels

LADY GLEN HOTELS Jan Anderson Proprietor King Robert Hotel Glasgow Rd, Bannockburn, Stirling FK7 0LJ T: 01786 811666 E: info@kingroberthotel.co.uk W: www.ladyglen.co.uk

LAVENDER HOTELS Stephan Sikorski Managing Director Bolholt Country Park Hotel Walshaw Rd, Bury BL8 1PU T: 01617 624000 E: stephan@lavenderhotels.co.uk W: www.lavenderhotels.co.uk

JUMEIRAH INTERNATIONAL Derek Picot Regional Vice President 207 Sloane Street, London SW1X 9QX T; 020 7858 7555 W: www.jumeirah.com JUPITER HOTELS Andrew Gill Chief Executive Castle House, Desborough Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HP11 2PR T: 01494 473800

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LAKE DISTRICT COUNTRY HOTELS David Williams Managing Director Cragwood House Hotel Ecclerigg, Windermere LA23 1LQ T: 01539 488177 E: info@cragwoodhousehotel. co.uk W: www. lakedistrictcountryhotels.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

LEGACY HOTELS Andy Townsend Chief Executive 3 Henley Court, Henley-inArden, Warwickshire B95 5BA T: 08444 119011 W: www.legacy-hotels.co.uk LEISUREPLEX LTD Paul H Sawbridge Managing Director Euxton Lane Euxton, Chorley PR7 6AF T: 01257 248011 E: info@alfatravel.co.uk W: www.leisureplex.co.uk LESTER HOTELS LTD Simon Lester Managing Director St Johns House, The Walk, Potters Bar EN6 1QQ T: 08456 884001 E: david.stanford@lhms.co.uk W: www.llhms.co.uk

LION HOTELS GROUP Sasha Gulzer Managing Director Mansion (Lions) Hotel, Grand Parade, Eastbourne BN21 3VS T: 01323 727411 E: sasha@lionhotelsltd.com W: www.lionhotels.com LOCHS & GLENS HOLIDAYS LTD Neil Wells Managing Director School Rd, Gartocharn, Alexandria G83 8RW T: 01389 713713 E: neil.wells@lochsandglens.com W: www.lochsandglens.com LONDON LODGE HOTELS Paul Grindrod Proprietor Abbey Lodge Hotel, 51 Grange Park, London W5 3PR T: 020 8567 7914 E: enquiries@Londonlodgehotels. com W: www.Londonlodgehotels.com LORDS GROUP OF HOTELS Taher Tayeb Managing Director 100 College Rd, Harrow HA1 1BQ T: 02085 152850 E: taher@thelordsgroup.co.uk W: www.thelordsgroup.co.uk LOWY GROUP Peter M Lowy Chairman Founder 16 Leinster Square W2 4PR T: 020 7221 1400 E: peterlowy@lowygroup.com W: www.lowygroup.co.uk

M MACDONALD HOTELS David Guile Chief Executive Whiteside House, Bathgate EH48 2RX T: 01506 815200 E: marketing@macdonaldhotels. co.uk W: www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk MACLAY INNS Steve Mallon Chief Executive The E Centre Cooperage Way Business Village, Alloa FK10 3LP T: 01259 272087 E: info@maclay.co.uk W: www.maclay.com MANTIS GROUP Adrian Gardiner Proprietor The Draycott 24/26 Cadogan Gardens, London SW3 2RP T: 020 7730 6466 E: adrian.gardiner@ mantiscollection.com W: www.mantiscollection.com MARBLE ARCH HOTELS Peter Evans Proprietor George Hotel, 58/60 Cartwright Gardens, London WC1H 9EL T: 020 7387 8777 E: reception@georgehotel.com W: www.georgehotel.com MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL Amy Mcpherson President & Managing Director Barnard’s Inn 86 Fetter Lane, London EC4A 1EN T: 020 7012 7000 E: amy.mcpherson@marriott.com W: www.marriott.co.uk MARSTONS INNS & TAVERNS Ralph Findlay Chief Executive Marstons House, Brewery Rd Wolverhampton WV1 4JT T: 01902 329170 E: enquiries@marstonstaverns. co.uk W: www.marstonstaverns.co.uk MARTYNS LEISURE BREAKS Martyn Harrison Proprietor 67 Beach Rd Kewstoke, WestonSuper-Mare BS22 9UR T: 08458 801058 E: cro@martynsleisure.co.uk W: www.martynsleisurebreaks. co.uk


DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

MAYBOURNE GROUP Stephen Alden Chief Executive 30 Old Burlington St, Mayfair, London W1S 3AR T: 020 7107 8830 E: salden@maybourne.com W: www.maybourne.com MAYFLOWER GROUP Mr. Saloojee Mayflower Hotel, 26/28 Trebovir Rd, London SW5 9NJ T: 020 7370 0991 E: info@mayflower-group.co.uk W: www.mayflower-group.co.uk McKEEVER HOTEL GROUP Eugene McKeever Proprietor Dunsilly Hotel, 20 Dunsilly Rd, Antrim BT41 2JH T: 02894 462929 E: mail@mckeevergroup.com W: www.mckeeverhotelgroup. com McLEAN INNS Mark Stockhausen Managing Director The Bridge Inn, 457 London Rd, Isleworth TW7 5AA T: 020 8568 0088 E: info@mclean-inns.com W: www.mclean-inns.com McMILLAN HOTELS Hamilton McMillan Proprietor North West Castle Hotel, Royal Crescent, Stranraer DG9 8EH T: 01776 704413 E: info@mcmillanhotels.com W: www.mcmillanhotels.com MCQUADE GROUP Robert McQuade Proprietor Albion Hotel 407 North, Woodside Rd, Glasgow G20 6NN T: 01413 398620 E: info@mcquadehotels.com W: www.mcquadehotels.com MENZIES HOTELS Tim Penter Chief Executive Bakum House, Etwall Rd, Mickleover, Derby DE3 0DL T: 08702 423100 E: info@menzieshotels.co.uk W: www.menzies-hotels.co.uk MERIDIAN LEISURE HOTELS Mr. Janmohamed Managing Director 2 Russell St, Windsor RG41 5TS T: 01753 832223 E: ho@meridianleisure.com W: www.meridianleisure.com

MERLIN ENTERTAINMENT GROUP Ian Crabbe General Manager Alton Towers Resort, Alton ST10 4DB T: 01538 704600 E: wayne.burton@alton-towers. com W: www.alton-towers.co.uk MILLENNIUM COPTHORNE HOTELS PLC Richard Hartman Chief Executive Scarsdale Place, Kensington, London W8 5SR T: 01293 772288 E: marketing@millenniumhotels. co.uk W: www.millenniumhotels.com MILLER’S COLLECTION Max Heritage Proprietor Peat Spade Inn, Longstock, Stockbridge SA20 6DR T: 01264 810612 E: info@peatspadeinn.co.uk W: www.millerscollection.co.uk MILSOM HOTELS Paul Milsom Proprietor Gun Hill, Dedham, Colchester CO7 6HP T: 01206 322367 E: milsoms@milsomhotels.com W: www.milsomhotels.com

MORAN HOTELS Tom Moran Managing Director The Red Cow Hotel Naas Rd, Dublin 22 T: 00353 1459 3650 E: kmoran@moranhotels.com W: www.moranhotels.com

NEW FOREST HOTELS PLC Michaela Lisle Managing Director Forest Lodge Hotel, Pikes Hill Lyndhurst SO43 7AS T: 02380 283717 E: forest@newforesthotels.co.uk W: www.newforesthotels.co.uk

MORETHANHOTELS Clifford Grauers Chief Executive Express By Holiday Inn NEC Bickenhall Parkway, Birmingham B40 1QA T: 01217 800820 E: info@morethanhotels.com W: www.morethanhotels.com

NEWQUAY HOTELS James Nettleton Director Esplanade Hotel, Pentire, Newquay TR7 1PS T: 01637 873333 E: james@newquay-hotels.co.uk W: www.newquay-hotels.co.uk

MORGANS HOTEL GROUP Anne Golden Managing Director Sanderson Hotel, 50 Berners St, London W1T 3NG T: 020 7300 1400 E: anne.golden@ morganshotelgroup.com W: www.morganshotelgroup.com MORVAN FAMILY HOTELS Sean Morvan Manager Norfolk Lodge Hotel, Rouge Bouillon, St Helier, Jersey JE2 3ZB T: 01534 601935 E: jane.snell@morvanhotels.com W: www.morvanhotels.com

MODERN HOTELS GROUP Jonathan Segal Chief Executive Roseville St, St Helier, Jersey JE1 4HE T: 01534 735511 E: jo.tuohy@themoderngroup.com W: www.modernhotels.com

MWB GROUP HOLDINGS PLC Andrew Coppel Chief Executive MWB Group Holdings Plc, 1 West Garden Place, Kendal Street W2 2AQ T: 020 7706 2121 E: kbowerman@mwb.co.uk W: www.mwb.co.uk

MONUMENT LEISURE Gerry Smith Proprietor Grange Manor Hotel, Glensburgh Rd, Grangemouth FK3 8XJ T: 01324 474836 E: info@grangemanor.co.uk W: www.grangemanor.co.uk

MYHOTELS Andy Thrasyvoulou Managing Director 11/13 Bailey St, London WC1B 3HD T: 020 3004 6040 E: natashahendrichs@myhotels. com W: www.myhotels.com

MOONEY HOTEL GROUP Felix Mooney Director Wellington Park Hotel, 21 Malone Rd, Belfast BT9 6RU T: 02890 381111 E: fmooney@mooneyhotelgroup. com W: www.mooneyhotelgroup.com

N NELSON (NORTH WEST) HOTELS LTD Harold Nelson Proprietor Grosvenor Pulford Hotel Wrexham Rd, Pulford, Chester CH4 9DG T: 01244 570560 E: info@nelsonnorthweSt,co.uk W: www.nelsonnorthweSt,co.uk

NH HOTELS Juliet Howie Director of Sales UK and France 202-220 Cromwell Road SW5 0SW T: 02072 441498 E: j.howie@nh-hotels.com W: www.nh-hotels.com

O OCEANA HOTELS Brian Shone Proprietor Hotel Gleneagles, Asheldon Rd, Torquay TQ1 2QS T: 01803 293637 E: enquiries@hotel-gleneagles. com W: www.hotel-gleneagles.com OLD MILL BREWERY LTD Paul Wetherell Managing Director Mill St, Snaith, Goole DN14 9HU T: 01405 861813 E: sales@oldmillbrewery.co.uk W: www.oldmillbrewery.co.uk OMSHANTI GROUP Rajinder Pal Director Marlborough House Hotel 321 Woodstock Rd, Oxford OX2 7NY T: 01865 311321 E: enquiries@marlbhouse.co.uk W: www.omshanti-group.com ORCHID PUBS LTD Rufus Hall Chief Executive Park Mill, Burrydell Lane, Park St, St Albans AL2 2HB T: 01727 871100 E: rufus.hall@orchidgroup.co.uk W: www.orchidpubs.co.uk

OXFORD HOTELS & INNS LTD Mark Edwards Managing Director Hotels Division Regus House, Victory Way, Admirals Park, Dartford DA2 6QD T: 01322 303011 E: info@oxfordhotelsandinns.com W: www.oxfordhotelsandinns.com OXFORDSHIRE HOTELS GROUP John Anderson Managing Director The Deddington Hotel, High Street, Deddington, Banbury OX15 0SH T: 01869 338274 E: john.anderson@ oxfordshirehotels.co.uk W: www.oxfordshire-hotels.co.uk

P PEBBLE HOTELS Faye Higgs General Manager Potters Heron Hotel, Ampfield Romsey SO51 9ZF T: 02380 277800 E: thepottersheron@pebblehotels. com W: www.pebblehotels.com PEEL HOTELS PLC Robert Peel Chairman 19 Warwick Avenue, London W9 2PS T: 020 7266 1100 E: robert.peel@peelhotel.com W: www.peelhotel.co.uk PENNINGTON HOTELS Craig Lowrie Manager Sella Park Country Hotel, Calderbridge, Seascale CA20 1DW T: 01946 841601 E: craig@penningtonhotels.com W: www.penningtonhotels.com PONTINS Alex Langsam Chief Executive Ainsdale House, Ainsdale Beach, Shore Rd, Southport PR8 2PZ T: 08445 765943 E: marketing@pontins.com W: www.pontins.com PORTLAND HOTELS Colin Paton Chief Executive The Portland Suite, 187 Clermiston Rd, Edinburgh EH12 6UG T: 01315 289966 E: colin.paton@portlandhotels. co.uk W: www.portlandhotels.co.uk

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PREM GROUP Jim Murphy Managing Director No 7 Hatton Garden, Liverpool L3 2FE T: 01512 279467 E: eharan@premgroup.com W: www.premgroup.com PREMIER CRU HOTELS & INNS LLP Ian Shelton Managing Director Sycamore Barn, The Village, Farnley Tyas, Huddersfield HD4 6UD T: 01484 664440 E: ishelton@1ercru.co.uk W: www.1ercru.co.uk PREMIER INN Patrick Dempsey Chief Executive Whitbread Court, Houghton Hall Business Pk, Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 01582 499499 E: patrick.dempsey@whitbread. com W: www.premierinn.com PRIDE OF BRITAIN HOTELS Peter Hancock Chief Executive Cowage Farm, Foxley, Malmesbury SN16 0JH T: 01666 824666 E: peter@prideofbritainhotels. com W: www.prideofbritainhotels.com PRIMA HOTELS LTD Liam Walsh Proprietor The Stannylands Hotel Stanneylands Rd, Wilmslow SK9 4EY T: 01625 525225 E: sales@stanneylandshotel.co.uk W: www.primahotels.co.uk PRINCIPAL HAYLEY HOTELS Tony Troy Chief Executive The Inspire, Hornbeam Park, Harrogate HG2 8PA T: 01423 853800 E: marie.hart@principal-hayley. com W: www.principal-hayley.com

Q QMH LTD Irwen Rieck Chief Executive Queens Court, 9/17 Eastern Rd, Romford RM1 3NG T: 01708 730522 E: marketing@qmh-hotels.com W: www.qmh-hotels.com

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Q N HOTELS LTD Qamar Ahmed Managing Director Q N House, Loughton Business Centre, Loughton IG10 3FL T: 020 8532 5111 E: enquiries@qnhgroup.com W: www.qnhgroup.com QHOTELS Michael Purtill Managing Director Wellington Hse, Cliffe Park Bruntcliffe Rd, Morley, Leeds LS27 0RY T: 01132 898989 E: stay@qhotels.co.uk W: www.qhotels.co.uk QUEENSFERRY HOTELS Russell Imrie Managing Director Bruntsfield Hotel, 69-74 Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh EH10 4HH T: 01312 291393 E: russell.imrie@ queensferryhotels.co.uk W: www.thebruntsfield.co.uk

R R C A HOTELS GROUP Jack Gill Managing Director Royal Court Apartments, 51 Gloucester Terrace, London W2 3DQ T: 020 7402 5077 E: info@rcahotels.co.uk W: www.rcahotels.co.uk RADISSON EDWARDIAN HOTEL Jasminder Singh Chief Executive Officer 140 Bath Rd, Hayes UB3 5AW T: 020 8757 7900 E: marketing@radisson.com W: www.radissonedwardian.com

REDWOOD LEISURE LTD Gordon Whiting Managing Director Dunsinane House, Kilspindie Rd, Dundee DD2 3PW T: 01382 815511 E: enquiries@redwoodleisure. co.uk W: www.redwoodleisure.co.uk REGENCY PARK HOTEL Gary Ockwell General Manager Regency Park Hotel, Bowling Green Rd, Thatcham RG18 3RP T: 01635 871555 E: info@regencyparkhotel.co.uk W: www.regencyparkhotel.co.uk RELAIS AND CHATEAUX Jaume Taupies International President 10 Beauchamp Place, Knightsbridge SW3 1NQ T: 08456 019937 E: president@relaischateaux.com W: www.relaischateaux.com RESTOVER LODGE HOTELS Michelle Tomms Proprietor Restover Lodge Hotel, Denby Way, Hellaby Ind ESt, Rotherham S66 8RY T: 01709 700255 E: rotherham@restoverlodge.co.uk W: www.restoverlodge.co.uk REW HOTELS Sylvia Rew Proprietor Livermead House Hotel, Sea Front, Torquay TQ2 6QJ T: 08450 710571 E: info@livermead.com W: www.rewhotels.com REZIDOR HOTEL GROUP Hubert Joly President 31 Rue De Colonel Pierre 75741 Paris T: +33 141 33 60 00 W: www.carlson.com

RAMSIDE HALL HOTELS LTD John Adamson Proprietor Ramside Hall Hotel, Carrville, Durham DH1 1TD T: 01913 865282 E: mail@ramsidehallhotel.co.uk W: www.ramsidehallhotel.co.uk

RICHARDS HOTELS Barry Richards Proprietor The Beach Hotel, The Avenue Minehead TA24 5AP T: 01643 702193 E: thebeach@richardshotels.co.uk W: www.richardshotels.co.uk

RANDALLS JERSEY David Le Quesne Managing Director PO Box 43, Clare St, St Helier, Jersey JE4 9NB T: 01534 836700 E: aMichalski@randalls.je W: www.randallsjersey.com

RICHARDSON GROUP Keith Richardson Managing Director Grand Hotel, Torquay, Devon TQ2 6NT T: 01803 296677 E: info@richardsonhotels.co.uk W: www.richardsonhotels.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

RICK STEIN GROUP Rick Stein Restaurateur Seafood Restaurant, Riverside, Padstow PL28 8BY T: 01841 532700 E: reservations@rickstein.com W: www.rickstein.com

SEFTON GROUP Mark Lewin Managing Director Sefton Hotel, Harris Promenade, Douglas, Isle of Man IM1 2RW T: 01624 645500 E: mark.lewin@seftongroup.co.im W: www.seftonhotel.co.im

ROADCHEF HOLDINGS LTD Simon Turl Chief Executive Roadchef House, Bettys Lane, Norton Canes, Cannock WS11 9UX T: 01543 272597 E: paula.smith@roadchef.com W: www.roadchef.com

SEYMOUR HOTELS David Seymour Managing Director 1 Wharf St, St Helier, Jersey JE3 0ZX T: 01534 875926 E: dseymour@seymourhotels.com W: www.seymourhotels.com

ROCCO FORTE COLLECTION Rocco Forte Chairman 70 Jermyn Street SW1Y 6NY T: 020 7321 2626 E: gmoore@roccofortecollection. com W: www.roccofortecollection.com

S S A BRAIN & CO LTD Martin Reed Chief Financial Office The Cardiff Brewery, Crawshay St, Cardiff CF10 1SP T: 02920 402060 E: enquiries@sabrain.co.uk W: www.sabrain.com SANGUINE HOSPITALITY Simon Matthews-Williams Chairman Cadbury House, Congresbury, Bristol BS49 5AD T: 01934 839012 E: info@sanguinehospitality.com W: www.sanguinehospitality.com SARNIA HOTELS Carol Harris Managing Director Moores Hotel, Le Pollet, St Peter Port GY1 1WH T: 01481 724452 E: moores@sarniahotels.com W: www.sarniahotels.com SAROVA HOTELS Satinder Vohra Managing Director 11 Thurloe Place, London SW7 2RS T: 020 7589 5151 E: rembrandt@sarova.co.uk W: www.sarova.com

SHAFTESBURY HOTELS Ramesh Arora Managing Director 27 Devonshire Terrace, London W2 3DP T: 08000 194066 E: info@shaftesburyhotels.com W: www.shaftesburyhotels.com SHEARINGS HOLIDAYS Vincent Flower Managing Director Miry Lane, Wigan WN3 4AG T: 01942 244246 W: www.shearings.com SHEPHERD NEAME LTD Jonathan Neame Chief Executive Faversham Brewery, 17 Court St, Faversham ME13 7AX T: 01795 532206 E: company@shepherd-neame. co.uk W: www.shepherd-neame.co.uk SHIELDPRIDE LTD John Webb Managing Director Pincents Manor Hotel, Pincents Lane, Reading RG7 5BZ T: 01189 323511 E: pincentsmanor@hotmail.co.uk W: www.pincentsmanor.co.uk SHIRE HOTELS Antony Spencer Managing Director The Old Wine Warehouse, Larkhill St, Blackburn BB1 5DF T: 01254 267444 E: info@shirehotels.com W: www.shirehotels.com SHIVA HOTELS Rishi Sachdev Chief Executive Regent House, TheobaldSt, Elstree, Borehamwood WD6 4RS T: 020 8327 1331 E: rishi@shiva.co.uk W: www.shiva.co.uk


DIRECTORY

UK Hotel Groups

SIDMOUTH HOTELS Mark Seaward Proprietor The Hotel Elizabeth, The Esplanade, Sidmouth EX10 8AT T: 01395 513503 E: elizabeth@hotels-sidmouth. co.uk W: www.hotels-sidmouth.co.uk SKELWITH GROUP Paul Ellis Managing Director 31 Bootham, York YO30 7BT T: 08450 944995 E: paul.ellis@skelwithgroup.com W: www.skelwithgroup.com SKENE HOUSE HOTELS Charles Skene Chairman 96 Rosemont Viaduct, Aberdeen AB25 1NX T: 01224 627171 E: reservations@skene-house.co.uk W: www.skene-house.co.uk SKYLAND HOTELS LTD Mark Moon Director 102/104 Moorgate Rd, Rotherham S60 2BG T: 01709 849955 E: reservations@carltonparkhotel. com W: www.carltonparkhotel.com SLEEPERZ HOTELS LTD David Myers Chief Executive East Lodge, Euston Sq Gardens 188 Euston Rd, London NW1 2EF T: 020 7554 5626 E: ianrollason@sleeperz.com W: www.sleeperz.com SLEEPWELL HOTELS LTD Mark Wilson Managing Director Viking House, Nelson St, Douglas, Isle of Man IM1 2AH T: 01624 639396 E: mark.wilson@sleepwellhotels. com W: www.sleepwellhotels.com SMALL LUXURY HOTELS Brian Mills Managing Director 3rd Floor Portland House Bressenden Place SW1E 5BH T: 020 7802 3400 E: contact@slh.com W: www.slh.com SOHO HOUSE UK Nick Jones Managing Director 72/74 Dean Street, London W1D 3SG T: 020 7851 1197 E: india@sohohouse.com W: www.sohohouse.com

SOMERSTON HOTELS LTD Chris Byrd Director of Finance Bridgeway House, Bridgeway, Stratford Upon Avon CV37 6YY T: 01789 415015 E: enquiries@somerstonhotels. co.uk W: www.somerstonhotels.co.uk SOUTH LAKES HOTELS Peter J Denby Managing Director 6 Station Rd, Hest Bank, Lancaster LA2 6HP T: 01524 825454 E: jonathan@bestlakesbreaks.co.uk W: www.bestlakesbreaks.co.uk SOUTHWATER EVENT GROUP Tom Gray Chief Executive International Centre, St Quentin Gate, Telford TF3 4JH T: 01952 281500 E: sales@southwatereventgroup. com W: www.southwatereventgroup. com

ST PANCRAS HOTELS GROUP Tony Megaro Managing Director California Hotel, 4/8 Belgrove St, London WC1H 8AB T: 020 7837 7629 E: california@stpancrashotels. co.uk W: www.stpancrashotels.co.uk

SYMPHONY HOTELS Mike Sheffield Co-Director Monarch House, 33 Cross St, Perth PH2 8JQ T: 01738 444444 E: mike.sheffield@ symphonyhotels.co.uk W: www.symphonyhotels.co.uk

STARCROWN HOTELS LTD Kiran Kay Operating Manager The Blakemore Hotel, 30 Leinster Gardens, London W2 3AN T: 020 7262 4591 E: info@starcrown.com W: www.starcrown.com

T

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS Michael Wale Senior Vice President Park Lane Hotel, Piccadilly W1J 7BX T: 020 7499 6321 W: www.starwoodhotels.com

SPIRES APARTMENTS Margaret Beattie Managing Director 531 Great Western Rd, Aberdeen AB10 6PE T: 08452 700090 E: info@thespires.co.uk W: www.thespires.co.uk

STAVROU HOTELS Michael Stavrou Managing Director Gower Hotel, 129 Sussex Gardens, Hyde Park, London W2 2RX T: 020 7262 2262 E: gower@stavrouhotels.co.uk W: www.stavrouhotels.co.uk

SPLENDID HOTEL GROUP Shiraz Boghani Managing Partner Haydon House, 296 Joel St, Pinner HA5 2PY T: 020 8429 9500 E: info@splendidhotels.co.uk W: www.splendidhotels.co.uk

STRATHMORE HOTELS PLC Ronnie Rickard Managing Director 116 Strathmore House, East Kilbride, Glasgow G74 1LF T: 01355 266886 E: info@strathmorehotels.com W: www.strathmorehotels.com

SPORTING LODGE INNS Matthew Lennon Managing Director Sporting Lodge Inn, Warrington Rd, Leigh WN7 3XQ T: 01942 671256 E: matthew.lennon@ sportinglodgeinns.co.uk W: www.sportinglodgeinns.co.uk

STYLE HOTEL GROUP Amanda Jame Proprietor Salisbury House Hotel, 14 Billetfield, Taunton TA1 3NN T: 01823 272083 E: enquiries@ salisburyhousehotel.co.uk W: www.salisburyhousehotel.co.uk

ST AUSTELL BREWERY CO LTD James Staughton Managing Director 63 Trevarthian Rd, St, Austell PL25 4BY T: 01726 74444 E: info@staustellbrewery.co.uk W: www.staustellbrewery.co.uk

SUNDIAL GROUP Tim Chudley Managing Director Highgate House Grooms Lane, Creaton, Northampton NN6 8NN T: 01604 505505 E: info@sundialgroup.com W: www.sundialgroup.com

TAVISTOCK LEISURE Mark Hird Managing Director Temple Chambers, Duro Terrace, Sunderland SR2 7DX T: 01915 651122 E: jackie@tynetubeservices.co.uk W: www.tavistockleisure.co.uk THORPENESS & ALDEBURGH HOTELS Tim Rowan-Robinson Managing Director Thorpeness Hotel, Thorpeness, Leiston IP16 4NH T: 01728 452176 E: info@thorpeness.co.uk W: www.thorpeness.co.uk THURLESTONE ESTATES Graham Grose Managing Director Thurleston Hotel, Thurleston, Kingsbridge TQ7 3NN T: 01548 560382 E: enquiries@thurlestone.co.uk W: www.thurlestone.co.uk TOMAHAWK HOTELS LTD Giacomo Carlomango General Manager Woodlands Hotel, Gelderd Rd, Leeds LS27 7LY T: 01132 381488 E: reception@woodlandsleeds. co.uk W: www.tomahawkhotels.co.uk TORQUAY LEISURE HOTELS LTD Lawrence Murrell Proprietor Derwent Hotel, Belgrave Rd, Torquay TQ2 5HL T: 01803 400100 E: jbrowne@tlh.co.uk W: www.tlh.co.uk TOWN & COUNTRY HOTELS GROUP Julian Hitchcock Managing Director Bear Hotel, 63 High St, Cowbridge CF71 7AF T: 01446 774814 E: julian@townandcountryhotels. co.uk W: www.townandcountryhotels. co.uk

TOWN HOUSE COMPANY Peter Taylor Chairman The Bythswood Square Hotel, 11 Blythswood Square, Glasgow G2 4AD T: 01412 401666 E: peter@ thetownhousecollection.com W: www.townhousecollection. com TOWNHOUSE GROUP Navin Varma Managing Director Frederick House Hotel, Edinburgh EH2 1EX T: 01312 261999 E: frederickhouse@ednet.co.uk W: www.frederickhousehotel.com TRAVELODGE Guy Parsons Chief Executive Sleepy Hollow, Aylesbury Rd, Thame OX9 3AT T: 01844 358500 E: joanne.francis@travelodge.co.uk W: www.travelodge.co.uk

U URBAN SPLASH Tom Bloxham Chairman Timber Wharf, 16/22 WorsleySt, Castlefield, Manchester M15 4LD T: 01618 392999 E: headoffice@urbansplash.co.uk W: www.urbansplash.co.uk

V VELADAIL HOTELS LTD Chris Penn General Manager Flemings Hotel, 7/12 Half Moon St, London W1J 7BH T: 020 7499 2964 E: enquiries@flemings-mayfair. co.uk W: www.flemings-mayfair.co.uk VINEYARD GROUP Andrew McKenzie Manging Director Vineyard At Stockcross, Stockcross, Newbury RG20 8JU T: 01635 528770 E: katmitcham@the-vineyaRd,co. uk W: www.the-vineyaRd,co.uk

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UK Hotel Groups

VISION HOTELS Stephen Remmington Managing Director 14/16 Verney Rd, London SE16 3DZ T: 08456 030051 E: enquiries@visionhotels.co.uk W: www.visionhotels.co.uk

W WADWORTH & CO LTD Charles Bartholomew Chairman Northgate Brewery, Devizes SN10 1JW T: 01380 723361 E: sales@wadworth.co.uk W: www.wadworth.co.uk WARNER HOLIDAYS LTD John Cook Chief Executive Warner House, 1 Park Lane, Hemel Hempstead HP2 4YL T: 01442 230300 E: enquiries@warnerholidays.co.uk W: www.warnerleisurehotels.co.uk WATERS EDGE HOTELS Kanti Singh Managing Director Quality Dudley, Birmnigham Rd, Dudley DY1 4RN T: 01384 458070 E: gm@qualityhoteldudley.co.uk W: www.waters-edge-hotel.co.uk

Y YOTEL LTD Gerard Greene Chief Executive 13 George St, London W1U 3QJ T: 020 7100 8011 E: gerard@yotel.com W: www.yotel.com

Y YOUNG & CO BREWERY PLC Stephen Goodyear Chief Executive Riverside House, 26 Osiers Rd, London SW18 1NH T: 020 8875 7000 E: enquiries@youngs.co.uk W: www.youngs.co.uk

Z ZOLA HOTELS Niall Caven Managing Director Kings Arms Hotel 30 High St, Amersham HP7 0DJ T: 01494 725722 E: centraloffice@zolahotels.com W: www.zolahotels.com

WELCOME BREAK GROUP LTD Rod McKie Chief Operating Officer No 2 Vantage Court, Tickford St, Newport Pagnell MK16 9EZ T: 01908 299700 E: darren.woodhouse@ welcomebreak.co.uk W: www.welcomebreak.co.uk WOODLEY GROUP Girish Dhrona Finance Director Enterprise Hotel, 15/25 Hogarth Rd, London SW5 0QJ T: 020 7373 4502 E: enquiries@enterprisehotel.co.uk W: www.woodleygroup.co.uk WYNDHAM HOTEL GROUP Michael Poynter Chief Executive The Triangle, 5 Hammersmith Grove, London W6 0LG T: 020 8762 6600 E: sandra.storey@ wyndhamworldwide.com W: www.wyndhamworldwide. com

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DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

UK Restaurant Groups 21 HOSPITALITY GROUP Terry Laybourne Proprietor Cafe 21, Trinity Gardens, Quayside, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 2HH T: 01912 220755 E: enquiries@cafetwentyone.co.uk W: www.cafetwentyone.co.uk

A AAGRAH RESTAURANTS LTD Mohammed Aslam Managing Director 4 Saltaire Rd, Shipley BD18 3HN T: 01274 530880 E: info@aagrah.com W: www.aagrah.com ADMIRAL TAVERNS Kevin George Managing Director Suite H3, Steam Mill Business, Steam Mill St, Chester CH3 5AN T: 01244 321171 E: info@admiraltaverns.co.uk W: www.admiraltaverns.co.uk ADNAMS PLC Jonathan Adnams Chairman Sole Bay Brewery East Green, Southwold IP18 6JW T: 01502 727200 E: info@adnams.co.uk W: www.adnams.co.uk AL WAHA Mohammed Bader-Alden Antabli Head Chef/Proprietor 75 Westbourne Grove W2 4UL T: 020 7229 0806 E: baderalden8@hotmail.com W: www.alwaharestaurant.com ALCATRAZ DINING GROUP Shab Hashtroudi Managing Director Unit 20, Branksome Bs Centre, Cortrey Close, Poole BH12 4BQ T: 01202 746162 E: office@alcatraz.co.uk W: www.alcatraz.co.uk

ALVINOS (NE) LTD Paul James Pringle Director 88 Pilgrim St, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 6SG T: 01912 615656 E: info@alvinosbar.co.uk W: www.alvinosbar.co.uk AMANO CAFE Adrian Devito Managing Director Victor Wharfe, Clink St, London SE1 9DW T: 020 7234 0000 E: clink@amanocafe.com W: www.amanocafe.com AMT COFFEE Alistair McCallum-Toppin Managing Director Unit 1a, 1 Lyon Way, Greenford UB6 0BN T: 020 8832 8630 E: elizabeth@amtcoffee.co.uk W: www.amtcoffee.co.uk APOSTROPHE RESTAURANTS LTD Amir Chen Managing Director 12 Devereux Court, London WC2R 3JJ T: 020 7583 8555 E: amir@apostropheuk.com W: apostropheuk.com ARBUTUS, WILD HONEY, LES DEUX SALONS Anthony Demetre Co-Proprietor 63/64 Frith St, London W1D 3JW T: 020 7734 4545 E: anthony@arbutusrestaurant. co.uk W: www.arbutusrestaurant.co.uk ARKELLS BREWERY LTD James R Arkell Chairman Kingsdown, Stratton Saint, Margaret, Swindon SN2 7RU T: 01793 823026 E: arkells@arkells.com W: www.arkells.com ATMOSPHERE BARS & CLUBS LTD Paul Harbottle Chief Executive Seebeck House, 1 Seebeck Place, Knowlhill, Milton Keynes MK5 8FR T: 08701 128776 E: info@atmospherebars.co.uk W: www.chicagosbars.co.uk

AUTO GRILL CATERING Gary Strangwood Operations Director 5 PondSt, London NW3 2PA T: 08450 949094 E: info@autogrillcateringuk. com AWT RESTAURANTS Antony Worrall-Thompson Proprietor The Greyhound, Gallowstree Rd, Rotherfield Peppard, Henley-on-Thames RG9 5HT T: 01189 722227 E: greyhound@awtrestaurants. com W: www.awtrestaurants.com

B B@1 Steve Locke Managing Director 1st Floor, 7-11 St, John’s Hill, London SW11 1TR T: 020 77389 055 E: stevelocke@beatone.co.uk W: www.beatone.co.uk BAA BAR Iain Hoskins Manager 7 Myrtle Street, Liverpool L7 7DN T: 01517 070610 E: iainhoskins@baabar.co.uk W: www.baabar.co.uk BALLS BROTHERS Richard Balls Chief Executive 313 Cambridge Heath Rd, London E2 9LQ T: 020 7739 6466 E: info@ballsbrothers.co.uk W: www.ballsbrothers.co.uk BARBURRITO RESTAURANTS Paul Kilpatrick Managing Director 134 The Orient, Trafford Centre, Manchester M17 8EH T: 01617 476165 E: traffordcentre@barburrito. co.uk W: www.barburrito.co.uk

BARRACUDA GROUP LTD Mark McQuater Chief Executive Lunar House Unit 4, Field House Lane, Marlow SL7 1LW T: 08453 452528 E: mark.mcquater@ barracudagroup.co.uk W: www.barracudagroup.co.uk

BB’S COFFEE & MUFFINS Patrick McCarthy Chief Executive 4 – 5 Kirtons Farm, Pingewood, Reading RG30 3UN T: 01189 598813 E: contact@bbscoffe&muffins. com W: www.bbscoffeeandmuffins. com

BARTER INNS LTD Ken Ryan Proprietor 132 Gipsy Hill, London SE19 1PW T: 020 8670 7001 E: barterinns@aol.com W: www.barterinns.co.uk

BEARTOWN BREWERY LTD Ian Burns Managing Director Bromley House, Spindle St, Congleton CW12 1QN T: 01260 299964 E: headbrewer@ beartownbrewery.co.uk W: www.beartownbrewery.co.uk

BASILICO LTD Jeffrey Parsons Managing Director 690 Fulham Rd, London SW6 5SA T: 08000 283531 E: info@basilico.co.uk W: www.basilico.co.uk BATH ALES LTD Roger Jones Managing Director Unit 3/7, Caxton Industrial Estate, Tower Rd, North Warmley, Bristol BS30 8XJ T: 01179 474797 E: roger@bathales.co.uk W: www.bathales.co.uk BAXTERSTOREY Alastair Storey Chief Executive The Waterfront, 300 Thames Valley Park Drive, Reading RG6 1PT T: 01189 356700 E: hstorey@baxterstorey.com W: www.baxterstorey.com BAY RESTAURANT GROUP LTD Paul Symonds Chief Executive Porter Tun House, 500 Capabilty Green, LUTON LU1 3LS T: 08451 262944 E: alison.rochester@ bayrestaurantgroup.com W: www.laurelpubco.com

BEDS AND BARS LTD Keith Knowles Managing Director Overlord House, 1D Colet Gardens, London W14 9DH T: 020 8600 5210 W: www.bedsandbars.com BELHAVEN BREWERY CO LTD Euan Venters Group Managing Director Belhaven Brewery, Spott Rd, Dunbar EH42 1RS T: 01368 864488 E: reception@belhaven.co.uk W: www.belhaven.co.uk BENIHANA (UK) LTD 37 Sackville St, London W1S 3DQ T: 020 7439 0756 E: info@benihana.co.uk W: www.benihana.co.uk BENTALLS PLC Adam Fenwick General Manager WoodSt, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 1TX T: 020 8546 1001 E: info@bentalls.co.uk W: www.bentalls.co.uk BISPHAM GREEN BREWERY CO Martin Ainscough Managing Director c/o The Eagle & Child, Malt Kiln Lane, Bispham Green, Ormskirk L40 3SG T: 01257 464718 E: martin@ainscoughs.co.uk W: www.ainscoughs.co.uk

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DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

BLACK & BLUE Nicholas Hill Managing Director 10 Broughton Rd, Fulham, London SW6 2LA T: 020 7731 7848 E: julesgay@aol.com W: www. blackandbluerestaurants.com BLACK DOOR GROUP David Kennedy Managing Director Biscuit Factory, 16 Stoddart Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 1AN T: 01912 605411 W: www.ne2foodsocial.co.uk BODEAN’S Andre Blais Managing Director 10 Poland Street, London W1F 8PZ T: 020 7287 7575 E: soho@bodeansbbq.com W: www.bodeansbbq.com BOISDALE LTD Ranald Macdonald Managing Director 15 Eccleston St, London SW1W 9LX T: 020 7730 6922 E: info@boisdale.co.uk W: www.boisdale.co.uk BOOMERANG PUBS Mark Van der Goot Managing Director The Rosendale, 65 Rosendale Rd, London SE21 8EZ T: 020 8761 9008 E: dine@therosendale.co.uk W: www.therosendale.co.uk BOTANIC INNS Steven Magorrian Managing Director 261/263 Ormeau Rd, Belfast BT7 3GG T: 02890 509700 E: info@botanicinns.com W: www.botanicinns.com BRASSERIE BLANC Raymond Blanc Chairman 1st Floor Stone Barn, Blisworth Fm, Stoke Rd, Blisworth NN7 3DB T: 01604 878450 E: miltonkeynes@brasserieblanc. com W: www.brasserieblanc.com BRAVO INNS LTD Ken Buckley Managing Director 44 Knutsford Rd, Warrington WA4 1AG T: 01925 573420 E: ken.buckley@bravoinns.com W: www.bravoinns.com

