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Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1001

A Rare, Unique South Carolina Confederate Butternut Forage Cap Any South Carolina Confederate kepi is a rare find. But to have a forage cap with the South Carolina state seal such as this is almost never seen by Civil War collectors. This cap is in excellent condition made with butternut wool cloth and perfect hand embroidered in gold gilt thread South Carolina state seal sewn at the front. The offset dark triple gilt braid appears at each side and around the base of the crown giving this kepi a very distinctive look. The leather visor and chin strap are in excellent condition as well making this a singularly important Confederate headgear. It is quite possible that this forage cap is the only one in existence.

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$35,000


Lot 1002

A Rare Confederate South Carolina 1st Lieutenant’s Butternut Uniform – Lieutenant Y. J. Bobo 3rd South Carolina Volunteer Infantry, Company D 1st Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg Y. S. Bobo enlisted at Union, South Carolina at the beginning of the war and was quickly promoted to 1st Lieutenant. The regiment fought from 1st Manassas through Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville and on to Gettysburg. This unit served with the Army of Northern Virginia in almost every major battle of the Civil War. We know that 1st Lieutenant Bobo survived the war since his name appears in the Confederate Veteran magazine as being a member of the Camp Giles chapter of the United Confederate Veterans in, ironically, living in Union, South Carolina after the war. He was one of the lucky soldiers to survive since 45 % of the troops in this regiment were lost. From 1st Manassas to Gettysburg and to Bentonville this regiment fought bravely as one of the elite units of General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. The 1st Lieutenant’s frock coat with its butternut colored wool broadcloth and two rows of seven South Carolina state buttons is accented by two gold bullion bars on the blue velvet standup collar. Matching blue velvet at the cuffs topped by gold braid quatrefoil on the sleeves make this a very attractive coat. Bobo wrote his name and regiment in ink on a white piece of cloth and sewed it into the lining of this coat. This is truly a remarkable South Carolina uniform. $65,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1003

The Rarest Confederate Officer’s Uniform – 1st South Carolina Sharpshooters – Captain Robert Chisolm – Officer’s Shell Jacket with Charleston Tailor’s Label Captain Robert Chisolm, commanded Company A, 1st Battalion, of the famous South Carolina Sharpshooters in the Defense of Charleston in 1863. In the corpus of known Confederate uniforms this ranks as one of the great rarities for several reasons, first it is one of only a handful of Confederate Officer’s shell jacket’s known to exist (J.E.B. Stuart had one), it is one of only a few Confederate Uniforms with the Tailor’s Label inside, thus we not only know who wore it and when, but we know who made this uniform for him. Another rarity is the brass “battle beads” up each sleeve in conjunction with his quatrefoil sleeve insignia, Captain Chisolm also signed the inside of the uniform in ink, the double breasted front has its original Confederate Eagle CS-36 brass buttons, blockade run, made in England each button is back marked “T & B Manchester”. A truly Unique, custom-made Confederate uniform all the way. He served under General George Pickett, A.P. Hill, and Joseph E. Johnston and helped save the city of Charleston during the siege of 1863. Custom made for him by “C. Decau & Co, Charleston S.C.” whose label is still inside the collar, it is interesting to note that the wide lapels on his uniform are similar to those of Robert E. Lee’s uniform, perhaps he had a photo of Lee and asked the tailor to “Make me a uniform like General Lee’s” Also, the brass battle beads on each sleeve, are only known to exist on generals’ uniforms all on cadet grey wool with blue trim. The condition is excellent and completely untouched and original, just as it was when purchased from Capt. Chisolm’s descendants. Accompanied by his service records as well as Les Jenson Letter of Authenticity. $95,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1004

Confederate General’s kepi made in Georgia on a light blue wool fabric with Four rows of Quatrefoil and Confederate brass Eagle Buttons on either side of the Visor The ultra Rare Confederate Regulation General’s kepi, of which only a few are known to exist. Most Generals in the Confederate Army rose through the ranks from Captain & Colonel and retained their kepis from previous ranks. Thus, a true regulation Confederate General’s kepi is extremely rare and missing in most museum as well as private collections. This is in near mint condition with a black stripe liner, and tarred paste board inner crown on the interior. The outside is literally the finest that exists, in a light blue almost turquoise wool, beautifully hand sewn with four bands of quatrefoil, with CS-1 Eagle buttons on either side of the leather chin strap which also has a large brass buckle. The condition is completely untouched and original; they just don’t exist any nicer than this $55,000

