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2013 Media Placements The Abbi Agency


Henge Docks Table Of Contents Date

Publication

2/8/2013

allParenting.com

2/1/2013

MacWorld

2/1/2013

CNET

1/31/2013

TUAW

1/10/2013

iLounge

1/9/2013

ITProPortal

1/9/2013

MacWorld

1/9/2013

Electronista

1/8/2013

#MacHash

1/8/2013

engadget

1/8/2013

GadgetMac

1/8/2013

PC Mag

1/8/2013

Super Tech Blog

Title Valentine's Gifts For Tech Lovers Macworld/iWorld 2013 Best Of Show Winners Henge Docks Offers Quick And Cheap MacBook Docking Options Gravitas From Henge Docks Is Heavy Magic Show Report: Henge Docks CES 2013: Henge Docks Unveils MacBook And iPad/iPod Docking Stations CES 2013: Henge Docks Horizontal Dock Henge Docks Returns With A New Model For RMBP, MB Air CES Show Report: Henge Docks Henge Announces Its Latest Horizontal Dock For MacBooks, Loads Of Ports For Connecting Your Wares Henge Docks Horizontal Dock For MacBooks Henge Docks Add Connectivity To Your Apple Laptop, Tablet Henge Docks Rolls Out New Horizontal Dock For MacBook Air And MacBook Pro


If you have a laptop system, you might be familiar with the frustrations that can be involved with using it in a desktop environment where you might need to clear a space on your desk to set it up, or have it sit awkwardly to the side while you connect a keyboard, mouse, an adapter for an external display, and other peripherals. There are several options available to help in these situations, with one that I recently outlined being the new Thunderbolt docking solutions that are beginning to enter the market. While these options reduce the number of cables to attach, they do still leave you with the problem of where to put your system. While smaller systems like the MacBook Air are relatively easy to tuck away, the 15-inch and older 17inch systems are substantially larger and may still take up space on a desk. If you find yourself in this situation, then one solution is to use a full system dock like the horizontal dock from Henge Docks. Henge Docks is a company based in Virginia that since 2009 has made form-fitting docking cradles for Apple's laptop systems, which offer a convenient way to not only attach all of your peripheral devices, but additionally hold the Mac in a way that both does its natural style a bit of justice and ensures it stays ventilated and accessible. For its uses, the dock takes advantage of the MacBook's "clamshell" mode of operation, where if you close the lid and attach an external keyboard and monitor, you will be able to use it as a desktop system. The advantage that the Henge Docks dock offers is the ability to hold the laptop in a vertical position conveniently off to the side, and provide a means to attach your needed peripherals simply by seating the system into the dock. The Henge Docks dock works essentially as a frame that grips the ends of power, USB, FireWire, audio, and Thunderbolt connectors, and holds them in-line with the system's chassis so all you need to do is press the system into the dock to connect them all at once.


Setting up While this setup is ultimately convenient in the long run, it does take a little assembly to get going. Out of the box you get a molded plastic dock cradle and a set of extension cables for USB, FireWire, and audio, along with a set of adapters for Apple's various MagSafe power connectors. You then have to configure the dock for your uses by choosing which connections you want and then mounting them in the dock using the provided set-screws. This process does take a little time, though one easy approach is to attach the needed cords to your system and then feed them through the dock, followed by seating the system into the dock and tightening them down. While you can configure the dock with a select set of connections, one option is to simply connect them all so they are available for use at any time down the road. Even though it's a touch cumbersome, the setup of the dock is relatively straightforward and should for the most part be a onetime deal. Using the dock Once set up, you can then attach your system to the dock by sliding it into the cradle, where it should align with the attachments you have chosen and then seat into them when you press down. This works well for the most part; however, in using it with my 17-inch MacBook Pro there have been times when a connection was slightly off and needed a slight jiggle to seat down properly. This can be prevented by ensuring the system is both vertical when seating it and also inserting it with care, but it does mean that the dock is not an option in which you can quickly plunk your system and be off and running, since doing so may chance scratching or nicking the edges of your ports. When connected the system behaves as it would in any clamshell configuration, and is quite pleasant to have cranking away at the side of the desk instead of obtrusively laying flat and being in the way. One detail to note is the ports on the MacBook will be hidden within the dock, so if you need to attach a temporary peripheral such as a USB flash drive then you will need to be sure to configure the dock with one of the included USB extension cables to leave dangling for such purposes. The same goes for the audio and FireWire ports, so even though the system is customizable in what ports you can add, if there is a chance you may need them at a later point then you might consider simply adding them all to the dock when setting it up. Like most MacBook systems, my 17-inch MacBook Pro