172

BRIDGEHOUSE CAPITAL Andy Ruhan Chairman & Chief Executive 35 Davy’s St, London W1K 4LS T: 020 7495 8801 E: info@bridgehousecapital.com W: www.bridgehousecapital.com BRINKLEY RESTAURANTS John Brinkley Managing Director Brinkleys, 51 Hollywood Rd, London SW10 9HX T: 020 7351 1683 E: info@brinkleys.com W: www.brinkleys.com BROKEN FOOT INNS LTD Peter Mackie Director 15 Bathurst Mews, London W2 2SB T: 07973 799541 E: psmackie@brokenfootinns. com BRULA Lawrence Hartley Proprietor 43 Crown Rd, St Margarets, Twickenham TW1 3EJ T: 020 8892 0602 E: lawrence@brula.co.uk W: www.brula.co.uk BRUNNING & PRICE LTD Graham Price Managing Director Yew Tree Farm Buildings, Saighton Lane, Chester CH3 6EG T: 01244 333100 E: graham.price@ brunningandprice.co.uk W: www.brunningandprice.co.uk BURTON BRIDGE BREWERY LTD Bruce Wilkinson Co Director 24 BridgeSt, Burton-on-Trent DE14 1SY T: 01283 510573 E: bbb@burtonbridgebrewery. fsnet.co.uk W: www.burtonbridgebrewery. co.uk BUSABA EATHAI Jale Erentok Managing Director 2nd Flr, 42/48 Gt PortlandSt, London W1W 7NB T: 020 7291 1111 E: jale@busaba.com W: busaba.com BUTCOMBE BREWERY LTD Guy Newell Managing Director Coxs Green, Wrington, Bristol BS40 5PA T: 01934 863963 E: guy@butcombe.com W: www.butcombe.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

C C H MARLOW LTD Howard Marlow Managing Director Ffrwd Grech Rd Ind Estate, Brecon LD3 8LA T: 01874 623731 E: sales@breconshirebrewery.com W: www.breconshirebrewery.com CAFE SPICE NAMASTE Cyrus Todiwala OBE Chef Patron 16 PrescotSt, London E1 8AZ T: 020 7488 9242 E: ctodiwala@yahoo.co.uk W: www.cafespice.co.uk CAFFE NERO GROUP LTD Gerry Ford Chairman and CEO 3 NealSt, London WC2H 9PU T: 020 7520 5150 E: enquiries@caffenero.com W: www.caffenero.com CALCO PUBSCALEDO Neil Martin Finance Director Calco Midlands Ltd, 23 Sedgemere Rd, Birmingham B26 2AX T: 01217 843016 E: simon.hurd@calcopubs.com CALEDONIAN BREWING CO LTD Stephen Crawley Managing Director 42 Slateford Rd, Edinburgh EH11 1PH T: 01313 371286 E: info@caledonian-brewery.co.uk W: www.caledonian-brewery.co.uk CAMELOT INNS & TAVERNS Michael Kane Managing Director Pi House, 23 Clifton Road, Shefford, Bedfordshire SG17 5AF T: 01462 812621 E: mikek@camelotinns.fsnet. co.uk W: www.camelotinns.co.uk CAPITAL PUB COMPANY PLC James Watson Director 28 South MoltonSt, London W1K 5RF T: 020 7589 4888 E: nickcollins@ capitalpubcompany.com W: www.capitalpubcompany.com

CAPRICE HOLDINGS LTD. Richard Caring Chief Executive 72 -74 Dean Street, W1D 3SG T: 020 7307 5760 E: shgreception@sohohouse.com W: www.caprice-holdings.co.uk CARLUCCIO’S RESTAURANTS Simon Kossoff Chief Executive 35 Rose St, London WC2E 9EB T: 020 7580 3050 E: theoffice@carluccios.com W: www.carluccios.com CASTLE LEISURE GROUP Paul Smith Managing Director 52-54 King St, Stirling FK8 1AY T: 01786 409010 E: admin@clg.co.uk W: www.clg.co.uk CASTLE ROCK BREWERY Colin Wilde Managing Director The Brewery Queensbridge Rd, Nottingham NG2 1NB T: 01159 851615 E: helen.tidy@castlerockbrewery. co.uk W: www.castlerockbrewery.co.uk CATERING UK LTD (THAI SQUARE) Michael Cohen Managing Director 17/19 Cockspur St, London SW1Y 5BL T: 020 7839 3000 E: thaisquare@btconnect.com W: www.thaisquare.com CHAPMAN GROUP LTD Chris R Chapman Managing Director The Offices. Avenals Farm Water Lane, Angmering BN16 4EP T: 01903 856744 E: chris@thechapmansgroup.co.uk W: www.thechapmansgroup.co.uk CHARLES WELLS LTD Paul Wells Chairman Havelock St, Bedford, MK40 4LU T: 01234 272766 E: info@wellsandyoungs.co.uk W: www.charleswells.co.uk CHARNWOOD PUB COMPANY Will Fraser-Allen Director 1 Kings Arms Yard, London EC2R 7AF T: 020 7601 1850 E: info@charnwoodpubco.co.uk W: www.charnwoodpubco.co.uk

CHRISTOPHERS AMERICAN BAR Michael Gottlieb Managing Director 35 Walton St , London SW3 2HN T: 020 7584 5556 E: michael15@btinternet.com W: www.christophersgrill.com CHURCHILL TAVERNS GROUP Frederick Ward Managing Director Avon House, Tithe Barn Rd, Wellingborough NN8 1DH T: 01933 222110 E: fred.ward@churchill-inns.com CITY INNS Katie J Davies Managing Director 19 Bootham, York YO30 7BW T: 01904 641105 E: theexhibitionhotel@cityinns. org COAL GRILL & BAR John Gater Managing Director 5a Hampton Road, Hampton Hill, TW12 1JN T: 02089 730864 E: jegater@aol.com W: www.coalgrillandbar.co.uk COFFEE REPUBLIC PLC Tariq Affara Chief Executive 10 Rochester Row, Victoria, London SW1P 1BS T: 020 7828 5800 E: tariq@arabinvestments.com W: www.coffeerepublic.co.uk COLUMBO GROUP Steve Blonde Managing Director 44 Essex Road, Islington, London N1 8LN T: 020 7354 9993 E: steve@thecolumbogroup.com W: www.thecolumbogroup.com COMPASS GROUP Ian Sarson Group Managing Director Parkview, 82 Oxford Rd, Uxbridge UB8 1UX T: 01895 554554 E: info@compass-group.co.uk W: www.compass-group.co.uk CONCEPT VENUES Mark Fuller Chief Executive Officer Sanctum Soho, London W1B 5NF T: 020 7292 6100 E: mmmfuller@aol.com W: www.conceptvenues.com


DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

CONWAY TAVERNS Michael Conway Managing Director 148 North End Rd, London W14 9PP T: 020 7385 4202 E: conwaytaverns@aol.com COQ D’OR RESTAURANT COMPANY Richard Shepherd Managing Director 6 / 8 MaddoxSt, London W1S 1NR T: 020 7409 2260 E: richaRd,shepherd@ langansrestaurants.co.uk W: www.langansrestaurants.co.uk CORNEY & BARROW WINE BARS LTD Dean Peck Executive Head Chef 1 Thomas MoreSt, London E1W 1YZ T: 020 7265 2500 E: Dean.peck@corneyandbarrow. com W: www.corney-barrow.co.uk COSTA COFFEE LTD Mark Phillips Managing Director Whitbread Court, Porz Avenue, Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 01582 424200 E: supplier.info@whitbread.com W: www.whitbread.co.uk COTE RESTAURANTS Andy Bassadone Managing Director 15 Greek St, London W1D 4DP T: 020 3206 7940 E: andy@cote-restaurants.co.uk W: www.cote-restaurants.co.uk CRAZY BEAR GROUP Jason Hunt Proprietor Bear Lane, Stadhampton, Oxford OX44 7UR T: 01865 890714 E: enquiries@crazybearstadhampton.co.uk W: www.crazybeargroup.co.uk CRITERION ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD Peter Gullis Operations Director Haddenham Business Park Haddenham, Aylesbury HP17 8LJ T: 01844 293250 E: peter.gullis@criterionasset.co.uk W: www.criterionasset.co.uk CUISINE COLLECTION Claudio Pulze Proprietor Al Duca Restaurant,4 - 5 Duke of York Street SW1Y 6LA T: 020 7839 3090 E: alduca@btconnect.com W: www.alduca-restaurant.co.uk

D D & D RESTAURANTS Desmond Gunewardena Chief Executive 18 Kirby St, London EC1N 8TS T: 020 7716 0716 E: info@danddLondon.com W: www.danddLondon.com DANIEL BATHAM & SON LTD Tim Batham Managing Director The Delph Brewery, Brierley Hill DY5 2TN T: 01384 77229 E: sales@bathams.co.uk W: www.bathams.co.uk DANIEL THWAITES BREWERY PLC Rick Bailey Chief Executive Star Brewery, Penny Street, Blackburn BB1 6HL T: 01254 686868 E: rickbailey@thwaites.co.uk W: www.danielthwaites.com DAVY GROUP LTD Bruce Edwards Managing Director 44/46 Tooley St, London SE1 2SZ T: 020 7407 9670 E: info@davy.co.uk W: www.davy.co.uk DEBENHAMS PLC Michael Sharp Chief Executive 1 Welbeck St, London W1G 0AA T: 020 7408 4444 E: head.office@debenhams.com W: www.debenhams.com DEL AZIZ RESTAURANTS Shahrock Parvin Managing Director 24/32 Vanston Place, London SW6 1AX T: 020 7386 0086 E: enquiries@delaziz.co.uk W: www.delaziz.co.uk DI MAGGIO’S Mario Gizzi Managing Director 11, Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow G1 3AJ T: 01412 216100 E: enquiries@dimaggios.co.uk W: www.dimaggios.co.uk

DIGBY TROUT RESTAURANTS Tim Hammond Chief Executive Viewpoint, 240 London Road TW18 4JT T: 08450 300100 E: enquiries@digbytrout.com W: www.digbytrout.co.uk DIM T RESTAURANTS Jonathan Plant Chief Executive 32 Charlotte St, London W1T 2NQ T: 020 7637 1166 E: info@dimt.co.uk W: www.dimt.co.uk DIXY CHICKEN Shakeel Arshad Chief Executive 110 Butterfield, Great Marlings, Luton LU2 8DL T: 01582 439717 E: info@dixychicken.com W: www.dixychicken.com DOMINOS PIZZA GROUP LTD Lance Bachelor Chief Executive Lasborough Rd, Kingston, Milton Keynes MK10 0AB T: 01908 580000 E: pr@dominos.co.uk W: www.dominos.co.uk DONNINGTON BREWERY LTD James R Arkell Chief Executive Stow on the Wold, Cheltenham GL54 1EP T: 01451 830603 E: info@donningtonales.com W: donnington-brewery.com DORBIERE LTD Robin Gray Chief Executive Unit 3, Stainburn Rd, Openshaw, Manchester M11 2ER T: 01614 384060 E: ibraham.mukadam@lwcdrinks.co.uk W: www.lwc-drinks.co.uk DRUCKERS VIENNA PATISSERIE Paul May Managing Director 146/156 Sarehole Rd, Hall Green, Birmingham B28 8DT T: 01217 777000 E: paulmay@druckers.co.uk W: www.druckers.co.uk DUKEDOM LEISURE Sam Wright Chief Executive PO Box 209, Redcar TS10 9AF T: 01642 759930 E: davidgaine@o2email.co.uk W: www.dukedom.co.uk

E EBURY WINE BAR LTD Nigel Windridge Managing Director 139 Ebury St, London SW1W 9QU T: 020 7730 8206 E: nigel@eburywinebar.co.uk W: www.eburywinebar.co.uk ECLECTIC BARS Ruben Harley Chief Executive 533 Kings Rd, London SW10 0TZ T: 08448 844445 E: info@eclecticbars.co.uk W: www.eclecticbars.co.uk ECO RESTAURANTS Sami Wasif Proprietor 162 Clapham High St, London SW4 7UG T: 08713 328767 E: info@ecorestaurants.com W: www.ecorestaurants.com ED’S EASY DINER Andrew Guy Director Avenfield House, 118-127 Park Lane, London W1K 7AG T: 020 7493 0300 E: ed@edseasydiner.co.uk W: www.edseasydiner.co.uk EGO RESTAURANTS LTD James Horler Chairman 4th Floor Huntingdon House, Princes Street, Bolton BL1 1EJ T: 08451 270501 E: laura@egorestaurants.com W: www.egorestaurants.com ELBOW ROOM Audrey McCracken Managing Director 17 Nelson Rd, London SE10 9JB T: 020 7833 4392 E: info@theelbowroom.co.uk W: www.theelbowroom.co.uk ELGOOD & SONS LTD Nigel Elgood Chairman North Brink Brewery, Wisbech PE13 1LW T: 01945 583160 E: belinda@elgoods-brewery.co.uk W: www.elgoods-brewery.co.uk ELIZABETH HOLDINGS PLC Richard Cattermole Chief Executive 33 Fore St, Ipswich IP4 1JL T: 01473 217458 E: info@elizabethholdings.co.uk

ENTERPRISE INNS PLC Ted Tuppen Chief Executive 3 Monkspath Hall Rd, Solihull B90 4SJ T: 01217 337700 E: enquiries@enterpriseinns.plc.uk W: www.enterpriseinns.com ESSENDEN PLC Nick Basing Chief Executive 3rd Floor, 2-4 St, Georges Road Wimbledon, London SW19 4DP T: 02089 793932 E: joanna.davies@essenden.com W: www.essenden.com ETRUSCA RESTAURANTS Piero Quaradeghini Chief Executive Suite 9-11, 65 London Wall, London EC2M 5TU T: 020 7374 6966 E: comments@ etruscarestaurants.com W: www.etruscarestaurants.com EUROPA LEISURE David Dalmau Managing Director Unit 6, Forest Hill Ind Estate, Perivale, London SE23 2LX T: 08454 900512 E: ddalmau@barcelona-tapas.com W: www.barcelona-tapas.com EVERARDS BREWERY LTD Stephen Gould Managing Director Castle Acres, Narborough, Leicester LE19 1BY T: 01162 014100 E: mail@everards.co.uk W: www.everards.co.uk

F FAT CAT CAFE BAR LTD Matthew Saunders Managing Director 63 Friargate, Derby DE1 1DJ T: 01332 298069 E: matt.saunders@ thefatcatgroup.co.uk W: www.fatcatcafebars.co.uk FAUCET INN LTD Steve Cox Chief Executive 88/90 George St, London W1U 8PA T: 020 7486 5175 E: headoffice@faucetinn.com W: www.faucetinn.com

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FAVORITE CHICKEN & RIBS LTD Keith Woodley Chief Executive 7 Davy Rd, Gorse Lane, Clacton-on-Sea CO15 4XD T: 01255 222568 E: mailroom@favorite.co.uk W: www.favorite.co.uk

FOUNDATION INNS PLC Ian Grundy Managing Director The Vine, 29 High St, Walton-on-Thames KT12 1DG T: 01932 254431 E: ian.grundy@foundationinns. com W: www.foundationinns.com

GAUCHO RESTAURANTS Zeev Godik Chairman 4th Floor, 7-9 Swallow Street, London W1B 4DE T: 020 7432 9600 E: headoffice@ gauchorestaurants.com W: www.gauchorestaurants.co.uk

FELINFOEL BREWERY CO LTD Philip Lewis Finance Director Felinfoel Brewery, Felinfoel Llanelli SA14 8LB T: 01554 773357 E: info@felinfoel-brewery.com W: www.felinfoel-brewery.com

FREDERIC ROBINSON LTD Peter B Robinson Chief Executive Unicorn Brewery, Stockport SK1 1JJ T: 01614 806571 E: brewery@frederic-robinson. co.uk W: www.frederic-robinson.co.uk

GEORGE BATEMAN & SON LTD Stuart Bateman Chief Executive Salem Bridge Brewery, Mill Lane, Wainfleet, Skegness PE24 4JE T: 01754 880317 E: sbateman@bateman.co.uk W: www.bateman.co.uk

FENG SUSHI Silla Bjerrum Managing Director 13 Stoney Street, Borough Market, London SE1 9AD T: 020 7403 0981 E: silla@fengsushi.co.uk W: www.fengsushi.co.uk

FREEDOM BREWERY LTD Edward Maynham Managing Director Bagots Park, Abbots Bromley, Rugeley WS15 3ER T: 01283 840721 E: freedom@freedombrewery.com W: www.freedombrewery.com

FESTIVAL REPUBLIC Melvyn Benn Managing Director 35 Bow St, London WC2E 7AU T: 020 7009 3000 E: mbenn@festivalrepublic.com W: www.festivalrepublic.com

FRONT ROOM LTD Neil Spanjar Chief Executive 124 Station Rd, London E4 6AB T: 020 8529 2265 E: info@theroomchingfoRd,com W: www.theroomchingfoRd,com

FIRST RESTAURANT GROUP Mitchel Tillman Managing Director The Waterway, 54 Formosa St, London W9 2JU T: 020 7266 6326 E: info@frgroup.co.uk W: www.frgroup.co.uk FISH! KITCHEN Tony Allan Managing Director PO Box 138, Chislehurst BR7 5XX T: 020 8468 1492 E: tony@fishkitchen.com W: www.fishkitchen.com FISHWORKS Ranjit Boparen Managing Director Crown House, 72 Hammersmith Rd, London W14 8TH T: 020 7242 8156 E: enquiries@fishworks.co.uk W: www.fishworks.co.uk FOOD AND FUEL PUBS LTD Jo Cumming Chief Executive 6 Camera Place, Chelsea, London SW10 0BH T: 020 7352 6465 E: joc@foodandfuel.co.uk W: www.foodandfuelpubs.co.uk

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FULLER, SMITH & TURNER PLC Michael Turner Chief Executive Griffin Brewery, Chiswick Lane South, London W4 2QB T: 020 8996 2000 E: fullers@fullers.co.uk W: www.fullers.co.uk

G G1 GROUP Stefan King Managing Director Virginia House, 62 Virginia St, Glasgow G1 1TX T: 01415 524494 E: joanneframe@g1group.co.uk W: www.g1group.co.uk GALA CORAL GROUP Carl Lever Chief Executive New Castle House, Castle Boulevard,Nottingham NG7 1FT T: 01159 485000 E: sarah.mercer@galacoral.com W: www.galacoral.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

GEORGES TRADITION Andrew Constaninou Managing Director 1 Pride Park View, Victoria Way, Derby DE24 8AN T: 01332 226640 E: amanda.reid@ georgestradition.co.uk W: www.georgestradition.co.uk GERONIMO INNS LTD Rupert Clevely Chief Executive The East Hill, 21 Alma Rd, London SW18 1AA T: 020 8877 8826 E: info@geronimo-inns.co.uk W: www.geronimo-inns.co.uk GI PARTNERS Phil Kaziewicz Managing Director 5th Floor, 35 Portman Square, London W1H 6LR T: 020 7034 1120 E: info@gipartners.com W: www.gipartners.com GINGERMAN RESTAURANTS Ben Mckellar Managing Director The Ginger Fox, Muddlesworth Rd, Albourne, Hassocks BN6 9EA T: 01273 857888 E: ben@gingermanrestaurants.com W: www.gingermanrestaurants. com GIRAFFE Juliet Joffe Director Churchill House, 137 Brent St, London NW4 4DJ T: 020 8457 2776 E: smiles@giraffe.net W: www.giraffe.net

GLENDOLA LEISURE LTD Alex Salussolia Managing Director 364 High Street, Harlington, Hayes UB3 5LF T: 020 8385 4500 E: reception@afgc.co.uk W: www.glendola.co.uk GONDOLA GROUP Harvey Smyth Director The 5th Floor 2 Balcombe St, London NW1 6NW T: 08451 305160 E: helen.barrett@gondolagroup. co.uk W: www.gondolaholdings.com GOOD EARTH GROUP Chris Tan Director 233 Brompton Rd, London SW3 2EB T: 020 7584 3658 E: chris@goodearthgroup.com W: www.goodearthgroup.co.uk

GRAY & SONS (CHELMSFORD) LTD Nicola J Kitchener Chief Executive Rignals Lane Galleywood, Chelmsford CM2 8RE T: 01245 475181 E: enquiries@grayandsons.co.uk W: www.grayandsons.co.uk GREEN & BLUE WINES Kate Thal Managing Director 36/38 Lordship Lane, London SE22 8HJ T: 020 8693 9250 E: kate.thal@greenandbluewines. com W: www.greenandbluewines.com GREENDALE LEISURE LTD Rowan Carter Managing Director Greendale Business Park, Woodbury, Salterton, Exeter EX5 1EW T: 01395 232855 E: remediesbar@btinternet.com W: www.remediesbar.co.uk

GORDON RAMSAY HOLDINGS LTD Gordon Ramsay Chief Executive 1 Catherine Place, London SW1E 6DX T: 020 7592 1360 E: operations@gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com

GREENE KING PLC Rooney Anand Chief Executive Westgate Brewery, Westgate St, Bury St Edmunds IP33 1QT T: 01284 763222 E: info@greeneking.co.uk W: www.greeneking.co.uk

GOURMENT BURGER KITCHEN Alasdair Murdoch Chief Executive 1 Lindsey St, Suite C Second Floor, London EC1A 9HP T: 08700 662099 E: alasdair.murdoch@gbk.co.uk W: www.gbk.co.uk

GREGGS PLC Kennedy McMeikan Chief Executive Fernwood House, Clayton Road Jesmond, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1TL T: 01912 817721 E: getintouch@greggs.co.uk W: www.greggs.co.uk

GOURMET RESTAURANTS LTD Anoup Treon Chairman 717B North Circular Rd, London NW2 7AH T: 020 8438 4990 E: info@tiffinbites.com W: www.tiffinbites.com GRAND UNION GROUP Adam Marshall Managing Director 153 Upper St, Islington, London N1 1RA T: 020 7226 3303 E: info@gugroup.co.uk W: www.gugroup.co.uk

H H B CLARK & CO SUCCESSORS LTD David Garthwaite Managing Director Westgate Brewery, 136 Westgate, Wakefield WF2 9SW T: 01924 373328 E: wakefieldreception@hbclark. co.uk W: www.hbclark.co.uk HALL & WOODHOUSE LTD Anthony Woodhouse Managing Director The Brewery, Blandford St. Mary Blandford Forum DT11 9LS T: 01258 452141 E: marketing@hall-woodhouse. co.uk W: www.badgerbrewery.com


DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

HANSON CATERING Paul Hanson Managing Director Unit 7, Colne Way Court, Colne Way, Watford WD24 7NE T: 01923 247047 E: info@hansonscatering.co.uk W: www.hansoncatering.co.uk HARD ROCK CAFE LTD Calum McPherson Managing Director 148 Old Park Lane, London W1K 1QY T: 020 7629 0382 E: London_reception@hardrock. com W: www.hardrock.com HARRY RAMSDENS PLC Marija Simovic Chief Executive 72 Hammersmith Road, London W14 8TH T: 020 7383 3167 E: comments@harryramsdens. co.uk W: www.harryramsdens.co.uk HARVEY & SON (LEWES) LTD Miles A Jenner Managing Director Bridge Wharf Brewery, 6 Cliffe High St, Lewes BN7 2AH T: 01273 480209 E: wi@harveys.org.uk W: www.harveys.org.uk HEAVITREE BREWERY PLC Nick Tucker Chairman Trood Lane, Exeter EX2 8YP T: 01392 217733 E: stephanie@heavitree.co.uk W: www.heavitreebrewery.co.uk HERON & BREARLEY LTD Ian Lennox Managing Director Falcon Brewery, Kewaigue, Douglas, Isle of Man IM2 1QG T: 01624 699400 E: ian.lennox@heronandbrearley. com W: www.heronandbrearley.com HOLDEN’S BREWERY LTD Jonathan Holden Chief Executive George St, Woodsetten, Dudley DY1 4LW T: 01902 880051 E: jono@holdensbrewery.co.uk W: www.holdensbrewery.co.uk

HOOK NORTON BREWERY CO LTD James Clarke Managing Director Hook Norton, Banbury OX15 5NY T: 01608 737210 E: info@hook-norton-brewery. co.uk W: www.hooky.co.uk HOOPERS GROUP Anne Horton Managing Director Montpelier House, Montpelier Rd, Torquay TQ1 1BJ T: 01803 299226 E: annehorton@hoopers.ltd.uk W: www.hoopers.ltd.uk HOP BACK BREWERY LTD John Gilbert Chairman Unit 22, Batten Rd Ind Estate, Downton, Salisbury SP5 3HU T: 01725 510986 E: john@hopback.co.uk W: www.hopback.co.uk HOWARD OPERATIONS Paul Kinsey Chief Executive 4 Bank Court, Weldon Rd, Loughborough LE11 5RF T: 08451 302689 E: ianharries@howardoperations. co.uk HOWIES RESTAURANT GROUP David Howie Scott Suite 14, St Colme St, Edinburgh EH3 6AA T: 01315 571779 E: info@howies.uk.com W: www.howies.uk.com HOXTON SQUARE BAR Andreas Akerlund Managing Director 3 Hoxton Street, London N1 6NU T: 020 7613 0709 E: info@hoxtonsquarebar.com W: www.hoxtonsquarebar.com HRH Philip Barker Proprietor 16-18 Franklin mount, Harrogate HG1 5EJ T: 01423 565 800 E: contact@grillerestaurants.com W: www.balmoralhotel.co.uk HWBC Paran Sandhu Managing Director Sandymount Rd, Walsall WS1 3AP T: 01922 644453 E: info @hwbc-ltd.co.uk W: www.highgatebrewery.com

HYDES BREWERY LTD Chris Hopkins Chief Executive 46 Moss Lane West, Manchester M15 5PH T: 01612 261317 E: chrishopkins@hydesbrewery. com W: www.hydesbrewery.com

I IGNITE GROUP LTD Matt Hermer Chief Executive 15A Ives St, London SW3 2ND T: 020 7589 1200 E: info@ignite-group.com W: www.ignite-group.com IN THE BAR LTD Tony Callaghan Managing Director Bretherton House, Bretherton Row, Wigan WN1 1LL T: 01942 823980 E: ll@inthebar.org INC GROUP Frank Dowling Chief Executive 17 Nelson Rd, Greenwich, London SE10 9JB T: 020 8305 4980 E: chris.cocker@greenwich-inc. com W: www.incgroup.co.uk INDIVIDUAL RESTAURANT CO PLC Adrian Green Finanace Director Ridgefield House, 4th Floor, 14 John Dalton St, Manchester M2 6JR T: 01618 395511 W: www.individualrestaurants. co.uk INNBRIGHTON LTD Gavin George Chief Executive 146 Springfield Rd, Brighton BN1 6BZ T: 01273 550000 E: ggeorge@innbrighton.com W: www.drinkinbrighton.co.uk INNS & LEISURE LTD David Clark Chief Executive 20/24 Leicester Rd, Preston PR1 1PP T: 01772 252917 E: info@innsandleisure.co.uk W: www.innsandleisure.co.uk

INTERTAIN LTD John Lesley Chief Executive Rowley House Elstree Way, Borehamwood WD6 1JH T: 020 8327 2540 E: info@intertainmentuk.com W: www.intertainuk.com

J W LEES & CO (BREWERS) LTD William G R Lees-Jones Managing Director Greengate Brewery, Middleton, Manchester M24 2AX T: 01616 432487 E: mail@jwlees.co.uk W: www.jwlees.co.uk

INTREPID LEISURE Duncan Ward Managing Director 33 Market Place, Henley-on-Thames RG9 2AA E: enquires@intrepid-leisure.co.uk W: www.intrepidpubs.co.uk

JAMIE’S ITALIAN Simon Blagden Managing Director 19/23 High St, Kingston-upon-Thames KT1 1LL T: 020 8912 0110 E: enquiries@jamieoliver.com W: www.jamieoliver.com

INVENTIVE LEISURE PLC Roy Ellis Chief Executive 21 Old St, Ashton-under-Lyne OL6 6LA T: 01613 303876 E: roy.ellis@inventiveleisure.com W: www.revolution-bars.co.uk ITSU Julian Metcalfe Proprietor 18/20 Lower Regent St, London SW1Y 4PH T: 020 7930 2647 E: sales@itsu.co.uk W: www.itsu.co.uk

J J C & R H PALMER LTD Anthony J C Palmer Chief Executive Old Brewery, Bridport DT6 4JA T: 01308 422396 E: enquiries@palmersbrewery.com W: www.palmersbrewery.com J D WETHERSPOON PLC John Hutson Chief Executive Wetherspoon House, Central Park, Reeds Crescent, Watford WD24 4QL T: 01923 477777 E: customerservices@ jdweatherspoon.co.uk W: www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk/ home/hotels J E BEALE PLC Tony Brown Chief Executive Granville Chambers, 21 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth BH2 6BJ T: 01202 203484 E: reception@beales.co.uk W: www.beales.co.uk

JD WETHERSPOON Tim Martin Chairman Wetherspoon House, Central Park, Reeds Crescent Watford WD24 4QL T: 01923 477777 E: customerservices@ jdweatherspoon.co.uk W: www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk JERSEY POTTERY Matthew Jones Director Gorey Village, Grouville, Jersey JE3 9EP T: 01534 850850 E: info@jerseypottery.com W: www.jerseypottery.com JESSON & CO Soren Jesson Proprietor Scottish Provident Building 1 Lombard St, London EC3V 9AA T: 020 7929 6611 E: reception@1lombardstreet.com W: www.1lombardstreet.com JIMMY SPICES Jasbinder Choonge Managing Director 64/66 Station Rd, Solihull B91 3RX T: 01217 092111 E: info@jimmyspices.co.uk W: www.jimmyspices.co.uk JONGLEURS COMEDY LTD John Davy Co-Proprietor 20b Chancellors St, London W6 9RN T: 0870 0111960 E: anas.shaikh@jongleurs.com W: www.jongleurs.com JOSEPH HOLT PLC Richard Kershaw Director The Brewery Empire St, Cheetham, Manchester M3 1JD T: 01618 343285 E: dave.topping@joseph-holt.com W: www.joseph-holt.com

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KEARNEY DEVELOPMENTS Francis Kearney Proprietor 24 John Street, Consett DH8 5LA T: 01207 502919 E: frank.kearney@btconnect.com

LA TASCA RESTAURANTS LTD Simon Wilkinson Chief Executive County House, Glyme Court Langford Lane, Kidlington OX5 1LQ T: 01865 595490 E: enquiries@latasca.co.uk W: www.latasca.co.uk

KELLYS TAVERNS LTD Harry Kelly Managing Director 156 Cottingham Rd, Corby NN17 1SY T: 01536 204660 E: info@hktaverns.co.uk W: www.kellytaverns.co.uk KINGDOM TAVERNS LTD Cameron Kettles Finance Director Dean House, 191 Nicol St, Kirkcaldy KY1 1PF T: 01592 200033 KONDITOR & COOK Paul Cons Managing Director 63 Stamford St, London SE1 9NB T: 020 7921 9200 E: paul@konditorandcook.com W: www.konditorandcook.com KORNICIS GROUP Nick Tamblyn Chief Executive 195/197 Kings Rd, Chelsea, London SW3 5ED T: 020 7349 4440 E: enquiries@kornicis.co.uk W: www.kornicis.co.uk KRISPY KREME DOUGHNUTS Don Henshall Managing Director Unit 4, Albany Park, Frimley Rd, Camberley GU16 7PQ T: 01276 601170 E: office@krispykreme.co.uk W: www.krispykreme.co.uk KURNIA INTERTRADE LTD Michael Kheng Managing Director Spanish City High St, Marblethorpe LN12 1AL T: 01507 477481 E: mkheng@kurnia.co.uk W: www.kurnia.co.uk

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LADHAR GROUP Barry Ladhar Operation Director 15/16 Stockholm Clse, Tyne Tunnel Trading Estate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE29 7SF T: 01912 708649 E: barry.ladhar@ladhar.co.uk W: www.ladhar.co.uk LAS IGUANAS Eren Ali Managing Director 38 Whiteladies Rd, Bristol BS8 2LG T: 01179 706664 E: eren@iguanas.co.uk W: www.iguanas.co.uk LE BISTROT PIERRE Robert Beacham Co-Proprietor Ashbourne House, 49/51 Forest Rd East, Nottingham NG1 4HT T: 01159 477920 E: lisa.boaden@lebistrotpierre. co.uk W: www.lebistrotpierre.co.uk LE MONDE Bob Norton Managing Director 60/62 St Mary St, Cardiff CF10 1FE T: 02920 398036 E: lemonade@le-monde.co.uk W: www.le-monde.co.uk LE PIAF Peter Goldstone Managing Director 40 Wimbledon Hill Rd, London SW19 7PA T: 020 8947 3355 E: marketing@redspiaf.co.uk W: www.le-piaf.com LEISURE PARCS LTD Michael Williams Managing Director 97 Church St, Blackpool FY1 1HU T: 01253 629600 E: davidgore@leisure-parcs.co.uk W: www.leisure-parcs.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

LEON Henry Dimbleby Managing Director 3 Crispin Place, London E1 6DW T: 020 7247 4369 E: henry@leonrestaurants.co.uk W: www.leonrestaurants.co.uk

LIVING VENTURES LTD Tim Bacon Managing Director 4/6 Princess St, Knutsford WA16 6DD T: 01565 631234 E: timbacon@livingventures.com W: www.livingventures.com

LEVANT GROUP Tony Kitous Managing Director 65 Wigmore Street, London W1U 1JT T: 020 7486 1111 E: reservations@levant.co.uk W: www.levant.co.uk

LOCALE RESTAURANTS Douglas Smiley Managing Director 1 Lawn Terrace, Blackheath, London SE3 9LJ T: 020 8318 6561 E: blackheath@localerestaurants. com W: www.localerestaurants.com

LIBERATION GROUP Mark Crowther Chief Executive 19 Royal Square, St Helier, Jersey JE2 4WA T: 01534 764000 E: kenrick.brooks@ liberationgroup.com W: www.liberationgroup.com LISBOA PATISSERIE Celia Gomes Managing Director 57 Golborne Rd, London W10 5NR T: 020 8968 5242 E: celiagomes@btconnect.com LITTLE BAY Peter Ilic Managing Director 228 Belsize Road, London NW6 4BT T: 020 7372 1888 E: info@littlebay.co.uk W: www.littlebay.co.uk LITTLE CHEF Tracy Mulligan Managing Director 22 Jessops Riverside, 800 Brightside Lane, Sheffield S9 2RX T: 01142 567100 E: marketing@littlechef.co.uk W: www.littlechef.co.uk LITTLE GEMS Steve Wilkins Managing Director 5C Ridgeway Court, Groveberry Rd, Leighton Buzzard LU7 4SR T: 01525 858444 E: info@ littlegemscountrydining.co.uk W: www. littlegemscountrydining.co.uk LITTLEJOHNS RESTAURANTS LTD Gavin Mackenzie Director Ice Centre, Bught Park, Inverness IV3 5SR T: 01463 717052 E: gavin@littlejohns.co.uk W: www.littlejohns.co.uk

LONDON FINE DINING GROUP John De Stefano Chairman 13 Stratford Place, London W1C 1BD T: 020 7408 7250 E: giorgio@ Londonfinedininggroup.com W: www. Londonfinedininggroup.com LONGRIDGE RESTAURANTS LTD Paul Heathcote Chief Executive 23 Winckley Square, Preston PR1 3JJ T: 01772 252732 E: preston@heathcotes.co.uk W: www.heathcotes.co.uk LOUNGERS Alex Reilly Chief Executive 2nd Floor, 14 St Thomas St, Bristol BS1 6JJ T: 01179 637340 E: alex@loungers.co.uk W: www.thelounges.co.uk LOVELY PUBS Paul Salisbury Managing Director The Orange Tree, Warwick Rd, Chadwick End, Solihull B93 0BN T: 01564 785364 E: theorangetree@lovelypubs. co.uk W: www.orangetreepub.co.uk LUMINAR PLC Peter Marks Chief Executive Luminar House, Deltic Avenue, Rooksley, Milton keynes, MK13 8LN T: 01908 544100 E: mailbox@luminar.co.uk W: www.luminar.co.uk

LYNNET LEISURE LTD Len Mortimer Managing Director 3rd Floor, 29 Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow G1 3AJ T: 01412 255615 E: stephen.marsh@lynnetleisure. com W: www.lynnetleisure.com

M MA CUISINE GROUP John McLements Managing Director 6 Whitton Rd, Twickenham TW1 1BJ T: 020 8607 9849 E: johnmac21@aol.com W: www.macuisinegroup.co.uk MACLAY GROUP PLC Steve Mallon Managing Director Unit 2/4, The E Centre, Cooperage Way Business Village, Alloa FK10 3LP T: 01259 272087 E: info@maclay.co.uk W: www.maclay.com MAISON BLANC General Manager Willenfield Rd, Park Royal, London NW10 7BQ T: 020 8838 0848 E: john.sackey@maisonblanc.com W: www.maisonblanc.com MALCOLM JOHN RESTAURANTS Malcolm John Managing Director Fish & Grill, 48/50 South End, Croydon CR0 1DP T: 020 8774 4060 E: info@fishandgrill.co.uk W: www.fishandgrill.co.uk MAMA GROUP Dean James Chief Executive, 59/65 Worship St, London EC2A 2DU T: 020 7688 9000 E: caroline.bates@mamagroup. co.uk W: www.mamagroup.co.uk MARKET TOWN TAVERNS LTD Ian Fozard Managing Director Unit 4A Mercury Court, Manse Lane, Knaresborough HG5 8LF T: 01423 866100 E: ian@markettowntaverns.co.uk W: www.markettowntaverns.co.uk


DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

MARKS & SPENCER Mark Bolland Chief Executive Waterside House, 35 North Wharf Road, W2 1NW T: 020 7935 4422 E: marc.bolland@ marksandspencer.com W: marksandspencer.com MARLON ABELA RESTAURANT CORP Marlon Abela Chairman Marc Ltd, 14/16 Bruton, Place, London W1J 6LX T: 020 7647 1888 E: info@marcrestaurants.com W: www.marcrestaurants.com MAROUSH Maarouf Abuzaki Chief Executive 45/49 Edgware Rd, London W2 2HZ T: 020 7723 3666 E: betty@maroush.com W: www.maroush.com MARSDENS CATERERS S’FIELD LTD Raja Adil Managing Director 139 Cricklewood Broadway, London NW2 3HY T: 020 8452 4900 E: info@marsdenscaterers.com MARSTONS INNS & TAVERNS PLC Ralph Findlay Chief Executive Marstons House, Brewery Rd, Wolverhampton WV1 4JT T: 01902 329170 E: derek.andrew@marstons. co.uk W: www.marstonstaverns.co.uk MASALA WORLD Ranjit Mathrani Promoter Directors 1 Great Cumberland Place, W1H 7AL T: 020 7724 2525 E: info@realindianfood.com W: www.realindianfood.com MASSARELLA CATERING GROUP LTD Mark S Massarella Chief Executive Thurcroft Hall, Brookhouse, Laughton, Sheffield S25 1XZ T: 01909 568891 E: markm@massarella.co.uk W: www.massarella.co.uk MATCH BAR GROUP Jonathan Downey Director 37-38 Margaret Street, London W1G 0JF T: 020 7065 6844 E: bookings@matchbar.com W: www.matchbar.com