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1005

Confederate General Stephen Dodson Ramseur’s Kepi – Killed at Cedar Creek Elaborate Quatrefoil – A Rare Confederate Find This excellent kepi was worn by Confederate General Stephen Dodson Ramseur and is constructed of medium blue wool and has outstanding gold braid at each side and the back. The four gold braids at the band and three at each side are indicative of the General Officer’s rank as is the wonderful construction of this kepi. There is a Williams & Brown Confederate hatmaker’s label inside the crown, the only Confederate hat makers in the city during the war. There were relatively few General officers who fought for the Confederacy and much rarer to find one of their kepis in this condition, an ultra-rare Confederate General’s kepi worn by one of the youngest Confederate generals of the war. Although there is some mothing, the overall condition of this kepi is very good. The gold braid is brilliant, especially at the top quatrefoil. The leather chin strap and patent leather visor are intact, gold eagle staff buttons at the sides with all in very good condition as well. This is an excellent addition to any collection. General Ramseur fought bravely throughout the Peninsula Campaign and was severely wounded at Malvern Hill. He was promoted to Brigadier General in November 1862 becoming the youngest Confederate general at the time. He fought bravely at Gettysburg pursuing Union troops at Cemetery Hill. He was promoted to Major General becoming the youngest West Point graduate promoted to that rank in the Confederate Army. General Ramseur fought with Early’s Corps in the Valley Campaign but fell mortally wounded at Cedar Creek, falling into Union hands, dying at General Sheridan’s headquarters the next day. General Early’s account from Cedar Creek indicates General Ramseur’s bravery: Major-General Ramseur fell into the hands of the enemy mortally wounded, and in him not only my command, but the country suffered a heavy loss. He was a most gallant and energetic officer whom no disaster appalled, but his courage and energy seemed to gain new strength in the midst of confusion and disorder. He fell at his post fighting like a lion at bay, and his native State has reason to be proud of his memory. General Jubal Early, Cedar Creek. $55,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1006

Confederate Medical Officer’s Kepi–Captured at the Battle of Corinth Padded with Cotton Balls from a Mississippi plantation 1861 This Confederate Medical Officer’s kepi has three beautiful, symmetrical bands of gold braid at each side and at the top rim. A counterpart Union doctor captured this kepi at the Battle of Corinth. With gold gilt petal buttons at each side of the visor of this black wool kepi, the hat has a rare gold braid chin strap and is most importantly is still stuffed with cotton balls used as padding, from the slave cotton fields of Mississippi. The brown quilted lining is in excellent condition and has a 19th century ink capture label inside. Kepi’s from the Confederate Medical service are very rare and indeed much sought after. This example is in very good condition with the lining still intact is a showpiece Confederate kepi which is a must for any private or museum collection, a very rare captured Confederate Medical Officer’s black kepi padded with cotton balls. $35,000

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1007

A Confederate Regulation General’s Kepi on Dark Blue wool with CS-1 Buttons This collection contained both types of General’s Kepis. This is more of the Chasseur style with the deeply chased back. The hand sewn quatrefoil in the regulation generals four bands is beautifully done, the stitching is still on top of the heavy gilt quatrefoil bands. It has Confederate CS -1 brass eagle buttons on either side of the hand cut leather chin strap and the leather visor is also excellent and original. An ultra rare Confederate General’s Regulation Kepi. $65,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1008

Confederate Virginia Silver Gilt Braid Embtoidered Kepi Virginia State buttons and “Va.” embroidery work This medium blue kepi is a Confederate Virginia hat through and through. In overall superb condition, this wool kepi has excellent Virginia State seal buttons at each side of the chin leather strap. The finely embroidered ‘Va.’ inside an elaborate embroidered silver thread wreath makes this one of the finest examples of Virginia headgear in existence. The tall crown makes the hat even more distinctive and desirable for any major collection. The maker’s name of “John A. Baker – 63 Walker Street” appears lightly stamped inside the crown. A Virginia showpiece. $25,000

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1009

18th Virginia Cavalry - The only known Confederate Cavalry Officer’s Yellow Kepi The only known Confederate Cavalry Officer’s Regulation kepi made of yellow wool. Worn by Captain George J. Pratt, Company H, 18th Virginia Cavalry that served under General John Imboden in battles from Gettysburg in 1863 to serving with the VMI cadets in the battle of New Market, and throughout the Shenandoah Valley campaigns. Beautifully made with bands of gold quatrefoil for the rank of First Lieutenant, with a dark blue oil cloth visor with eagle buttons on either side and a brass buckle on the leather chin strap. The lining is also a yellow silk, with a red leather sweat band, the inside crown is made of white pasteboard. This is the only known surviving example of a Confederate cavalry officer’s kepi made in yellow in accordance with Confederate Regulations. This is the very kepi illustrated in the Time-Life Books, (accompanied by Jensen letter of Authenticity) $75,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1010