has all of its I/O ports on one side of the system so the dock only requires the system be inserted to be powered and connected; however, some systems like the MacBook Air have the power port on the opposite side than the I/O ports, so you will have to be sure to attach the power after inserting these systems into their docks. Limitations While the dock does have its benefits, it also comes with some limitations. The first is that being molded plastic, the dock is lightweight enough so if you lift the system then the grip of the connections will carry the dock along with it. Therefore, in order to disconnect it you will have to grip the system and pull it from the dock while providing resistance against the dock's base. This is a bit cumbersome since the aluminum shell on Apple's systems is not the best gripping surface. Additionally, for the larger and heavier 17-inch MacBook Pro, the grip needed to pull the system out of the dock is a bit concerning, so I've found myself preferring to pry it up from the side. Granted this may only be a requirement for the larger and heavier systems, but in this respect, one detail the dock could benefit greatly from is a quick-release latch that could be used to push the system up from the ports and allow it to be gently lifted, instead of having to grip and pull. A final issue with the Henge Docks dock is it form fits to the closed MacBook chassis, and thereby requires the system to operate in clamshell mode at all times. While this is the intent of the dock, it does limit you from using the display both for extended desktop purposes and for troubleshooting. If for some reason your system stops outputting video to the external monitor, then the only way to manage the situation is to pull the system from the dock, which will unplug everything, including sensitive storage drives that may experience corruption if pulled while in use. Granted in these situations you can undo the set screws for the connectors and slide the system out of the dock with everything attached, but having a quick means to open the MacBook's display if needed would be nice. Overall Even though the Henge Docks dock has its limitations, the device is still a remarkably effective and attractive docking solution. The dock would benefit from a lever release of some kind, especially for larger systems, and it would be nice to have an option for quickly opening the display if needed; however, despite this it does function quite well. While Thunderbolt docking options may provide additional capability to your system, the Henge Docks docking station offers a quick way to hold the system in a convenient place and give you most of what is needed to dock your Mac. In addition, the price makes it an attractive alternative. Currently Thunderbolt docks start at around $250, but this dock costs between $55 for the MacBook Air to $75 for the 17-inch MacBook Pro. In addition to the docks for MacBooks, Henge Docks makes a holder for Apple's Bluetooth keyboard and trackpad called "Clique," and a number of docking options for iOS devices.


There's not much to say about a dock, is there? It's pretty simple: You put your iDevice on a dock and, depending on the functionality, you may charge, sync or blast some audio out. In the case of the Gravitas from Henge Docks, you can do all of those things plus there's some magic inside. That magic is a special alloy, 265 percent more dense than aluminum, that gives the Gravitas an astounding amount of heft. As a result, you can dock your iDevices into the smallish Gravitas, but remove them without holding the dock with your other hand. It's a beautiful thing, because the dock looks aluminum, but just stays then when you lift your device up. Besides weighing almost one kilogram, the Gravitas offers an audio line out, and a USB data / power connection. There are plastic inserts to accommodate iPads and iPhones. They'll have 30-pin and Lightning versions available at launch. The Gravitas should be shipping in March for US$69. Henge is here at Macworld, and you can reserve yours with no obligation to buy when it is released. Henge makes some useful, nicely designed gear (stay tuned for another item we spotted at CES and at Macworld), so if you're in the market for a stylish and useful dock, check into the Gravitas.


Henge Docks has focused its business on Mac docking stations in the past, but now it’s expanding out into iOS device docks as well. Its Gravitas Dock for iPhone, iPad, and iPod is substantial—it weighs almost a kilogram.


Henge Docks showed off two new docking stations at CES, each adding both functionality and connectivity to your mobile Apple gear. First up is the Horizontal Dock, designed specifically for the MacBook Pro with Retina Display and the MacBook Air (suitable for all sizes). Weighing roughly 2.5kg, its solid metal chassis matches the Apple aesthetic while expanding connectivity options to include three external displays, six USB 3.0 peripherals, two audio devices, an Ethernet connection, an SD Card, and a FireWire 800 device. The rear of the Horizontal Dock also houses a Kensington security slot, adding a helpful layer of physical security previously unavailable in newer MacBooks. The Horizontal Dock utilises a unique fourpoint positioning system that properly aligns the laptop during insertion. Undocking the laptop, meanwhile, is accomplished by simply pushing a button. The docking and undocking process takes under two seconds, effectively making the transition from portable to desktop a fluid endeavour.


Optional software complements the physical aspect of docking by enabling users to create multiple profiles on their laptops for desktop and portable computing. The Horizontal Dock is slated for release in Q3 for $249 (£155). A Thunderbolt version will be released in Q4, for $349 (£218). For smaller iOS devices like the Apple iPhone, iPad, and iPod, Henge offers up its Gravitas Dock. Although its all-metal chassis measures just 7.6cm in diameter and is only 5cm tall, it's constructed out of a dense metal alloy which helps stabilise docked devices by virtue of its weight. The Gravitas will be available in Lightning or 30-pin connector versions; both models featuring a USB port and an audio line-out. You also get three interchangeable inserts designed to accommodate the different iOS devices and most third-party cases. Both versions of the Gravitas dock will be available in Q2 for $69 (£43) apiece.