MAXWELLS RESTAURANTS GROUP Brian Stein Proprietor 22 Henrietta St, London WC2E 8ND T: 020 7379 6132 E: marketing@maxwells.co.uk W: www.maxwells.co.uk McDONALDS RESTAURANTS LTD Jill McDonald Chief Executive 11/59 High Rd, East Finchley, London N2 8AW T: 08702 413300 E: externalmarketing@uk.mcd. com W: www.mcdonalds.co.uk McMANUS TAVERNS LTD Gary McManus Chief Executive Kingsthorpe Rd, Northampton NN2 6HT T: 01604 713601 E: gary@mcmanuspub.co.uk W: www.mcmanuspub.co.uk McMULLEN & SONS LTD Peter Furniss-Smith Managing Director Hertford Brewery, 26 Old Cross, Hertford SG14 1RD T: 01992 584911 E: reception@mcmullens.co.uk W: www.mcmullens.co.uk MEANTIME BREWING COMPANY LTD Alastair Hook Managing Director Unit 4 and 5, Lawrence Trading Estate, Blackwell Lane, Greenwich, London SE10 0AR T: 020 8293 1111 E: alastair@meantimebrewing. co.uk W: www.meantimebrewing.co.uk MED KITCHEN Robert Hill Chief Executive 21 Loudoun Rd, London NW8 0NB T: 020 7328 1222 E: raymond.defazio@ medkitchen.co.uk W: www.medkitchen.co.uk MELA RESTAURANT GROUP Kuldeep Singh Managing Director 152 Shaftesbury Avenue, London WC2H 8HL T: 020 7836 8635 E: enquiries@melarestaurant. co.uk W: www.melarestaurant.co.uk

MEREDITH GROUP Barnaby Meredith Proprietor 63/69 Canonbury Rd, London N1 2DG T: 020 7354 8143 E: info@thehouseislington.com W: www.themeredithgroup.co.uk MERLIN ENTERTAINMENTS LTD Nick Varney Chief Executive 3 Market Close, Poole BH15 1NQ T: 01202 666900 E: katherine.macleod@ merlinentertainments.biz W: www.merlinentertainments.biz MERLIN INNS LTD Anthony Matthews Managing Director 84 Smithbrook Kilns, Cranleigh GU6 8JJ T: 01483 278172 E: merlininns@tiscali.co.uk MISO NOODLE BARS Ogan Wemsey Chief Executive 10 East St, Bromley BR1 1QX T: 020 8460 4678 E: info@misonoodlebar.co.uk W: www.misonoodlebar.co.uk MISS MILLIES Ann Walker Managing Director 1 The Concourse, Brislington, Bristol BS4 5BG T: 01179 771870 E: info@missmillies.co.uk W: www.missmillies.co.uk MITCHELLS & BUTLERS John Lovering Chairman 27 Fleet Street, Birmingham B3 1JP T: 08706 093000 E: hannah.woodall@mbplc.com W: www.mbplc.com MITCHELLS OF LANCASTER Jonathon Barker Managing Director 11 Moor Lane, Lancaster LA1 1QB T: 01524 596000 E: sales@mitchellspubs.co.uk W: www.mitchellhotels.co.uk MODERN BRITISH CANTEEN Patrick Clayton-Malone Proprietor 16/24 Underwood St, London N1 7JQ T: 020 7253 8160 E: pcm@canteen.co.uk W: www.canteen.co.uk

MOGFORDS LTD Jeremy Mogford Proprietor 36 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3LD T: 01865 511115 E: louise@mogfoRd,co.uk W: www.mogfoRd,co.uk MOLE’S BREWERY LTD Roger Catte Managing Director 5 Merlin Way, Bowerhill, Melksham SN12 6TJ T: 01225 704734 E: sales@moles-cascade.co.uk W: www.molesbrewery.com MONTPELIERS LTD David Wither Managing Director 29 Queensferry St, Edinburgh EH2 4QS T: 01312 261370 E: info@montpeliers.co.uk W: www.montpeliers.co.uk MOORHOUSES BREWERY LTD David Grant Managing Director 4 Moorhouse St, Burnley BB11 5EN T: 01282 422864 E: info@moorhouses.co.uk W: www.moorhouses.co.uk MOSHI MOSHI SUSHI Caroline Bennett Managing Director 86, Fruit & Wool Exchange, Brushfield Street, London E1 6EP T: 020 7377 5005 E: info@moshimoshi.co.uk W: www.moshimoshi.co.uk

N NANDO’S Robbie Enthoven Proprietor Erico House 93/99, Upper Richmond Road, SW15 2TG T: 020 8394 6730 E: enquiries@nandos.co.uk W: www.nandos.co.uk NESTLE Paul Grimwood Chief Executive St, Georges House, Croydon CR9 1NR T: 020 8686 3333 W: www.nestle.co.uk

NORTHCOTE GROUP Craig Bancroft Partner Northcote Manor, Northcote Rd, Langho, Blackburn BB6 8BE T: 01254 240555 E: maureen.bardell@northcote. com W: www.northcote.com NOURA RESTAURANTS Chahine Al Khoury Food and Drinks Manager 16 Hobart Place, Belgravia, SW1W 0HH T: 020 7235 9444 E: noura@noura.co.uk W: www.noura.co.uk NOVUS LEISURE LTD Steve Richards Chief Executive Clareville House, 26-27 Oxendon Street, London SW1Y 4EL T: 020 7968 2400 E: jason.thorndycraft@ novusleisure.com W: www.novusleisure.com

O OAK TAVERNS LTD Ian Collinson Managing Director 8A Buttermarket, Thame OX9 3EW T: 01844 213867 E: info@oaktaverns.co.uk W: www.oaktaverns.co.uk ORCHID GROUP Rufus Hall Chief Executive Park Mill, Burydell Lane, Park St, St Albans AL2 2EZ T: 01727 871100 E: Rufus.hall@orchidgroup.co.uk W: www.orchidpubs.co.uk OTTOLENGHI Yotam Ottolenghi Proprietor 287 Upper St, London N1 2TZ T: 020 7288 1454 E: upper@ottolenghi.co.uk W: www.ottolenghi.co.uk

P PACIFICO GROUP Blake Perrot General Manager La Perla Bar, 28 Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London WC2E 7JS T: 020 7240 7400 E: cafepac@aol.com W: www.cafepacifico-laperla.com

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PALM RESTAURANTS Wally Ganzi Co-Managing Director 1/3 Pont St, London SW1X 9EJ T: 020 7201 0710 E: klattanzio@palm.com W: www.thepalm.com PAPERINO’S Mark Billington Managing Director 283 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3HQ T: 01413 323800 E: citycentre@paperinos.co.uk W: www.paperinos.co.uk PARK LEISURE DUNDEE James Marr Managing Director 31 Pockhill, Dundee DD1 5DH T: 01382 223484 E: sean@parkleisuredundee.com W: www.parkleisuredundee.com PATISSERIE VALERIE Paul May Chief Executive 146/156 Sarehole Rd, Birmingham B28 8DT T: 01217 777000 E: info@patisserieholdings.co.uk W: www.patisserie-valerie.co.uk PAUL Esther O’Halloran Managing Director Medious House, 2nd Floor, 63 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1DG T: 020 7420 2080 E: info@paul-uk.com W: www.paul-uk.com PEACH PUB COMPANY LTD Lee Cash Chief Executive The Peach Barns, Somerton Rd, North Aston, Bicester OX25 6HX T: 01869 220110 E: supersuppliers@peachpubs.com W: www.peachpubs.com PERFECT PIZZA LTD Jat Watsu Managing Director Gailey Park, Gravelly Way, Standeford, Wolverhampton WV10 7BW T: 01902 797100 W: www.perfectpizza.co.uk PETCHEY PUBS Jack Petchey Chief Executive 13 Clements Lane, Ilford IG1 2QY T: 020 8252 8000 E: kranjan@petchey.co.uk W: www.petcheypubs.com

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PEYTON AND BYRNE Oliver Peyton Co-Proprietor The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN T: 020 7747 2525 E: info@peytonandbyrne.co.uk W: www.peytonandbyrne.com

POD Tim Hall Chief Executive Peer House, 8-14 Verulam Street, London WC1X 8LZ T: 020 7831 3993 E: tim@podfood.co.uk W: www.podfood.co.uk

PREZZO PLC Adam and Sam Kaye Directors Johnston House, 8 Johnston Rd, Woodford green IG8 0XA T: 08456 023257 E: admin@prezzoplc.co.uk W: www.prezzorestaurants.co.uk

PHILPOTTS LTD Mike Kendall Commercial Director Unit 9, Pioneer Court, Morton Palms, Darlington DL1 4WD T: 08452 068800 E: office@philpotts.co.uk W: www.philpotts.co.uk

POLLEN STREET SOCIAL Jason Atherton Patron 8-10 Pollen Street W1S 1NQ T: 020 7290 7600 E: eservations@ pollenstreetsocial.com W: www.pollenstreetsocial.com

PHO. Stephen Wall Managing Director 86 St John Street, Clerkenwell, London SE1M 4EH T: 020 7253 7624 E: info@phocafe.co.uk W: www.phocafe.co.uk

PONTI’S GROUP LTD Stefano Ispani Managing Director 17/21 Wenlock Rd, Islington, London N1 7SL T: 020 7250 1414 E: sispani@pontis.co.uk W: www.pontis.co.uk

PUB PEOPLE CO LTD Kevin Sammons Marketing Director Morewood House, 15 Maisies Way, The Village, South Normanton, Alfreton DE55 2DS T: 01773 510863 E: kevin.sammons@pubpeople. com W: www.pubpeople.com

PING PONG Jean-Michelle Orieux Managing Director 162/168 Regent St, London W1B 5TD T: 020 7851 6969 E: events@pingpong-group.com W: www.pingpongdimsum.com

POPOLO EVENTS Stuart Young Managing Director 16 Bonemill Lane, Washington NE38 8AJ T: 01914 154688 E: info@popololeisure.co.uk W: www.popololeisure.co.uk

PITCHER & PIANO Colin Sadler Managing Director Hammersmith Studios, 55a Yeldham Rd, London W6 8JS T: 020 8741 2325 E: alice.hicks@pitcherandpiano. com W: www.pitcherandpiano.com

POPPINS RESTAURANTS John Robinson Director Suite 3, Unit 4, Christie Place, Durvin Road, Bognor Regis BO22 9RT T: 01243 864647 E: info@poppinsrestaurants.co.uk W: www.poppinsrestaurant.co.uk

PIZZA GO GO Leo Rossi Chief Executive Unit 6, Teakcroft, Fairview Ind Est, Marsh Way, Rainham RM13 8UH T: 01708 551414 E: info@pizzagogo.co.uk W: www.pizzagogo.net

POWDER TRAIN LLP Jack Bowyer Managing Director Hayhurst, 1st Floor Hampshire House, 169 High Street, Southampton S014 2BY T: 01730 829827 E: info@powdertrain.co.uk W: www.powdertrain.co.uk

PIZZAEXPRESS PLC Harvey Smyth Chief Executive The 5th Floor, 2 Balcomb Street, London NW1 6NW T: 08453 899489 E: alexwhitelaw@pizzaexpress.com W: www.pizzaexpress.co.uk

PRESCOTT & CONRAN LTD Peter Prescott Managing Director 2/4 Boundary St, London E2 7DD T: 020 7729 1051 E: info@prescottandconran.com W: www.prescottandconran.com

PLEISURE LTD Nick Griffin Managing Director St James Tavern, 16 Madeira Place, Brighton BN2 1TN T: 01273 571651 E: nick@pleisure.com W: www.pleisure.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

PRET A MANGER (EUROPE) LTD Clive Schlee Chief Executive 1 Hudsons Place, London SW1V 1PZ T: 020 7827 8000 E: mary.mckendry@pret.com W: www.pret.com

R R W RANDALL LTD Ian Rogers Managing Director PO Box 154, La Piette Brewery, St Georges Esp, St Peter Port, Guernsey GY1 3JG T: 01481 720134 E: ianrogers@rwrandall.co.uk W: www.randallsbrewery.com RAOUL’S GOURMET LTD Geraldine Leventis Managing Director 13a Clifton Rd, London W9 1SZ T: 020 7286 2287 E: gleventis@raoulsgourmet.com W: www.raoulsgourmet.com

PUCCINO’S Shirley Woodward Marketing Director 120 Bridge Rd, Chertsey KT16 8LA T: 01932 445 250 E: shirley@puccinosww.com W: www.puccinosworldwide.com

REMARKABLE RESTAURANTS LTD Robert L Thomas Managing Director 13 Eburne Rd, London N7 6AR T: 020 7272 2171 E: remarkable01@btconnect.com

PUNCH TAVERNS Roger Whiteside Chief Executive Jubilee House, Second Avenue, Burton-On-Trent DE14 2WF T: 01283 501600 E: enquiries@punchtaverns.com W: www.punchtaverns.com

RENAISSANCE PUBS Tom Peake Managing Director 185 Kennington Lane, London SE11 4EZ T: 020 7735 1061 E: tom@renaissancepubs.co.uk W: www.renaissancepubs.co.uk

Q QUEENSWAY HOSPITALITY LTD Joe Stenson Managing Director 2nd Floor, Tower House, 226 Cromwell Rd, London SW5 0SW T: 020 7244 4100 E: info@queensway.com W: www.queensway.com QUICKSILVER MANAGEMENT LTD Kevin Thornton Managing Director 20/24 The White House, Halford St, Tamworth B79 7QF T: 01827 62345 E: kevin@mercurygroup.org W: www.mercurymanagement. co.uk

RESTAURANT GROUP PLC Andrew Page Chief Executive 5/7 Marshalsea Rd, London SE1 1EP T: 08456 125001 E: sarah.allcock@trgplc.com W: www.trgplc.com REX RESTAURANT ASSOCIATES Jeremy King and Chris Corbin Restaurateurs 157 Piccadilly, W1J 9EB T: 020 7647 1810 E: jeremy.king@rexra.com W: www.thewolseley.com RICHARDSONS GROUP LTD Jake Richardson Managing Director 1 Earl St, Northampton NN1 3AU T: 01604 630666 E: marketing@richardsonsevents. com W: www.richardsonsevents.com RICHOUX GROUP Salvatore Diliberto Managing Director 528 Cochrane Mews, St Johns Wood, London NW8 6NY T: 020 7483 7001 E: info@richouxgroup.co.uk W: www.richoux.co.uk


DIRECTORY

UK Restaurant Groups

RICK STEIN GROUP Rick Stein Chairman Seafood Restaurant, Riverside, Padstow PL28 8BY T: 01841 532 700 E: reservations@rickstein.com W: www.rickstein.com

SAN CARLO RESTAURANTS Carlo Di Stefano Chairman 4 Temple St, Birmingham B2 5BN T: 01216 437080 E: info@sancarlo.co.uk W: www.sancarlo.co.uk

RICKER RESTAURANTS Will Ricker Proprietor 82 Princedale Road, London W11 4NL T: 020 7630 1020 E: info@rickerrestaurants.com W: www.rickerrestaurants.com

SANLEO LTD Lino Della-Pesca Managing Director 38/42 Guildhall St, Preston PR1 3NU T: 01772 824824 E: info@tiggis.co.uk W: www.tiggis.co.uk

RISING STAR LEISURE Steve Kelly Managing Director 16A Clapham Common, Clapham Common Southside, London SW4 7AB T: 020 7978 1333 E: steve@risingstarleisure.com W: www.risingstarleisure.com

SCEPTRE LEISURE LTD Kenneth Turner Chief Executive 139 Brookfield Place, Walton Summit Centre, Preston PR5 8BF T: 01772 694242 E: mark.white@sceptreleisure. co.uk W: www.sceptreleisure.co.uk

ROCKET James Horler Managing Director 4th Floor, Huntingdon House, Princess Street, Bolton BL1 1EJ T: 08451 270501 E: accounts@rocketrestaurants. co.uk W: www.rocketrestaurants.co.uk

S S & N PUB COMPANY 2/4 Broadway Park, Southguile Broadway, Edinburgh EH12 9JZ T: 01315 281000 E: enquiries@s-npubcompany. co.uk W: www.s-npubcompany.co.uk

SCOTTISH & NEWCASTLE PLC Stephen Orlowski Managing Director Heineken UK, 2-4 Broadway Park, South Guile, Edinburgh EH12 9JZ T: 01315 281000 E: consumercare@heineken.co.uk W: www.heineken.co.uk SHEPHERD NEAME LTD Jonathan Neame Chief Executive Faversham Brewery, 17 Court St, Faversham ME13 7AX T: 01795 532206 E: company@shepherd-neame. co.uk W: www.shepherd-neame.co.uk

S A BRAIN & CO LTD Martin Reed Chief Financial Officer The Cardiff Brewery, Crawshay St, Cardiff CF10 1SP T: 02920 402060 E: enquiries@sabrain.co.uk W: www.sabrain.com

SHIMLA PINKS RESTAURANTS Mandeep Kohli Managing Director 5 Ways Leisure Complex, Broad St, Birmingham B15 1AY T: 01216 330366 E: enquiries@shimlapinks.com W: www.shimlapinks.com

SALTIRE TAVERNS LTD Billy Lowe Managing Director 25 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1EN T: 01316 221820 E: info@saltire-taverns.co.uk W: www.saltire-taverns.co.uk

SIMPSONS OF MAYFAIR PLC Sandy Singh Managing Director 36 Upper Brook St, London W1K 7QJ T: 020 7491 4040 E: sandy@simpsonsofmayfair.com W: www.simpsonsofmayfair.com

SAMUEL SMITH LTD H Smith Old Brewery, High St, Tadcaster LS24 9SB T: 01937 832225

SIR JOHN FITZGERALD LTD David Horgan Chief Executive Cafe Royal Building, 8 Nelson St, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 5AW T: 01912 320664 E: info@sjf.co.uk W: www.sjf.co.uk

STARBUCKS COFFEE CO LTD Chris Engskov Managing Director, UK Building 4 Chiswick Pk, 566 Chiswick High Rd, London SW6 4JT T: 020 8834 5000 E: customercareuk@starbucks.com W: www.starbucks.com

SOFRA RESTAURANTS LTD Huseyin Ozer Managing Director 11 Circus Rd, London NW8 6NX T: 020 7586 9889 E: ebarut@sofra.co.uk W: www.sofra.co.uk

STEAMROLLER RESTAURANTS Jamie Barber Proprietor Walmar House, 288 Regents St, London W1B 3AL T: 02076 591500 E: jamie@hush.co.uk W: www.hush.co.uk

SOHO HOUSE GROUP Nick Jones Chief Executive 72/74 Dean Street, London W1D 3SG T: 020 7292 0120 E: martin@sohohouse.com W: www.sohohouse.com SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD Luigi Lavarini Managing Director Cranbourn St, London WC2H 7AB T: 020 7395 0390 E: info@spaghettihouse.co.uk W: www.spaghettihouse.co.uk SPUD-U-LIKE LTD Tony Schlesinger Managing Director 9 Central Business Centre, Great Central Way, London NW10 0UR T: 020 8830 2424 E: headoffice@spudulike.com W: www.spudulike.com SPUR STEAK HOUSE Stephen Logue Chairman 21-22 Old Steyn, Brighton BN1 1EL T: 01273 670700 E: helen@businessblueprints.co.uk W: www.spur.co.za SQUARE PIE Martin Dewey Managing Director 105 C Commercial Street, London E1 6BG T: 02072 472100 E: martind@squarepie.com W: www.squarepie.com SSP Andrew Lynch Chief Executive 1 The Heights, Brooklands Weybridge, Surrey KT13 0NY T: 01932 792400 E: eileen.kenny@ssp-intl.com W: www.foodtravelexperts.com

SUBWAY RESTAURANTS Trevor Haynes Area Development Manager Chaston House, Mill Court Hinton Way, Great Shelford, Cambridge CB22 5LD T: 01223 550820 E: info@subway.co.uk W: www.subway.co.uk

T TADCASTER PUB COMPANY Jim Walsh Chairman Commer House, Station Rd, Tadcaster LS24 9JF T: 01937 835020 E: james@tadpubco.co.uk W: www.tadpubco.co.uk TAMPOPO RESTAURANTS David Fox Managing Director Quay House, Quay Street, Manchester M3 3JE T: 01618 322764 E: enquiries@tampopo.co.uk W: www.tampopo.co.uk TATTERSHALL CASTLE GROUP David Ford Managing Director Regus House , Windmill Hill Bs Park, Swindon SN5 6QR T: 01793 441429 E: info@tattershallcastlegroup.com W: www.the1440 co.uk THAI RIVER COMPANY Pann Adda 308 Latimer Rd, London W10 6QW T: 020 8960 5988 E: mkt_gardenandgrill@hotmail. com W: www.thairiver.co.uk

THE FINE FOOD CO. Robert Tame Managing Director 330 Upper St, London N1 2XQ T: 020 7359 3026 E: robert.tame@thefinefood.co.uk W: www.thefinefood.co.uk THE HEAD OF STEAM LTD Tony Brookes Managing Director Manesty, Leazes Lane, Hexham NE46 3AE T: 01434 607393 E: tony@theheadofsteam.co.uk W: www.theheadofsteam.co.uk THE STAR INN Andrew Pern Chef Proprietor Harome, Near Helmsley, North Yorkshire YO62 5JE T: 01439 770397 E: reservations@ thestarinnatharome.co.uk W: www.thestaratharome.co.uk THORLEY TAVERNS LTD Frank Thorley Managing Director The Old Police Station, 60 Gladstone Rd, Broadstairs CT10 2TA T: 01843 602010 E: pjt@thorleytaverns.co.uk W: www.thorleytaverns.co.uk TINGDENE PARKS LTD Ian Collier Sales & Marketing Director Bradfield Rd, Finedon Rd Industrial Estate, Wellingborough NN8 4HB T: 01933 230130 E: sarah@tingdene.net W: www.tingdene-parks.net TINSELTOWN Suhil Hasan Managing Director 44/46 St John St, London EC1M 4DF T: 020 7689 2424 E: info@tinseltown.co.uk W: www.tinseltown.co.uk TOSSED Vincent McKevitt Proprietor The Greenhouse, 31-33 Baker St, London W1U 8EJ T: 020 7289 2516 E: bakerstreet@tosseduk.com W: www.tosseduk.com TOWN & CITY PUB COMPANY Toby Smith Chief Executive Porter Tun House, 500 Capabilty Green, Luton LU1 3LS T: 08451 262944 E: general@demys.com W: www.laurelpubco.com

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TOWN CENTRE RESTAURANTS Mark Winter Chief Executive Unit 6, Dundee Way, Enfield EN3 7SX T: 020 8443 3968 E: mark@towncentrerestaurants. co.uk W: www.towncentrerestaurants. co.uk TRADITIONAL SCOTTISH ALES LTD Douglas Ross Bandeath Industrial Estate, Throsk, Stirling FK7 7NP T: 01786 817000 E: enquiries@bridgeofallan.co.uk W: www.bridgeofallan.co.uk TRAGUS HOLDINGS LTD Graham Turner Chief Executive 163 Eversholt St, London NW1 1BU T: 020 7121 3200 E: info@tragusholdings.com W: www.tragusholdings.com TRIPLE ROCK LTD Chris Clark Managing Director The Barns, Woodlands End, Mells, Frome BA11 3QD T: 01373 813345 E: chris@triplerock.co.uk TRUST INNS Brian King Managing Director Blenheim House, Foxhole Rd, Ackhurst Park, Chorley PR7 1NY T: 01257 238800 E: info@trustinns.co.uk W: www.trustinns.co.uk

U

URBAN & COUNTRY LEISURE Ross Saunders Managing Director 20-24 the White House, Halford St, Tamworth, Staffordshire B79 7QS T: 08453 011142 E: jason@ urbanandcountryleisure.com W: www. urbanandcountryleisure.com

V

WHITE STAR LINE Jimmy Lahoud Managing Director 48 Greek St, London W1D 4EF T: 020 7734 7333 E: sales@whitestarline.org.uk W: www.whitestarline.org.uk

VALEMINT LTD Michael Davies Managing Director Main Rd, Church Village, Pontypridd CF38 1PY T: 01443 201139 E: mike.fagins@tiscali.co.uk

WIMPY GB LTD Darren Hele Managing Director 2 The Listons, Liston Rd, Marlow SL7 1FD T: 01628 891655 W: www.wimpy.uk.com

VIMAC LEISURE LTD Paul Mackings Chief Executive Unit 7, Witney Way, Boldon Business Park, Boldon Colliery NE35 9PE T: 01915 368388 E: paul.mackings@vimac-leisure. co.uk W: www.vimac-leisure.co.uk

WINE INNS Robert Davies Managing Director 3 Duncrue Place, Belfast BT3 9BU T: 02890 746274 E: swilson@winemart.co.uk W: www.winemart.com

W W H BRAKSPEAR & SONS PLC Tom Davies Chief Executive The Bull Courtyard, Bell St, Henley-on-Thames RG9 2BA T: 01491 570200 E: gillashplant@brakspearpubs. co.uk W: www.brakspear.co.uk

UKAI SUSHI Abbas Moaven Managing Director 223 Portabello Rd, London W11 1LU T: 020 7243 3222 E: info@ukai.co.uk W: www.ukai.co.uk

WADWORTH & CO LTD Charles Bartholomew Chairman Northgate Brewery, Devizes SN10 1JW T: 01380 723361 E: sales@wadworth.co.uk W: www.wadworth.co.uk

UNILEVER Paul Polman Chief Executive 100 Victoria Embankment, Blackfriars EC4Y 0DY T: 020 7822 5252 W: www.unilever.co.uk

WELCOME BREAK GROUP LTD Rod McKie Chief Operating Officer No 2 Vantage Court, Tickford St, Newport Pagnell MK16 9EZ T: 01908 299700 E: darren.woodhouse@ welcomebreak.co.uk W: www.welcomebreak.co.uk

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WHITBREAD RESTAURANTS DIVISION Andy Harrison Chief Executive Whitbread Court, Porz Avenue, Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 01582 424200 E: supplier.info@whitbread.com W: www.whitbread.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

WOODFORDE’S LTD Mike Betts Joint Managing Director Broadland Brewery, Woodbastwick, Norwich NR13 6SW T: 01603 720353 E: mike@woodfordes.co.uk W: www.woodfordes.co.uk WOODLANDS RESTAURANTS Rajat Sood Managing Director 12 West Close, Wembley Park, Wembley HA9 9PJ T: 020 8904 7897 E: enquiries@ woodlandsrestaurant.co.uk W: www.woodlandsrestaurant. co.uk

Y YELLOWHAMMER BARS Tim Fearn Finance Director Bloxham Mill, Barford Rd, Bloxham, Banbury OX15 4FF T: 08445 434800 E: tim.fearn@tbasolutions.co.uk W: www.yellowhammerbars.com

YORK BREWERY CO LTD Andrew Barker Managing Director 12 Toft Green, Micklegate, York YO1 6JT T: 01904 621162 E: info@yorkbrew.co.uk W: www.yorkbrew.co.uk YOUNG & CO BREWERY PLC Stephen Goodyear Chief Executive Riverside House, 26 Osiers Rd, London SW18 1NH T: 020 8875 7000 E: enquiries@youngs.co.uk W: www.youngs.co.uk YUM RESTAURANTS INTERNATIONAL Martin Shuker Chief Executive 32 Goldsworth Rd, Woking GU21 6JT T: 01483 717000 E: kate.surey@yum.com W: www.yum.com

Z ZILLI FISH LTD Aldo Zilli Managing Director 36/40 Brewer St, London W1F 9TB T: 020 7437 4867 E: zilli@btconnect.com W: www.zillialdo.com ZUMA AND ROKA Rainer Becker Founder 5 Raphael Street, Knightsbridge SW7 1DL T: 020 7584 1010 E: info@zumarestaurant.com W: www.zumarestaurant.com


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Hotels

Distinguished Hotels 51 BUCKINGHAM GATE TAJ SUITES AND RESIDENCES Araceli Rius Perez Hotel Manager 51 Buckingham Gate, Taj Suites and Residences, London SW1E 6AF T: 020 7769 7766 E: pverma@cplonsj.co.uk W: www.51-buckinghamgate.com

A ANDAZ LIVERPOOL STREET Arnaud de Saint Exupery General Manager 40 Liverpool St, London EC2M 7QN T: 020 7618 5010 E: catherine.hamilton@hyatt.com W: london.liverpoolstreet.andaz. hyatt.com ATHENAEUM HOTEL & APARTMENTS Simon Wakefield General Manager The Athenaeum, 116 Piccadilly Mayfair W1J 7BJ T: 020 7499 3464 E: Wakefields@athenaeumhotel. com W: www.athenaeumhotel.com

B BAGLIONI HOTEL Luca Virgilio General Manager 60 Hyde Park Gate, London SW7 5BB T: 020 7368 5700 E: k.remy@baglionihotels.com W: www.baglionihotels.com BALMORAL HOTEL Sir Rocco Forte Chairman The Balmoral, 1 Princes St , Edinburgh EH2 2EQ T: 01315 562414 E: reservations.balmoral@ roccofortehotels.com W: www.thebalmoralhotel.com

BERKELEY HOTEL Klaus Kabelitz General Manager Wilton Place, Knightsbridge, London T: 020 7235 6000 E: info@the-berkeley.co.uk W: www.the-berkeley.co.uk

CHEWTON GLEN HOTEL AND SPA Andrew Stembridge Managing Director New Milton BH25 6QS T: 01425 275341 E: reservations@chewtonglen.com W: www.chewtonglen.com

BOVEY CASTLE HOTEL Jeremy Rata Managing Director North Bovey Dartmoor National Park, Devon T: 08444 740077 E: reception@boveycastle.com W: boveycastle.com

CLARIDGE’S Thomas Kochs General Manager 49 Brook Street W1K 4HR T: 020 7629 8860 E: tkochs@claridges.co.uk W: www.claridges.co.uk

BROWN’S HOTEL Stuart Johnson General Manager Albemarle Street, London T: 020 7493 6020 E: browns@roccofortehotels.com W: www.brownshotel.com

C CAMERON HOUSE ON LOCH LOMOND John Ketting Managing Director Cameron House on Loch Lomond, Loch Lomond G83 8QZ T: 01389 755565 E: stephen.carter@devere.co.uk W: www.cameronhouse.co.uk CAPITAL Kate Levin General Manager 22 Basil Steet SW3 1AT T: 020 7589 5171 E: kate.levin@capitalhotel.co.uk W: www.capitalhotel.co.uk CELTIC MANOR RESORT Dylan Matthews Chief Executive Coldra Woods, The Usk Valley, Newport NP18 1HQ T: 01633 413000 E: jjones@celtic-manor.com W: www.celtic-manor.com CHESTER GROSVENOR AND SPA Jonathan Slater Managing Director Eastgate, Chester CH1 1LT T: 01244 324024 E: reservations@ chestergrosvenor.com W: www.chestergrosvenor.com

CLIVEDEN HOUSE Nick Gamble General Manager Cliveden House, Taplow SL6 0JF T: 01628 668 561 E: tracy.solarz@clivedenhouse. co.uk W: www.clivedenhouse.co.uk CONNAUGHT Nathalie Seiler-Hayez General Manager Carlos Place W1K 2AL T: 020 7499 7070 E: nseiler-hayez@the-connaught. co.uk W: www.the-connaught.co.uk

D DORCHESTER HOTEL Roland Fasel General Manager Park Lane, London T: 020 7629 8888 E: info@thedorchester.com W: www.thedorchester DRAYCOTT HOTEL John Hanna General Manager 22-26 Cadogan Gardens SW3 2RP T: 020 7730 6466 E: john.hanna@draycotthotel.com W: www.draycotthotel.com DUKES HOTEL Heloise Deparisse Marketing Manager St. James’s Place SW1A 1NY T: 020 7491 4840 E: bookings@dukeshotel.com W: www.dukeshotel.com

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EGERTON HOUSE HOTEL Michelle Devlin General Manager 17-19 Egerton Terrace, Knightsbridge SW3 2BX T: 020 7589 2412 E: bookeg@rchmail.com W: www.egertonhousehotel.com

GLENAPP CASTLE Graham Cowan Proprietor Glenapp Castle Hotel, Ballantrae KA26 0NZ T: 01465 831212 E: info@glenappcastle.com W: www.glenappcastle.com

F FAIRMONT ST ANDREWS Garrett Turta General Manager St Andrews KY16 8PN T: 01334 837000 E: garrett.turta@fairmont.com W: www.fairmont.com/standrews FORBURY HOTEL Peter Farqhar General Manager 26 The Forbury, Reading RG1 3EJ T: 01189 527770 E: reception@theforburyhotel. co.uk W: www.theforburyhotel.co.uk FOUR SEASONS HOTEL HAMPSHIRE Charlie Parker General Manager Four Seasons Hotel Hampshire, Dogmersfield Park, Chalky Ln, Dogmersfield RG27 8TD T: 01252 853000 E: charlie.parker@fourseasons.com W: www.fourseasons.com/ hampshire FOUR SEASONS HOTEL LONDON AT CANARY WHARF Michael Purtill General Manager 46 Westferry Circus, London E14 8RS T: 020 7510 1999 E: reservations.caw@fourseasons. com W: www.fourseasons.com

GLENEAGLES HOTEL Peter Lederer Chairman The Gleneagles Hotel, Auchterarder PH3 1NF T: 01764 662231 E: peter.lederer@gleneagles.com W: www.gleneagles.com GORING HOTEL Graham Copeman General Manager 15 Beeston Place SW1W 0JW T: 020 7396 9000 E: gcopeman@thegoring.com W: www.thegoring.com GRAND HOTEL EASTBOURNE Jonathan Webley General Manager King Edwards Parade, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 4EQ T: 01323 412345 E: jwebley@elitehotels.co.uk W: www.grandeastbourne.com GRAND JERSEY HOTEL & SPA Eamonn Elliot Managing Director Esplanade, St Helier, Jersey JE2 3QA T: 01534 722301 E: gm@grandjersey.com W: www.grandjersey.com GROSVENOR HOUSE, A JW MARRIOTT HOTEL Stewart Bowery General Manager Grosvenor House, Park Lane W1K 7TN T: 020 7499 6363 E: grosvenor-house@ marriotthotels.com W: www.marriott.co.uk

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DIRECTORY

Distinguished Hotels

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HALKIN HOTEL Kenneth Speirs General Manager Halkin Street SW1X 7DJ T: 020 7333 1000 E: kenneth.speirs@halkin. como.bz W: www.halkin.como.bz

JUMEIRAH CARLTON TOWER Derek Picot Regional General Manager Jumeirah Carlton Tower On Cadogan Place SW1X 9PY T: 020 7235 1234 E: derek.picot@jumeirah.com W: jumeirah.com/ JumeirahCarltonTower

HANBURY MANOR William Boulton Smith General Manager Ware SG12 0SD T: 01920 487722 E: william.boulton-smith@ marriotthotels.com W: www.marriott.co.uk HOTEL MISSONI EDINBURGH Carina Svensen General Manager 1 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1AD T: 01312 206666 E: carina.svensen@hotelmissoni. com W: hotelmissoni.com HOWARD HOTEL Leon Kiteley General Manager The Howard, 34 Great King St, Edinburgh EH3 6QH T: 01315 573500 E: lkiteley@oldwaverley.co.uk W: www.thehoward.com HYATT REGENCY-LONDON THE CHURCHILL Michael Gray General Manager 30 Portman Square, London T: 020 7486 5800 E: london.churchill@hyatt.com W: www.london.churchill. hyatt.com

I INVERLOCHY CASTLE Jane Watson Managing Director Torlundy, Fort William PH33 6SN T: 01397 702177 E: info@inverlochy.co.uk W: www.inverlochycastlehotel. com ISLE OF ERISKA Anne Schaeflein General Manager Hotel, Spa & Island, Benderloch By Oban, Argyll PA37 1SD T: 01631 720371 E: fabrice@eriska-hotel.co.uk W: www.eriska-hotel.co.uk

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L LANDMARK HOTEL Francis Green General Manager 222 Marylebone Road, London NW1 6JQ T: 020 7631 8000 E: webmarketing@thelandmark. co.uk W: www.landmarklondon.co.uk LANESBOROUGH Geoffrey Gelardi General Manager Hyde Park Corner SW1X 7TA T: 020 7259 5599 E: info@lanesborough.com W: www.lanesborough.com LANGHAM Paul Walters General Manager Regent Street, 1C Portland W1B 1JA T: 020 7636 1000 E: paul.walters@langhamhotels. com W: london.langhamhotels.co.uk LE MANOIR AUX QUAT SAISONS Philip Newman Hall Director and General Manager Church Road, Great Milton Oxford OX44 7PD T: 01844 278881 E: reservations@blanc.co.uk W: www.manoir.com LONDON MARRIOTT HOTEL COUNTY HALL Theresa Maw General Manager London Marriott Hotel County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road County Hall SE1 7PB T: 020 7928 5200 E: theresa.maw@marriotthotels. com W: www.marriott.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

LONDON MARRIOTT HOTEL PARK LANE Miles Pooley General Manager 140 Park Lane W1K 7AA T: 020 7493 7000 E: miles.pooley@marriotthotels. com W: www.marriott.co.uk

MANDARIN ORIENTAL HYDE PARK LONDON Anthony McHale General Manager 66 Knightsbridge SW1X 7LA T: 020 7235 2000 E: tmchale@mohg.com W: www.mandarinoriental.com/ london

LONDON MARRIOTT HOTEL WEST INDIA QUAY Katrin Hentszel General Manager 22 Hertsmere Rd, Canary Wharf E14 4ED T: 020 7093 1000 E: katrin.hentszel@ marriotthotels.com W: www.marriott.com

MERCHANT HOTEL Adrian McLaughlin General Manager The Merchant Hotel, 16 Skipper St, Belfast BT1 2DY T: 02890 234888 E: adrian@themerchanthotel. com W: www.themerchanthotel.com

LOUGH ERNE RESORT Ferghal Percell General Manager Belleek Road Enniskillen BT93 7ED T: 02866 323230 E: info@lougherneresort.com W: www.lougherneresort.com LOWRY HOTEL Peter Kienast General Manager 50 Dearmans Place, Chapel Wharf, Manchester M3 5LH T: 01618 274000 E: pkienast@ roccofortecollection.com W: www.thelowryhotel.com LUCKNAM PARK Harry Murray MBE Chairman Bath Colerne, Chippenham, Wiltshire T: 01225 742777 E: reservations@lucknanpark. co.uk W: www.lucknampark.co.uk LUTON HOO HOTEL Matthew Long General Manager Luton Hoo, The Mansion House, Luton LU1 3TQ T: 01582 734437 E: mlong@elitehotels.co.uk W: www.lutonhoo.co.uk

M MACDONALD BATH SPA Martin Clubbe General Manager Macdonald Bath Spa Hotel, Sydney Road , Bath BA2 6JF T: 08448 799106 E: sales.bathspa@macdonaldhotels.co.uk W: www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