The Confederate Secret Service in France in 1864 Unique Confederate Uniform of Lieutenant Colonel Richard Snowden Andrews Made in France by the same tailor for Napoleon III, one of only two Confederate Officers Uniforms with French flat braid gold sleeve quatrefoil, the other being General Robert E. Lee’s Founder of the Maryland Light Artillery, disemboweled at the Battle of Cedar Mountain when he was shot through the stomach while leading his men, this being his new Confederate uniform he had made while on Confederate Secret Service duty to buy artillery for the Confederacy This is the only Confederate Secret Service Officer’s Uniform in Existence – it is Magnificent It was worn by him in France, Prussia, England, Havana, Cuba and with Maximilian in Mexico

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Richard Snowden Andrews was an illustrious officer in the Confederate Army, making his name known in many circles before, during and after the War. Born in 1830 Richard (Snowden) Andrews grew up in Washington, DC until his father moved the family to Baltimore when Richard was nineteen. Andrews trained as an architect and enjoyed much success in the pre-war years, designing the largest building made of hand cut stone, the Weston State Hospital in West Virginia, then the Governor’s Mansion in Annapolis and an addition to the US Treasury Building in Washington, DC.

History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

A memoir of Andrew’s life as well as battle reports and recollections of Andrews’ fellow soldiers provide much detail of his fascinating life on and off the battlefield. In Richard Snowden Andrews: Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the First Maryland, a vivid portrait of Andrews emerges. While in the midst of his successful career as an architect in 1861, Andrews realized that war was eminent and sought to rally prominent politicians in Maryland to side with the Confederacy. After failed attempts to garner support in raising troops and securing the money needed to supply them, he travelled to Richmond and met with Governor John Letcher receiving a commission as a captain of artillery. Andrews had secretly stolen the


plans for twelve-pounder Napoleon cannon and personally supervised the manufacture of the first Confederate cannon to be made at the Tredegar Works at Richmond. Even the famous Washington Artillery of New Orleans was provided with two of the cannon he produced as Andrews noted in his memoir. His training as an architect and vigor in supporting the Confederacy led to a Captain’s commission of what would become the First Maryland Artillery composed of men who had flocked to Richmond from Maryland, as eager as Andrews to join Lee’s Army the fight for a Southern Confederacy. Andrews was the premier artillery commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, readily praised by General Robert E. Lee and General

Stonewall Jackson in military dispatches. It was at the Battle of Cedar Mountain while fighting under General Charles Sidney Winder and Stonewall Jackson that Andrews was to be remembered for surviving the most gruesome wound seen by soldiers of the Civil War. General Winder had just been mortally wounded by a Union artillery shell, indeed General Winder died in Andrews’ arms. Andrews remounted his horse and was immediately hit by shrapnel through his stomach from another Union artillery round exploding next to him. Almost completely disemboweled, he slid from his horse and to the side of a road where he was taken by ambulance to a farmhouse, subsequently becoming a Union prisoner. Given no hope of survival by the first doctor who examined him

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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while on the battlefield and then by other doctors who left him to die, Andrews survived with the help of his wife who traveled from Baltimore with their infant child and nanny to nurse him back to health. In fact, a country doctor named Dr. Amos told him that there was no chance for him to live. Andrews asked if there might be even a “chance in ten, twenty or even a hundred?” Since Andrews was so persistent, the doctor agreed to treat him, thus saving his life. General Stonewall Jackson had high praise for Andrews declaring, “Especial credit is due to Major Andrews for the success and gallantry with which his guns were directed until he was wounded and taken from the field”. But Andrews did recuperate from his horrible wounds being fitted with a silver plate over his stomach to hold his body together, after being exchanged and he saw action again at the Battle of Winchester. Again he was severely wounded in his right arm, but Andrews’ fighting days were over. Instead he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and was ordered into the Confederate Secret Service to purchase the newly developed Armstrong rifled breech loading cannon and other artillery for the Confederate Army in Europe as appointed by President Jefferson Davis and sent to Europe along with Colonel Thomas S. Rhett. They successfully ran the blockade from Wilmington through Nassau and spent one year procuring artillery travelling extensively throughout England, France and Germany. In letters sent back to the Confederacy they proudly announced that Andrews had been successful in obtaining two forty-pounder cannon to send back to the Confederacy. Lt. Colonel Andrews and Colonel Thomas Rhett met on May 1, 1864 with Sir William Armstrong at his armament factory in England. He had just invented the big bore breech loading rifled cannon which would help turn the tide of battle for the Confederate Army.