Expands port options, Thunderbolt version coming in Q4 Henge Docks, well known for its MacBook Pro docking stations, has announced a new model at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas: the Horizontal Dock, a $249 combination riser and docking station specifically for the MacBook Air and Retina MacBook Pro. The new dock stands in stark contrast to the company's vertically-oriented AirDock and Henge Docks that allow users to run and hook monitors to MacBooks with the lid closed. The new Horizontal Dock offers up to 14 ports in all, including expanding the number of USB 3.0 ports, doubling audio outputs and supporting up to three external displays. The dock is made of a metal frame with a Kensington security slot, and uses a four-point precision positioning system to align the built-in ports to the dock's expansion features. The regular version offers a total of six USB 3.0 ports, two audio outputs, an Ethernet port, an SD card, power and a Firewire 800 connection. It is expected to ship in the third quarter of the year, with a Thunderbolt-enabled version for $100 more coming in the fourth quarter of 2013. Preorders for the regular version are bing taken now, compatible with the 11- and 13-inch MacBook Air as well as the 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display.


We know what this might look like to you, but it's not a robotic MacBook Pro crawler. This is Henge Docks' new horizontal dock for the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. Yep, they make docks for Macs in case you didn't already know. The Horizontal Dock is a $249 aluminum docking station for MacBooks that essentially expends the limited ports you've been stuck with since the day you purchased your MacBook. All you have to do is dock your MacBook into the Horizontal Dock, it'll you'll gain access to 6 powered USB 3.0 ports, three Mini DisplayPort outputs (a Thunderbolt equivalent dock will set you back $349) - so you could drive a triple external display setup, dual audio outputs, Ethernet, FireWire 800, SD card slot and a Kensington lock. Henge Docks is planning to start shipping the Horizontal Dock in Q3, and the Thunderbolt model only in Q4. Both are available now to pre-order.


Henge wants to add functionality and connectivity to your mobile Apple gear with two new docking stations the company is showing off at CES. First up is the Horizontal Dock, which is designed specifically the 13- and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display and the 11- and 13-inch MacBook Air. Weighing roughly five and a half pounds, its solid metal chassis matches the Apple aesthetic while expanding connectivity options to include three external displays, six USB 3.0 peripherals, two audio devices, an Ethernet connection, an SD Card, and a FireWire 800 device. The rear of the Horizontal Dock also houses a Kensington Security Slot, adding a helpful layer of physical security previously unavailable in newer MacBooks. The Horizontal Dock utilizes a unique four-point positioning system that properly aligns the system during insertion. Undocking the system, meanwhile, is easily accomplished by the mere push of a button. All said, the docking and undocking process takes under two seconds, effectively making the transition from portable to desktop a fluid endeavor. Optional expansion software complements the physical aspect of docking by allowing users to create multiple profiles on their laptops for desktop and portable computing. The Horizontal Dock is slated for release in the third quarter for $249. A Thunderbolt-enabled version will be released in Q4, for $349.


For smaller iOS devices like the Apple iPhone, iPad, and iPod, Henge offers up its Gravitas Dock. Although its all-metal chassis measures just 3 inches in diameter and is only 2 inches tall, it's constructed out of a dense metal alloy, whose weight lends a measure of stability to docked devices, while ensuring that the Gravitas stays put when they're undocked.. The Gravitas will be available in Lightning or 30-pin connector versions; both models featuring a USB port and an audio line-out. You also get three interchangeable inserts designed to accommodate the different iOS devices and most third-party cases. Both versions of the Gravitas dock will be available in Q2 for $69 apiece.


Henge Docks, the company notorious for its incredibly well-designed docks for Apple laptops, has strutted out a brand-new resting spot at CES 2013. The new Horizontal Dock is compatible with Apple’s most recent MacBook Air and MacBook Pro with Retina Display models, allowing users to plug in three additional displays thanks to its wide array of ports. If that’s not enough to satisfy your connectivity needs, users will also have access to six USB 3.0 ports, two 3.5mm audio jacks, an Ethernet port, FireWire 800 and an SD card slot. The dock is composed of a solid metal material, offering a substantial and hefty stature. Add this to to the fact that a Kensington security slot is included for additional security, and you’ve got yourself one durable piece of docking machinery. Pre-orders begin today for $249 with an expected ship date of sometime in Q3. Those in need of a version with Thunderbolt compatibility will have to wait until Q4 and shell out an extra $100.

2013 Hengedocks Media Placements  

2013 Hengedocks Media Placements

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