METROPOLITAN LONDON Thomas Orchard General Manager 19 Old Park Lane W1K 1LB T: 020 7447 1000 E: thomas.orchard@ metropolitan.como.bz W: www.metropolitan.london. como.bz MILESTONE HOTEL Geoffrey Wild Deputy General Manager 1 Kensington Court W8 5DL T: 020 7917 1000 W: www.milestonehotel.com

N NO 41 Fredrick Dallot Manager 41 Buckingham Palace Road SW1W 0PS T: 020 7300 0041 E: book@rchmail.com W: www.41hotel.com

O OLD COURSE HOTEL GOLF RESORT AND SPA Debbie Taylor President, the Hospitality & Real Estate Group St. Andrews, Kingdom of Fife Scotland KY16 9SP T: 01334 474371 E: reservations@oldcoursehotel. co.uk W: www.oldcoursehotel.co.uk ONE ALDWYCH Stefan Soennichsen General Manager 1 Aldwych WC2B 4RH T: 020 7300 1000 E: stefansoennichsen@ onealdwych.com W: www.onealdwych.com

P PENNYHILL PARK HOTEL & THE SPA Julian Tomlin General Manager Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa, London Road, Bagshot GU19 5EU T: 01276 478426 E: enquiries@pennyhillpark.co.uk W: www.pennyhillpark.co.uk PLAZA ON THE RIVER CLUB AND RESIDENCE Greg Hegarty Regional General Manager 18 Albert Embankment SE1 7TJ T: 020 7769 2525 E: hbond@pphe.com W: www.plazaontheriver.co.uk PRESTONFIELD HOUSE Alan McGuiggan General Manager Prestonfield House, Priestfield Road, Edinburgh EH16 5UT T: 01316 622308 E: amc@prestonfield.com W: www.prestonfield.com

R RADISSON EDWARDIAN HAMPSHIRE HOTEL Michael Cheung General Manager 31-36 Leicester Square WC2H 7LH T: 020 7839 9399 E: reshamp@radisson.com W: radissonedwardian.com/ hampshire RADISSON EDWARDIAN HOTEL Stephen Miles General Manager Free Trade Hall, Peter St, Manchester M2 5GP T: 01618 359929 E: miless@radisson.com W: www.radissonedwardian.com CHANCERY COURT HOTEL Matthias Roeke General Manager 252 High Holborn WC1V 7EN T: 020 7829 9888 E: matthiasroeke@ chancerycourt.com W: www.chancerycourthotel.com


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Hotels

RITZ HOTEL LONDON Stephen Boxall Managing Director 150 Piccadilly W1J 9BR T: 020 7493 8181 E: execoffice@theritzlondon.com W: www.theritzlondon.com ROCKLIFFE HALL Steve Gibson Chairman Rockliffe Hall, Hurworth-onTees, Darlington DL2 2DU T: 01325 729999 E: enquiries@rockliffehall.com W: www.rockliffehall.com ROYAL CRESCENT HOTEL Sharon Love General Manager The Royal Crescent Hotel, 16 Royal Crescent, Bath BA1 2LS T: 01225 823333 E: sharon.love@royalcrescent. co.uk W: www.royalcrescent.co.uk ROYAL GARDEN HOTEL Graham Bamford General Manager 2-24 Kensington High St, Kensington, London T: 020 7937 8000 E: grahambamford@ royalgardenhotel.co.uk W: www.royalgardenhotel.co.uk ROYAL HORSEGUARDS HOTEL Anne Marie Dowling General Manager 2 Whitehall Court, London T: 08713 769033 E: toby.isenberg@guoman.co.uk W: www.guoman.com

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SHERATON GRAND HOTEL & SPA JP Kavanagh General Manager 1 Festival Square, Edinburgh EH3 9SR T: 01312 299131 E: jp.kavanagh@sheraton.com W: www.sheratonedinburgh.co.uk

STOKE PARK Chester King Managing Director Stoke Park, Park Road, Stoke Poges SL2 4PG T: 01753 717 171 E: info@stokepark.com W: www.stokepark.com

SHERATON PARK TOWER Colin Bennett General Manager 101 Knightsbridge SW1X 7RN T: 020 7235 8050 E: colin.bennett@ starwoodhotels.com W: www.sheraton.com/parktower

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SOFITEL LONDON ST JAMES Denis Dupart General Manager 6 Waterloo Place SW1Y 4AN T: 020 7747 2200 E: H3144@sofitel.com W: www.sofitel.com/London SOUTH LODGE HOTEL Rupert Spurgeon General Manager Brighton Road, Nr. Horsham West Sussex RH13 6PS T: 01403 891711 E: enquiries@southlodgehotel. co.uk W: www.southlodgehotel.co.uk ST. DAVID’S HOTEL & SPA Graeme Barclay General Manager The St. David’s Hotel & Spa, Havannah Street, Cardiff CF10 5SD T: 02920 454045 E: adele.tibbott@principalhayley.com W: www.thestdavidshotel.com

SCOTSMAN Fiona Gray General Manager 20 North Bridge, Edinburgh EH1 1TR T: 01315 565565 E: fgray@tshg.co.uk W: www.thescotsmanhotel.co.uk

ST. JAMES’S HOTEL & CLUB Henrik Muehle Managing Director 7-8 Park Place, St James’s SW1A 1LS T: 020 7316 1608 E: Henrik@stjameshotelandclub. com W: www.stjamesclubandhotel. co.uk

SEAHAM HALL HOTEL & SERENITY SPA Jackie Moores General Manager Lord Byron’s Walk, Seaham SR7 7AG T: 01915 161400 E: jackie.moores@seaham-hall. co.uk W: www.seaham-hall.co.uk

STAFFORD LONDON, BY KEMPINSKI Leon Baum General Manager 16-18 Saint James’s Place SW1A 1NJ T: 020 7493 0111 E: leon.braum@kempinski.com W: www.kempinski.com/es/ london

TURNBERRY RESORT, SCOTLAND Jordi Tarrida General Manager Turnberry KA26 9LT T: 01655 331000 E: jordi.tarrida@ luxurycollection.com W: www.turnberryresort.co.uk

V VINEYARD AT STOCKCROSS Andrew McKenzie Managing Director Stockcross, Newbury, Berkshire T: 01635 528770 E: general@the-vineyard.co.uk W: www.the-vineyard.co.uk

W WESTBURY Zeljko Stasevic General Manager 37 Conduit Street W1F 2YF T: 020 7629 7755 E: gm@westburymayfair.com W: www.westburymayfair.com WHATLEY MANOR Peter Egli General Manager Easton Grey Malmesbury SN16 ORB T: 01666 822888 E: peter@whatleymanor.com W: www.whatleymanor.com WYNDHAM GRAND LONDON Jay Wytzel Managing Director Chelsea Harbour SW10 0XG T: 020 7823 3000 E: wyndhamlondon@wyndham. com W: www.wyndhamgrandlondon. co.uk

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DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

Distinguished Restaurants 1901 Michael Kreiling Head Chef Andaz Hotel, 40 Liverpool Street EC2M 7QN T: 020 7618 7000 E: London.restres@andaz.com W: www.andaz.com

AIRDS HOTEL Robert McPherson Head Chef Port Appin, Argyll PA38 4DF T: 01631 730236 E: airds@airds-hotel.com W: www.airds-hotel.com

21212 Paul Kitching Chef Proprietor 3 Royal Terrace, Edinburgh EH7 5AB T: 08452 221212 E: reservations@21212restaurant. co.uk W: www.21212restaurant.co.uk

ALAIN DUCASSE AT THE DORCHESTER HOTEL Nicolas Defremont Restaurant Director Park Lane, London W1K 1QA T: 020 7629 8866 E: alainducassereservations@ thedorchester.com W: www.alainducasse-dorchester. com

36 ON THE QUAY Ramon and Karen Farthing Proprietor 47 South Street, Emsworth PO10 7EG T: 01243 375592 E: bookings@36onthequay.co.uk W: www.36onthequay.co.uk

ALBANNACH HOTEL Colin Craig Chef Proprietor BaddidarrochLochinver, Sutherland IV27 4LP T: 01571 844407 E: info@thealbannach.co.uk W: www.thealbannach.co.uk

5 NORTH ST Cathryn and Marcus Ashenford Chef Proprietors Winchcombe, Cheltenham GL54 5LH T: 01242 604566 E: marcusashenford@yahoo.co.uk W: www.5northstreetrestaurant. co.uk

ALBEMARLE AT BROWN’S HOTEL Marcus Verberne Executive Chef Albemarle Street, Mayfair W1A 4BP T: 020 7493 6020 E: thealbemarle@ roccofortecollection.com W: www.thealbemarlerestaurant. com

A ABSTRACT RESTAURANT Graham Campbell Head Chef Glenmoriston Town House Hotel, Ness Bank, Inverness IV2 4SF T: 01463 223777 E: reception@ glenmoristontownhouse.com W: www.abstractrestaurant.com ADAM SIMMONDS AT DANESFIELD HOUSE Adam Simmonds Executive Chef Danesfield House Hotel & Spa, Henley Road, Marlow-on-Thames SL7 2EY T: 01628 891010 E: asimmonds@danesfieldhouse. co.uk W: www.danesfieldhouse.co.uk

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ALDERLEY RESTAURANT, ALDERLEY EDGE HOTEL James Thistleton Restaurant Manager Macclesfield Road, Alderley Edge SK9 7BJ T: 01625 583033 E: sales@alderleyedgehotel.com W: www.alderleyedgehotel.com

AMBERLEY CASTLE James Dugan Head Chef Amberley, Nr. Arundel BN18 9LT T: 01798 831992 E: info@amberleycastle.co.uk W: www.amberleycastle.co.uk ANDREW FAIRLIE AT GLENEAGLES Andrew Fairlie Head Chef Gleneagles Hotel, Auchterarder PH3 1NF T: 01764 694267 E: reservations@andrewfairlie. co.uk W: www.andrewfairlie.co.uk ANGELIQUE Alan Murchison Executive Chef 2 South Embankment, Dartmouth TQ6 9BH T: 01803 839425 E: info@angeliquedartmouth. co.uk W: www.angeliquedartmouth. co.uk ANTHONY’S RESTAURANT Anthony James Flinn Executive Chef 19 Boar Lane, Leeds LS1 6EA T: 01132 455922 E: anthonys@ anthonysrestaurant.co.uk W: www.anthonysrestaurant.co.uk APICIUS Faith Hawkins Proprietor 23 Stone St, Cranbrook TN17 3HF T: 01580 714666 W: www.restaurant-apicius.co.uk

ALLORO RESTAURANT Daniele Camera Head Chef 19-20 Dover Street W1S 4LU T: 020 7495 4768 E: alloro@ Londonfinedininggroup.com W: www.atozrestaurants.com

APSLEYS (AT THE LANESBOROUGH HOTEL) Massimiliano Blasone Executive Chef The Lanesborough, Hyde Park Corner SW1X 7TA T: 020 7333 7254 E: aspleys@lanesborough.com W: http://www.lanesborough. com

AMAYA Premen Mohan General Manager 15 Halkin Arcade SW1X 8JT  T: 020 7823 1166 E: info@realindianfood.com W: www.amaya.biz

ARBUTUS Tom Slegg General Manager 63 - 64 Frith Street W1D 3 JW T: 02077 344545 E: info@arbutusrestaurant.co.uk W: www.arbutusrestaurant.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

ARDANAISEIG HOTEL Peter Webster General Manager Kilchrenan, Taynuilt PA35 1HE T: 01866 833333 E: peter@ardanaiseig.com W: www.ardanaiseig.com AUBERGE DU LAC Phil Thompson Executive Chef Welwyn AL8 7XG T: 01707 368888 E: aubergeevents@brocket-hall. co.uk W: www.aubergedulac.co.uk AUBERGINE AT THE COMPLEAT ANGLER Miles Nixon Head Chef Macdonald Compleat Angler Hotel, Marlow Bridge, Marlow SL7 1RG T: 01628 484444 E: aubergineca@ Londonfinedininggroup.com W: www.atozrestaurants.com AVENUE RESTAURANT, LAINSTON HOUSE HOTEL Andy MacKenzie Head Chef Woodman Lane Sparsholt, Winchester SO21 2LT T: 01962 776088 E: amackenzie@lainstonhouse. com W: www.lainstonhouse.com

B BAR BOULUD Dean Yasharian Head Chef Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, 66 Knightsbridge SW1X 7LA T: 020 7201 3899 E: boulud@mohg.com W: www.barboulud.com BARRICA James Knight Head Chef 62 Goodge Street, W1T 4NE T: 020 7436 9448 E: info@barrica.co.uk W: www.barrica.co.uk

BATH PRIORY HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND SPA Sam Moody Head Chef Weston Road, Bath BA1 2XT T: 01225 331922 E: mail@thebathpriory.co.uk W: www.thebathpriory.co.uk BENARES Jitin Joshi Executive Head Chef 12a Berkeley Square House Berkeley Square W1j 6BS T: 020 7629 8886 E: reservations@ benaresrestaurant.co.uk W: www.benaresrestaurant.com BILDESTON CROWN Chris Lee Head Chef High Street, Bildeston IP7 7EB T: 01449 740510 E: reception@ thebildestoncrown.com W: www.thebildestoncrown.com BISTROT BRUNO LOUBET Bruno Loubet Chef Patron The Zetter Hotel, 86 - 88 Clerkenwell Road EC1M 5RJ T: 020 3463 0298 E: eat@bistrotbrunoloubet.com W: www.bistrotbrunoloubet.com BLACK RAT James Johnston Restaurant Manager 88 Chesil Street, Winchester SO23 0HX T: 01962 844465 E: restaurant@theblackcat.co.uk W: www.theblackrat.co.uk BLACK SWAN Adam Jackson Head Chef Oldstead, North Yorkshire Y061 4BL T: 01347 868387 E: enquiries@blackswanoldstead. co.uk W: www.blackswanoldstead.co.uk BLEEDING HEART Julien Nagel Head Chef Bleeding Heart Yard off Greville Street, Hatton Garden EC1N 8SJ T: 020 7242 2056 E: tony@bleedingheart.co.uk W: www.bleedingheart.co.uk


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

BLUEBIRD RESTAURANT U. Kaya Restaurant Manager 5 Quay Street, Lymington SO41 3AS T: 01590 676908 E: bluebirdrestaurant@ btconnect.com W: www.bluebirdrestaurant. co.uk BOATH HOUSE HOTEL Don Matheson Proprietor Auldearn, Nairn IV12 5TE T: 01667 454896 E: info@boath-house.com W: www.boath-house.com BOCCA DI LUPO Jacob Kennedy Head Chef 12 Archer Street W1D 7BB T: 020 7734 2223 E: info@boccadilupo.com W: www.boccadilupo.com BODYSGALLEN HALL AND SPA Michael Cheetham Head Chef Llandudno, North Wales LL30 1RS T: 01492 584466 E: reservations@bodysgallen.com W: www.bodysgallen.com BOHEMIA (AT THE CLUB HOTEL & SPA) Tim Phillips General Manager Green Street, St. Helier, Jersey Channel Islands JE2 4UH T: 01534 876500 E: bohemia@huggler.com W: www.theclubjersey.com BOUNDARY Peter Weeden Head Chef 2-4 Boundary Street, Shoreditch E2 7DD T: 020 7729 1051 E: info@theboundary.co.uk W: www.theboundary.co.uk/ BOX TREE RESTAURANT Simon Gueller Chef Proprietor 35-37 Church Street, Ilkley, West Yorkshire, LS29 9DR T: 01943 608484 E: info@theboxtree.co.uk W: www.theboxtree.co.uk BRAIDWOODS Keith Braidwood Chef Proprietor Dalry KA24 4LN T: 01294 833544 E: keithbraidwood@btconnect. com W: www.braidwoods.co.uk

BURLINGTON (AT THE DEVONSHIRE ARMS COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL) Steve Smith Head Chef Bolton Abbey, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 6AJ T: 01756 710441 E: reception@ thedevonshirearms.co.uk W: www.thedevonshirearms.co.uk BUTCHERS ARMS James Winter Proprietor Lime St, Eldersfield, Gloucestershire GL19 4NX T: 01452 840381 W: www.thebutchersarms.net BYBROOK RESTAURANT Stephen Browning General Manager Manor House Hotel and Golf Club, Castle Combe, Nr. Bath SN14 7HR T: 01249 782206 E: enquiries@manorhouse.co.uk W: www.manorhouse.co.uk

C CAMELLIA RESTAURANT Lewis Hamblet Head Chef South Lodge Hotel, Brighton Rd, Nr. Horsham RH13 6PS T: 01403 891711 E: enquiries@southlodgehotel. co.uk W: www.southlodgehotel.co.uk

CASTLE TERRACE Dominic Jack Chef Patron 33 - 35 Castle Terrace, Edinburgh EH1 2EL T: 08719 639706 W: www.castleterracerestaurant. com

CHURCH GREEN Aiden Byrne Chef Proprietor Higher Lane Lymm WA13 OAP T: 01925 752068 E: reservations@thechurchgreen. co.uk W: www.thechurchgreen.co.uk

CECCONI’S Giacomo Maccioni Manager 5a Burlington Gardens W1S 3EP T: 020 7434 1500 W: www.cecconis.co.uk

CHUTNEY MARY Siddharth Krishna Head Chef 535 Kings Road, Chelsea SW10 0SZ T: 020 7351 3113 E: chutneymary@realindianfood. com W: www.chutneymary.com

CELLAR RESTAURANT Peter Jukes Head Chef 24 East Green, Anstruther, Fife KY10 3AA T: 01333 310378 E: susancellars@aol.com W: www.cellaranstruther.co.uk CHAPTER ONE Andrew McLeish Executive Chef Farnborough Common, Locksbottom BR6 8NF T: 01689 854848 E: info@chaptersrestaurants.com W: www.chaptersrestaurants.com CHECKERS Stephane Borie Chef Proprietor Broad Street, Montgomery, Powys SY15 6PN T: 01686 669822 E: kathryn@ thecheckersmontgomery.co.uk W: www. thecheckersmontgomery.co.uk

CARLTON RIVERSIDE Mary Ann Gilchrist Head Chef Llanwrtyd Wells Powys, Mid Wales LD5 4ST T: 01591 610248 E: info@carltonriverside.com W: carltonriverside.com

CHEWTON GLEN HOTEL Luke Matthews Executive Head Chef New Milton BH25 6QS T: 01425 275341 E: lmatthews@chewtonglen.com W: www.chewtonglen.com

CASAMIA Peter and Jonray Sanchez-Iglesias Head Chefs 38 High Street, Westbury-on-Trym BS9 3D2 T: 01179 592884 E: info@casamiarestaurant.co.uk W: www.casamiarestaurant.co.uk

CHEZ BRUCE Edward Arthur Restaurant Manager 2 Bellevue Road, Wandsworth SW17 7EG T: 020 8672 0114 E: enquiries@chezbruce.co.uk W: www.chezbruce.co.uk

CASTLE HOUSE Claire Nicholls Head Chef Castle Street Hereford HR1 2NW T: 01432 356321 E: info@castlehse.co.uk W: www.castlehse.co.uk

CHINA TANG Chef Fong Head Chef The Dorchester, 53 Park Lane W1K 1QA T: 020 7629 9988 E: chinatangreservations@ chinatang.co.uk W: www.thedorchester.com

CIGALA Jake Hodges Head Chef 54 Lamb’s Conduit Street WC1N 3LW T: 020 7405 1717 E: chef@cigala.co.uk W: www.cigala.co.uk CINNAMON CLUB Vivek Singh Chief Executive The Old Westminster Library, 30-32 Great Smith St, London SW1P 3BU T: 02072 222555 E: vivek@cinnamonclub.com W: www.cinnamonclub.com CLOS MAGGIORE Marcellin Marc Head Chef 33 King Street, Covent Garden WC2E 8JD T: 020 7379 9696 E: enquiries@closmaggiore.com W: www.closmaggiore.com CLUB GASCON Christian Haller General Manager 57 West Smithfield EC1A 9DS T: 020 7796 0600 E: info@clubgascon.com W: www.clubgascon.com COLETTE’S AT THE GROVE Russell Bateman Head Chef London’s Country Estate, Chandler’s Cross WD3 4TG T: 01923 807807 E: Russell.Bateman@thegrove. co.uk W: www.thegrove.co.uk COLONY BAR AND GRILL Atul Kochhar Executive Chef and Director 8 Paddington Street W1U 5QH T: 020 7935 3353 E: enquiries@colonybarandgrill. com W: www.colonybarandgrill.com

CONNAUGHT Helene Darroze Head Chef Carlos Place, Mayfair W1K 2AL T: 020 7409 7070 E: hdarroze@the-connaught. co.uk W: http://www.the-connaught. co.uk CORRIGAN’S Richard Corrigan Chef Proprietor 28 Upper Grosvenor Street W1K 7EH T: 020 7499 9943 E: reservations@ corrigansmayfair.com W: www.corrigansmayfair.com COWORTH PARK Chris Meredith Executive Chef Blacknest Road, Ascot SL5 7SE T: 01344 876600 E: CPA@dorchestercollection. com W: www.coworthpark.com CRAZY BEAR FITZROVIA Anusak Thepdamrongchaikagul Head Chef 26 - 28 Whitfield Street, Fitzrovia T: 020 7631 0088 E: enquiries@crazybear-fitzrovia. co.uk W: www.crazybeargroup.co.uk CROSS AT KINGUSSIE David Young Proprietor Tweed Mill Brae, Ardbroilach Road, Kingussie PH21 1LB T: 01540 661166 E: relax@thecross.co.uk W: www.thecross.co.uk CROWN AT THE CELTIC MANOR RESORT Ronan Hunter General Manager Coldra Woods, Newport NP18 1HQ T: 01633 410262 E: postbox@celtic-manor.com W: www.crown.celtic-manor. com CROWN AT WHITEBROOK James Sommerin Head Chef Whitebrook, Near Monmouth, Monmouthshire NP25 4TX T: 01600 860254 E: info@crownatwhitebrook. co.uk W: www.crownatwhitebrook. co.uk

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CURLEW Mark and Sara Colley Proprietors Junction Road, Bodiam TN32 5UY T: 01580 861394 E: enquiries@ thecurlewrestaurant.co.uk W: www.thecurlewrestaurant. co.uk

D DARROCH LEARG HOTEL Nigel Franks Proprietor Braemar Road, Ballater AB35 5UX T: 01339 755443 E: enquiries@darrochlearg.co.uk W: www.darrochlearg.co.uk DEAN STREET TOWNHOUSE Stephen Tonkin Head Chef 69 - 71 Dean Street W1D 3SE T: 020 7434 1775 E: stephen@ deanstreettownhouse.com W: www.deanstreettownhouse. com DEANE’S RESTAURANT Michael Deane Chef Proprietor 36-40 Howard Street, Belfast BT 1 6PF T: 02890 331134 E: info@michaeldeane.co.uk W: www.michaeldeane.co.uk DINING ROOM (AT MALLORY COURT) Simon Haigh Head Chef Mallory Court Hotel, Harbury Lane, Royal Leamington Spa CV33 9QB T: 01926 330214 E: reception@mallory.co.uk W: www.mallory.co.uk DINNER BY HESTON BLUMENTHAL Heston Blumenthal Patron Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7LA T: 020 7201 3833 W: www.dinnerbyheston.com DON Matt Burns Head Chef The Courtyard, 20 St. Swithins Lane EC4N 8AD T: 020 7626 2606 E: bookings@thedonrestaurant. co.uk W: www.thedonrestaurant.com

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DRAKES Steve Drake Chef Patron The Clock House, High Street Ripley GU23 6AQ T: 01483 224777 E: info@drakesrestaurant.co.uk W: www.drakesrestaurant.co.uk DRIFTWOOD Chris Eden Head Chef Rosevine, Portscatho TR2 5EW T: 01872 580644 E: info@driftwoodhotel.co.uk W: www.driftwoodhotel.co.uk

E E&O Samantha Goodchild General Manager 14 Blenheim Crescent W11 1NN T: 020 7229 5454 E: eando@rickerrestaurants.com W: www.rickerrestaurants.com EL FARO Javier Capella Head Chef 3 Turnberry Quay E14 9RD T: 020 7987 5511 E: fernando@el-faro.co.uk W: www.el-faro.co.uk ELECTRIC BRASSERIE Steven Tonkin Executive Chef 191 Portobello Road W11 2ED T: 020 7908 9696 E: steven@deanstreettownhouse. com W: www.electricbrasserie.com ELEPHANT RESTAURANT AND BRASSERIE Simon Hulstone Head Chef 3 & 4 Beacon Terrace, Torquay TQ1 2BH T: 01803 200044 E: info@elephantrestaurant.co.uk W: www.elephantrestaurant.co.uk EQUILIBRIUM Brian Garside General Manager Fawsley Hall Fawsley Daventry NN11 3BA T: 01327 892000 E: info@fawsleyhall.com W: www.fawsleyhall.com EYRE BROTHERS David Eyre Head Chef 70 Leonard St. EC2A 4QX T: 020 7613 5346 E: eyrebros@btconnect.com W: www.eyrebrothers.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

F FAKHRELDINE Youssef Harb Head Chef 85 Piccadilly W1J 7NB T: 020 7493 3424 E: info@fakhreldine.co.uk W: www.fakhreldine.co.uk FAT DUCK Heston Blumenthal Proprietor High Street, Bray SL6 2AQ T: 01628 580333 W: www.thefatduck.co.uk FIFTEEN Jamie Oliver Restauranteur Fifteen, London 15 Westland Place N1 7LP T: 020 3375 1515 E: info@fabulousfeasts.co.uk W: www.fifteen.net FINO RESTAURANT Nieves Barragan Head Chef 33 Charlotte St W1T 1RR T: 020 7813 8010 E: reception@finorestaurant.com W: www.finorestaurant.com FISCHER’S AT BASLOW HALL John Cooper General Manager Calver Road, Baslow DE45 1RR T: 01246 583259 E: reservations@fischersbaslowhall.co.uk W: www.fischers-baslowhall. co.uk FOYER AT CLARIDGE’S Martyn Nail Head Chef 55 Brook Street W1K 4HR T: 020 7409 6307 E: dining@claridges.co.uk W: www.claridges.co.uk FRAICHE Marc Wilkinson Chef-Patron 11 Rose Mount, Oxton, Wirral CH43 5SG T: 01516 522914 E: contact@restaurantfraiche.com W: www.restaurantfraiche.com

G GALVIN AT WINDOWS Fred Siriax General Manager 22 Park Lane, London W1K 1BE T: 02072 084021 E: fred.siriax@hilton.com W: www.galvinatwindows.com

GALVIN LA CHAPELLE Zac Whittle Head Chef 35 Spital Square, London E1 6DY T: 020 7299 0400 E: info@galvinrestaurants.com W: www.galvinrestaurants.com GAUCHO PICCADILLY Ross Butler General Manager 25 Swallow Street W1B 4QR T: 020 7734 4040 E: piccadilly@gauchorestaurants. co.uk W: www.gauchorestaurants.co.uk GAUTHIER Alexis Gauthier Proprietor 21 Romilly Street, W1D 5AF T: 020 7494 3111 E: info@gauthiersoho.co.uk W: www.gauthiersoho.co.uk GAY HUSSAR (THE) Carlos Mendoca Head Chef 2 Greek Street, Soho W1D 4NB T: 020 7437 0973 E: gayhussar@corushotels.com W: www.gayhussar.co.uk GIDLEIGH PARK Michael Caines MBE Executive Head Chef Chagford TQ13 8HH T: 01647 432367 E: gidleighpark@gidleigh.co.uk W: www.gidleigh.com GILPIN LODGE COUNTRY HOUSE Phil Cubin Head Chef Crook Road Windermere, The English Lake District LA23 3NE T: 01539 488818 E: hotel@gilpinlodge.co.uk W: www.gilpinlodge.co.uk GLASSHOUSE Patra Panas Restaurant Manager 14 Station Parade, Kew TW9 3PZ T: 020 8940 6777 E: info@glasshouserestaurant. co.uk W: www.glasshouserestaurant. co.uk GLENAPP CASTLE Adam Stokes Head Chef Ballantrae KA26 0NZ T: 01465 831212 E: info@glenappcastle.com W: www.glenappcastle.com

GLENMORISTON TOWN HOUSE HOTEL Graham Campbell Head Chef 20, Ness Bank IV2 4SF T: 01463 223777 E: reception@ glenmoristontownhouse.com W: www. glenmoristontownhouse.com GORDON RAMSAY AT CLARIDGE’S Andy Downton Restaurant Manager Brook Street W1K 4HR T: 020 7499 0099 E: reservations@gordonramsay. com W: www.gordonramsay.com GRAND, JERSEY Richard Allen Head Chef The Esplanade, St. Helier JE2 3QA T: 01534 722301 E: reception@grandjersey.com W: www.grandjersey.com GRAVETYE MANOR HOTEL Rupert Gleadow Head Chef Vowels Lane, West Hoathly RH19 4LJ T: 01342 810567 E: info@gravetyemanor.co.uk W: www.gravetyemanor.co.uk GREEN INN (THE) Chris O’Halloran Head Chef 9 Victoria Road, Ballater AB35 5QQ T: 01339 755701 E: info@green-inn.com W: www.green-inn.com GREENHOUSE Marlon Abella Proprietor 27A Hay’s Mews, Mayfair W1J 5NY T: 020 7647 1888 E: marlonabela@ marcrestaurants.com W: www.greenhouserestaurant. co.uk GREENHOUSE Alexandre Seret Sommelier 27A Hay’s Mews, Mayfair W1J 5NY T: 020 7647 1888 E: alexandreseret@ marcrestaurants.com W: www.greenhouserestaurant. co.uk


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

GRILL AT THE DORCHESTER Brian Hughson Head Chef 53 Park Lane , Mayfair W1K 1QA T: 020 7319 7147 E: reservations.uk@ dorchestercollection.com W: www.thedorchester.com

H HAKKASAN Mark Hastings General Manager 8 Hanway Place W1T 1HD T: 020 7927 7000 E: markhastings@hakkasan.com W: www.hakkasan.com HAMBLETON HALL Tim Hart Proprietor Hambleton, Oakham LE15 8TH T: 01572 756991 E: hotel@hambletonhall.com W: www.hambletonhall.com HAMBROUGH Robert Thompson Chef Patron Hambrough Road, Ventnor PO38 1SQ T: 01983 856333 E: reservations@robertthompson.com W: www.robert-thompson.com HAND & FLOWERS Tom Kerridge Chef Proprietor 126 West Street, Marlow SL7 2BP T: 01628 482277 E: theoffice@thehandandflowers. co.uk W: www.thehandandflowers. co.uk HARROW AT LITTLE BEDWYN Ross Dixie General Manager Marlborough SN8 3JP T: 01672 870871 E: reservations@harrowinn.co.uk W: www. theharrowatlittlebedwyn.co.uk HARRY’S PLACE Harry Hallam Chef Proprietor 17 High Street, Great Gonerby Grantham NG31 8JS T: 01476 561780

HARTWELL HOUSE Tony Critchley Manager, Food & Beverages Oxford Road , Near Aylesbury HP17 8NR T: 01296 747444 E: anc@hartwell-house.com W: www.hartwell-house.com HARWOOD ARMS Alex Sergeant General Manager / Sommelier Walham Grove, Fulham SW6 1QR T: 020 7386 1847 E: admin@harwoodarms.com W: www.harwoodarms.com HELL BAY Richard Kearsley Head Chef Bryther, Isles of Scilly TR23 OPR T: 01720 422 947 E: contactus@hellbay.co.uk W: www.hellbay.co.uk HEREFORD ROAD RESTAURANT Tom Pemberton Head Chef 3 Hereford Road, Westbourne Grove W2 4AB T: 020 7727 1144 E: info@herefordroad.org W: www.herefordroad.org HIBISCUS Claude Bosi Chef Proprietor 29 Maddox Street W1S 2PA T: 020 7629 2999 E: enquriies@hibiscusrestaurant. co.uk W: www.hibiscusrestaurant.co.uk HINTLESHAM HALL HOTEL Alan Ford Head Chef Hintlesham, Ipswich IP8 3NS T: 01473 652334 E: reservations@hintleshamhall. com W: www.hintleshamhall.co.uk HOLBECK GHYLL Andrew Macpherson General Manager Holbeck Ghyll Country House Hotel, Holbeck Lane, Windermere LA23 1LU T: 01539 432375 E: Andrew.MacPherson@ holbeckghyll.com W: holbeckghyll.com HOMEWOOD PARK HOTEL Sarah Moon Operations Manager Abbey Lane Hinton Charterhouse BA2 7TB T: 01225 723731 E: reservations@homewoodpark. co.uk W: www.homewooodpark.co.uk

HORN OF PLENTY Scott Paton Head Chef Country House Hotel & Restaurant, Gulworthy, Tavistock PL19 8JD T: 01822 832528 E: enquiries@thehornofplenty. co.uk W: www.thehornofplenty.co.uk HORSESHOE INN Riad Beerdux Chef Director Eddleston, Peebles EH45 8QP T: 01721 730225 E: reservations@horseshoeinn. co.uk W: www.horseshoeinn.co.uk HOTEL DU VIN BISTRO AT ONE DEVONSHIRE GARDENS Andy Rogers General Manager 1 Devonshire Gardens, Glasgow G12 OUX T: 01413 392001 E: receptionodg@hotelduvin.com W: www.hotelduvin.com HOTEL ENDSLEIGH Helen Costello General Manager Milton Abbot, Tavistock PL19 0PQ T: 01822 870000 E: mail@hotelendsleigh.com W: www.hotelendsleigh.com HOTEL TRESANTON Federica Bertolini General Manager Lower Castle Road, St. Mawes TR2 5DR T: 01326 270055 W: www.tresanton.com

I INVERLOCHY CASTLE Philip Carnegie Executive Head Chef Torlundy, Fort William PH33 6SN T: 01397 702177 E: bookings@inverlochy.co.uk W: www.inverlochycastlehotel. com ISLE OF ERISKA Anne Schaeflein General Manager Hotel, Spa & Island, Benderloch By Oban, Argyll PA37 1SD T: 01631 720371 E: office@eriska-hotel.co.uk W: www.eriska-hotel.co.uk

IVY Gary Lee Head Chef 1 - 5 West Street, WC2h 9NQ T: 020 7836 4751 W: www.the-ivy.co.uk IZNIK Emerald Mcguire Proprietor 19 Highbury Park, Islington N5 1QJ T: 020 7704 8099 E: info@iznik.co.uk W: www.iznik.co.uk

J J SHEEKEY OYSTER BAR Marco Fazzina General Manager 26-32 St. Martin’s Court, WC2N 4AL T: 020 7240 2565 E: office@j-sheekey.co.uk W: www.j-sheekey.co.uk JESMOND DENE HOUSE Michael Penaluna Head Chef Jesmond Dene Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 2 EY T: 0191 2123000 E: info@jesmonddenehouse.co.uk W: www.jesmonddenehouse.co.uk JSW Jake Watkins Head Chef / Proprietor 20 Dragon Street, Petersfield GU31 4JJ T: 01730 262030 E: jsw.restaurant@btconnect.com W: jswrestaurant.com JUDGES COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL Tim Howard General Manager Kirklevington Hall, Kirklevington, Yarm TS15 9LW T: 01642 789000 E: enquiries@judgeshotel.co.uk W: www.judgeshotel.co.uk

K KAI MAYFAIR Alex Chow Head Chef 65 South Audley Street, W1K 2QU T: 020 7493 8988 E: alexchow@kaimayfair.co.uk W: www.kaimayfair.co.uk

KENZA Olivier Chatelain General Manager 10 Devonshire Sq, EC2M 4YP T: 020 7929 5533 E: reservations@kenzarestaurant.com W: www.kenza-restaurant.com KEW GRILL Candido Da Silva Head Chef 10b Kew Green, Richmond TW9 3BH T: 020 8948 4433 W: www.awtrestaurants.com KINLOCH LODGE Marcello Tully Chef Director Sleat, Isle of Skye IV43 8QY T: 01471 833333 E: marcello@kinloch-lodge.co.uk W: www.kinloch-lodge.co.uk KITCHEN W8 David Chevalier General Manager 11-13 Abingdon Road, W8 6AH T: 020 7937 0120 E: reservations@kitchenw8com W: www.kitchenw8com KITCHIN Tom Kitchin Chef Proprietor 78 Commercial Quay, Leith, Edinburgh EH6 6LX T: 01315 551755 E: info@thekitchin.com W: www.thekitchin.com KNOCKINAAM LODGE David Ibbotson Proprietor Portpatrick, Dumfries and Galloway, DG9 9AD T: 01776 810471 E: reservations@ knockinaamlodge.com W: www.knockinaamlodge.com KOFFMANN’S (AT THE BERKELEY) Pierre Koffmann Executive Chef Wilton Place Knightsbridge, SW1X 7RL T: 020 7235 1010 E: koffmanns@theberkeley.co.uk KYASHII Patrick McClean General Manager 4a Upper Saint Martin’s Lane WC2H 9NY T: 020 7836 5211 E: pmacclean@kyashii.co.uk W: www.kyashii.co.uk

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L LA BODEGA TAPAS Juan Riof Proprietor 38 Hart Street, Henley-on-Thames RG9 2AU T: 01491 578 611 E: info@labodega-tapas.co.uk W: www.labodega-tapas.co.uk LA PETITE MAISON Nobuko Okamura Head Chef 54 Brooks Mews W1K 4EG T: 020 7495 4774 E: info@lpmLondon.co.uk W: www.lpmLondon.co.uk L’ANIMA Francesco Mazzei Head Chef 1 Snowden Street EC2A 2DQ T: 020 7422 7000 E: info@lanima.co.uk W: www.lanima.co.uk L’ATELIER DE JOEL ROBUCHON Achille Checuz General Manager 13 - 15 West Street, Soho WC2H 9NE T: 020 7010 8600 E: info@joelrobuchon.co.uk W: www.joelrobuchon.co.uk LA TROMPETTE Adele Stebbings Restaurant Manager 5 - 7 Devonshire Road, Chiswick W4 2EU T: 020 8747 1836 E: adele@latrompette.co.uk W: www.latrompette.co.uk LAUNCESTON PLACE Tim Allen Head Chef 1a Launceston Place W8 5RL T: 020 7937 6912 E: launcestonplace@ danddLondon.com W: www.launcestonplacerestaurant.co.uk L’AUTRE PIED Marcus Eaves Chef 5-7 Blandford Street W1U 3DB T: 020 7486 9696 E: info@lautrepied.co.uk W: www.lautrepied.co.uk LE CAPRICE Jesus Adorno Director Arlington House, Arlington Street SW1A 1RJ T: 020 7629 2239 E: reservations@le-caprice.co.uk W: www.le-caprice.co.uk