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


They were in possession of letters of introduction as well, one to Prince Radziwill of Prussia. They would be observing the weaponry and tactics of foreign armies including those of the famous Prussian Army, the most advanced in Europe. This is where Andrews became somewhat of a celebrity due to his heroic war exploits – and survival of his wounds. In an effort to secure a permit to observe troop movements, Andrews was called upon to show his combat wounds to Prussian officers eager to hear of his exploits. He pulled up his shirt and showed his massive scar from the battle at Cedar Mountain prompting the Prussian surgeon to remark ‘Lieber Gott!’ (Good God!). The commanding general of the Prussian Army, General von Moltke was summoned to see the miracle wound whereupon Colonel Andrews and Rhett were warmly received by the entire Prussia Army and allowed to study their weapons and tactics. Colonel Richard Snowden Andrews was slipping through the blockade on his way back to the Confederacy with a cargo of English newly-invented breech-loading Armstrong guns and ammunition to Richmond via Havana, Cuba when he learned of General Lee’s surrender on April 9, 1865. He vowed never to return to the United States and instead became an advisor to the French army, setting sail for Mexico and seeing service under the regime of Maximilian. But his time in Mexico was cut short as Maximilian’s rule collapsed in 1867. With the revolutionaries in control, Andrews returned to the United States and Baltimore. His friends all swore that he never took the oath of allegiance and returned to his profession as an architect and in granite mining used in the construction of federal buildings in Washington, DC. He did serve four governors of Maryland as a Brigadier General and Chief of Artillery of the state militia, in one instance putting down the great Baltimore & Ohio railroad riots with the assistance of some of his old Confederate comrades from his unit including Colonel Thomas Rhett. He also authored Mounted Artillery Drill; Compiled According to the Latest Regulations from Standard Military Authority. He died at his home in Baltimore in 1903.

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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This very important Lieutenant Colonel’s frock coat worn by Richard Snowden Andrews is in superb condition. Extremely well-tailored by the tailor to the Emperor of France, the fine quality French cadet gray wool coat is trimmed with the brilliant red artillery piping and has elaborate gold gilt flat braid on the sleeves identical to General Robert E. Lee’s uniform, which are the only two uniforms known to exist with the type of French flat braid on each of the sleeves. Two gold gilt stars at each side of his collar are indicative of his lieutenant colonel rank. The double-breasted front has two rows of seven Confederate Artillery ‘A’ buttons each back-marked ‘Superior Quality’ and three identical smaller ‘A’ cuff buttons on each sleeve. This quality coat is fully lined with green silk with the upper lining being quilted. The maker’s label in the collar is gold stamped on black silk and reads ‘Regiment Des Guides/Paule/Tailleur De S.M. L’Empereur/Et De Sa Maison Militaire’, a famous French tailor to Emperor Napoleon III. This is the same tailor that made uniforms for other prominent Confederate officers including Robert E. Lee. This is a remarkable Confederate lieutenant colonel’s coat worn by an important officer and diplomat who survived to tell his story to the world. This coat is accompanied by his Confederate-made vest with Maryland state cuff buttons, made of Irish grey wool, trimmed with red piping, and fancy flap pockets all with Maryland state buttons. He would have worn this en route going through the blockade to Europe when he was first commissioned by President Davis into the CSA Secret Service. The coat is also accompanied by his State of Maryland, Brigadier General’s uniform, dark blue with general’s stars, also with Maryland state buttons and black velvet collar he wore when he put down the Baltimore Riots, along with his Coach Driver’s fancy blue wool coat with long tails and elaborate brass buttons and his red striped silk vest. This is a unique archive of a Confederate Secret Service uniform made in 1864 while on a secret mission to acquire the cannon that could have saved the Southern Confederacy. Provenance: R. Snowden Andrews Charles Lee Andrews Maryland Historical Society Sotheby Park Bernet’s sale of Fine Americana, June 20-23, 1979, featuring property from the Maryland Historical Society - Lot 108 $125,000

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Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1011

Confederate Louisiana Militia Officer’s Grey - Blue Kepi – New Orleans 1861 Composed of cadet grey wool with a sky blue crown and band, this is an extremely attractive Confederate officers kepi from Louisiana. The patent leather strap and visor, all accent this Confederate lieutenant’s kepi with silvered quatrefoil. Two silver buttons depicting a hunting horn are at each side of the chinstrap at the visor. Inside the crown of the cap there is a fine silk lining with a period New Orleans Newspaper article on British commodities pricing under the lining of the crown. The leather sweatband is quite worn and missing in several places. However, this Confederate militia officer’s kepi is quite attractive, and a recent find from a Baton Rouge estate – never before on the market. $12,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1012

Original Cannon Pattern Used to Cast 3” Confederate Cannons at the Macon Arsenal, Georgia The original owner of this cannon pattern was the Findlay Ironworks established in Macon, Ga. during the 1850s. In the Spring of 1862 Findlay was purchased by the Confederate Government and formed the nucleus for the Macon Arsenal. This arsenal continued in operation throughout the war and its 12 lb. Napoleons were said to be the pride of the C.S. Army. Producing molds for Civil War cannon was a near-art process. As noted in Cotton, Fire and Dreams – The Robert Findlay Iron Works the Macon, Georgia plant employed skilled craftsmen to produce cannon molds like this, a vital product in the manufacture of the cannon needed for the Confederacy to make war. Mold makers were knowledgeable in the entire foundry process. By mixing sand and water by hand, the final casting process and finished cannon was their responsibility. This cannon mold from the Macon Arsenal is an extremely rare find. Unlike the Tredegar Iron Works in Virginia, the Macon foundry used no slave labor. This mold is for a sixpounder Napoleon and was undoubtedly used in the manufacture many Confederate cannon, a rare survivor from the Civil War. $35,000

A Macon-manufactured Napoleon at Gettysburg.

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1013

Colonel Charles F. Fisher’s 6th North Carolina Slouch Hat Worn by Him When Killed at 1st Bull Run Stained with his blood – Original hat cord Charles Fisher was born in Salisbury, North Carolina in 1816 to a wealthy family, socially prominent and politically involved. He was friends with North Carolina Governor John Ellis who led North Carolina into the Confederacy. A Yale alumnus, Fisher formed the 6th North Carolina Infantry Regiment at the outbreak of the war but first called his unit into action to serve as Governor Ellis’ funeral escort upon his death in early July 1861. But the regiment would be swiftly sent into combat at 1st Bull Run on July 21, 1861 where Colonel Fisher would lead his men in capturing the all-important Rickett’s Battery. Colonel Fisher fell mortally wounded in the head wearing this slouch hat. The historic capture of the battery is commemorated on one of the US Postal Service’s 150th anniversary stamps issued in 2011. This black slouch hat with its gold braid cord and acorns is in as-expected condition with holes at the crown, front and back. Colonel Fisher had personally seen to it that his unit had been equipped for what would be the first major battle of the war. He had resigned his position as president of the North Carolina Railroad and was also a state senator before the war. He was an ardent Confederate and was sorely missed by his regiment when killed at Bull Run. Captain Ray said, “We especially lamented the loss of Colonel Fisher - noble, true, brave. No better provider for his men could be found and they were devoted to him. Colonel Charles Fisher was one of the most heroic souls that ever drew a blade.” Colonel Charles F. Fisher was lauded as one of the first and foremost heroes of the Confederacy. Fort Fisher near Wilmington was named for him and was called the ‘Gibraltar of the South’ for its intense fortifications keeping Wilmington open to the Confederacy until early 1865. It took several Union assaults so vicious that 70 Federal soldiers earned the Congressional Medal of Honor for its capture. It is now a state park and National Historic Landmark. This slouch hat was worn by a gallant soldier as he died for his country, leaving everything behind fighting for what he believed to be right.

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET

$45,000


Confederate Artillery Officer’s Uniform worn by Dr. Francis A. Stanford discovered in his antebellum home “St. Elmo” in Columbus, Georgia

Lot 1014 A stunning Confederate Artillery Captain’s Uniform - Coat and Pants, worn by Capt/Surgeon Francis A Stanford of the 15th Alabama Volunteers, latter surgeon for General Joseph Wheeler’s Army of Tennessee Cavalry Corps. This uniform and those of his brothers-in-law were all recently discovered in the antebellum home of “St. Elmo” (namesake of the famous literary work) certainly one of the last great discoveries. Captain Stanford had married one of the Fontaine girls, her brother Theophilus Fontaine was a commander in the 3rd Georgia Cavalry (his Confederate uniform was discovered at the same time) and later in the 20th Georgia in Lee’s Army and fought from Gettysburg to the surrender at Appomattox. Their father was the mayor of Columbus, Georgia, and they all lived in the magnificent Antebellum home of St. Elmo. The uniform has triple quatrefoil running up each sleeve to near the shoulder, his captain’s bars are neatly sewn onto his bright red collar, cuff ’s are matching bright red, with fourteen Eagle Staff buttons on the double breasted front, and three small eagle staff cuff buttons on each cuff, and tail buttons. Capt. Stanford has signed the waist band inside his trousers which are a darker shade of grey, with same bright red piping down each leg, with bone button closures. Condition is bright color yet some mothing at edges. Accompanied by his service records, as well as a Les Jensen Letter of Authenticity $65,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1015