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LE CHAMPIGNON SAUVAGE David Everitt-Matthias Chef Proprietor 24-28 Suffolk Road, Cheltenham GL50 2AQ T: 01242 573449 E: mail@lechampignonsauvage. co.uk W: www.lechampignonsauvage. co.uk LE GAVROCHE Emmanuel Landre General Manager 43 Upper Brook Street W1K 7QR T: 020 7408 0881 E: bookings@le-gavroche.com W: www.le-gavroche.co.uk LE MANOIR AUX QUAT’SAISONS Gary Jones Executive Head Chef Church Road, Great Milton, Oxford OX44 7PD T: 01844 278881 E: lemanoir@blanc.co.uk W: www.manoir.com LEDBURY Brett Graham Head Chef 127 Ledbury Road, Notting Hill W11 2AQ T: 020 7792 9090 E: info@theledbury.com W: www.theledbury.com L’ENCLUME Simon Rogan Chef Proprietor Cavendish Street, Cartmel Nr, Grange over Sands LA11 6PZ T: 015395 36362 E: info@lenclume.co.uk W: www.lenclume.co.uk LEWTRENCHARD MANOR John Hooker Chef Patron Lewdown, Near Okehampton EX20 4PN T: 01566 783222 E: info@lewtrenchard.co.uk W: www.lewtrenchard.co.uk LINTHWAITE HOUSE HOTEL Andrew Nicholson General Manager Crook Road, Windermere LA23 3JA T: 01539 488600 E: stay@linthwaite.com W: www.linthwaite.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

LITTLE BARWICK HOUSE Tim Ford Chef Patron Barwick Village, Yeovil BA22 9TD T: 01935 423902 E: reservations@barwick7fsnet. co.uk W: www.littlebarwickhouse.co.uk LOCANDA LOCATELLI Giorgio Locatelli Chef Proprietor 8 Seymour Street W1H 7JZ T: 020 7935 9088 E: info@locandalocatelli.com W: www.locandalocatelli.com LOCHGREEN HOUSE Andrew Costley Head Chef Monktonhill Road, Southwood Troon KA10 7EN T: 01292 313343 E: lochgreen@costley-hotels.co.uk W: www.lochgreenhouse.co.uk LONGRIDGE RESTAURANT Regis Sardais Restaurant Manager 104-106 Higher Road, Longridge, Preston PR3 3SY T: 01772 784969 E: longridge@heathcotes.co.uk W: www.heathcotes.co.uk LONGUEVILLE MANOR HOTEL Pedro Bento General Manager St Saviour, Jersey JE2 7WF T: 01534 725501 E: info@longuevillemanor.com W: www.longuevillemanor.com LORDS OF THE MANOR Paul Thompson General Manager Upper Slaughter GL54 2JD T: 01451 820243 E: pthompson@ lordsofthemanor.com W: www.lordsofthemanor.com L’ORTOLAN Nick Chappel Head Chef Church Lane Shinfield, Reading RG2 9BY T: 01189 888500 E: info@lortolan.com W: lortolan.com LOVES RESTAURANT Steve Love Chef Proprietor The Glasshouse, Canal Square, Browning Street, Birmingham B16 8FL T: 012 1454 5151 E: info@loves-restaurant.co.uk W: www.loves-restaurant.co.uk

LUCIO Andrea Cornacciea Head Chef 257 Fulham Road SW3 6HY T: 020 7823 3007 E: info@luciorestaurant.com W: www.luciorestaurant.com LUTYENS David Burke Head Chef 85 Fleet Street EC4Y 1AE T: 020 7583 8385 E: info@lutyens-restaurant.com W: www.lutyens-restaurant.com

MAZE Sid Clark General Manager 10 - 13 Grosvenor Square W1K 6JP T: 020 7107 0000 E: maze@gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com/maze

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MICHAEL WIGNALL AT THE LATYMER Julian Tomlin General Manager Pennyhill Park Hotel & The Spa, London Road, Bagshot GU19 5EU T: 01276 478426 E: enquiries@pennyhillpark.co.uk W: www.pennyhillpark.co.uk

MALLORY COURT HOTEL Simon Haigh Head Chef Harbury Lane, Royal Leamington Spa CV33 9QB T: 01926 330214 E: reception@mallory.co.uk W: www.mallory.co.uk

MIDSUMMER HOUSE Daniel Clifford Head Chef Midsummer Common, Cambridge CB4 1HA T: 01223 369299 E: reservations@ midsummerhouse.co.uk W: www.midsummerhouse.co.uk

MANOR HOUSE HOTEL AND GOLF CLUB Stephen Browning General Manager The Manor House, Castle Combe, Nr. Bath SN14 7HR T: 01249 782206 E: sbrowning@manorhouse.co.uk W: www.manorhouse.co.uk

MILL AT GORDLETON Elizabeth Cottingham Proprietor Silver Street, Hordle, Nr. Lymington SO416DJ T: 01590 682219 E: info@themillatgordleton. co.uk W: www.themillatgordleton.co.uk

MARCUS WAREING AT THE BERKELEY HOTEL Marcus Wareing Chef Patron /Proprietor The Berkeley Hotel, Wilton Place, Knightsbridge SW1X 7RL T: 020 7235 1200 E: marcuswareing@the-berkeley. co.uk W: www.marcus-wareing.com

MIN JIANG Marco Royo-Gota Food & Beverage Manager Royal Garden Hotel 2-24 Kensington High Street W8 4PT T: 02073 611999 E: marcoroyo-gota@ royalgardenhotel.co.uk W: www.minjiang.co.uk

MARTIN WISHART Martin Wishart Chef Proprietor 54 The Shore, Leith, Edinburgh EH6 6RA T: 01315 533557 E: info@martin-wishart.co.uk W: www.martin-wishart.co.uk

MOMO Phillipe Angelo Head chef 25 Heddon Street W1B 4BH T: 020 7434 4040 E: reservations@momoresto.com W: www.momoresto.com

MASON’S ARMS Mark Dodson Chef Patron Knowstone, South Molton EX36 4RY T: 01398 341231 E: enqs@masonarmsdevon.co.uk W: www.masonsarmsdevon.co.uk

MORGAN M Yannick Shaloyard General Manager 50 Long Lane EC1A 9EJ T: 020 7609 3560 E: morganmeunier@btconnect. com W: www.morganm.com MORO Samantha Clark Head Chef 34 - 36 Exmouth Market EC1R 4QE T: 020 7833 8336 E: info@moro.co.uk W: www.moro.co.uk


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

MORSTON HALL Galton & Tracy Blackiston Proprietors Morston, Holt NR25 7AA T: 01263 741041 E: reception@morstonhall.com W: www.morstonhall.com MR. UNDERHILL’S AT DINHAM WEIR Chris Bradley Chef Dinham Weir, Ludlow SY8 1EH T: 01584 874431 E: cjbradley@mr-underhills.co.uk W: www.mr-underhills.co.uk MURANO Angela Hartnett Chef-Patron 20 Queen Street W1J 5PP T: 020 7495 1127 E: muranorestaurant@angelahartnett.com W: www.angela-hartnett.com

N NAHM (HALKIN HOTEL) Troy Sutton Restaurant Manager Halkin Street SW1X 7DJ T: 02073 331234 E: troy.sutton@nahm.como.bz W: http://www.nahm.como.bz NEPTUNE RESTAURANT WITH ROOMS Kevin Mangeolles Proprietor 85 Old Hunstanton Road, Old Hunstanton PE36 6HZ T: 01485 532122 E: reservations@theneptune.co.uk W: www.theneptune.co.uk NEWICK PARK HOTEL Chris Moore Head Chef Newick, nr. Lewes BN8 4SB T: 01825 723633 E: bookings@newickpark.co.uk W: www.newickpark.co.uk NOBU Mark Edwards Executive Chef 19 Old Park Lane WIY 4LB T: 020 7447 4747 E: marke@noburestaraunts.com W: noburestaurant.com NOBU Nobu Matsuhisa Proprietor 15 Berkeley Street W1J 8DY T: 020 7290 9222 W: noburestaurant.com

NORTH ROAD Christoffer Hruskova Proprietor 69 - 73 St. John Street, London EC1M 4AN T: 020 3217 0033 W: www.northroadrestaurant. co.uk NORTHCOTE Lisa Allen Head Chef Northcote Road, Langho Blackburn BB6 8BE T: 01254 240555 E: reservations@northcote.com W: www.northcote.com NORTON HOUSE HOTEL Michael Sanchez Food & Beverage Manager Ingliston, Edinburgh EH28 8LX T: 01313 331 275 E: nortonhouse@handpicked. co.uk W: www.handpickedhotels.co.uk NOTTING HILL BRASSERIE Karl Burdock Head Chef 92 Kensington Park Road Notting Hill Gate W11 2PN T: 020 7229 4481 E: info@nottinghillbrasserie.com W: www.nottinghillbrasserie. com NUMBER ONE Gary Quinn Manager The Balmoral, 1 Princes Street, Edinburgh EH2 2EQ T: 01315 576727 E: gquinn@roccofortehotels.com W: www.thebalmoralhotel.com NUT TREE Michael North Patron Main Street, Murcott, Oxon OX5 2RE T: 01865 331253 W: www.nuttreeinn.co.uk

O OAK ROOM AT GREAT FOSTERS Simon Bolsover Head Chef Stroude Road, Egham TW20 9UR T: 01784 433822 E: reception@greatfosters.co.uk W: www.greatfosters.co.uk

OCEAN RESTAURANT (AT THE ATLANTIC HOTEL) Mark Jordan Head Chef Le Mont de la Pulente St Brelade, Jersey, Channel Islands JE3 8HE T: 01534 744101 E: info@theatlantichotel.com W: www.theatlantichotel.com OCKENDEN MANOR Adam Smith General Manager Cuckfield, West Sussex RH17 5LD T: 01444 416111 E: a.smith@ockenden.manor.com W: www.hshotels.co.uk/hotels/ ockenden-manor ODETTE’S RESTAURANT Bryn Williams Chef Patron 130 Regents Park Road, Primrose Hill NW1 8XL T: 020 7586 8569 E: info@odettesprimrosehill.com W: www.odettesprimrosehill.com OLD VICARAGE Tessa Bramley Chef Patron Ridgeway Moor, Ridgeway Village, Near Sheffield S12 3XW T: 01142 475814 E: eat@theoldvicarage.co.uk W: www.theoldvicarage.co.uk OLIVE BRANCH AND BEECH HOUSE Sean Hope Chef Proprietor Main Street, Clipsham LE15 7SH T: 01780 410355 E: info@theolivebranchpub.com W: www.theolivebranchpub.com OLIVE TREE AT THE QUEENSBERRY HOTEL Laurence & Helen Beere Proprietors 4 - 7 Russell Street, Bath BA1 2QF T: 01225 447928 E: reservations@thequeensberry. co.uk W: www.thequeensberry.co.uk ON THE ROCKS Richard Thomas Proprietor Bridge Road, Yarmouth, Isle of Wight PO41 OPJ T: 08719 628216

ONE-O-ONE Pascal Proyart Head Chef 101 Knightsbridge SW1X 7RN T: 020 7235 8050 E: pascal.proyart@ starwoodhotels.com W: www.sheratonparktower.com ORCHID Charles Large General Manager Torbay Road Sea Front, Torquay TQ2 6RH T: 01803 213611 W: www.corbynhead.com ORRERY Igor Tymchyshyn Head Chef 55 Marylebone High Street W1U 5RB T: 020 7616 8000 E: orreryreservations@ danddLondon.com W: www.orreryrestaurant.co.uk OSCARS OF CARDIFF Grady Atkins Head Chef 6 - 10 Romilly Crescent, Cardiff CF11 9NR T: 02920 341264 E: info@oscarsofcardiff.com W: www.oscarsofcardiff.com OXO TOWER RESTAURANT Jacinta Phelan General Manager Oxo Tower Wharf, Barge House Street SE1 9PH T: 020 7803 3888 E: oxo.reservations@ harveynichols.com W: www.harveynichols.com

P PARIS HOUSE Alan Murchison Executive Chef Woburn Park, Woburn MK17 9QP T: 01525 290692 E: info@parishouse.co.uk W: www.parishouse.co.uk PARK (AT LUCKNAM PARK) Hywel Jones Head Chef Lucknam Park Hotel & Spa, Bath Colerne, Chippenham SN14 8AZ T: 01225 742777 E: hjones@lucknampark.co.uk W: www.lucknampark.co.uk

PASS Rupert Spurgeon General Manager South Lodge Hotel, Brighton Road, Nr. Horsham RH13 6PS T: 01403 891711 E: rspurgeon@southlodgehotel. co.uk W: www.southlodgehotel.co.uk PEARL RESTAURANT AND BAR Jun Tanaka Executive Chef 252 High Holborn WC1V 7EN T: 020 7829 7000 E: jun.tanaka@pearl-restaurant. com W: www.pearl-restaurant.co.uk PEAT INN Geoffrey Smeddle Chef Proprietor Near St Andrews, Fife KY15 5LH T: 01334 840206 E: stay@thepeatinn.co.uk W: www.thepeatinn.co.uk PETERSHAM NURSERIES CAFE Greg Maluf Head Chef Petersham Nurseries, Church Lane, Off Petersham Road, Richmond TW10 7AG T: 020 8605 3627 E: info@petershamnurseries.com W: www.petershamnurseries.com PETRUS Sean Burbidge Head Chef 1 Kinnerton Street, Knightsbridge SW1X 8EA T: 020 7592 1609 E: petrus@gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com PIED A TERRE David Moore Director 34 Charlotte Street W1T 2NH T: 020 7636 1178 E: info@pied-a-terre.co.uk W: www.pied-a-terre.co.uk PIPE & GLASS INN James and Kate Mackenzie Chef / Proprietors West End, South Dalton, Beverley HU17 7PN T: 01430 810246 E: email@pipeandglass.co.uk W: www.pipeandglass.co.uk POLLEN STREET SOCIAL Jason Atherton Proprietor 8/10 Pollen Street, London T: 0207 290 7600 W: www.pollenstreetsocial.com

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DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

PONY & TRAP Josh Eggleton Chef Proprietor Knowle Hill Newtown, Chew Magna, Somerset BS40 8TQ T: 012 7533 2627 E: josh@theponyandtrap.co.uk W: www.theponyandtrap.co.uk

READ’S David Pitchford Head Chef Macknade Manor, Canterbury Road, Faversham Me13 8XE T: 017 9553 5344 E: enquiries@reads.com W: www.reads.com

PRIORY BAY Bin Edwards Head Chef The Priory Bay Hotel, Priory Drive, Seaview PO34 5BU T: 019 8361 3146 E: enquiries@priorybay.co.uk W: www.priorybay.com

RESTAURANT ALIMENTUM Mark Poynton Chef Patron 152 - 154 Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 8PB T: 012 2341 3000 E: reservations@ restaurantalimentum.co.uk W: www.restaurantalimentum. co.uk

PURNELL’S Glynn Purnell Chef Proprietor 55 Cornwall Street, Birmingham B3 2DH T: 0121 212 9799 E: info@purnellsrestaurant.com W: www.purnellsrestaurant.com

Q QUILON Santanu Mazumdar Restaurant Manager 41 Buckingham Gate, Victoria SW1E 6AF T: 020 7821 1899 E: info@quilonrestaurant.co.uk W: www.quilon.co.uk

R RACINE Henry Harris Head Chef 239 Brompton Road SW3 2EP T: 020 7584 4477 E: henry@racine.com W: www.racine-restaurant.com RAMPSBECK COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL Andrew McGeorge Head Chef Watermillock, Ullswater CA11 0LP T: 0 17684 86442 E: enquiries@rampsbeck.co.uk W: www.rampsbeck.co.uk RASOI Gopi Krishna Ketineni Manager 10 Lincoln Street, Chelsea SW3 2TS T: 020 7225 1881 E: info@rasoir-uk.com W: www.rasoi-uk.com

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RESTAURANT GORDON RAMSAY Clare Smyth Head Chef 68 Royal Hospital Road SW3 4HP T: 020 7352 4441 E: royalhospitalroad@ gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com RESTAURANT NATHAN OUTLAW Nathan Outlaw Head Chef The St Enodoc Hotel, Rock PL27 6LA T: 01208 863394 E: mail@nathan-outlaw.com W: www.nathan-outlaw.co.uk RESTAURANT SAT BAINS Sat Bains Patron Lenton Lane, Nottingham NG7 2SA T: 011 5986 6566 E: info@restaurantsatbains.net W: www.restaurantsatbains.net RHODES TWENTY FOUR Michael Haydon General Manager Tower 42, 25 Old Broad Street EC2N 1HQ T: 020 7877 7703 E: www.rhodes24co.uk W: www.rhodes24co.uk RHODES W1 Fabrice Roulin Restaurant Manager Great Cumberland Place W1H 7DL T: 020 7616 5930 E: restaurant@rhodesw1com W: www.rhodesw1com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

RIVER CAFE Sian Wyn Owen Head Chef Thames Wharf, Rainville Road W6 9HA T: 020 7386 4200 E: sian@rivercafe.co.uk W: www.rivercafe.co.uk ROAD HOLE RESTAURANT Daniel Pereira General Manager Old Course Hotel, St Andrews Kingdom of Fife KY16 9SP T: 0 1334 474371 E: reservations@oldcoursehotel. co.uk W: www.oldcoursehotel.kohler. com ROAST Sergei Gubars General Manager Floral Hall, Borough Market Stoney Street SE1 1TL T: 084 5034 7300 E: reception@roast-restaurant.com W: www.roast-restaurant.com ROKA Hamish Brown Head Chef 37 Charlotte Street W1T 1RR T: 020 7580 6464 E: info@rokarestaurant.com W: www.rokarestaurant.com ROMAN CAMP COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL Ian McNaught Head Chef Callander Fk17 8BG T: 018 7733 0003 E: mail@romancamphotel.co.uk W: www.romancamphotel.co.uk ROYAL OAK Dominic Chapman Head Chef Paley Street, Littlefield Green, Nr. Maidenhead SL6 3JN T: 01628 620 541 E: info@theroyaloakpaleystreet. com W: www.theroyaloakpaleystreet. com RULES RESTAURANT David Ayliffe Head Chef 35 Maiden Lane, Covent Garden WC2E 7LB T: 020 7836 5314 E: chef@rules.co.uk W: www.rules.co.uk

S SAKE NO HANA Imran Khaleel General Manager 23 St James’s St SW1A 1HA T: 020 7925 8988 E: imran@sakenohana.com W: www.sakenohana.com SAKI BAR & FOOD EMPORIUM Ayako Watanabe General Manager 4 West Smithfield EC1A 9JX T: 020 7489 7033 E: info@saki-food.com W: www.saki-food.com SAMUEL’S AT SWINTON PARK Simon Crannage Head Chef Masham, Ripon HG4 4JH T: 017 6568 0900 E: enquiries@swintonpark.com W: www.swintonpark.com SANGSTER’S Bruce Sangster Chef Proprietor 51 High Street, Elie, Fife KY9 1BZ T: 01333 331001 E: bruce@sangsters.co.uk W: www.sangsters.co.uk SEAFOOD RESTAURANT Tim Butler Proprietors Bruce Embankment, St Andrews Fife KY16 9AB T: 01334 479 475 E: standrews@ theseafoodrestaurant.com W: www.theseafoodrestaurant. com SEAFOOD RESTAURANT Rupert Wilson General Manager Riverside, Padstow PL28 8BY T: 01841 532700 E: reservations@rickstein.com W: www.rickstein.com SEMPLICE Marco Torre Chef Proprietor 8 - 10 Blenheim Street W1S 1 LJ T: 020 7495 1509 E: info@ristorantesemplice.com W: ristorantesemplice.com

SEVEN PARK PLACE (AT ST. JAMES’S HOTEL AND CLUB) William Drabble Executive Chef 7-8 Park Place, St. James’s SW1A 1LS T: 020 7316 1600 E: William@ stjameshotelandclub.com W: www.stjameshotelandclub.com SHARROW BAY COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL Colin Akrigg Head Chef Sharrow Bay Lake, Ullswater Penrith CA10 2LZ T: 01768 486301 E: info@sharrowbay.co.uk W: www.sharrowbay.co.uk SIENNA Elena Brown Manager 36 High West Street, Dorchester DT1 1UP T: 01305 250022 E: browns@siennarestaurant.co.uk W: www.siennarestaurant.co.uk SIMON RADLEY AT THE CHESTER GROSVENOR Simon Radley Head Chef The Chester Grosvenor, 56 -58 Eastgate, Chester CH1 1LT T: 012 4432 4024 E: jan.roberts@chestergrosvenor. com W: www.chestergrosvenor.com SIMPSONS Andreas Antona Chef Patron 20 Highfield Road, Edgbaston B15 3DU T: 0121 454 3434 E: info@simpsonsrestaurant.co.uk W: www.simpsonsrestaurant.co.uk SIR CHARLES NAPIER Julie Griffiths Proprietor Sprigg’s Alley, Chinnor OX39 4BX T: 01494 483011 E: info@sircharlesnapier.co.uk W: www.sircharlesnapier.co.uk SKETCH Roel Lintermans Head Chef 9 Conduit Street W1S 2XG T: 087 0777 4488 E: roell@sketch.uk.com W: www.sketch.uk.com


DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

SPICE MERCHANT Hashan Chowdhury Restaurant Manager 25 Thameside, Henley-on-Thames RG9 2LJ T: 014 9163 6118 E: henley@spicemerchantgroup. com W: www.spicemerchantgroup.com SPORTSMAN Philip and Stephen Harris Proprietors Faversham Road, Seasalter, Whitstable CT5 4BP T: 01227 273370 E: sportsmanseasalter@ googlemail.com W: www.thesportsmanseasalter. co.uk ST. JOHN Trevor Gulliver Chief Executive 26 St. John Street, London EC1M 4AY T: 020 7553 9842/ 020 7553 9842 E: tg@stjohnrestaurant.com W: www.stjohnrestaurant.com ST. MARTIN’S ON THE ISLE Keith Bradford General Manager Island of St Martin’s, Scilly Isles TR25 0QW T: 01720 422090 E: stay@stmartinshotel.co.uk W: www.stmartinshotel.co.uk STAGG INN Steve Reynolds Head Chef Titley, Kington HR5 3RL T: 01544 230221 E: reservations@thestagg.co.uk W: www.thestagg.co.uk STOCK HILL COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL & RESTAURANT Peter Hauser Head Chef Gillingham SP8 5NR T: 0 1747 823626 E: reception@stockhillhouse.co.uk W: www.stockhillhouse.co.uk SUMMER LODGE COUNTRY HOUSE HOTEL Steven Titman Head Chef Evershot DT2 0JR T: 0 19 3548 2000 E: infosl@rchmail.com W: www.summerlodgehotel.co.uk SUMOSAN Geraldine O’Neill General Manager 26B Albemarle St, W1S 4HY T: 020 7495 5999 E: info@sumosan.com W: www.sumosan.com

SWINTON PARK Simon Crannage Head Chef Masham, Ripon HG4 4JH T: 01765 680900 E: enquiries@swintonpark.com W: www.swintonpark.com

T TAMARIND Rajesh Suri Chief Executive 20 Queen Street, Mayfair, W1J 5PR T: 020 7629 3561 E: manager@tamarindrestaurant. com W: www.tamarindrestaurant.com TAN-Y-FOEL COUNTRY HOUSE Janet Pitman Chef Proprietor Capel Garmon, Nr Betws y Coed, Llanrwst, Conwy LL26 0RE T: 01690 710507 E: enquiries@tyfhotel.co.uk W: www.tyfhotel.co.uk TASSILI AT THE GRAND HOTEL Richard Allen Executive Head Chef Esplanade, St. Helier, Jersey JE2 3QA T: 01534 722301 E: reception@grandjersey.com W: www.grandjersey.com TERRACE (AT MONTAGU ARMS) Phil Archer Resident Manager The Montagu Arms Hotel, Beaulieu, New Forest SO42 7ZL T: 01590 612324 E: parcher@montaguarmshotel. co.uk W: www.montaguarmshotel.co.uk TEXTURE Agnar Sverrisson Chef Patron 34 Portman Street W1H 7BY T: 020 7224 0028 E: info@texture-restaurant.co.uk W: www.texture-restaurant.co.uk THACKERAY’S Richard Phillips Chef & Co-Proprietor 85 London Road, Tunbridge Wells TN1 1EA T: 01892 511921 E: info@thackerays-restaurant. co.uk W: www.thackerays-restaurant. co.uk

THE CAFÉ AT PORLOCK WEIR Andrew & Sarah Dixon Chef / Proprietors Porlock Weir , Minehead TA24 8PB T: 01643 863300 E: sarah@thecafeporlock.co.uk W: www.andrewsontheweir.co.uk THE GREEN INN Chris O’Halloran Head Chef 9 Victoria Road, Ballater AB35 5QQ T: 013 3975 5701 E: info@green-inn.com W: www.green-inn.com THE TAMARIND TREE Yeadin Chowdhury Restaurant Manager Reading Road, Lower Basildon Reading RG8 9ND T: 014 9167 1555 W: www.tamarindtree.biz THEO RANDALL AT THE INTERCONTINENTAL Theo Randall Head Chef & Patron 1 Hamilton Place, Park Lane W1J 7QY T: 0 20 7318 8747 E: reservations@theorandall.com W: www.theorandall.com THREE CHIMNEYS Eddie & Shirley Spear Proprietors Colbost, Isle of Skye IV55 8ZT T: 014 7051 1258 E: eatandstay@threechimneys. co.uk W: www.threechimneys.co.uk TRINITY Leah Kirkland General Manager 4 The Polygon, Clapham Old Town SW4 0JG T: 020 7622 1199 E: dine@trinityrestaurant.co.uk W: www.trinityrestaurant.co.uk TRISHNA Karam Sethi Head Chef 15 -17 Blandford Street, Marylebone Village W1U 3DG T: 020 7935 5624 E: info@trishnaLondon.com W: www.trishnaLondon.com TURNERS Richard Turner Head Chef 69 High Street, Birmingham B17 9NS T: 0121 4264440 E: info@turnersofharborne.com W: www.turnersofharborne.com

TYDDYN LLAN Bryan Webb Chef Proprietor Llandrillo, nr. Corwen, Denbighshire LL21 0ST T: 01490 440264 E: mail@tyddynllan.co.uk W: www.tyddynllan.co.uk

U UMU Yoshinori Ishii Head Chef 14-16 Bruton Place, Mayfair W1J 6LX E: yishii@umurestaurant.com W: www.umurestaurant.com

V

WATERSIDE INN Alain Roux Chef Patron Ferry Road, Bray SL6 2AT T: 016 2862 0691 E: reservations@waterside-inn. co.uk W: www.waterside-inn.co.uk WELL HOUSE HOTEL Murdo Alex Macritchie Head Chef St. Keyne, nr Looe PL14 4RN T: 01579 342001 W: www.wellhouse.co.uk WEST HOUSE Graham Garrett Head Chef 28, High Street, Biddenden TN27 8AH T: 01580 291341 E: mail@thewesthouserestaurant. co.uk W: www.thewesthouserestaurant. co.uk

VIAJANTE Nuno Mendes Chef Patron Patriot Square, Bethnal Green E2 9NF T: 020 7871 0461 E: htry@viajante.co.uk W: www.viajante.co.uk

WHATLEY MANOR Peter Egli General Manager Easton Grey Malmesbury SN16 ORB T: 016 6682 2888 E: peter@whatleymanor.com W: www.whatleymanor.com

VILLA MARINA Pepe Dieguez Restaurant Manager 18 Thameside, Henley-on-Thames RG9 1BH T: 014 9157 5262 W: www.villamarina-henley.com

WHITE ROOM Paul Leonard Head Chef Seaham Hall Lord Byron’s Walk Seaham, County Durham SR7 7AG T: 01915 161400 E: info@seaham-hall.co.uk W: www.seaham-hall.co.uk

VINEYARD AT STOCKCROSS Daniel Galmiche Executive Chef Stockcross, Newbury RG20 8JU T: 01635 528770 E: danielgalmiche@the-vineyard. co.uk W: www.the-vineyard.co.uk

W WALDO’S Carlos Martinez Executive Head Chef Cliveden, Taplow SL6 0JF T: 01628 668561 E: info@clivedenhouse.co.uk W: www.clivedenhouse.co.uk WALNUT TREE Shaun Hill Proprietor Llanddewi Skirrid, Abergavenny Monmouthshire NP7 8AW T: 01873 852797 E: mail@thewalnuttreeinn.com W: www.thewalnuttreeinn.com

WILD HONEY Will Smith Proprietor 12 St. George Street, Mayfair W1S 2FB T: 020 7758 9160 E: info@wildhoneyrestaurant. co.uk W: www.wildhoneyrestaurant. co.uk WILTONS Andrew Turner Head Chef 55 Jermyn St, SW1Y 6LX T: 020 7629 9955 E: wiltons@wiltons.co.uk W: www.wiltons.co.uk WINDSOR GRILL Andrew Thorn Head Chef 65 St. Leonard’s Road, Windsor SL4 3BX T: 017 5385 9658 W: www.awtrestaurants.com

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DIRECTORY

Distinguished Restaurants

Y YAUATCHA Eda Neto General Manager 15 Broadwick Street, Soho W1F 0DL T: 020 7494 8888 E: Reservations@yauatcha.com W: www.yauatcha.com YORK & ALBANY Alan Morris General Manager 127-129 Parkway NW1 7PS T: 020 7388 3344 E: yorkandalbany@ gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com YORKE ARMS Frances Atkins Proprietor/ Executive Chef Ramsgill-in-Nidderdale, Pateley Bridge, near Harrogate North Yorkshire HG3 5RL T: 01423 755243 E: enquiries@yorke-arms.co.uk W: www.yorke-arms.co.uk

Z ZAFFERANO RESTAURANT Enzo Cassini General Manager 15 Lowndes Street, Chelsea SW1X 9EY T: 02072355800 E: info@zafferanorestaurant.com W: www.zafferanorestaurant.com ZAIKA Luigi Gaudino General Manager No1 Kensington High Street W8 5NP T: 020 7795 6533 E: Zaika@btconnect.com W: www.zaika-restaurant.co.uk ZUMA Rainer Becker Founder 5 Raphael Street Knightsbridge SW7 1DL T: 020 7584 1010 E: info@zumarestaurant.com W: www.zumarestaurant.com

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Organisations A AA HOTEL SERVICES Emma Davis Marketing Manager 14th floor, Fanum House, Basing View, Basingstoke RG21 4EA T: 01256 844455 E: emma.davis@theaa.com W: www.theaa.com ACADEMY OF CULINARY ARTS Sarah Jane Staines Chief Executive 53 Cavendish Road, London SW12 0BL T: 020 8673 6300 E: sarahjanestaines@aoca.org.uk W: www.academyofculinaryarts. org.uk ACADEMY OF FOOD AND WINE SERVICES Nick Scade Chairman Trinity Court, 34 West Street, Sutton SM1 1SH T: 020 8661 4646 E: nick@acfws.org W: www.acfws.org ADVISORY CONCILIATION AND ARBIRTRATION SERVICE (ACAS) John Taylor Chief Executive Euston Tower, 286 Euston Road London NW1 3JJ T: 020 7210 3633 E: jtaylor@acas.org.uk W: www.acas.org.uk ASSOCIATION FOR CONFERENCES AND EVENTS (ACE) Michael Sharp Chairman Riverside House, 160 High St, Huntingdon PE18 6SG T: 01480 223484 E: ace@aceinternational.org W: www.aceinternational.org ASSOCIATION FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (ASLIB) Rebecca Marsh Director Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley BD16 1WA T: 01274 777700 E: dheath@aslib.com W: www.aslib.com

ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE ORGANISERS (ABPCO) Anne Doherty Managing Director Wellington Park, Belfast BT9 6DJ T: 02890 387475 E: info@abpco.org.uk W: www.abpco.org.uk ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH TRAVEL AGENTS (ABTA) Mark Tanzer Chief Executive 30 Park Street, London SE1 9EQ T: 09012 015050 E: abta@abta.com W: www.abta.com ASSOCIATION OF CATERING EXCELLENCE Sean Valentine Chairman Bourne House, Horsell Park, Woking GU21 4LY T: 01483 765111 E: admin@acegb.org W: www.acegb.org ASSOCIATION OF ELECTRICITY PRODUCERS David Porter Chief Executive Charles House, 5-11 Regent Street, London SW1Y 4LR T: 020 7930 9390 E: enquiries@aepuk.com W: www.aepuk.com ASSOCIATION OF EVENT ORGANISERS Karin Halwagi Chief Executive 119 High Street, Berkhamsted HP4 2DJ T: 01442 285810 E: info@aeo.org.uk W: www.aeo.org.uk ASSOCIATION OF HEALTHCARE CLEANING PROFESSIONALS Judith Hudson National Secretary Prospect House, 148 Lawrence Street, York YO10 3EB T: 01908 243425 E: judith.hudson@ahcp.co.uk W: www.ahcp.co.uk

ASSOCIATION OF LEADING VISITOR ATTRACTIONS Bernard Donoghue Director / Company Secretary 4 Westminster Palace Gardens, London SW1P 1RL E: email@alva.org.uk W: www.alva.org.uk ASSOCIATION OF LICENSED MULTIPLE RETAILERS (ALMR) Nick Bish Chief Executive 9b Walpole Court, London W5 5ED T: 020 8579 2080 E: info@almr.org.uk W: www.almr.org.uk

BRITISH BEER & PUB ASSOCIATION Brigid Simmonds Chief Executive Ground Floor, Brewers’ Hall, Aldermanbury Square, London EC2V 7HR T: 020 7627 9191 E: web@beerandpub.com W: www.beerandpub.com BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Martyn Pellew President 65 Petty France, London SW1H 9EU T: 020 7654 5800 E: info@britishchambers.org.uk W: www.britishchambers.org.uk

AUTOMATIC VENDING ASSOCIATION Jonathan Hilder Chief Executive Saunderton Estate, Wycombe Road, Saunderton HP14 4BF T: 01494 568960 E: jonathan@ava-vending.co.uk W: www.ava-vending.co.uk

BRITISH DIETETIC ASSOCIATION (THE) Andy Burman Chief Executive 5th Floor Charles House, 148-149 Great Charles Street, Birmingham B3 3HT T: 01212 008080 E: info@bda.uk.com W: www.bda.uk.com

B

BRITISH FRANCHISE ASSOCIATION Brian Smart Director General Centurion Court, 85f Milton Park, Abingdon OX14 4RY T: 01235 820470 E: mailroom@thebfa.org W: www.thebfa.org

BAR EXCHANGE Simon Blezard Chief Executive Utopia Village, 7 Chalcot Road, London NW1 8LH T: 020 3137 2675 E: info@barexchange.com W: www.barexchange.com BED AND BREAKFAST ASSOCIATION David Weston Chief Executive c/o The Pheasants B&B, 24 Greenhill, Sherborne DT9 4EW T: 01935 815252 E: info@bandbassociation.org W: www.bandbassociation.org BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF LEISURE PARKS, PIERS AND ATTRACTIONS Jeremy Reed Chief Executive Suite 12, 37 Tanner Street, London SE1 3LF T: 020 7403 4455 E: hannah@balppa.org W: www.balppa.org

BRITISH FROZEN FOOD FEDERATION Brian Young Director-General Warwick House, Long Bennington Business Park, Main Road, Long Bennington, Newark NG23 5JR T: 01400 283090 E: generaladmin@bfff.co.uk W: www.bfff.co.uk BRITISH HOLIDAY AND HOME PARK ASSOCIATION BHA Ros Pritchard Director General Chichester House, 6 Pullman Court, Great Western Road, Gloucester GL1 3ND T: 01452 526911 E: enquiries@bhhpa.org.uk W: www.ukparks.com

BRITISH HOSPITALITY ASSOCIATION Ufi Ibrahim Chief Executive Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk BRITISH INSTITUTE OF CLEANING SCIENCE Stan Atkins Chief Executive 9 Premier Court, Boarden Close, Moulton Park, Northampton NN3 6LF T: 01604 678710 E: info@bics.org.uk W: www.bics.org.uk BRITISH INSTITUTE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Gareth Tancred Chief Executive Number One Building, The Causeway, Bishop’s Stortford CM23 2ER T: 08450 581356 E: info@bifm.org.uk W: www.bifm.org.uk BRITISH INSTITUTE OF INNKEEPING (BII) Peter Thomas Chief Executive Wessex House, 80 Park Street, Camberley GU15 3PT T: 01276 684449 E: reception@bii.org W: www.bii.org.uk BRITISH NUTRITION FOUNDATION Professor Judith Buttriss Director General High Holborn House, 52-54 High Holborn, London WC1V 6RQ T: 020 7404 6504 E: postbox@nutrition.org.uk W: www.nutrition.org.uk BRITISH PEST CONTROL ASSOCIATION Simon Forrester Chief Executive Mallard Way Pride Park, Derby DE24 8GX T: 01332 294288 E: enquiry@bpca.org.uk W: www.bpca.org.uk

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BRITISH QUALITY FOUNDATION David Callaghan President 32-34 Great Peter Street, London SW1P 2QX T: 020 7654 5000 E: mail@bqf.org.uk W: www.bqf.org.uk BRITISH RESORTS AND DESTINATIONS ASSOCIATION (BRADA) Peter Hampson Director Southport Town Hall, Lord Street, Southport PR8 1DA T: 01519 342285 E: info@britishresorts.co.uk W: www.britishresorts.co.uk BRITISH SAFETY COUNCIL Alex Botha Chief Executive 70 Chancellors Road, London W6 9RS T: 020 8741 1231 E: marketing@britsafe.org W: www.britsafe.org BRITISH SANDWICH ASSOCIATION Jim Winship Director Association House, 18c Moor Street, Chepstow NP16 5DB T: 01291 636333 E: admin@sandwich.org.uk W: www.sandwich.org.uk BRITISH STANDARDS INSTITUTION (BSI) Mike Low Director 389 Chiswick High Road, London W4 4AL T: 020 8996 9001 E: cservices@bisgroup.com W: www.bsigroup.com BUSINESS VISITS AND EVENTS PARTNERSHIP Michael Hirst Chairman 16 Prowse Avenue, Bushey Heath, WD23 1JR T: 020 8950 8071 E: mbhirst@lineone.net W: www. businesstourismpartnership.com

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C CAMPAIGN FOR REAL ALE (CAMRA) Mike Benner Chief Executive 230 Hatfield Road, St Albans AL1 4LW T: 01727 867201 E: camra@camra.org.uk W: www.camra.org.uk CARBON TRUST Tom Delay Chief Executive 6th Floor, 5 New Street Square, London EC4A 3BF T: 08000 852005 E: customercentre@carbontrust. co.uk W: www.carbontrust.co.uk CATERING EQUIPMENT DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION (CEDA) Robin McKnight Managing Director CEDA Limited, PO Box 683, Inkberrow WR7 4WQ T: 01386 793911 E: robinmcknight@ceda.co.uk W: www.ceda.co.uk CATERING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIERS ASSOCIATION (CESA) Keith Warren Director Westminster Tower, 3 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7SL T: 020 7793 3030 E: enquiries@cesa.org.uk W: www.cesa.org.uk CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Graham Jukes Chief Executive Chadwick Court, 15 Hatfields, London SE1 8DJ T: 020 7928 6006 E: info@cieh.org W: www.cieh.org CHARTERED MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE Christopher Kinsella Chief Executive Management House, Cottingham Road, Corby NN17 1TT T: 01536 204222 E: enquiries@managers.org.uk W: www.managers.org.uk