A Very Rare Washington Artillery Kepi The famous New Orleans unit who were considered the finest in the Confederacy This superb kepi was worn by a soldier from the famous Washington Artillery of New Orleans, the most prominent artillery unit of the war. Made up of prominent citizens of the city, the unit dated back to the Mexican War where it became famous for its bravery and accuracy on the field of battle. At the outbreak of the Civil War the unit immediately was sent to Virginia and took part at the Battle of Manassas. This gallant and colorful unit had mustered into service at Lafayette Square in New Orleans; quickly distinguishing themselves in battle and went on to glory with General Lee’s Army at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Part of their notoriety was their colorful uniforms, few of which survive today. This bright red kepi with black band is one of the most distinctive headgear from the Civil War. With a single gold braid at each side and the top of the crown, the kepi is accented by a magnificent ‘W A’ at the front below two beautiful gold bullion crossed cannon. The leather chin strap and visor are accented by two eagle staff buttons. The overall condition of this rare and historic kepi is superb making it an ultra-rare and very desirable kepi from one of the most famous units of the Civil War. $27,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1016

A Confederate Artillery Arsenal Issue Kepi Worn by Private Robert Royall A Distinctive red and grey color of the Richmond Howitzers ca. 1861 Private Robert Royall wore this Richmond Howitzer kepi. Royall signed the inside of the kepi ‘R Royall Rm’d Howitzers’. Private Royall also drew crossed cannon and the words ‘Richmond Howitzers’ inside the cap as well. Royall enlisted as a private in the 1st Richmond Howitzers in 1861 and served throughout the war. A rare find due to the distinctive construction and coloration, not to mention that the kepi is identified to an important artillaryman; this Confederate Artillery kepi has the very desirable medium gray wool cloth and a rare red band and top at the crown. The Richmond Howitzers was a historic unit founded in Richmond, Virginia not long after John Brown’s raid. It is also a Richmond Depot issue, very rare and formerly partly of the Bill Turner Collection. The Richmond Howitzer’s served bravely with General Lee during most of the battles of the Army of Northern Virginia. Showing field use and restoration, the leather chin strap has Confederate Richmond made ‘I’ infantry brass buttons, backmarked ‘extra-rich’ at each side and a very rare tarred linen visor indicative of its Confederate construction. This is a rare survivor of a Confederate enlisted man’s headgear. Another kepi identified to Royall is featured at the Museum of the Confederacy at Richmond and illustrated in the Time-Life series. The kepi has been authenticated by Les Jensen and is accompanied by a letter from him. $35,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1017

State of Louisiana Officer’s Slouch Hat with Gold Gilt Pelson Insignia State of Louisiana Officers Slouch hat, with magnificent “Sequined Pelican” state seal sewn directly onto the front of the hat, with gold large acorns hat cord, and silk hat band, and trimmed with silk thread. A remarkable state slouch hat, obviously made by New Orleans finest uniform makers, the detail of the sequin’s state seal is stunning. A superb and rare showpiece from Louisiana. $22,500

Lot 1018

22nd Louisiana Colonel’s Uniform Grouping with Louisiana State Buttons A remarkable Assemblage of a Louisiana Colonel’s Uniform, including the Crown of his Kepi and chin strap with Louisiana buttons till attached, as well as his collar insignia, 14 Louisiana Confederate State buttons, all mounted on a large part of his grey uniform, with quatrefoil from his sleeves sewn in a circle making this an ornate memento for his family after the war, but a loss to the collecting community as they not only cut up his uniform, but his hat too! After the war, the southern states were under military occupation and Confederate uniforms and insignia were banned which may explain this assemblage which is identified to the 22nd Louisiana Infantry. All mounted on 19th century paste board & framed 20 inches tall. $12,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1019

A Very Rare Confederate Regimental Flag The 21st South Carolina Volunteers Captured at Battery Wagner during a Union amphibious assault This ranks as one of the rarest and best Confederate flags in private hands. Due to the facts that we know who carried it and when, even by whom made it; this Battery Wagner capture flag is an extremely valuable and historical collector’s item. Made in Charleston, South Carolina in 1862, this flag descended through the family of Major John West who served on the staff of General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard when he was in command of the defenses of Charleston. Confederate regimental marked flags are very rare with only a few surviving the war. The noted Civil War flag expert Howard Michael Madaus noted in his report on this flag that, “It is one of the better documented flags with data available on its manufacturer Hayden & Whilden of Charleston, its capture from the 21st South Carolina by the 9th Maine Infantry, only a few flags are as well documented as this flag”. The flag is accompanied by Mr. Madaus’ letter of authenticity as well as lengthy family provenance including a notarized letter from the descendants of Major John West. The family sold the flag to a noted Charleston collector and is now in a private collection being made available for acquisition. This flag flew over Battery Wagner during the famous amphibious assault on July 10, 1863 when 1,200 Confederates defended the fort against the overwhelming odds of a 6,000-man Union naval assault. Colonel Robert Shaw’s famous African-American troops of the 54th Massachusetts spearheaded the assault where their unit was virtually annihilated. Union troops eventually made their way into the fort and captured this flag only to be repeatedly repulsed. The attack was famously documented in the award-winning film Glory. This flag had been made only six months before the battle by Hayden & Whilden and delivered to the 21st South Carolina Infantry in downtown Charleston on February 10, 1863. The unit carried this flag at Battery Wagner and had it captured by the 9th Maine Infantry who subsequently returned it to Charleston after the war. Beautifully made of wool muslin, the flag still retains its original bright colors. With its 11 hand-sewn stars in the canton, the field contains the red and white bars of the Confederacy upon which the regiment’s name ‘21st Regt. S.C.V’ appears in hand-cut and sewn letters. Showing the expected wear of a battle flag, this flag is nevertheless a remarkable showpiece from an extremely important battle and regiment that fought there. This is a rare regimental flag for any collection or museum. Size: 4’ x 6.’ $125,000

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Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1020

An Extremely Rare South Carolina Secession Flag A patriotic image painted on white silk Made at the beginning of the Civil War for South Carolina troops, this beautiful silk flag has been examined and authenticated by the noted flag expert Howard Michael Madaus. Patriotic Latin logos translated to “Prepared in body and all things” and “While I breathe, I hope” are painted onto the white silk field beneath a beautiful South Carolina palmetto tree. Metallic gold fringe surrounds this 35 x 35 inch company-sized flag. Two other very similar flags have survived the war and are housed in the important collections of the South Carolina Confederate Relics Room and Museum in Columbia, South Carolina as noted in Mr. Madaus’ report which accompanies this flag. One is signed by the military artist, ‘F. Newton’, the artist who painted these flags. While the white silk field and gold bullion fringe are in excellent condition, the center part of the green palmetto tree has seen some inpainting. This is a fantastic showpiece. $25,000

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1021

Confederate Two-Piece “CS” Gilt Buckle on Richmond Arsenal Bullet Stitched Belt A rare Confederate Officers belt set, on original brown russet leather belt. Arsenal made in Richmond and issued to an officer in Lee’s Army. It retains 90% of its original gold gilting, the leather is supple and it is an excellent and rare original Confederate Officer’s Richmond Arsenal CS Army issue belt set. Accompanied by Mullinax Letter of Authenticity. Ex: Walter’s collection. $12,500

Lot 1022

An Alabama Confederate Belt Set Belt, Alabama State Seal Buckle, Cap Box and Confederate-Made Holster This Alabama Confederate belt set features the two-piece Alabama buckle cast with the Alabama state seal during the Civil War. The leather belt, holster and cap box are in very good condition but have seen field use making this a very attractive Confederate belt rig. Desired by collectors due to the scarcity of the Alabama buckle which is in excellent condition for age and use, this belt set has the Confederate made holster with pliable leather and the original brass catch and cap box with its original state flap and finial. This is a very nice presentation set. $9,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1023

Confederate Embossed “CS” Canteen made in New Orleans According the Steve Mullinax, author of Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates, there are only four “CS” embossed canteens known to exist. This exact canteen is pictured on page 85 in the canteen book by Steve Sylvia and Michael O’Donnell. It is thought by some authorities that these “CS” canteens were made in New Orleans in 1861. This canteen was captured at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862. It is completely genuine and is one of the rarest Confederate items known to exist. Accompanied by a Letter of Provenance from Steve Mullinax. $35,000

Lot 1024

A Confederate ‘C.S.A.’ Buckle, Belt and Cap Box Rectangular ‘Atlanta Arsenal’ Cast Buckle This attractive belt set includes the scarce, rectangular ‘Atlanta Arsenal’ cast brass commonly used by the Army of Tennessee. With a somewhat bright patina at the ‘C.S.A.’ lettering, the background has a pitted dark gray color. The buckle is attached to a pliable leather waist belt which has a fine leather cartridge box as well. This beautiful buckle was designed in response to the 1861 Confederate regulations which called for a “gilt rectangular sword belt plate”. The plate was actually produced in cast brass with a high concentration of copper leaving it with this nice, reddish shade. Francis Minchemer was contracted to cast 4,000 of these plates using scrap from the Atlanta Arsenal. Very few survive in this fine condition. This is an excellent Confederate belt and cartridge box with a fine Atlanta Arsenal buckle. $7,500