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CITY AND GUILDS OF LONDON INSTITUTE Chris Jones General Director 1 Giltspur Street, London EC1A 9DD T: 020 7294 2800 E: businessunit@cityandguilds. com W: www.cityandguilds.com CLEANING AND HYGIENE SUPPLIERS ASSOCIATION Jeff Bell Chairman PO Box 770, Marlow SL7 2SH T: 01628 478273 E: secretary@chsa.co.uk W: www.chsa.co.uk COELIAC UK Sarah Sleet Chief Executive 3rd Floor, Apollo Centre, Desborough Road, High Wycombe HP11 2QW T: 01494 437278 E: helpline@coeliac.org.uk W: www.coeliac.org.uk CONFEDERATION OF BRITISH INDUSTRY (CBI) John Cridland Director General Centre Point, 103 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1DU T: 020 7379 7400 E: enquirydesk@cbi.org.uk W: www.cbi.org.uk CONFEDERATION OF TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY Ian Pack General Manager 37 Duke Street, London W1U 1LN T: 020 7258 9850 E: info@cthawards.com W: www.cthawards.com CONSUMERS ASSOCIATION Peter Vickery-Smith Chief Executive 2 Marylebone Road, London NW1 4DF T: 020 7770 7000 E: which@which.co.uk W: www.which.co.uk COUNCIL FOR HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT EDUCATION (CHME) Angela Roper Co-Chair E: ingrebliunaite@bournemouth. ac.uk W: www.chme.org.uk

COURT OF MASTER SOMMELIERS Brian Julyan Chief Executive 1 Seaway Close, Chelston Torquay TQ2 6PY T: 01803 605031 E: bjulyan@ courtofmastersommeliers.org.uk W: www. courtofmastersommeliers.org

DEPARTMENT FOR ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS Rt Hon. Caroline Spelman MP Secretary of State Nobel House, 17 Smith Square SW1P 3JR T: 08459 335577 E: defra.helpline@defra.gsi. gov.uk W: www.defra.gov.uk

CRAFT GUILD OF CHEFS Andrew Green Chairman 1 Victoria Parade, 331 Sandycombe Road Richmond TW9 3NB T: 020 8948 3870 E: enquiries@craftguildofchefs. org W: www.craftguildofchefs.org

DEPARTMENT FOR TRANSPORT Rt Hon. Justine Greening MP Secretary of State 33 Horseferry Road. 76 Marsham Street SW1P 4DR T: 03003 303000 W: www.dft.gov.uk

D DAIRY COUNCIL Judith Bryans Director 93 Baker Street, London W1U 6QQ T: 020 7467 2629 E: info@dairycouncil.co.uk W: www.milk.co.uk DAIRY UK Jim Begg Director General 93 Baker Street London, W1U 6QQ T: 020 7486 7244 E: info@dairyuk.org W: www.dairyuk.org

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DH) Rt. Hon Andrew Lansley MP Secretary of State Richmond House, 79 Whitehall SW1A 2NS T: 020 7210 4850 W: www.dh.gov.uk

E EC REPRESENTATION IN THE UK Jonathan Scheele Head of Representation in the UK Europe House, 32 Smith Square, London SW1P 3EU T: 020 7973 1992 E: jonathan.scheele@ec.europa.eu W: www.ec.europa.eu

DEPARTMENT FOR BUSINESS INNOVATION AND SKILLS (BIS) Rt Hon Dr Vince Cable MP Secretary of State 1 Victoria Street SW1H OET T: 020 7215 5000 E: enquiries@bis.gsi.gov.uk W: www.bis.gov.uk

ENERGY NETWORKS ASSOCIATION David Smith Chief Executive 6th Floor, Dean Bradley, House 52 Horseferry Road, London SW1P 2AF T: 020 7706 5100 E: info@energynetworks.org W: www.energynetworks.org

DEPARTMENT FOR CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT (DCMS) Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP Secretary of State 2 - 4 Cockspur Street SW1Y 4DH T: 020 7211 6000 E: enquiries@culture.gsi.gov.uk W: www.culture.gov.uk

ENGLISH HERITAGE Simon Thurley Chief Executive 1 Waterhouse Square, 138-142 Holborn, London EC1N 2ST T: 020 7973 3000 E: customers@english-heritage. org.uk W: www.english-heritage.org.uk

DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION Rt Hon Michael Gove MP Secretary of State Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith Street SW1P 3BT T: 08700 002288 W: www.education.gov.uk

ENGLISH UK Tony Millns Chief Executive 219 St John Street London EC1V 4LY T: 020 7608 7960 E: info@englishuk.com W: www.englishuk.com


DIRECTORY

Organisations

ENVIRONMENT AGENCY Chris Smith Chairman Millbank Tower, 25th Floor 21/24 Millbank, London SW1P 4XL T: 08708 506506 E: enquiries@environmentagency.gov.uk W: www.environment-agency. gov.uk EQUALITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION Trevor Phillips Chairman 3 More London, Riverside Tooley Street, London SE1 2RG T: 020 3117 0235 E: info@equalityhumanrights.com W: www.equalityhumanrights.com EUROPEAN FEDERATION OF CONTRACT CATERING ORGANISATIONS (FERCO) Marie-Christine Lefevre Director Bastion Tower, 5 Place du Champ de Mars-Boite 14 B1050 Brussels T: 003 2255 03676 E: info@ferco-catering.org W: www.ferco-catering.org

EVIIVO FRONTDESK Johanna Reder Marketing Manager 4th Floor, Horatio House, 77 Fulham Palace Road, London T: 020 8576 5600 E: johanna.reder@eviivo.com W: www.eviivo.com

F FAMILY HOLIDAY ASSOCIATION John McDonald Director 3 Gainsford Street, London SE1 2NE T: 020 7436 3304 E: info@fhaonline.org.uk W: www.fhaonline.org.uk FARMSTAY UK Andy Woodward Chief Executive National Agricultural Centre, Stoneleigh Park CV8 2LG T: 02476 696909 E: admin@farmstay.co.uk W: www.farmstay.co.uk

EUROPEAN TOUR OPERATORS ASSOCIATION Tom Jenkins Executive Director 6 Weighhouse Street, London W1K 5LT T: 020 7499 4412 E: info@etoa.org W: www.etoa.org

FEDERATION OF AWARDING BODIES (FAB) Jill Lanning Director 75 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7HS T: 020 7921 4417 E: enquiries@awarding.org.uk W: www.awarding.org.uk

EVENT SERVICES ASSOCIATION Jim Winship Director Association House, 18C Moor Street, Chepstow NP16 5DB T: 01291 636335 E: admin@tesa.org.uk W: www.tesa.org.uk

FEDERATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRADE ASSOCIATIONS (FETA) Cedric Sloan Director General 2 Waltham Court, Milley Lane Hare Hatch, Reading RG10 9TH T: 01189 403416 E: info@feta.co.uk W: www.feta.co.uk

EVENT SUPPLIERS & SERVICES ASSOCIATION (ESSA) Chris Skeith Director 119 High Street, Berkhamsted HP4 2DJ T: 08451 221880 E: info@essa.uk.com W: www.essa.uk.com EVENTIA Tracy Johnson Marketing Services Director 5th Floor, Galbraith House, 141 Great Charles Street, Birmingham B3 3LG T: 01212 121400 E: info@eventia.org.uk W: www.eventia.org.uk

FEDERATION OF LICENSED VICTUALLERS ASSOCIATION Nigel Williams President 126 Bradford Road, Brighouse HD6 4AU T: 01484 710534 E: admin@flva.co.uk W: www.flva.co.uk

FEDERATION OF SMALL BUSINESS (FSB) John Walker Chairman Sir Frank Whittle Way, Blackpool Business Park Blackpool FY4 2FE T: 01253 336000 E: john.walker@fsb.org.uk W: www.fsb.org.uk FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION Sue Tyley Associate Director London Road, Moreton-inMarsh GL56 0RH T: 01608 812500 E: fpa@thefpa.co.uk W: www.thefpa.co.uk FOOD & DRINK FEDERATION Melanie Leech Director General 6 Catherine Street, London WC2B 5JJ T: 020 7836 2460 E: generalenquires@fdf.org.uk W: www.fdf.org.uk FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY (FSA) Aviation House, 125 Kingsway WC2B 6NI T: 020 7276 8829 E: helpline@foodstandards.gsi. gov.uk W: www.food.gov.uk FOODSERVICE CONSULTANTS SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL (FCSI) David Bentley Chairman PO Box 1253, Woking GU22 2EW T: 01483 761122 E: admin@fcsi.org.uk W: www.fcsi.org.uk

G GUERNSEY TOURISM Tony Dawson Manager PO Box 23, St Peter Port GY1 3AN T: 01481 234567 E: enquiries@visitguernsey.com W: www.visitguernsey.com GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS Jonathan Woods Administrator 255 Kent House Road, Beckenham BR3 1JQ T: 020 8659 0422 E: guild@gfw.co.uk W: www.gfw.co.uk

GUILD OF PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH BUTLERS Robert Watson Managing Director Hayling Island T: 02392 637919 E: robert@guildofbutlers.com W: www.guildofbutlers.com GUILD OF PROFESSIONAL TOASTMASTERS Robert Grosse Secretary T: 020 8852 4621 E: info@guild-of-toastmasters. co.uk W: www.guild-of-toastmasters. co.uk

H

HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY TRUST (HIT SCOTLAND) Stephen Carter OBE Chairman PO Box 14598, Minathort, Kinross KY13 9WS T: 01577 865231 E: info@hitscotland.co.uk W: www.hitscotland.co.uk HOTEL BOOKING AGENTS ASSOCIATION (HBAA) Peter Ducker Executive Director Chestnut Suite, Office 9, Guardian House, Borough Road, Godalming, Guildford GU7 2AE T: 08456 033349 E: executiveofficer@hbaa.org.uk W: www.hbaa.org.uk

HEALTH AND SAFETY EXECUTIVE (HSE) Geoffrey Podger Chief Executive Redgrave Court, Merton Road, Bootle L20 7HS E: hse.infoline@connaught.plc.uk W: www.hse.gov.uk

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS & CAFES IN EUROPE (HOTREC) Anna Torres Chief Executive 111 Boulevard Anspach, Box 4, Brussels 1000 T: 003 2251 36323 E: main@hotrec.eu W: www.hotrec.eu

HISTORIC HOUSES ASSOCIATION Sarah Edwards Marketing Manager 2 Chester Street, London SW1X 7BB T: 020 7259 5688 E: info@hha.org.uk W: www.hha.org.uk

HR IN HOSPITALITY Carl Smith Chairman Suite 59, 2 Lansdowne Row, Berkeley Square, London W1J 6HL T: 020 7557 6064 E: kim.dunsmore@pmsr.com W: www.hrinhospitality.co.uk

HISTORIC ROYAL PALACES Michael Day Chief Executive Hampton Court Palace, East Molesey KT8 9AU T: 020 3166 6322 E: development@hrp.org.uk W: www.hrp.org.uk HOSPITALITY ACTION Penny Moore Chief Executive 62 Britton Street, London C1M 5UY T: 020 3004 5511 E: info@hospitalityaction.org.uk W: www.hospitalityaction.org.uk HOSPITALITY FINANCE, REVENUE AND IT PROFESSIONALS Paul Dukes Chairman Suite 6, Merley House, Business Centre, Merley House Lane, Wimborne BH21 3AA T: 01202 889430 E: info@hospa.org W: www.hospa.org

I INSTITUTE OF BREWING & DISTILLING Simon Jackson Executive Director 33 Clarges Street, London W1J 7EE T: 020 7499 8144 E: simon.jackson@ibd.org.uk W: www.ibd.org.uk INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS CONSULTING Christopher Kinsella Acting Director 4th Floor, 2 Savoy Court, The Strand, London WC2R 0EZ T: 020 7497 0580 E: ibc@ibconsulting.co.uk W: www.ibconsulting.co.uk

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INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS IN ENGLAND & WALES Michael Izza Chief Executive Chartered Accountants’ Hall, Moorgate Place, London EC2R 6EA T: 020 7920 8100 E: generalenquiries@icaew.co.uk W: www.icaew.co.uk INSTITUTE OF CUSTOMER SERVICE Joanna Causon Chief Executive 2 Castle Court, St Peter’s Street, Colchester CO1 1EW T: 01206 571716 E: jo.causon@icsmail.co.uk W: www. instituteofcustomerservice.com INSTITUTE OF DIRECTORS (IOD) Simon Walker Chief Executive 116 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5ED T: 020 7766 8866 E: enquiries@iod.com W: www.iod.com INSTITUTE OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Jon Poole Chief Executive 5 Cambridge Court, 210 Shepherd’s Bush Road, London W6 7NJ T: 020 7603 6316 E: info@ifst.org W: www.ifst.org INSTITUTE OF HOSPITALITY Philippe Rossiter Chief Executive Trinity Court, 34 West Street, Sutton SM1 1SH T: 020 8661 4900 E: info@theinstituteofhospitality. org W: www.instituteofhospitality.org INSTITUTE OF MASTERS OF WINE Siobhan Turner Executive Director 24 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 6EP T: 020 7383 9130 E: sturner@mastersofwine.org W: www.mastersofwine.org INSTITUTE OF REFRIGERATION Miriam Rodway Institute Secretary Kelvin House, 76 Mill Lane, Carshalton SM5 2JR T: 020 8647 7033 E: ior@ior.org.uk W: www.ior.org.uk

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INSTITUTE OF TOURIST GUIDING Isabel Moore President Coppergate House, 16 Brune Street, London E1 7NJ T: 020 7953 8397 E: office@itg.org.uk W: www.itg.org.uk

ISLE OF MAN TOURISM Rod Nipper Chief Executive St Andrew’s House, Finch Road, Douglas IM1 2PX T: 01624 686766 E: tourism@gov.im W: www.visitisleofman.com

MEETINGS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (MIA) Jane Longhurst Chief Executive PO Box 515, Kelmarsh NN6 9XW T: 08452 305508 E: info@mia-uk.org W: www.mia-uk.org

INSTITUTE OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM Stephen Freudman Chairman PO Box 217, Ware SG12 8WY T: 08444 995653 E: enquiries@itt.co.uk W: www.itt.co.uk

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MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGIES ASSOCIATION Jennipher Marshall-Jenkinson Chairman 23 Earlsfield Holyport, Bray SL6 2LZ T: 01628 675704 E: jennipher@ microwaveassociation.org.uk W: www.microwaveassociation. org.uk

INSTITUTION OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (IOSH) Rob Strange Chief Executive The Grange, Highfield Drive, Wigston LE18 1NN T: 01162 573100 E: enquiries@iosh.co.uk W: www.iosh.co.uk INTERNATIONAL HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION (IH&RA) Dr. Ghassan Aïdi Chief Executive 41 Avenue General Guisan (Lausanne), 1009 Pully T: 004 1217 114283 E: info@ih-ra.com W: www.ih-ra.com INTERNATIONAL TOURISM PARTNERSHIP (ITP) Claire Melford Chief Executive 15-16 Cornwall Terrace, London NW1 4QP T: 020 7467 3600 E: tourismpartnership@ibif.org W: www.tourismpartnership.org INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL CATERING ASSOCIATION (ITCA) Stephen White President The Maple Suite, Guardian House, Borough Road, Godalming GU7 2AE T: 01483 419449 E: itca@associationservices.co.uk W: www.itcanet.com INVESTORS IN PEOPLE UK Michael Davies Chief Executive UKCES, 28-30 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W 0TT T: 020 7881 8966 E: info@investorsinpeople.co.uk W: www.investorsinpeople.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

JERSEY TOURISM David DeCarteret Director Liberation Place, St Helier JE1 1BB T: 01534 448800 E: info@jersey.com W: www.jersey.com

L LEATHERHEAD FOOD RESEARCH Paul Berryman Chief Executive Randalls Road, Leatherhead KT22 7RY T: 01372 376761 E: help@leatherheadfood.com W: www.leatherheadfood.com

MIDLAND ASSOCIATION OF RESTAURANTS, CATERERS, HOTELS & ENTERTAINMENT (MARCHE) Hillary Hall Chief Executive PO Box 2989, Edgbaston B15 2XZ T: 01214 401892 E: info@marche.org.uk W: www.marche.org.uk

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LOCAL AUTHORITIES COORDINATORS OF REGULATORY SERVICES (LACORS) John Ranford Chief Executive Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ T: 020 7664 3000 E: info@local.gov.uk W: www.lacors.com

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CARE CATERING Karen Oliver Chair Meadow Court, Faygate Lane, Faygate RH12 4SJ T: 08707 480180 E: info@thenacc.co.uk W: www.thenacc.co.uk

LOCAL AUTHORITY CATERERS ASSOCIATION (LACA) Linda Mitchell Chairman Bourne House, Horsell Park, Woking GU21 4LY T: 01483 766777 E: info@laca.co.uk W: www.laca.co.uk

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CATERING BUTCHERS (NACB) Peter Allen Chairman 224 Central Markets, London EC1A 9LH T: 020 7248 1896 E: info@nacb.co.uk W: www.nacb.co.uk

M MASTER INNHOLDERS Jeremy Logie Executive Secretary 15 Heath Way, Totnes TQ9 5GP T: 01803 862795 E: jeremy.logie@talk21com W: www.masterinnholders.co.uk

NATIONAL FARMERS UNION (NFU) Peter Kendall President Agriculture House, Stoneleigh Park, Stoneleigh CV8 2TZ T: 02476 858500 E: peter.kendall@nfu.org.uk W: www.nfuonline.com

NATIONAL PEST TECHNICIANS ASSOCIATION John Davison Chief Executive Head Office, NPTA House, Hall Lane, Kinoulton NG12 3EF T: 01949 81133 E: officenpta@aol.com W: www.npta.org.uk NATIONAL TRUST Dame Fiona Reynolds Director General PO Box 39, Warrington WA5 7WD T: 08448 001895 E: enquiries@nationaltrust.org.uk W: www.nationaltrust.org.uk NATIONWIDE CATERERS ASSOCIATION Bob Fox Managing Director Association House, 89 Mappleborough Road, Shirley, Solihull B90 1AG T: 01216 032524 E: enq@ncass.org.uk W: www.ncass.org.uk NATURAL ENGLAND Helen Phillips Chief Executive 1 East Parade, Sheffield S1 2ET T: 03000 606000 E: enquiries@naturalengland. org.uk W: www.naturalengland.org.uk NORTHERN IRELAND ASSEMBLY PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS Ballymiscaw Stormont, Belfast BT4 3XX T: 02890 521333 E: info.office@niassembly.gov.uk W: www.niassembly.gov.uk NORTHERN IRELAND HOTELS FEDERATION Janice Gault Chief Executive The McCune Building, 1 Shore Road, Belfast BT15 3PG T: 02890 776635 E: john@nihf.co.uk W: www.nihf.co.uk NORTHERN IRELAND TOURIST BOARD (NITB) Chief Executive St Anne’s Court, 59 North Street, Belfast BT1 1NB T: 02890 231221 W: www.nitb.com


DIRECTORY

Organisations

NUTRITION SOCIETY Fred Wentworth-Bowyer Chief Executive 10 Cambridge Court, 210 Shepherds Bush Road , London W6 7NJ T: 020 7602 0228 E: office@nutsoc.org.uk W: www.nutsoc.org.uk

O OFFICE OF THE QUALIFICATIONS & EXAMINATIONS REGULATOR (OFQUAL) Glenys Stacey Chief Executive Spring Place, Coventry Business Park, Herald Avenue, Coventry CV5 6UB T: 03003 033344 E: info@ofqual.gov.uk W: www.ofqual.gov.uk ONE AND ALL FOUNDATION (THE) Peter Lederer Chairman 26 Carnaby Street, London W1F 7DF T: 020 7534 0395 E: info@oneandall.org.uk W: www.oneandall.org.uk OUTDOOR INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION Louise Ramsay Chief Executive EICA Ratho, South Platt Hill, Newbridge, Edinburgh EH28 8AA T: 01313 334414 E: info@ outdoorindustriesassociation.co.uk W: www. outdoorindustriesassociation. co.uk

P PEOPLE 1ST Brian Wisdom Chief Executive 2nd Floor, Armstrong House, 38 Market Square, Uxbridge UB8 1LH T: 01895 817000 W: www.people1st.co.uk PIZZA AND PASTA ITALIAN FOOD ASSOCIATION Jim Winship Chief Executive Association House, 18c Moor Street, Chepstow NP16 5DB T: 01291 636338 E: admin@papa.org.uk W: www.papa.org.uk

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QUALITY MEAT OF SCOTLAND Uel Morton Chief Executive The Rural Centre, West Mains Ingliston, Newbridge EH28 8NZ T: 01314 724040 E: info@qmscotland.co.uk W: www.qmscotland.co.uk

SALSA Chris Grimes Scheme Director c/o Bloxham Mill, Barford Road, Bloxham, Banbury OX15 4FF T: 01295 724248 E: info@salsafood.co.uk W: www.salsafood.co.uk

QUALITY SCOTLAND Dave Bradley Chief Executive 11 Abercromby Place, Edinburgh EH3 6LB T: 01315 562333 E: info@qualityscotland.co.uk W: www.qualityscotland.co.uk

R RECRUITMENT & EMPLOYMENT CONFEDERATION (REC) Kevin Green Chief Executive 15 Welbeck Street, London W1G 9XT T: 020 7009 2100 E: info@rec.uk.com W: www.rec.uk.com RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION Bob Walton President Richard, Earl of Bradford Chairman Queens House, 55 - 56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk ROYAL ASSOCIATION FOR DISABILITY & REHABILITATION (RADAR) Liz Fayce Chief Executive 12 City Forum, 250 City Road, London EC1V 8AF T: 020 7250 3222 E: radar@radar.org.uk W: www.radar.org.uk ROYAL SOCIETY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH Richard Parish Chief Executive 3rd Floor, Market Towers, 1 Nine Elms Lane, London SW8 5NQ T: 020 3177 1600 E: info@rsph.org.uk W: www.rsph.org.uk

SAVOY EDUCATIONAL TRUST Julia Sibley Chief Executive Queen’s House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7269 9692 W: www.savoyeducationaltrust. org.uk SCOTTISH FOOD & DRINK FEDERATION (SFDF) Flora McLean Director 4a Torphichen Street, Edinburgh EH3 8JQ T: 01312 299415 E: sfdf@sfdf.org.uk W: www.sfdf.org.uk SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT (THE) Edinburgh EH99 1SP T: 01313 485000 E: sp.info@scottish.parliament.uk W: www.scottishparliament.uk SCOTTISH QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY Dr. Janet Brown Chief Executive The Optima Building, 58 Robertson Street, Glasgow G2 8DQ T: 08452 791000 E: customer@sqa.org.uk W: www.sqa.org.uk SCOTTISH TOURISM FORUM Stephen Leckie Chairman 29 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7RN T: 01312 206321 W: www.stforum.co.uk SEA FISH INDUSTRY AUTHORITY Paul Williams Chief Executive 18 Logie Mill, Logie Green Road, Edinburgh EH7 4HS T: 01315 583331 E: seafishboard@seafish.co.uk W: www.seafish.org

SOCIETY OF FOOD HYGIENE TECHNOLOGY Sue Werran Operations Director The Granary, Middleton House Farm, Tamworth Road, Middleton B78 2BD T: 01827 872500 E: admin@sofht.co.uk W: www.sofht.co.uk SOCIETY OF HOSPIAL LINEN SERVICE AND LAUNDRY MANAGEMENT Ian Hargreaves Chief Executive c/o The Willows, 109 Victoria Road East, Thornton Cleveleys FY5 5HQ T: 01253 869968 E: info@linenmanager.co.uk W: www.linenmanager.co.uk SPA BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Suki Kalirai Chairman Suite 5-6, Philpot House, Station Road, Rayleigh SS6 7HH T: 08707 800787 E: info@spabusinessassociation. co.uk W: www.spabusinessassociation. co.uk SPORT ENGLAND Kenny Price Chief Executive Third Floor, Victoria House, Bloomsbury Square, London WC1B 4SE T: 08458 508508 E: info@sportengland.org W: www.sportengland.org SPRINGBOARD CHARITABLE TRUST & SPRINGBOARD UK Dr. Anne Pierce MBE Chief Executive 3 Denmark Street, London WC2H 8LP T: 020 7497 8654 W: www.springboarduk.net

T TEA COUNCIL William Gorman Executive Chairman 9 The Courtyard, Gowan Avenue, London SW6 6RH T: 020 7371 7787 E: info@teacouncil.co.uk W: www.tea.co.uk

TEXTILE SERVICES ASSOCIATION Murray Simpson Chief Executive 3 Queen Square, Bloomsbury London WC1N 3AR T: 020 7843 9490 E: tsa@tsa-uk.org W: www.tsa-uk.org TOURISM ALLIANCE Brigid Simmonds Chairman Centre Point 103, New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1DU T: 020 7395 8246 W: www.tourismalliance.com TOURISM IRELAND Niall Gibbons Chief Executive Beresford House, 2 Beresford Road, Coleraine BT52 1GE T: 02870 359200 E: corporate.admin@ tourismireland.com W: www.tourismireland.com TOURISM MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE Dave Hughes President Horsefair, Boroughbridge YO51 9HP T: 01423 320781 W: www.tmi.org.uk TOURISM SOCIETY Gregory Yeoman Executive Director Queens House, 55/56 Lincolns Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 2465 E: admin@tourismsociety.org W: www.tourismsociety.org

U UK COMMISSION FOR EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLS Charlie Mayfield Chairman Renaissance House, Adwick Park Warn-upon-Dearne S63 5NB T: 01709 774800 E: info@ukces.org.uk W: www.ukces.org.uk UK INBOUND Mary Rance Chief Executive 3rd Floor, 388 The Strand, London WC2R 0LT T: 020 7395 7500 W: www.ukinbound.org

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Organisations

UNITED KINGDOM BARTENDERS GUILD Daniel Crebesse President Rosebank, Blackness, Linlithgow EH49 7NL T: 01506 834448 E: ukbglim@aol.com W: www.ukbg.co.uk UNITED KINGDOM VINEYARDS ASSOCIATION Ian Edwards Chairman PO Box 534, Abingdon OX14 9BZ T: 01865 390188 E: sian@ukva.org.uk W: www.ukva.org.uk

V VEGAN SOCIETY (THE) Jasmijn deBoo Chief Executive Donald Watson House, 21 Hylton Street B18 6HJ T: 01215 231736 E: info@vegansociety.com W: www.vegansociety.com VEGETARIAN SOCIETY UK John Green Chief Executive Parkdale, Dunham Road, Altrincham WA14 4QG T: 01619 252000 E: info@vegsoc.org W: www.vegsoc.org VISITBRITAIN Sandie Dawe Chief Executive 1 Palace St, London SW1E 5HE T: 020 7578 1000 E: Sandie.dawe@visitbritain.org W: www.visitbritain.org VISITENGLAND James Berresford 1 Palace St, London SW1E 5HE T: 020 7578 1400 W: www.visitengland.org VISIT LONDON Callum McLean Head of Commercial Partnerships 6th Floor, 2 More London Riverside, London SE1 2RR T: 020 7234 5821 E: trade@visitLondon.com W: www.visitLondon.com VISITWALES Jonathan Jones Chief Executive QED Centre Main Avenue, Trefforest Estate, Pontypridd, Cardiff CF37 5YR T: 08708 300306 E: info@visitwales.co.uk W: www.visitwales.co.uk

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W WALES THE TRUE TASTE Jonathan Parker Head of Marketing Development Unit Food, Fisheries and Market Development Division. Welsh Assembly Government, Rhodfa Padarn, Llanbadarn Fawr, Aberystwyth SY23 3UR T: 08450 103300 E: jonathan.parker@wales.gsi. gov.uk W: www.walesthetruetaste.co.uk WALES TOURISM ALLIANCE Chris Osborne Chairman c/o North Wales Tourism, 77 Conwy Road, Colwyn Bay LL29 7LN E: chris@wta.org.uk W: www.tourismalliance.org.uk WINE AND SPIRIT ASSOCIATION Gemma Keyes Office Manager International Wine & Spirit Centre, 39-45 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF T: 020 7089 3877 E: info@wsta.co.uk W: www.wsta.co.uk WINE AND SPIRIT EDUCATION TRUST Ian Harris Chief Executive International Wine & Spirit Centre, 39-45 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF T: 020 7089 3800 E: wset@wset.co.uk W: www.wsetglobal.com WINE SOCIETY Robin McMillan Chief Executive Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2BT T: 01438 741177 E: memberservices@ thewinesociety.com W: www.thewinesociety.com WORK FOUNDATION (THE) Steve Bevan Managing Director 21 Palmer Street, London SW1H 0AD T: 020 7976 3568 W: www.theworkfoundation.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

WORLD TOURISM ORGANISATION Taleb Rifai Secretary General Capitan Haya 42, Madrid 28020 T: (3)49 1567 8100 E: omt@unwto.org W: www.UNWTO.org WORLD TRAVEL & TOURISM COUNCIL (WTTC) David Scowfill President & Chief Executive 1-2 Queen Victoria Terrace, Sovereign Court, London E1W 3HA T: 08707 279882 E: enquiries@wttc.org W: www.wttc.org WRAP Dr. Liz Goodwin Chief Executive The Old Academy, 21 Horse Fair, Banbury OX16 0AH T: 01295 819900 E: info@wrap.org.uk W: www.wrap.org.uk


DIRECTORY

Colleges

Colleges B BEDFORD COLLEGE Raj Mandal Assistant Director Cauldwell Street, Bedford MK42 9AH T: 01234 291 000 E: rmandal@bedford.ac.uk W: www.bedford.ac.uk BLACKBURN COLLEGE Christine Kenyon Curriculum Manager, Hospitality St Paul’s Street, Blackburn BB2 1DL T: 01254 292 929 E: c.kenyon@blackburn.ac.uk W: www.blackburn.ac.uk

BLACKPOOL AND THE FYLDE COLLEGE John Swannie Head of Travel, Tourism, Leisure & Hospitality Ashfield Road, Bispham, Blackpool FY2 OHB T: 01253 352352 E: jsw@blackpool.ac.uk W: www.blackpool.ac.uk

BOSTON COLLEGE Steve Cottrell Curriculum Leader, Hospitality, Sport, Leisure & Tourism Skirbeck Road, Boston PE21 6JF T: 01205 365701 E: steve-c@boston.ac.uk W: www.boston.ac.uk BOURNEMOUTH AND POOLE COLLEGE OF FURTHER EDUCATION Bob Kells Head of Hospitality & Food Lansdowne, Meyrick Road, Bournemouth BH1 3JJ T: 01202 205205 E: kellsr@bpc.ac.uk W: www.thecolleges.ac.uk

BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY Crispin PL Farbrother Course Leader Undergraduate Hospitality Fern Barrow, Talbot Campus, Poole BH12 5BB T: 08456 501501 E: cfarbrot@bournemouth.ac.uk W: www.bournemouth.ac.uk

C CAMBRIDGE REGIONAL COLLEGE Tina Adrienne Head of Hospitality Management Science Park Campus, Kings Hedges Road, Cambridge CB4 2QT T: 01223 418867 E: tadrienne@camre.ac.uk W: www.camre.ac.uk CHICHESTER COLLEGE Liz Taylor Curriculum Team Manager, Hospitality and Tourism Westgate Fields, Chichester PO19 1SB T: 01243 786321 ext 2111 E: liz.taylor@chichester.ac.uk W: www.chichester.ac.uk CITY COLLEGE Steve Milnes Head of Academy Kings Road, Plymouth PL1 5QG T: 01752 305890 E: smilnes@cityplym.ac.uk W: www.cityplym.ac.uk CITY COLLEGE BRIGHTON Leroy Clarke Team Leader, Catering & Hospitality Pelham Street, Brighton BN1 4FA T: 01273 667788 E: lgc@ccb.ac.uk W: www.ccb.ac.uk CITY COLLEGE NORWICH Steve Thorpe Head of Hotel, Hair and Beauty Ipswich Road, Norwich NR2 2LJ T: 01603 773393 E: sthorpe@ccn.ac.uk W: www.ccn.ac.uk

CITY OF SUNDERLAND COLLEGE Alison Maynard Head of Distance and Vocational Education Bede Centre, Durham Road, Sunderland SR3 4AH T: 01915 116505 E: alison.maynard@citysun.ac.uk W: www.citysun.ac.uk COLCHESTER INSTITUTE Jon Pratt Head of Centre for Hospitality & Food Studies Colchester Campus, Sheepen Road, Colchester CO3 3LL T: 01206 712333 E: jon.pratt@colchester.ac.uk W: www.colchester.ac.uk

COLEG LLANDRILLO CYMRU Kevin Potts Head of Hospitality Llandudno Road, Rhos-on-Sea LL28 4HZ T: 01492 546666 E: k.potts@llandrillo.ac.uk W: www.llandrillo.ac.uk

CORNWALL COLLEGE Simon Cook Head of Faculty, Retail and Service Industries Cambourne Campus, Trevenson Road, Pool, Redruth TR15 3RD T: 01209 616314 E: simon.cook@cornwall.ac.uk W: www.cornwall.ac.uk

D DARLINGTON COLLEGE Nigel Smiles HospitalityTutor Central Park, Haughton Road, Darlington, County Durham DL1 1SU T: 01325 503050 E: n.smiles@darlington.ac.uk W: www.darlington.ac.uk

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EALING, HAMMERSMITH AND WEST LONDON COLLEGE Kevin Cleaver Head of Hospitality and Service Industries Gliddon Road, Barons Court W14 9BL T: 08009 802175 E: kevin.cleaver@wlc.ac.uk W: www.wlc.ac.uk

INVERNESS COLLEGE Fiona Williams Curriculum Manager, Hospitality 12 Ness Walk, Inverness IV3 5SQ T: 01463 273364 E: fiona.williams@inverness. uhi.ac.uk W: www.uhi.ac.uk

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G GRIMSBY INSTITUTE OF FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION Matt Belamy Head of Hospitality Nun’s Corner, Grimsby DN34 5BQ T: 01472 311222 E: infocent@grimsby.ac.uk W: www.grimsby.ac.uk GUILDFORD COLLEGE OF FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION Veronica Scully Head of Hospitality Stoke Park, Guildford GU1 1EZ T: 01483 448500 E: vscully@guildford.ac.uk W: www.guildford.ac.uk

H HALESOWEN COLLEGE Jane O’Sullivan Curriculum Team Manager Catering Whittingham Road, Halesowen, West Midland B63 3NA T: 01216 027777 E: jbridgewater@halesowen.ac.uk W: www.halesowen.ac.uk HIGHBURY COLLEGE Martin Tarbuck Head of Hospitality City of Portsmouth Centre, Winston churchill avenue, Portsmouth PO1 2DH T: 02392 383131 E: martin.tarbuck@highbury.ac.uk W: www.highbury.ac.uk

KENDAL COLLEGE Robert Marshall Slater Head of School Milnthorp Road, Kendal LA9 5AY T: 01539 814700 E: enquiries@kendal.ac.uk W: www.kendal.ac.uk

L LEEDS CITY COLLEGE Gordon Sybil Head of Department Thomas Danby Campus, Roundhay Road, Leeds LS7 3BG T: 08000 962319 E: danbycampus@ leedscitycollege.ac.uk W: www.leedscitycollege.ac.uk LEEDS METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY Sofia Rebelo Course Leader, Hospitality Management Civic Quarter, Leeds LS1 3HE T: 01138 120000 E: s.rebelo@leedsmet.ac.uk W: www.leedsmet.ac.uk LEICESTER COLLEGE Anne Wood Programme Area Manager for Hospitality and Food Freemen’s Park Campus, Aylestone Road, Leicester LE2 7LW T: 01162 242229 E: awood@lec.ac.uk W: www.leicestercollege.ac.uk

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LEWISHAM COLLEGE Michael Neal Curriculum Manager, School of Hospitality Lewisham Way SE4 1UT T: 020 8692 0353 E: michael.neal@lewisham.ac.uk W: www.lewisham.ac.uk

LIVERPOOL COMMUNITY COLLEGE Mike Perry Hospitality 9 Myrtle Street, Liverpool L7 7JA T: 01512 524513 E: mike.perry@liv-coll.ac.uk W: www.liv-coll.ac.uk LIVERPOOL COMMUNITY COLLEGE Gill Williams CGM 9 Myrtle Street, Liverpool L7 7JA T: 01512 524513 E: gill.williams@liv-coll.ac.uk W: www.liv-coll.ac.uk LOUGHBOROUGH COLLEGE Darren Creed Curriculum Team Leader, Catering Radmoor Road, Loughborough LE11 3BT T: 01509 215831 E: darren.creed@loucoll.ac.uk W: www.loucoll.ac.uk

M MANCHESTER COLLEGE (THE) Claire Wharton Curriculum Lead Manager, Hospitality Welcomb Street, Manchester M11 2NP T: 01619 203522 E: claire.wharton@ themanchestercollege.ac.uk W: www.themanchestercollege. ac.uk MANCHESTER METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY Charles Brennan Head of Dept, Food and Tourism Management All Saints Building, All Saints Manchester M15 6BH T: 01612 472000 E: c.brennan@mmu.ac.uk W: www.mmu.ac.uk

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MANCHESTER METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY Michael Jefferies Head of Dept, Food and Tourism Management All Saints Building, All Saints Manchester M15 6BH T: 01612 472000 W: www.mmu.ac.uk MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY Lucy Everest Head of Hospitality The Burroughs NW4 4BT T: 020 8411 5555 W: www.mdx.ac.uk MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY Bill Francis Head of Hospitality The Burroughs NW4 4BT T: 020 8411 5555 E: b.francis@mdx.ac.uk W: www.mdx.ac.uk MILLENNIUM CITY ACADEMY Michael Warner Director of Studies, Hospitality 76 - 78 Mortimer Street W1W 7SA T: 020 7323 5240 E: info@millenniumcityacademy.com W: www.millenniumcityacademy.com MOTHERWELL COLLEGE David Aikman Head of Hospitality 1 Enterprise Way, Motherwell ML1 2TX T: 01698 232323 E: daikman@motherwell.ac.uk W: www.motherwell.ac.uk

N NEW COLLEGE NOTTINGHAM Sacha McCarthy Head, Hospitality Management The Adams Building Stoney Street, Nottingham NG1 1NG T: 01159 534408 E: sacha.mccarthy@ncn.ac.uk W: www.ncn.ac.uk

NEWCASTLE COLLEGE Denise Faulds Section Manager, Hospitality Rye Hill Campus, Scotswood Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE4 7SA T: 01912 004000 E: denise.faulds@ncl-coll.ac.uk W: www.ncl-coll.ac.uk NORTH EAST WORCESTERSHIRE COLLEGE Lesley Baker Programme Area Manager, Hospitality and Catering Bromsgrove Campus, Slideslow Drive B60 1PQ T: 01527 570020 E: lbaker@ne-worcs.ac.uk W: www.ne-worcs.ac.uk NORTHAMPTON COLLEGE Mike Coppock Programme Leader, Back of House Booth Lane, Northampton NN3 3RF T: 01604 734051 E: mike.coppock@ northamptoncollege.ac.uk W: www.northamptoncollege. ac.uk

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ROBERT GORDON UNIVERSITY Daniel Turner Programme Leader, HTRE Schoolhill, Aberdeen AB10 1FR T: 01224 263845 E: d.turner@rgu.ac.uk W: www.rgu.ac.uk ROTHERHAM COLLEGE OF ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY Nick Croft-Smith Curriculum Manager, Hospitality, Travel & Retail Eastwood Lane, Rotherham S65 1EG T: 01709 722730 E: ncsmith@rotherham.ac.uk W: www.rotherham.ac.uk

SHEFFIELD CITY COLLEGE John Janiszewski Business Development Manager Granville Road, Sheffield S2 2RL T: 01142 602600 E: john.janiszewski@sheffcol.ac.uk W: www.sheffcol.ac.uk SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNIVERSITY Jenny Cockill Subject Group Leader, Hospitality City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB T: 01142 253329 E: j.j.cockill@shu.ac.uk W: www.shu.ac.uk

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY Donald Sloan Head of Dept, Hospitality Management Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP T: 01865 483813 E: hltm@brookes.ac.uk W: www.brookes.ac.uk

SOUTH CHESHIRE COLLEGE Wai Ng Head of Dept, Hospitality, Travel & Tourism Dane Bank Avenue, Crewe W2 8AB T: 01270 654654 ext 843 E: wai-ng@s-cheshire.ac.uk W: www.s-cheshire.ac.uk

QUEEN MARGARET UNIVERSITY Trevor Laffin Academic Director Queen Margaret University Drive, Musselburgh EH21 6UU T: 01314 740000 E: t.laffin@qmu.ac.uk W: www.qmu.ac.uk

SOUTH DOWNS COLLEGE Gerry Shurman Head of Curriculum, Catering, Hospitality & Travel College Road, Waterlooville PO7 8AA T: 02392 797979 E: college@southdowns.ac.uk W: www.southdowns.ac.uk SOUTH TYNESIDE COLLEGE Eileen Mannion Head of Department, Hospitality St. George’s Avenue, South Shields NE34 6ET T: 01914 273500 E: eileen.mannion@stc.ac.uk W: www.stc.ac.uk

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OXFORD AND CHERWELL VALLEY COLLEGE Mark Roberts Programme Manager, Catering and Hospitality The Oxford Campus, Broughton Road, Banbury OX16 9QA T: 01865 550550 E: mroberts2@ocvc.ac.uk W: www.ocvc.ac.uk

Q NEW COLLEGE STAMFORD Iain Middleton Team Leader - Hospitality and Catering Drift Road, Stamford PE9 1XA T: 01780 484350 E: imiddlet@stamford.ac.uk W: www.stamford.ac.uk

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SOUTH DEVON COLLEGE David Galtin Section Head, Catering, Hospitality & Tourism Vantage Point, Long Road, Paignton TQ4 7EJ T: 01803 540526 E: david.galtin@southdevon.ac.uk W: www.southdevon.ac.uk

ST. PATRICK’S INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE LTD. Dinesh Bist Head, School of Tourism & Hospitality St. Patrick’s International College Ltd. 24 Great Chapel Street, London W1F 8FS T: 020 7287 6664 F : 020 7287 6282 E:info@st-patricks.org.uk W: www.st-patricks.org.uk

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON COLLEGE Colin Gascoigne Programme Area Manager, Hospitality The Willows North, Alcester Road, Stratford-upon Avon CV37 9QR T: 01789 266245 E: colingascoigne@stratford. ac.uk W: www.stratford.ac.uk SUSSEX DOWNS COLLEGE John Lovell Curriculum Leader, Hospitality and Catering EVoC (Eastbourne) Campus Cross Levels Way, Eastbourne BN21 2UF T: 01323 637355 E: lesley.hart@sussexdowns.ac.uk W: www.sussexdowns.ac.uk


DIRECTORY

Colleges

SWINDON COLLEGE Barbara Ash Curriculum Area Manager, Hospitality North Star Campus, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1DY T: 01793 498221 E: barbaraash@swindon-college. ac.uk W: www.swindon-college.ac.uk

T THANET COLLEGE Roger Phillips Programme Manager of Catering Hospitality Ramsgate Road, Broadstairs CT10 1PN T: 01843 605040 E: catering@thanet.ac.uk W: www.thanet.ac.uk

U UNIVERISTY OF BOLTON Christine Hall Head of Hospitality Management Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB T: 01204 903628 E: ch14@bolton.ac.uk W: www.bolton.ac.uk UNIVERSITY CAMPUS, SUFFOLK Anita Beresford-Webb Course Leader, Event Management Waterfront Building, 19 Neptune Quay, Ipswich IP4 1QJ T: 01473 338000 E: a.beresfordwebb@ucs.ac.uk W: www.ucs.ac.uk UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BIRMINGHAM Neil Rippington Dean, College of Food Summer Row, Birmingham B3 1JB T: 01216 041000 E: marketing@ucb.ac.uk W: www.ucb.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON Paul Frost Head of School of Service Management Darley Raod, Eastbourne BN20 7UR T: 01273 643667 E: service.management@ brighton.ac.uk W: www.brighton.ac.uk

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL LANCASHIRE Jane Shaw Division Leader for Tourism, Hospitality and Event Preston PR1 2HE T: 01772 894900 E: jshaw@uclan.ac.uk W: www.uclan.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF DERBY Mr Leonard Cseh Subject Manager, Hospitality Kedleston Road, Derby DE22 1GB T: 01332 594628 E: l.cseh@derby.ac.uk W: www.derby.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE Andrew Bradley Course Leader, Events and Hospitality Oxstalls Campus, Oxstalls Lane, Longlevens, Gloucester GL2 9HW T: 012 4271 4490 E: abradley@glos.ac.uk W: www.glos.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF HUDDERSFIELD Rita Carmouche Head of Hospitality and Events Management Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH T: 014844 73346 E: k.clayton@hud.ac.uk W: www.hud.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH Philip Gibson Head of Hospitality Management Roland Levinsky Building, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA T: 01752 585617 E: pgibson@plymouth.ac.uk W: www.plymouth.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH Robin Shepherd Course Leader, Hospitality University House, Winston Churchill Avenue, Portsmouth PO1 2UP T: 02392 848484 E: robin.shepherd@port.ac.uk W: www.port.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF SALFORD Russell Kerfoot Head of Hospitality Management Salford M5 4WT T: 01612 952068 E: r.kerfoot@salford.ac.uk W: www.salford.ac.uk

UNIVERSITY OF SUNDERLAND (THE) Kevin Hannam Head of dept Tourism and Hospitality, Events Reg Vardy Building, St. Peter’s Way, Sunderland SR6 0DD T: 01915 152 311 E: tourism@sunderland.ac.uk W: www.sunderland.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF SURREY Dr Graham Miller School of Hospitality and Tourism Management Guildford GU2 7XH T: 01483 683095 E: g.miller@surrey.ac.uk W: www.surrey.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST OF SCOTLAND Tom Garret Programme Leader, Events Management Business School, Paisley Campus, Paisley PA1 2BE T: 01418 483456 E: info@uws.ac.uk W: www.uws.ac.uk

W WEST HERTS COLLEGE Phillip Candy Head of Hospitality Management Watford Campus Hempstead Road, Watford WD17 3EZ T: 01923 812000 E: philip.candy@westherts.ac.uk W: www.westherts.ac.uk WESTMINSTER KINGSWAY COLLEGE Gary Hunter Head of Hospitality Vincent Square SW1P 2PD T: 08700 609800 E: gary.hunter@westking.ac.uk W: www.westking.ac.uk

UNIVERSITY OF ULSTER Lucia Campbell Associate Head, Hospitality and Tourism Management Belfast Campus, York Street BT15 1ED T: 02870 123456 E: ml.campbell@ulster.ac.uk W: www.ulster.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF WALES INSTITUTE, CARDIFF Andrew Roberts Programme Director, Hospitality Cardiff School of Management, Western Avenue, Cardiff CF5 2YB T: 02920 416413 E: aroberts@uwic.ac.uk W: www.uwic.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF WEST LONDON David Foskett Head of Hospitality Ealing Campus, St. Mary’s Road Ealing W5 5RF T: 02085 795000 E: david.foskett@uwl.ac.uk W: www.tvu.ac.uk UNIVERSITY OF WOLVERHAMPTON Peter Robinson Head of the Leisure Department Gorway Road, Walsall Wolverhampton WS1 3BD T: 01902 321000 E: p.robinson@wlv.ac.uk W: www.wlv.ac.uk

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DIRECTORY

Suppliers

Suppliers Air Fresheners

SCENT AIR Lucy McHattie Head of Marketing 8 Lake End Court, Taplow, Berks SL6 OJQ T: 01628 601650 E: lm@scentairuk.com W: www.scentairuk.com

POTTERTON COMMERCIAL LTD. Rebecca Johnson Head of Marketing Baxi Commercial Division, Wood Lane, Erdington, Birmingham B24 9QP T: 08450 701055 E: potterton.commercial@ baxigroup.com W: www.pottertoncommercial. co.uk

Brand Fragrance

Bathrooms TWYFORDS BATHROOMS LTD. Mark Wingfield Marketing Manager Lawton Road, Alsager, Stoke-on-Trent ST7 2DF T: 01270 879777 E: mark.winfield@ twyfordbathrooms.com W: www.twyfordbathrooms.com

Boilers CALOMAX LTD. Paul Bowers Sales and Marketing Director Lupton Avenue, Leeds LS9 7DD T: 01132 496681 E: sales@calomax.co.uk W: www.calomax.co.uk

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PARSLEY IN TIME CATERING EQUIPMENT David Walpole Managing Director Units 1-2 Kingside Business Park, Ruston Road, Woolwich SE18 5BX T: 08445 449907 E: david@parsleyintime.co.uk W: www.parsleyintime.co.uk

Coffee

Bakery BAGATELLE Jacky Lesellier Managing Director The Bagatelle Concept Ltd, 704-711 Tudor Estate, Abbey Road NW10 7UW T: 020 8453 8000 E: info@bagatelle.co.uk W: www.bagatelle.co.uk

MULTIVAC UK Jim Campbell Managing Director Rivermead Drive, Swindon SN5 7UY T: 01793 425800 E: jim.campbell@multivac.co.uk W: www.multivac.co.uk

SCENT AIR Lucy McHattie Head of Marketing 8 Lake End Court, Taplow, Berks SL6 OJQ T: 01628 601650 E: lm@scentairuk.com W: www.scentairuk.com

Catering Equipment CATER-BAKE UK LTD Mark Hutchings Managing Director Unit A1 Senator Point, South Boundary Rd, Knowsley Ind Park, Liverpool L33 7RR T: 01515 485818 E: mark@cater-bake.co.uk W: www.cater-bake.co.uk CLICK ‘N ‘ORDER Dan Pala Managing Director 93 Bewsey Street, Warrington WA2 7JQ T: 08445 048714 E: info@clicknorder.co.uk W: www.clicknorder.org MONO EQUIPMENT Andrew Jones Managing Director Queensway Swansea West Industrial Park, Swansea SA5 4EB T: 01792 561234 E: ajones@monoequip.com W: www.monoequip.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

ESPRESSO DAIMO LTD Damien Watson Managing Director Unit 2 Willow Park, Upton Lane, Stoke Golding CV13 6EU T: 08009 701441 E: damien.watson@espressione. co.uk W: www.espressione.co.uk QUALITASSE LTD. Tony Phipps Marketing Manager Unit A2, Davy Close, West Ham Industrial Estate, Basingstoke RG22 6PW T: 01256 300050 E: tony.p@qualitasse.co.uk W: www.qualitasse.co.uk SEA ISLAND COFFEE LTD. Guy Wilmot Business Development Manager 111A Walton Street SW3 2HP T: 020 7584 7545 E: pdb@seaislandcoffee.com W: www.seaislandcoffee.com THE KENT & SUSSEX TEA & COFFEE COMPANY Richard Smith Managing Director Pivington Mill Egerton Road, Pluckley, Ashford TN27 0PG T: 01233 840265 E: sales@tea-and-coffee.com W: www.tea-and-coffee.com

Communications CALL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY LTD. Caroline Bloomer Marketing Manager Middlesex House, 29-45 High St, Edgware HA8 7UU T: 020 8381 1338 E: caroline.bloomer@callsystems.com W: www.call-systems.com

Consultants HORWATH HTL Erland Heiberg Principal 44 Essex Street, Strand WC2R 3JF T: 020 7583 3771 E: eheiberg@horwathhtl.com W: www.horwathhtl.com

Electrical Goods COMET GROUP PLC James Jablonski Senior Account Manager Summit Sales Promotion, Regal Place, Maxwell Road, Fulham SW6 2DH T: 020 7751 8595 E: james@summitsp.co.uk GLEN DIMPLEX PROFESSIONAL Jonathan Casley Sales & Marketing Director Stoney Lane, Prescott L35 2XW T: 08442 484466 E: sales@gdpa.co.uk W: www.glendimplex.com OTRUM UK Ms Jennifer Davies UK Sales Manager Cedar House, Camphill Road, West Byfleet KT14 6SQ T: 01932 344535 E: jennifer.davies@otrum.com W: www.otrum.com

PEGASUS SOLUTIONS Pegasus Solutions is the world’s leading provider of technology and services to hotels and travel distributors, supplying the awardwinning RezView® NG central reservation system, electronic distribution services, advanced agency commission processing and payment services, a full array of ecommerce solutions and hotel marketing representation services. Visit www.pegs.com, www.utell.com or www.openhospitality.com.

PHILIPS HOTEL TV Wouter Staal EMEA Marketing Manager Wouter Staal, High Tech Campus, HTC 37, room 7.007, 5656 AE Eindhoven T: 0031630526332 E: wouter.staal@philips.com W: www.hoteltv.co.uk

Energy Management DISTECH-CONTROLS A.C. De Haan Director of Sales Raam 16A, 5422 WX Gemert T: 0031492390341 E: sander@distech-controls.eu W: www.distech-controls.com

Flooring KARNDEAN FLOORING LTD. Kelly O’Hanlon Account Director Willoughby PR, 43 Calthorpe Rd, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 1TS T: 01214 563004 E: kellyo@willoughby-pr.co.uk W: www.willoughby-pr.co.uk


DIRECTORY

Suppliers

Food & Beverage BEER PARADISE LTD. Karen Annelly Operations Manager Unit 20, Centre Park, Marston Moor Business Park, Tockwith York YO26 7QF T: 01423 359533 E: sales@beerparadise.co.uk W: www.beerparadise.ltd.uk BMC GLOBAL Frank Otten Managing Director PO Box 24839, E1W 2RZ T: 020 7702 1528 E: frank.otten@bmcglobal.com W: www.bmcglobal.com ERLENBACHER Mrs Babette Schmidt Head of Marketing Wasserweg 39, 64521 GrobGerau T: 00496152803373 E: babette.schmidt@de.nestle. com W: www.erlenbacher.de/en

THE ICE CREAM UNION Producers of the highest quality artisan ice creams and sorbets in the UK today. Our customers include everyone from pubs and restaurants to international airlines. If you are seeking the very best, then we believe we can exceed your expectations. Henry Arculus Sales Director Unit 4, Voyager Business Park Spa Road, London, SE16 4RP T: 020 7237 9042 E: info@icecreamunion.com W: www.icecreamunion.com

JAMES WHITE DRINKS LTD Lawrence Mellinson Proprietor & Managing Director White’s Fruit Farm, Helmingham Road, Ashbocking IP6 9JS T: 01473 890111 E: lawrence@jameswhite.co.uk W: www.jameswhite.co.uk JOHN MOWER & CO. LTD. Angela O’Connor Marketing Manager Millmead House, Pindar Road, Hoddesdon EN11 ODE T: 01992 708210 E: enquiries@johnmower.co.uk W: www.johnmower.co.uk

LANTMANNEN UNIBAKE UK Martin Jones Sales Director Maidstone Road Milton Keynes MK10 OBD T: 01908 281999 E: sales@lantmannen.com W: www.lantmannen-unibake.com

M&J SEAFOOD Clare Twiff Marketing Manager 3-5 Faraday Road Rabans Lane Industrial Estate Aylesbury HP19 8RY T: 01296 610600 E: enquiries@mjseafoods.co.uk W: www.mjseafood.com

MARCANTONIO FOODS LIMITED Phillip Marcantonio Director 18-22 Thames Road, Barking IG11 0HZ T: 020 8591 3399 E: pbm@marcantonio.co.uk W: www.marcantonio.co.uk MARKUS PRODUCTS Richard Bancroft Managing Director Murray Way Wincanton Business Park, Wincanton BA9 9RX T: 01963 435270 E: richard@markusproducts.co.uk W: www.markusproducts.co.uk

UNCLE ROY’S COMESTIBLE CONCOCTIONS Uncle Roy is well known for innovative, award-winning condiments and ingredients; particularly popular are his Edible Flower Petals, adding style and interest to drinks, baking, sauces, entrees and desserts …and the amazing Mustard Seed Oils – the first and only legal oils available since 1977 – both Great Taste Award winners.

6-7 Buccleuch Street, Moffat, Dumfriesshire, Scotland DG10 9HA T: 0044 1683 221 076 E: uncleroy@uncleroys.co.uk W: www.uncleroys.co.uk

PAGO INTERNATIONAL Marvin Henshaw Manager 610-612 Carrwood Road, Chesterfield S41 9QB E: m.henshaw@pago.cc W: www.pago.cc PARRIPAK Nick Gale Managing Director Sandy Lane, Chicksands, Shefford SG17 5QB T: 01462 813279 E: nick.gale@parripak.co.uk W: www.parripak.co.uk YOUNG & CO BREWERY PLC Stephen Goodyear Chief Executive Riverside House, 26 Osiers Rd, London SW18 1NH T: 02088 757000 E: enquiries@youngs.co.uk W: www.youngs.co.uk

Furniture FURNITAL LTD Bonura Lorenzo Managing Director Units 6 - 8 Trinity Centre, Park Farm Industrial Estate, Wellingborough NN8 6ZB T: 01933 400084 E: sales@furnital.com W: www.furnital.com

FURNITURE REALM LTD Sarah Payne Sales & Marketing Coordinator Unit 2 Lynx Crescent Weston Industrial Estate Weston Super Mare Somerset BS24 9DJ T: 01934 425550 E: sarah@furniturerealm.co.uk W: www.furniturerealm.co.uk, W: www.furniturerealmdirect.co.uk

Guest Supplies

SYSCO GUEST SUPPLIES Harriet Smith Marketing Executive 4 Venus House, Calleva Business Park, Aldermaston T: 01189 829509 E: sales@guestsupply.com W: www.guestsupply.com

Hand Dryers MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC Fawn Litchfield Marketing Executive Automation Systems Division Travellers Lane, Hatfield AL10 8XB T: 01707 276100 E: fawn.litchfield@meuk.mee. com W: www.meuk.mee.com

Hygiene DIVERSEY INC. Moreno Dezio Regional President, Europe Maarssenbroeksedjik 2, 3542 DN Utrecht. The Netherlands T: 003 1302 476912 W: www.diversey.com SCA HYGIENE PRODUCTS LTD Julie Ray Marketing Manager Southfields Road, Dunstable LU6 3EJ T: 01582 677570 E: julie.ray@sca.com W: www.sca.com

Kitchen Worktops R.C.COPPIN LTD. Paddy Sherlock Manager Unit 2, Park Drive Industrial Estate, Braintree CM7 1AP T: 01376 550009 E: sales@rccoppinltd.co.uk W: www.rccoppinltd.co.uk

Lighting LEDS C4 S.A. Daniel Moncunill C/Afores S/N, 25750 Tora (Lleida) T: 0034973468100 E: daniel@leds-c4.com W: www.leds-c4.com PHILLIPS LIGHTING LTD. Caroline Easton Retail Manager Philips Centre, Guilford Business Park, Guilford GU2 8XH T: 01483 293399 E: caroline.easton@philips.com W: www.philips.com

Market Research BDRC CONTINENTAL Jude Bissert Client Services Director Kingsbourne House, 229 - 231 High Holborn WC1V 7DA T: 020 7405 4778 E: jude.bissert@bdrccontinental.com W: www.bdrc.co.uk

Purchasing BEACON PURCHASING Hazel Tunnicliffe Marketing Manager Beacon, Consort House, Amy Johnson Way, York Y030 4GP T: 01904 695588 E: hazel.tunnicliffe@ beaconpurchasing.co.uk W: www.beaconpurchasing.co.uk

Refrigeration ADANDE REFRIGERATION Ian Wood Managing Director 45 Pinbush Road, South Lowestoft Industrial Estate, Lowestoft NR33 7NL T: 01502 537135 E: tobydacosta@adande.com W: www.adande.com LIEBHERR Stephen Ongley National Account Manager Commercial Channel Coolectric ltd, Interchange point, Renny Park Rd, Newport Pagnell MK16 0HA T: 01767 602100 E: stephen.ongley@coolectric. co.uk W: www.myliebherr.co.uk

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DIRECTORY

Suppliers

Room Spray

Toiletries

Wine

SCENT AIR Lucy McHattie Head of Marketing 8 Lake End Court, Taplow, Berks SL6 OJQ T: 01628 601650 E: lm@scentairuk.com W: www.scentairuk.com

RICHARD BURBIDGE LTD. Ian Mackenzie Specificiation Sales Manager Whittington Road, Oswestry SY11 1HZ T: 01691 678300 E: info@richardburbidge.co.uk W: www.richardburbidge.co.uk

BANCROFT WINES Carlos De Haan Fine Wine Director Woolyard, 54 Bermondsey Street SE1 3UD T: 020 7232 5440 E: nmcandrew@bancroftwines. com W: www.bancroftwines.com

Seafood

PURELOSOPHY AG Dimitry Afanasiev Chief Executive Kasper-Fenner Str 6, 8700 Kusnacht, Zurich T: 041449100115 E: dimitry@purelosophy.com W: www.purelosophy.com

ALASKA SEAFOOD LTD. Lowri Holness Account Manager Dialogue Agency Ltd, 3rd Floor Finland House, 56 Haymarket SW1Y 4RN T: 020 8607 0340 E: l.holness@dialogueagency.com W: www.dialogueagency.com RAMUS SEAFOODS LTD Jonathan Batchelor Managing Director Ocean House, Kings Road, Harrogate HG1 5HY T: 01423 563271 E: jonathan@ramus.co.uk W: www.ramus.co.uk

Soft Furnishings LIDDELL Chris Brown Darwen House Walker Park, Blackburn BB12QE T: 08454 379852 E: chris.brown@ visionsupportservices.com W: www.liddell-linens.com/#about RICHARD HAWORTH David Stockton Web Manager Kearsley Mill Stoneclough, Radcliffe, Manchester M26 1RH T: 08453 377001 E: david_stockton@ruia.co.uk W: www.ruia.co.uk

Staircases RICHARD BURBIDGE LTD. Ian Mackenzie Specificiation Sales Manager Whittington Road, Oswestry SY11 1HZ T: 01691 678300 E: info@richardburbidge.co.uk W: www.richardburbidge.co.uk

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Training HIT TRAINING Chris Rose Marketing Manager Suite 24, Citybase, Fareham PO15 5TT T: 01489 560883 E: chris.rose@hittraining.co.uk W: www.hittraining.co.uk THIRD FORCE Lorna Tyrtania Senior Product Manager 36 Windsor Street, Uxbridge UB8 1AB T: 020 8843 5500 E: ltyrtania@thirdforce.com W: www.thirdforce.com

Water AG BARR PLC Alan Hay Marketing Manager 2nd Floor, Mansell House, Aspinall Close, Middlebrook, Bolton BL6 6QQ T: 01236 853400 E: alan.hay@agbarr.co.uk W: www.agbar.co.uk TY NANT SPRING WATER LTD. Nick Taylor Managing Director Bethania, Llanon SY23 5LS T: 01974 272111 E: nick.taylor@tynant.com W: www.tynant.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

BARTON BROWNSDON & SADLER LTD. Nick Budibent Director Court Gardens Farm, Orchard Lane, Ditchling BN6 8TH T: 01273 841111 E: info@bbswine.com W: www.bbswine.com LAITHWAITES WINE Simon McMurtrie Chief Executive New Aquitaine House, Exeter Way, Theale, Reading RG7 4PL T: 08451 947711 E: customerservice@ laithwaiteswine.co.uk W: www.laithwaites.co.uk MAJESTIC WINE WAREHOUSES LTD. Steve Lewis Chief Executive Majestic House, Otterspool Way, Watford WD25 8WW T: 01923 298200 E: slewis@majestic.co.uk W: www.majestic.co.uk


DIRECTORY

Food and Service Management Companies

Food and Service Management Companies A ABM CATERING Sue Johnstone Managing Director 10 Grosvenor House, Grosvenor Road, Coventry CV1 3FF T: 02476 552988 E: admin@abmcatering.co.uk W: www.abmcatering.co.uk ACCENT CATERING SERVICES Gordon Haggarty Managing Director The Old Station, Moor Lane, Staines TW18 4BB T: 01784 224690 E: info@accentcatering.co.uk W: www.accentcatering.co.uk ARAMARK LTD. Andrew Main Chief Executive 250 Fowler Avenue, IQ Business Park, Farnborough GU14 7JP T: 01252 529000 E: info@aramark.co.uk W: www.aramark.co.uk ARTIZIAN CATERING Alison Frith Managing Director Fairfax House, 15 Fulwood Place, London WC1V 6AY T: 01189 404440 W: www.artizian.co.uk AUTOGRAPH FOODSERVICE Paul Daly Managing Director Columbia Centre, Station Road, Bracknell RG12 1LP T: 01344 300444 W: www.autograph-foodservice. co.uk

B BARTLETT MITCHELL Wendy Bartlett Managing Director 80 High Street, Egham TW20 9HE T: 01784 471411 E: wendy@bartlettmitchell.co.uk W: www.bartlettmitchell.co.uk

BAXTERSTOREY Neil Mohonty Managing Director The Waterfront, 300 Thames Valley Park Drive, Reading RG6 1PT T: 01189 356700 W: www.baxterstorey.com BLUE APPLE CONTRACT CATERING Ruston Toms Director Orchard House, The Courtyard, Matthewsgreen Farm, Wokingham RG41 1JX T: 01189 893388 E: contact@blue-apple.co.uk W: www.blue-apple.co.uk BROOKSWOOD PARTNERSHIP Sue Parfett Managing Partner 1 Chesterfield Road, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey KT12 2TW T: 01932 233299 W: www.brookwood-ptnrs.com

C CH&CO Tim Jones Chairman Bryants Farm, Kiln Road, Dunsden, Reading RG4 9PB T: 01189 466300 E: sales@CHandCo.net W: www.chandco.net COMPASS GROUP Ian Sarson Managing Director Rivermead, Oxford Road, Denham, Uxbridge UB9 4BF T: 01895 554554 E: info@compass-group.co.uk W: www.compass-group.co.uk CYGNET FOODS Jim Cartwright Managing Director Limes 1, Parklands Way, Rubery, Birmingham B45 9PZ T: 01214 575282 W: www.cygnetfoods.co.uk

E

L

ELIOR Tim Hammond Chief Executive 41 Lothbury, London EC2R 7HG T: 08450 267501 W: www.elior.co.uk

LEXINGTON CATERING Julia Edmonds Managing Director 72 Cannon Street, London EC4N 6AE T: 020 7332 8585 W: www.lexingtoncatering.com

H

O

HARBOUR & JONES Patrick Harbour and Nathan Jones Proprietors 11 Long Acre WC2E 9LH T: 020 7520 5440 E: tasty@harbourandjones.co.uk W: www.harbourandjones.com

OCS UK Graham Gilbert Divisional Director 79 Limpsfield Road, Sanderstead CR2 9LB T: 08448 467 606 E: enquiries@ocs.co.uk W: www.ocs.co.uk

HARRISON CATERING SERVICES Geoffrey Harrison Managing Director Oxford House, Oxford Road, Thame OX9 2AH T: 01844 216777 W: www.harrisoncatering.co.uk HOST CONTRACTS MANAGEMENT Jerry Brand Managing Director Liss House, Station Road, Liss GU33 7AD T: 01730 897070 E: jerry.brand@hostmgt.com W: www.hostmgt.com

S SODEXO UK Phil Hooper Director of Corporate Affairs Capital House, 2nd Floor, 25 Chapel Street NW1 5DH T: 020 7535 7400 E: phil.hooper@sodexo.com W: www.sodexo.com

V

I ISS EATON Simon Titchener Managing Director ISS House, Genesis Business Park, Albert Drive, Woking GU21 5RW T: 08450 576300 W: www.uk.issworld.com

VACHERIN Mark Philpott Managing Director 16 - 18 Hatton Garden EC1N 8AT T: 020 7404 2277 E: phil.roker@vacherin.com W: www.vacherin.com

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DIRECTORY

Who’s Who

Who’s Who A

B

ABELA, Marlon Chairman Marlon Abela Restaurant Corp Marc Ltd, 14/16 Bruton Place, London W1J6LX T: 020 7647 1888 E: info@marcrestaurants W: www.marcrestaurants.com

BACKMAN, Peter Chairman Horizons FS Ltd. Winston House, 2 Dollis Park, London N3 1HF T: 020 8349 0162 E: info@hrzns.com W: www.hrzns.com

AIKENS, Tom Chef Proprietor 43 Elystan Street, Chelsea, London SW3 3NT T: 020 7584 2003 E: info@tomaikens.co.uk W: www.tomaikens.co.uk

BAINS, Sat Patron Restaurant Sat Bains With Rooms Lenton Lane, Nottingham NG7 2SA T: 01159 866566 E: info@restaurantsatbains.net W: www.restaurantsatbains.net

ALDEN, Stephen Chief Executive Maybourne Group 30 Old Burlington St. London W1S 3AR T: 020 7107 8830 E: salden@maybourne.com W: www.maybourne.com ANAND, Rooney Chief Executive Greene King PLC Westgate Brewery, Westgate St, Bury St Edmunds IP33 1QT T: 01284 763222 E: info@greeneking.co.uk W: www.greeneking.co.uk ARORA, Surinder Chairman Arora International Ltd Arora International Hotel, The Grove, Bath Rd, West Drayton UB7 ODG T: 020 8759 9000 E: enquiries@arorainternational. co.uk W: www.arorainternational.com ATHERTON, Jason Proprietor Pollen Street Social, 8-10 Pollen Street, London W1S 1NQ T: 020 8600 3600 E: info@jasonatherton.co.uk W: www.jasonatherton.co.uk

BAIRD-MURRAY, Justin Managing Director Metropole Hotel Llandrindod Wells, Temple Street, Llandrindod Wells, Powys LD1 5DY T: 01597 823700 E: info@metropole.co.uk W: www.metropole.co.uk BALDWIN, David Chairman Baldwin’s Omega Restaurant, Sheffield Brincliffe Hill, Off Psalter Lane, Sheffield S11 9DF T: 01142 551818 E: mail@baldwinsomega.com W: www.baldwinsomega.com BANCROFT, Nigel Managing Director Northcote Group Northcote Manor, Langho, Blackburn BB6 8BE T: 01254 240555 E: maureen.bardell@northcote.com W: www.northcote.com BARKLEM, Nigel Chairman Henley Media Group 100 City Road, London EC1Y 2BP T: 020 7871 0123 E: nbarklem@ henleymediagroup.com W: www.henleymediagroup.com BARNARD, Robert Managing Director PKF Consultancy Farringdon Place, 20 Farringdon Road, London EC1M 3AP T: 020 70650105 E: info@uk.pkf.com W: www.pkf.com

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l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

BARTLETT, Wendy Managing Director Bartlett Mitchell 80 High Street, Egham TW20 9HE T: 01784 414411 E: wendy@bartlettmitchell.co.uk W: www.bartlettmitchell.co.uk BASSET, Gerard Proprietor Hotel Terravina 174 Woodlands Road, Woodlands, Netley Marsh, Southampton SO40 7GL T: 02380 293784 E: info@hotelterravina.co.uk W: www.hotelterravina.co.uk BATCHELOR, Lance Chief Executive Officer Domino’s UK and Ireland 1 Thornbury, West Ashland, Milton Keynes MK6 4BB E: marketing@dominos.co.uk W: www.dominos.uk.com BATEMAN, Graeme Managing Director Elite Hotels Ashdown Park, Wych Cross RH18 5JR T: 01342 820264 E: elite@elitehotels.co.uk W: www.elitehotels.co.uk BATTERSBY, David OBE Chief Executive Hospitality & Leisure Manpower Burgoine House,Burgoine Quay,8 Lower Teddington Rd, Kingston upon Thames KT1 4ER T: 020 8977 4419 E: hlm@halm.co.uk W: www.halm.co.uk BAXTER, William Deputy Chief Executive Baxter Storey The Waterfront, 300 Thames Valley Park Drive, Reading RG6 1PT T: 01189 356700 W: www.baxterstorey.com BEALE, Andrew Chairman Beale’s Hotels West Lodge Park, Cockfosters Road, Hadley Wood, Herts EN4 0PY T: 020 8216 3900 E: headoffice@bealeshotels.co.uk W: www.bealeshotels.co.uk

BEJERANO, Abraham Chairman A B Hotels Sopwell House Hotel, Cottonmill Lane, Sopwell, St. Albans AL1 2HQ T: 01727 844741 E: enquiries@abhotels.co.uk W: www.abhotels.co.uk BERRESFORD, James Chief Executive VisitEngland 1 Palace Street, London SW1E 5HX T: 020 7578 1400 W: www.visitengland.org BLANC, RAYMOND Patron Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons Church Road, Great Milton OX44 7PD T: 01844 278881 E: lemanoir@blanc.co.uk W: www.lemanoir.com BLUMENTHAL, Heston Proprietor Fat Duck High Street, Bray SL6 2AQ T: 01628 580333 E: info@hindsheadbray.com W: www.thefatduck.co.uk BOSI, Claude Chef Proprietor Hibiscus 29 Maddox Street, London W15 2PA T: 020 7629 2999 E: enquiries@hibiscusrestaurant. co.uk W: www.hibiscusrestaurant.co.uk BOWIE, James Proprietor Belmont House Hotel The Belmont Hotel, De Montfort Street, Leicester LE1 7GR T: 01162 544773 E: info@belmonthotel.co.uk W: www.belmonthotel.co.uk BRADFORD, The Earl of Chairman Restaurant Association Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3B T: 020 7447 744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk

BRAV, Angela Chief Execuive InterContinental Hotels group Broadwater Park, Denham, Buckinghamshire UB9 5HR T: 01895 512000 W: www.ihgplc.com BREND, John and Peter Group Directors Brend Hotels Ltd Park Hotel, Taw Vale, Barnstaple EX32 9AE T: 01271 372166 E: sales@brend-hotels.co.uk W: www.brend-hotels.co.uk BRENNAN, John Chief Executive Jury’s Inns 146 Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge Dublin T: 03531 6075048 E: john_brennan@jurysinns.com W: www.jurysinns.com BRETON, Jean Claude Maitre d’ Restaurant Gordon Ramsay 66 Royal Hospital Road, London SW3 4HP T: 020 7352 4441 E: royalhospitalroad@ gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com BRIGFORD, David Strategy Director Merlin Entertainments 3 Market Close, Poole BH15 1NQ T: 020 8899 6110 E: enquiries@ merlinentertainment.biz W: www.merlinentertainments. biz BROWN, Chris Partner Turpin Smale Consultants Blackfriars Foundry, 156 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8EN T: 07876 233405 E: chris.brown@turpinsmale. co.uk W: www.turpinsmale.co.uk BROYD, Richard Chairman Historic House Hotels Ltd Hartwell House, Oxford Road, Near Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP17 8NR T: 01296 747444 E: info@hartwell-house.com W: www.historichousehotels.com


DIRECTORY

Who’s Who

C CAINES MBE, Michael Executive Head Chef Gidleigh Park Chagford TQ13 8HH T: 01647 432367 E: gidleighpark@gidleigh.co.uk W: www.gidleigh.com CAMPBELL GRAY, Gordon Chairman CampbellGray Hotels 353 Strand, London WC2R OHS T: 020 7395 1660 E: executiveoffice@ campbellgrayhotels.com W: www.campbellgrayhotels.com CANTLAY, Dr Mike Chief Executive VisitScotland Ocean Point One, 94 Ocean Drive, Edinburgh EH6 6JH T: 08458 591006 E: info@visitscotland.com W: www.visitscotland.org CARING, Richard Chief Executive Caprice Holdings Ltd. 72 -74 Dean Street, London W1D3SG T: 020 730 7560 E: shgreceception@sohohouse.com W: www.caprice-holdings.co.uk CASH, Lee Chief Executive Peach Pub Company Ltd The Peach Barns, Somerton Rd, North Aston, Bicester OX25 6HX T: 01869 220110 E: supersuppliers@peachpubs.com W: www.peachpubs.com CLARKE, Alan Chief Executive Northern Ireland Tourist Board St Anne’s Court, 59 North Street Belfast BT1 1NB T: 02890 231221 E: info@nitb.com W: www.nitb.com CLEVELY, Rupert Chief Executive Geronimo Inns Ltd The East Hill, 21 Alma Road London SW18 1AA T: 020 8877 8826 E: info@geronimoinns.co.uk W: www.geronimoinns.co.uk

CLINCH, Michael Proprietor Chatsworth Hotel Steyne, Worthing, West Sussex BN11 3DU T: 01903 236103 E: hotel@chatsworthworthing. co.uk W: www.chatsworthworthing. co.uk COBHAM, Lady Penelope Chairman VisitEngland 1 Palace Street, London SW1E 5HX T: 020 7578 1400 W: www.visitengland.com CONNELLY, Paul Head of Purchasing Beacon Purchasing Consort House, Amy Johnson Way, York YO30 4GP T: 01904 695588 E: paul.connelly@ beaconpurchasing.co.uk W: www.beaconpurchasing.co.uk COOGAN, Michelle Chief Operating Officer Wyndham Hotel Group Landmark House, Hammersmith Bridge Road London W6 9EJ T: 020 8762 6600 E: sandra.storey@ wyndhamworldwide.com W: www.wyndhamworldwide. com COOK, Robert Chief Executive De Vere Village Hotels Unit 790 (6A), Mandarin Court, Centre Pak, Warrington WA1 1GG T: 08449 800075 W: www.village-hotels.co.uk COPPEL, Andrew Chief Executive Officer De Vere Hotels The Gloucester Building, De Vere Venues Sunningdale Park, Larch Avenue, Ascot SL5 0QE T: 0844 9809950 W: www.devere.co.uk COPPOLA, Fernando Villa Marina 18 Thameside, Henley-onThames, Oxfordshire RG9 1BH T: 01491 575262 W: www.villamarina_henley.com CORBIN, Chris Restaurateur Rex Restaurant Associates 157 Piccadilly, London W1J 9EB T: 020 7449 6996 W: www.thewolseley.com

CRITOPH, Stephen Group Finance Director Restaurant Group PLC 5/7 Marshalsea Rd, London SE1 1EP T: 08456 125001 E: sarah.allcock@trgplc.com W: www.trgplc.com

COTTON, Bob OBE Consultant 10 The Promenade, Peacehaven BN10 8QF E: robert.cotton@btopenworld. com

DEMETRE, Anthony Co-Proprietor Arbutus, Wild Honey, Les Deux Salons 63/64 Frith St, London W1D 3JW T: 020 7734 4545 E: anthony@arbutusrestaurant.co.uk W: www.arbutusrestaurant.co.uk

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COUCHMAN, Martin Deputy Chief Executive British Hospitality Association Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk

DANGERFIELD, Tony Chief Executive De Vere Venues Gloucester Building, Sunningdale Park, Larch Avenue Ascot SL5 0QE T: 08708 803020 E: customerservicds@ deverevenues.co.uk W: www.deverevenues.co.uk

DEMPSEY, Patrick Chief Executive Premier Inn Whitbread Court, Houghton Hall Business Pk, Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 01582 499499 E: enquiries@premierinn.com W: www.premierinn.com

CORRIGAN, Richard Chef Proprietor Corrigan’s 28 Upper Grosvenor Street, London W1K 7EH T: 020 7499 9943 W: www.corrigansmayfair.com

COUSINS, Richard Chairman Compass Group Parkview, 82 Oxford Road, Uxbridge UB9 4BF T: 01895 554544 E: info@compass-group.co.uk W: www.compass-group.co.uk COWDRAY, Christopher Chief Executive Dorchester Collection 3 Tilney Street, London W1K 1BJ T: 020 7629 4848 E: cowdray@ dorchestercollection.com W: www.dorchestercollection. com CRAWFORD, Guy Chief Executive Officer Jumeirah Hotels 207 Sloane Street, London SW1X 9QX T: 020 7858 7555 W: www.jumeirah.com CRERAR, Paddy Chief Executive Crerar Hotels Ltd 1 Queen Charlotte Lane, Edinburgh EH6 6BL T: 01315 547173 E: enquiry@crearhotels.com W: www.crearhotels.com CRIDLAND, John Director General Confederation of British Industry Centre Point, 103 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1DU T: 020 7379 7400 E: enquirydesk@cbi.org.uk W: www.cbi.org.uk

DARK, Philip Vice President Rezidor Hotel Group Avenue Du Bourget 44, B - 1130 Brussels T: 03227 029200 E: info@rezidor.com W: www.rezidor.com DAVIES, Gary Chief Executive Officer Mailmaison Hotels/Hotel du Vin 1 West Garden Place, Kendal Street, London W2 2AQ T: 020 7012 3744 W: www.malmaison.com DAVY, Christopher Chairman National Executive, British Hospitality Association Proprietor Rose and Crown Hotel Romaldkirk, Barnard Castle, Co Durham DL12 9EB T: 01833 650213 E: hotel@rose-and-crown.co.uk DE HAAN, Peter Chairman Bancroft Wines Woolyard, 54 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3UD T: 020 7232 5440 E: nmcandrew@bancroftwines.com W: www.bancroftwines.com DE STEFANO, John Chairman London Fine Dining Group 13 Stratford Place, London W1C 1BD T: 020 7408 7250 E: giorgio@ londonfinedininggroup.com W: www.londonfinedininggroup. com

DEWBERRY, Alan Chairman H2O Publishing Apex House, London Road, Northfleet, DA11 9PD T: 0845 5006008 W: www.h20publishing.co.uk DONAGHUE, Bernard Chief Executive Association of Leading Visitor Attractions 4 Westminster Palace Gardens, Artillery Row, London SW1P 1RL T: 020 72221728 E: email@alva.org.uk W: www.alva.org.uk DUCKER, Peter Executive Director Hotel Booking Agents Association 3000 Cathedral Hill, Guildford GU22 7YB T: 08456 033349 E: executive officer@hbaa.org.uk W: www.baa.org.uk DUNNING, John Chairman Westmorland Motorway Services Westmorland Place, Orton, Penrith, Cumbria, CA10 3SB T: 01539 624511 E: feedback@westmorland.com W: www.westmorland.com

E EDWARDS, Mark Executive Chef Nobu 19 Old Park Lane, London W1YLB T: 020 7447 4747 E: marke@noburestaurants.com W: www.myriadrestaurantgroup. com

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EDWARDS, Rowena Chief Executive Graysons Restaurants 5th Floor, St Martin’s House, 16 St Martin’s Le Grand, London EC1A 4EN T: 020 7397 8702 E: sales@graysonshospitality.com W: www.graysonsrestaurants.com

EVANS, Jane Chief Executive Meetings Industry Association PO Box 515, Kelmarsh, Northampton NN6 9XY T: 0845 2305508 E: info@mia-uk.org W: www.mia-uk.org

ELLIS, Gavin Director Knockomie Hotel, Forres Grantown Road, Forres, Moray IV36 2SG T: 01309 673146 E: stay@knockomie.co.uk W: www.knockomie.co.uk

F

ELSMIE, Patrick Managing Director Gleneagles Auchterarder, Pertshire PH3 1NF T: 01764 662231 E: resort.sales@gleneagles.com W: www.gleneagles.com ENGSKOV, Kris Managing Director Starbucks UK Building 4, Chiswick Park, 566 Chiswick High Road, London W4 5YE T: 020 8834 5000 E: ukinfo@starbucks.com W: www.starbucks.co.uk ENTHOVEN, Robbie Managing Director Nando’s Erico House, 93/99 Upper Richmond Road, London SW15 3TY T: 02083 946735 E: enquiries@nandos.co.uk W: www.nandos.co.uk EPSTEIN, Jeffrey Chief Executive Best Loved Hotels PO Box 602, Redhill, Surrey RH1 5XA T: 08450 121700 E: mail@bestloved.com W: www.bestloved.com ESPOSITO, Arturo General Manager Pestana Hotels 354 Queenstown Road, London SW8 4AE T: 020 7062 8000 W: www.pestana.com EVANS, Andrew Proprietor St Bride’s Hotel & Spa St Brides Hill, Saundersfoot, Pembrokeshire SA69 9NH T: 01834 812304 E: marketing@stbridesspahotel. com W: www.stbridesspahotel.com

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FAHY, Ciaran Managing Director Cavendish Hotel, London 81 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6JF T: 020 7930 2111 W: www.thecavendish-london. co.uk

G GALVIN, Chris and Jeff Chef Proprietors Galvin La Chapelle 35 Spital Square, London E1 6DY T: 020 7299 0400 E: info@galvinrestaurants.com W: www.galvinrestaurants.com GAULT, Janice Chief Executive Northern Ireland Hotels Federation, The McCune Building, 1 Shore Road, Belfast BT15 3PG T: 02890 776635 W: www.nihf.co.uk

FAIRHURST, David Chief People Officer McDonald’s Restaurants, Europe 11-59 High Road, East Finchley, London N2 8AW W: www.mcdonalds.co.uk

GEOGHEGAN, Niall Chairman Menzies Hotels Bakum House, Etwall Road, Mickleover, Derbyshire, DE3 0DL T: 08458 503013 W: www.menzieshotels.co.uk

FENTUM, Haydn Chief Executive Bespoke Hotels Bespoke House, The Old Rectory, Windsor End, Beaconsfield HP9 2JW T: 08708 903740 E: info@bespokehotels.com W: www.bespokehotels.com

GILL, A A Restaurant Critic The Sunday Times 1 Virginia Street, London E98 1RL T: 020 7782 5000 W: www.times.co.uk

FIGGE, Heiko Chief Executive Guoman Hotel Management (UK) Ltd, Corporate Office, PO Box 909, Bath Road, Uxbridge UB8 9FH T: 020 7138 0000 W: www.guoman.com FINDALY, Ralph Chief Executive Marstons Inns & Taverns MarstonsHouse, Brewery Road Wolverhampton WV1 4JT T: 01902 329170 E: enquiries@marstontaverns. co.uk W: www.marstonstaverns.co.uk FLOWER, Vince Managing Director Shearings Holidays Miry Lane, Wigan WN3 4AG T: 01942 244246 E: hr@shearings.com W: www.shearings.com FORTE, Sir Rocco Chairman Rocco Forte Collection 70 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6NY T: 020 7321 2626 E: cholliday@ roccofortecollection.com W: www.roccofortecollection.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

GILL, Andrew Chief Executive Jupiter Hotels Castle House, Desborough Road, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire HP11 2PR T: 01494 473800 W: www.jupiterhotels.co.uk GONZALES, Raul Chief Executive Barcelo Hotels & Resorts Watling Street, Hinckley LE10 9JA T: 01455 631122 E: stay@barcello-hotels.co.uk W: www.barcelo-hotels.co.uk GORING, Jeremy Chairman The Goring Hotel, London Beeston Place, London, SW1V 0JW T: 020 7396 9000 E: reception@thegoring.com W: www.thegoring.com GOTTLIEB, Michael Managing Director Christopher’s Group 18 Wellington Street, London, WC2E 7DD T: 020 7240 4222 E: reception@christophersgrill.com W: www.christophersgrill.com

GRAY, Michael General Manager Hyatt Regency-London The Churchill, 30 Portman Square, London W1H 7BH T: 020 7486 5800 E: london.churchill@hyatt.com

HALLIDAY, Nick Chief Executive Brownsword Hotels Weston Road, Bath, BA1 2XT T: 01225 331922 E: mail@thebathpriory.co.uk W: www.brownswordhotels.co.uk

GREEN, Frances Managing Director Landmark Hotel, London 222 Marylebone Road, London NW1 6JQ T: 020 7631 8000 E: webmarkeing@thelandmark. co.uk W: www.landmarklondon.co.uk

HAMMOND, Tim Chief Executive Elior UK Viewpoint House, 240 London Road, Staines TW18 4JT T: 08450 300100 E: info@elior.co.uk W: www.elior.co.uk

GROSE, Graham Proprietor Thurlestone Hotel Thurlestone, South Devon, TQ7 3NN T: 01548 560382 E: enquiries@thurlestone.co.uk W: www.thurlestone.co.uk

HANDS, John Chief Executive Hand Picked Hotels The Stables, Crathorne Hall Hotel. Crathorne, Yarm, Nr Yorks T515 OAR T: 08454 580901 W: www.handpickedhotels.com

GUILE, David Chief Executive Macdonald Hotels Whiteside House, Bathgate EH48 2RX T: 01506 815200 E: marketing@macdonaldhotels. co.uk W: www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

HARBOUR, Patrick Co-proprietor Harbour & Jones 11 Long Acre, London WC2E 9LH T: 020 7520 5440 E: tasty@harbourandjones.co.uk W: www.harbourandjones.com

GUNEWARDENA, Desmond Chief Executive D & D Restaurants 16 Kirby St, London EC1N 8TS T: 020 7716 0716 E: janar@danddlondon.com W: www.danddlondon.com GUY, Andrew Director Ed’s Easy Diner Avenfield House, 118-127 Park Lane, London, W1K 7AG T: 020 7629 6151 W: www.edseasydiner.com

H HALL, Hilary Chief Executive Midland Association of Restaurants, Caterers and Events 27 Spring Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2HA T: 01214 401892 E: admin@marche.org.uk W: www.marche.org.uk HALL, Rufus Chief Executive Orchid Group Park Mill, Burydell Lane, Park St, St. Albans AL2 2HB T: 01727 871100 E: rufus.hall@orchidgroup.co.uk W: www.orchidpubs.co.uk

HARRISON, Geoffrey Chairman Harrison Catering Services Oxford House, Oxford Road, Thame, OX9 2AH T: 01844 216777 W: www.harrisoncatering.co.uk HARRISON, Andy Chief Executive Whitbread plc Whitbread Court, Porz Avenue Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 01582 424200 E: supplier.info@whitbread.com W: www.whitbread.com HARTNETT, Angela Chef-Patron Murano 20 Queen Street, London W1J 5PP T: 020 7495 1127 E: muranorestaurant@angelahartnett.com W: www.angela-hartnett.com HASSELL, Tim Proprietor Ilsington Country House Hotel, Devon Ilsington Village, Nr Newton Abbott, Devon, TQ13 9RR T: 01364 661452 W: www.ilsington.co.uk


DIRECTORY

Who’s Who

HASTINGS, Howard Chief Executive Hastings Hotels Group Ltd 1066 House, Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast BT4 3LP T: 02890 748152 E: h.hastings@hastingshotel.com W: www.hastingshotel.com HAWKES, Sir Garry CBE President Edge Foundation 4 Millbank, London, SW1P 3JA T: 020 7960 1540 E: centre@edge.co.uk W: www.edge.co.uk HAYNES, Trevor Area Development Manager Subway Restaurants Chaston House, Mill Court, Hinton Way Cambridge CB225LD T: 01223 844884 E: info@subway.co.uk W: www.subway.co.uk HEARN, Grant Chairman Travelodge Sleepy Hollow, Aylesbury Road Thame OX9 3AT T: 01844 358500 E: jo.begbie@travelodge.co.uk W: www.travelodge.co.uk HEATHOTE, Paul Chief Executive Longridge Restaurants Ltd 23 Winckley Square, Preston PR13JJ T: 01772 252732 E: preston@heathcotes.co.uk W: www.heathcotes.co.uk HERLAND, Jocelyn Executive Chef Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester Hotel Park Lane, London W1K 1QA T: 020 7629 8866 E: alainducassereservations@ thedorchester.com W: www.alainducasse-dorchester. com HETHERINGTON, Bob Chief Operating Officer SSP 1 The Heights, Brooklands, Weybridge KT13 ONY T: 01932 792400 W: www.foodtravelexperts.com HILL, Steven Chief Executive Wagamama Waverley House, 7-12 Noel Street, London W1F 8GQ T: 020 7009 3600 W: www.wagamama.com

HIX, Mark Restaurateur Restaurants Etc. Hix Oyster and Chop House 36/37 Greenhill Rents, Concross St, London EC1M 6BN T: 020 7017 1930 E: jo@hixfoodetc.co.uk W: www.restaurantsetcltd.co.uk HOLMES, Terry Executive Director Red Carnation Hotels 14 -15 Grosvenor Place, London SW1X 7HH T: 020 7514 5607 W: www.redcarnationhotels.com HOOPER, Phil Corporate Affairs Director Sodexo One Southampton Row, London WC1B 5HA T: 020 7404 0110 W: www.sodexo.com HUNT MP, Rt Hon Jeremy Secretary of State Dept for Culture, Media & Sport 2 - 4 Cockspur St, London SW1Y 4DH T: 2072116000 E: enquiries@culture.gov.uk W: www.culture.gov.uk HUNT, Jason Proprietor Crazy Bear Group Bear Lane, Stadhampton, Oxford OX44 7UR T: 01865890714 E: enquiries@crazy-bearstadhampton.co.uk W: www.crazybeargroup.co.uk HUTTON, Richard Finance Director Greggs PLC Fernwood House, Clayton Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1TL T: 1912817721 E: getintouch@greggs.co.uk W: www.greggs.co.uk

I IBRAHIM, Ufi Chief Executive British Hospitality Association Queens House, 55 - 56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 2074047799 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk

IMRIE, Russell Managing Director Queensferry Hotels, Edinburgh Bruntsfield Hotel, 69 Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh, EH10 4HH T: 0131 229 1393 E: russell.imrie@ queensferryhotels.co.uk W: www.queensferryhotels.com ISPANI, Stefano Managing Director Ponti’s Group Ltd 17/21 Wenlock Rd, Islington, London N1 7SL T: 02072501414 E: sispani@pontis.co.uk W: www.pontis.co.uk IVELL, Bob Executive Chairman Mitchells and Butlers 27 Fleet Street, Birmingham B3 1JP T: 0121 4984000 E: media.centre@mbplc.com W: www.mbplc.com

J JACOBS, Allison Editor Hotel Business 25 Phoenix Court, Hawkins Road, Colchester CO2 8JY T: 1206505983 E: allison.jacobs@aceville.co.uk W: www.aceville.co.uk JOHNSON, Stuart General Manager Brown’s Hotel, London Albemarie Street, London W1S 4BP T: 020 7493 6020 W: www.brownshotel.com JONES, Nick Managing Director Soho House UK 72/74 Dean Street, London W1D 3SG T: 020 7851 1197 E: india@sohohouse.com W: www.sohohouse.com JONES, Robyn Chief Executive CH&Co Bryants Farm, Kiln Road, Dunsden, Reading RG4 9PB T: 01189 466300 E: sales@chandco.net W: www.chandco.net

K KAYE, Adam and Sam Non-Executive Directors Prezzo PLC Johnston House, 8 Johnston Rd, Woodford Green IG8 OXA T: 08456 023257 E: office@prezzoplc.co.uk W: www.prezzoplc.co.uk KEMP, Tim and Kit Co-Founders Firmdale Hotels PLC 18 Thurloe Place, London SW7 2SP T: 020 7581 4045 E: timkemp@firmdale.com W: www.firmdale.com KENNEDY, Tom Chief Financial Officer Hilton Worldwide Maple Court, Central Park, Reeds Crescent, Watford WD24 4QQ T: 020 7850 4000 E: nick.smart@hilton.com W: www.hilton.co.uk KOSSOFF, Simon Chief Executive Carluccio’s Restaurants 35 Rose St, London WC2E 9EB T: 020 7580 3050 E: theoffice@carluccios.com W: www.carluccios.com

L LANGSTON, Jonathan Chief Executive TRI Hospitality Group 88 Baker Street, London, W1U 6TQ T: 020 7486 5191 E: enquiries@trihc.com W: www.trihospitality.com LAWLESS, Gerald Executive Chairman Jumeirah Hotels 207 Sloane Street, London SW1X 9QX T: 020 7858 7555 W: www.jumeirah.com LECKIE, Stephen Chief Executive Crieff Hydro Hotel Crieff, Pertshire, PH7 3LQ T: 01764 655555 W: www.crieffhydro.com

LEDERER, Peter Chairman Gleneagles Auchterarder, Perthshire PH3 1NF T: 01764662231 E: peter.lederer@gleneagles.com W: www.gleneagles.com LEITH, Prue CBE Chairman The Office Chastleton Glebe, Chastleton, Nr Moreton in Marsh GL56 0SZ W: www.prue-leith.com LEVIN, David Chairman Capital Hotel, London 22-24 Basil Street, London, SW3 1AT T: 020 7589 5171 E: manager@capitalhotel.co.uk W: www.capitalhotel.co.uk LEWIS, Mark Editor Caterer & Hotelkeeper Quadrant House, Sutton SM2 5AS T: 020 8652 3656 E: mark.lewis@rbi.co.uk W: www.caterersearch.com LOCATELLI, Giorgio Chef Proprietor Locanda Locatelli 8 Seymour Street, London W1H 7JZ T: 020 7935 9088 E: info@locandalocatelli.com W: www.locandalocatelli.com LOEWI, David Managing Director D & D Restaurants 16 Kirby St, London EC1N 8TS T: 020 7716 0716 E: janar@danddlondon.com W: www.danddlondon.com LOGIE, Jeremy Executive Secretary The Master Innholders 15 Heath Way, Totnes, Devon TQ9 5GP T: 01803 862795 E: jeremy.logie@talk21.com W: www.masterinnholders.co.uk LOUIS, Len Chief Executive Classic British Hotels Suite 113, The Mayford Centre Mayford Green, Woking GU22 OPP T: 01483 747480 E: ceo@classicbritishhotels.com W: www.classicbritishhotels.com

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M MACDONALD, Donald Chairman Macdonald Hotels The Bobsleigh, Hempstead Road, Bovingdon, Hertfordshire, HP3 0DS T: 08451 204991 W: www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk MACDONALD, Kieran General Manager Savoy Hotel, London Strand, London, WC2R 0EU T: 020 7836 4343 E: savoy@fairmont.com W: www.fairmont.com/savoy MAHONY, Noel Chief Executive Baxter Storey The Waterfront, 300 Thames Valley Park Drive, Reading, RG6 1PT T: 01189 356700 W: www.baxterstorey.com MAIN, Andrew Chief Executive Aramark Ltd 250 Fowler Avenue, IQ Business Park, Farnborough GU14 7JP T: 01252 529000 E: info@aramark.co.uk W: www.aramark.co.uk MANSIGANI, Mohan Chief Financial Officer Tragus Holdings Ltd 163 Eversholt St, London NW1 1BU T: 020 7121 3200 E: info@tragusgroup.com W: www.tragusgroup.com MARTIN, Tim Chairman JD Wetherspoon Wetherspoon House, Central Park, Watford WD24 QL T: 01923 477777 W: www.jdwetherspoon.co.uk MATHARU, Brothers Chief Executives Grange Hotels Ltd 58 Rochester Row, London SW1P 1JU T: 020 7630 2000 E: rajma@grangehotels.com W: www.grangehotels.com McCALL, Stephen Managing Director InterContinental group UK & Ireland Broadwater Park Hotels, Denham, Buckinghamshire, UB9 5HR T: 01895 512000 W: www.ihgplc.com

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McDONALD, Jill Chief Executive Mcdonald’s Restaurants Ltd 11/59 High Rd, East Finchley, London N2 8AW T: 08702 413300 W: www.mcdonalds.co.uk

MORRIS, Richard Managing Director Loch Fyne Restaurants Greene King Plc, Abbot House, PO Box 337, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP33 1QW W: www.lochfyne-restaurants.com

McKENZIE, Andrew Managing Director The Peter Michael Collection The Donnington Valley Hotel, Old Oxford Road, Donnington, Newbury, Berkshire, RG14 3AG T: 01635 551199 E: general@donningtonvalley. co.uk W: www.donningtonvalley.co.uk

MURRAY, Harry MBE Chairman Lucknam Park Hotel Lucknam Park, Colerne, Chippenham, Wiltshire SN14 8AZ T: 01225 742777 W: www.lucknampark.co.uk

McPHERSON, Amy President Marriott International Barnard’s Inn, 86 Fetter Lane, London EC4A 1EN T: 020 7012 7000 E: amy.mcpherson@marriott.com W: www.marriott.co.uk METCALFE, Julian Founder Pret A Manger 1 Hudson’s Place, London SW1V 1PZ T: 020 7827 8000 W: www.julainmetcalfe.com MICHELS, Sir David President Institute of Hospitality, Tourism Alliance 114 Balmoral Apartments, 2 Praed Street, London W2 1JL T: 020 7724 6585 E: davidmichels@myco-uk.com W: www.instituteofhospitality.org MILSOM, Paul Chairman Milsom Hotels Ltd Gun Hill, Dedham, Colchester, Essex, CO7 6HP T: 01206 323150 W: www.milsomhotels.com MORGAN, Charles Chief Executive AB Hotels 50-60 Great Cumberland Place, London W1H 8DD W: www.abhotels.co.uk MORGAN-HEWITT, David Managing Director The Goring Hotel, London Beeston Place, London SW1V 0JW T: 020 7396 9000 E: reception@thegoring.com W: www.thegoring.com

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

MURRELL, Laurence Chairman Torquay Leisure Hotels Belgrave Road, Torquay TQ2 5HS T: 01803 400500 W: www.tlh.co.uk

N NUMPHUD, Simon Director Hotel Services, Automobile Association Floor 14, Fanum House, Basingstoke RG21 4EA T: 01256 844455 E: hotelservicescustomersupport@ theaa.com W: www.theaa.com

O OLIVER, Jamie Restaurateur Fifteen 15 Westland Place, London N1 7LP T: 020 3375 1515 E: info@fabulousfeasts.co.uk W: www.fifteen.net OSBORNE, Chris Chairman Wales Tourism Alliance 77 Conwy Road, Colwyn Bay, LL29 7LN T: 07749 785147 E: chris@wta.org.uk W: www.tourismalliance.org.uk

P PAGE, Andrew Chief Executive Restaurant Group Plc 5/7 Marshalsea Rd, London SE1 1EP T: 08456 125001 E: sarah.allcock@trgplc.com W: www.trgplc.com PAJARES, Ramon OBE Chairman Savoy Education Trust Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, WC2A 3BH T: 020 7269 9692 E: info@savoyeducationaltrust. org.uk W: www.savoyeducationaltrust. org.uk PARFETT, Sue Managing Partner The Brookwood Partnership Brookwood House, 1 Churchfield Road, Walton on Thames, Surrey KT12 2TW T: 01932 233299 E: info@brookwood-ptnrs.co.uk W: www.brookwood-ptnrs.com PARKER, Alan CBE President British Hospitality Association Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk PARSONS, Guy Chief Executive Travelodge Sleepy Hollow, Aylesbury Road, Thame OX9 3AT T: 01844 358500 W: www.travelodge.co.uk PEEL, Robert Chairman Peel Hotels, London 19 Warwick Avenue, London, W9 2PS T: 020 7266 1100 W: www.peelhotels.co.uk PENROSE MP, Rt. Hon John Minister for Tourism Department for Culture, Media And Sport 2 – 4 Cockspur Street, London SW1Y 4DH T: 020 7211 6000 E: enquiries@culture.gov.uk W: www.culture.gov.uk

PERN, Andrew Chef Proprietor The Star Inn Harome, Near Helmsley YO62 5JE T: 01439 770397 E: reservations@ thestarinatharome.co.uk W: www.therestaurantatharome. co.uk PETERSEN, Norbert Chief Executive Peel Hotels, London 19 Warwick Avenue, London, W9 2PS T: 020 7266 1100 W: www.peelhotels.co.uk PEYTON, Oliver CoProprietor Peyton and Byrne The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN T: 020 7747 2525 E: info@peytonandbyrne.co.uk W: www.peytonandbyrne.co.uk PHILIP, John Vice President Operations Hilton Worldwide International Operations Centre, Maple Court, Central Park, Reeds Crescent, Watford, WD24 4QQ T: 020 7856 8000 E: press.office@hilton.com W: www.hilton.co.uk PICOT, Derek Regional Vice President Jumeirah Hotels London 207 Sloane Street, London, SW1X 9QX T: 020 7858 7555 E: uksales@jumeirah.com W: www.jumeirah.com PIERCE, Anne MBE Chief Executive Spriingboard UK 3 Denmark Street, London WC2H 8LP T: 020 749 7854 E: sam@springboarduk.org.uk W: www.springboard.net POYNTER, Michael Chief Executive Wyndham Hotel Group The Triangle, 5 Hammersmith Grove, London W6 9EJ T: 020 8762 6600 W: www.wyndhamworldwide.com PRIYMAK, Sofia Publisher Henley Media Group 100 City Road, London EC1Y 2BP T: 020 7871 0123 E: spriymak@henleymediagroup. com W: www.henleymediagroup.com


DIRECTORY

Who’s Who

PULZE, Claudio Proprietor Cuisine Collection Al Duca Restaurant, 4 - 5 Duke of York Street, London SW1Y 6LA T: 020 7839 3090 E: alduca@btconnect.com W: www.alduca-restaurant.co.uk PURTILL, Michael Managing Director QHotels Wellington House, Cliffe Park, Bruntcliffe Road, Morley, Leeds LS27 0RY T: 01132 898989 E: customer-relations@qhotels. co.uk W: www.qhotels.co.uk

R RAGGETT, Jonathan Chief Executive Red Carnation Hotels 14-15 Grosvenor Place, London SW1X 7HH T: 020 7514 5607 W: www.redcarnationhotels.com RAMSAY, Gordon Restaurateur Gordon Ramsay Holdings LTD 1 Catherine Place, London SW1E 6DX T: 020 7592 1360 E: tonimears@gordonramsay.com W: www.gordonramsay.com RAWSTRON, Christopher Vice President Operations InterContinental Hotels Group UK & Ireland Broadwater Park, Denham, Buckinghamshire, UB9 5HR T: 01895 512000 W: www.ihgplc.com REED, Jeremy Chief Executive British Association of Leisure Parks, Piers and Attractions Suite 12, 37 Tanner Street, London, SE1 3LF T: 020 7403 4455 E: info@balppa.org W: www.balppa.org RHODES, Gary Restaurateur Rhodes W1 The Cumberland Hotel, Great Cumberland Place, London W1H 7DL W: www.garyrhodes.com

RITTER, Kurt President and Chief Executive Park Inn Avenue Du Bourget 44, Bruxelles T: 003227 029203 E: kurt.ritter@rezidorasas.com W: www.parkinn.co.uk ROBERTS, Rhys Chairman Best Western UK Central Office, Consort House, Amy Johnson Way, Clifton Moor, York, YO30 4GP T: 01904 695400 E: admin@bestwestern.co.uk W: www.bestwestern.co.uk ROBINSON, Martin Chairman Wagamama Waverley House, 7-12 Noel Street, London, W1F 8GQ T: 020 7009 3600 W: www.wagamama.com RODRIGUES, Christopher Chairman VisitEngland 1 Palace Street, London, SW1E 5HX T: 020 7578 1400 W: www.visitengland.org ROGERS, Christopher Group Finance Director Whitbread Restaurants Division Whitbread Court, Porz Avenue, Dunstable LU5 5XE T: 0158 242420 E: supplier.info@whitbread.com W: www.whitbread.com ROGERS, John Vice President Hilton UK & Ireland International Operations Centre, Maple Court, Central Park, Reeds Crescent, Watford WD24 4QQ T: 020 7856 8000 E: press.office@hilton.com W: www.hilton.co.uk ROSS, Calum Chairman BHA Scotland Proprietor Loch Melfort Hotel, Arduaine Arduaine, by Oban, Argyll, PA34 4XG T: 01852 200233 E: reception@lochmelfort.co.uk W: www.lochmelfort.co.uk ROSS, Shara General Manager Hotel Felix, Cambridge Whitehouse Lane, Huntingdon Road, Cambridge, CB3 0LX T: 01223 277977 E: help@hotelfelix.co.uk W: www.hotelfelix.co.uk

ROSSITER, Philippe Chief Executive Institute of Hospitality Trinity Court, 34 West Street, Sutton SM1 1SH T: 020 8661 4900 E: info@theinstituteofhospitality. com W: www.instituteofhospitality.org ROUGHEAD, Malcolm OBE Chief Executive VisitScotland Ocean Point One, 94 Ocean Drive, Edinburgh, EH6 6JH T: 08458 591006 E: info@visitscotland.com W: www.visitscotland.org ROUX, Michel Chef Proprietor Le Gavroche 43 Upper Brook Street, London W1K 7QR T: 020 7408 0881 E: bookings@le-gavroche.co.uk W: www.le-gavroche.co.uk ROUX, Michel Waterside Inn, Bray Ferry Road, Bray, Berkshire SL6 2AT T: 01628 620691 E: reservations@waterside-inn. co.uk W: www.waterside-inn.co.uk ROUX, Alain Chef Patron Waterside Inn Ferry Road, Bray SL6 2AT T: 01628 620691 E: reservations@waterside-inn. co.uk W: www.waterside-inn.co.uk ROUX, Albert Le Gavroche, London 43 Upper Brook Street, London, W1K 7QR T: 020 7408 0881 E: bookings@le-gavroche.co.uk W: www.le-gavroche.co.uk ROWLAND, Robin Chief Executive Yo! Sushi 95 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3BT T: 020 7841 0700 W: www.yosushi.com

S SACHAU, Reinar Chief Operating Officer Marriott International Barnard’s Inn, 86 Fetter Lane London EC4A 1EN T: 020 701 2700 E: reinar.sachau@marriott.co.uk W: www.marriott.co.uk

SARSON, Ian Group Managing Director Compass Group Parkview, 82 Oxford Rd, Uxbridge UB9 4BF T: 01895 554554 E: info@compass-group.co.uk W: www.compass-group.co.uk SCADE, Nick Chairman Academy of Food And Wine Trinity Court, 34 West Street, Sutton SM1 1SH T: 020 8661 4646 E: info@acfws.org W: www.acfws.org SCOBLE, Tim Chief Executive Officer Thistle Hotels, PO Box 909, Bath Road, Uxbridge UB8 9FH T: 020 7138 0000 W: www.thistlehotels.com SEEVARATNAM, Kingsley Vice President Westmont Hospitality Group, Europe Trac House, 34 Francis Grove, London, W19 4DT T: 020 8944 6666 E: kseevaratnam@westmontuk. com W: www.westmontuk.com SHEPHERD, Michael General Manager Hilton on Park Lane, London 22 Park Lane, London W1K 1BE T: 020 7493 8000 W: www.parklanehilton.com SHEPPARD, Robin Chairman Bespoke Hotels Bespoke House, The Old Rectory, Windsor End, Beaconsfield, HP9 2JW T: 08433 575555 W: www.bespokehotels.com SIBLEY, Julia Chief Executive Savoy Educational Trust Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7269 6992 E: info@savoyeducationaltrust. org.uk W: www.savoyeducationaltrust. org.uk SIMMONDS, Brigid Chief Executive British Beer & Pub Association Ground Floor, Brewers’ Hall Aldermanbury Square, London EC2V 7HR T: 020 7627 9191 E: contact@beerandpub.com W: www.beerandpub.com

SINGER, Paul Chief Executive London Fine Dining 13 Stratford Place, London W1C 1BD T: 020 7408 7250 E: Paul@londonfinedininggroup. com W: www.londonfinedininggroup. com SIROTKIN, Vivien Director of Hotel Operations QHotels Wellington House, Cliffe Park, Bruntcliffe Road, Morley, Leeds, LS27 0RY T: 01132 898989 E: customer-relations@qhotels. co.uk W: www.qhotels.co.uk SMALE, Peter Partner Turpin Smale Consultants 156 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8EN T: 020 7620 0011 E: peter.smale@turpinsmale.co.uk W: www.turpinsmale.co.uk SMYTH, Harvey Chief Executive Gondola Group The 5th Floor, 2 Balcomb Street, London NW1 6NW T: 08456 022704 E: info@gondolagroup.co.uk W: www.gondolaholdings.com SOLOMANS, Richard Chief Executive InterContinental Hotels Group UK & Ireland Broadwater Park, Denham, Buckinghamshire, UB9 5HR T: 01895 512000 W: www.ihgplc.com SPELMAN MP, Rt. Hon Caroline Secretary of State Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR T: 08459 335577 E: helpline@defra.gsi.gov.uk W: www.defra.gov.uk SPENCER, Tony Managing Director Shire Hotels The Old Wine, Warehouse,Larkhill Street, Blackbun, BB1 5DF T: 01254 267444 E: info@shirehotels.com W: www.shirehotels.co.uk

UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012 l

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DIRECTORY

Who’s Who

SPRINGFORD, Norman Executive Chairman Apex Hotels Ltd 32 Hailes Avenue, Edinburgh EH13 0LZ T: 01314 410441 E: events@apexhotels.co.uk W: www.apexhotels.co.uk

TOWNSEND, Andy Chief Executive Officer Legacy Hotels & Resorts 3 Henley Court, Prince Harry Road, Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, B95 5BA T: 08444 119011 W: www.legacy-hotels.co.uk

STANES, Sara-Jayne OBE Director Academy of Culinary Arts 53 Cavendish Road, London, SW12 0BL T: 020 8673 6300 E: sarajaynestanes@ academyofculinaryarts.org.uk W: www.academyofculinaryarts. org.uk

TROY, Tony Chief Executive Principal Hayley Group The Inspire, Hornbeam Square West, Harrogate, HG2 8PA T: 08448 542911 W: www.principalhayley.co.uk

STEIN, Rick Reataurateur Rick Stein Group Seafood Restaurant, Riverside, Padstow PL28 8BY T: 01841 537700 E: reservations@rickstein.com W: www.rickstein.com STOREY, Alastair Chief Executive BaxterStorey The Waterfront 300 Thames Valley Park Drive, Reading RG6 1PT T: 01189 356700 E: hstorey@baxterstorey.com W: www.baxterstorey.com

T TAYLOR, Peter Chairman The Town House Collection The Bonham, 35 Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh EH3 7RN T: 01312 266050 E: peter@ thetownhousecollection.com THOMPSON, James MBE Managing Director Witchery by the Castle, Edinburgh Castlehill, The Royal Mile, Edinburgh, EH1 2NF T: 01312 255613 E: mr@thewitchery.com W: www.thewitchery.com TOMS, Ruston Chairman Association of Catering Excellence Bourne House, Horsell Park, Woking, Surrey, GU21 4LY T: 01483 765111 E: admin@acegb.org W: www.acegb.org

212

TUPPEN, Ted Chief Executive Enterprise Inns PLC 3 Monkspath Hall Rd, Solihull B90 4SJ T: 01217 337700 W: www.enterpriseinns.com TURPIN, Dick Vice Chairman Hospitality Action 62 Britton Street, London EC1M 5UY T: 020 3004 5500 E: info@hospitalityaction.org.uk W: www.hospitalityaction.org.uk

V

W WALPOLE, David Managing Director Parsley In Time Catering Equipment Units 1 - 2 Kingside Business Park, Ruston Road, London SE18 5BX T: 08445 449907 E: david@parsleyintime.co.uk W: www.parsleyintime.co.uk WALSHE, Bill Chief Executive The Doyle Collection Marylebone Hotel, 47 Wellbeck St, London W1G 8DN T: 020 7969 3860 W: www.doylecollection.com WALTON MBE, Bob President Restaurant Association Queens House, 55-56 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BH T: 020 7404 7744 E: bha@bha.org.uk W: www.bha.org.uk WAREING, Marcus Chef Patron Marcus Wareing At The Berkeley Hotel Wilton Place, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7RL T: 2072351200 E: marcuswareing’the-berkeley. co.uk W: www.marcus-wareing.co.uk

VARNEY, Nick Chief Executive Merlin Entertainments 3 Market Close, Poole BH15 1NQ T: 020 8899 6110 E: enquiries@ merlinentertainment.biz W: www.merlinentertainments. biz

WARNER, Ben and Hugo Proprietors Benugo Ltd 26 Cross St, London EC1N 8UH T: 020 724 2376 W: www.benugo.com

VICKERS, Angela Managing Director Apex Hotels Apex Hotels House, 32 Hailes Avenue, Edinburgh EH13 0LZ T: 01314 410466 E: marketing@apexhotels.co.uk W: www.apexhotels.co.uk

WATSON, Jane Managing Director Inverlochy Castle Torlundy, Fort William T: 020 7486 5800 E: london.churchill@hyatt.com W: www.london.churchill. hyatt.com

VINCENT, Simon Area President (UK & Europe) Hilton Worldwide Maple Court, Central Park Reeds Crescent, Watford WD24 4QQ T: 020 7850 4000 E: nick.smart@hilton.com W: www.hilton.co.uk

WATT, Roddy Chief Executive Officer The Buell Consulting Group Southdown House, South Town Road, Medstead, Hampshire, GU34 5PP T: 08436 583245 E: roddy.watt@buellconsult. co.uk W: www.bellcosult.co.uk

l UK HOSPITALITY BLACK BOOK 2012

WEST, Tim Chairman Lexington Catering 72 Cannon Street, London EC4N 6AE T: 020 7332 8585 E: info@lexingtoncatering.com W: www.lexingtoncatering.com WHETTON, David Maitre d’ Annabel’s 44 Berkeley Square, London W1J 5QB T: 020 7629 1096 W: www.annabelsco.uk WHITE, Debbie Chief Executive Sodexo UK Capital House, 2nd Floor, 25 Chapel Street, London NW15DH T: 020 7535 7400 W: www.sodexo.com WILLIAMS, David MBE Chairman Ambassador Hotel, Llandudno The Grand Promenade, Llandudno, North Wales, LL30 2NR T: 01492 876886 E: sales@hotelambassador.co.uk W: www.hotelambassador.co.uk WISDOM, Brian Chief Executive People 1st 2nd Floor, Armstrong House, 38 Market Square, Uxbridge UB8 1LH T: 01895 817000 E: brianwisdom@people1st.co.uk W: www.people1st.co.uk WORRALL-THOMPSON, Antony Proprietor AWT Restaurants The Greyhound, Gallowstree Rd Rotherfield Peppard, Henley-on-Thames RG9 5HT T: 01189 722227 E: greyhound@awtrestaurants.com W: www.awtrestaurants.com


Hospitality Black Book 2012  

UK Hospitality Black Book 2012 is a database for the UK hospitality industry which includes hotels, restaurants, clubs and bars. The Black B...

Hospitality Black Book 2012  

UK Hospitality Black Book 2012 is a database for the UK hospitality industry which includes hotels, restaurants, clubs and bars. The Black B...

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