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Lot 1025

A Confederate “CS - STARS” Belt Buckle The Most desirable of all Confederate Belt-buckle’s made by Leech & Rigdon “J.W.S. Vicksburg July 4th 1863” capture notation on back This ‘CS - Stars’ buckle is one of the most desirable buckles for any collector or museum, impossible to find and this 1 of only 6 known is the finest existent. Made by Leech and Rigdon of Memphis, Tennessee, and Columbus, Mississippi the buckle has a rich gold-gilt patina with the eleven stars surrounding the ‘CS’ in the middle of the oval. Leech and Rigdon stayed one step ahead of the advancing Union Army by moving their factory from Memphis to Columbus, Mississippi in April, 1862. Remarkably, this buckle has been inscribed with the soldier’s initials ‘J.W.S.’ and ‘Vicksburg July 4th 1863’ on the back. This of course was the date that the besieged Confederate Army finally surrendered the city of Vicksburg to Ulysses S. Grant. Captured as a war trophy by a Union soldier having inscribed the date and location to mark the victory. The three belt hooks on the reverse are intact making this a very attractive and the most historic and finest example of this buckle known to exist. $29,500

Lot 1026

Confederate Sharps carbine made by Robinson in Richmond, VA for the Confederate Cavalry A rare Confederate .52 cal. Cavalry carbine, serial #1518, made by Robinson Arms in the Confederate Capital of Richmond, Virginia in 1862. This is a 100% original carbine just as manufactured in the armory for the Confederacy. In very fine condition in comparison with the others known to exist with crisp and sharp markings on the barrel top and untouched dark patina wood, good bore, and still has the saddle ring. A rare Confederate-made .52 caliber Cavalry carbine. $12,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1027

Confederate College Hill Officer’s 3 Branch Cavalry Saber – The First in Existence The Cavalry saber, which is in its original metal “lap seamed” scabbard, is one of the rarest of the College Hill products. There are only six (6) known examples of this pattern in existence today. The facility was operated by principal, L. T. Cunningham, on College Hill in Nashville, Tennessee where he continued operations until Nashville fell to Federal troops on April 1, 1862. After the fall of Nashville, Cunningham was taken into custody by the Federals, charged with treason and not released until after the war. It is unknown how many swords were produced by the firm nor if other products were made. The blade has a full on stopped fuller, which is three-quarters of an inch from the guard. The blade length is 33½” with an overall length 39¼.” The blade has an appealing dark, even patina with no pitting. The three branch guard is an example of one of their rarest swords with the standard high pommel as seen on products of this firm. The hilt retains its original leather wrap and a single copper wire, which is complete $17,500 and tight. This is the finest in epistual.

Lot 1028

Identified Confederate Rigdon & Ansley .36 Cal. Revolver, Serial Number 2151: “Battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas” Most authorities have pronounced the R&A revolvers, or as they were referenced at the time, “Navy Repeaters,” as the finest of all of the Confederate made handguns. This R&A, 12 cylinder stops, 36 cal. Pistol was manufactured by the firm after its relocation to Augusta, GA during the mid fall of 1864. The markings are correct for an R&A revolver and are: serial number stamping appears on the cylinder, cylinder pin, loading lever, loading lever catch, butt strap, barrel lug, the frame in 2 places, and in the wooden grip back strap channel (in pencil), “CSA” is stamped on the top flat of the barrel. The wedge is replaced by part of an old file and likely was done many years ago, or perhaps even during the war. There is a chip out of the right side of the grip that appears to have been missing for some time. Aesthetically, the revolver displays very nicely. There appears faintly scratched on the brass butt strap is the name: “LT Jordan.” Research by R&L Military Research, King, NC, indicates use by L.T. Jordan who was a private in the 4th Regiment Arkansas (Cavalry) Mounted Rifles. The unit was organized at Fort Smith, Arkansas in May of 1861 with 768 officers and men; at which time they were attached to McCulloch’s Brigade. They were mustered by companies into Confederate Service on June 9th – 15th, 1861. The unit/regiment fought at Wilson’s Creek and Elkhorn Tavern, participated in Bragg’s Kentucky Campaign under the command of Gen. Churchill. The Regiment was engaged at Murfreesboro and Jackson, as well as in many of the Army of Tennessee conflicts from Chickamauga to Bentonville. The unit reported 45 killed, 161 wounded and 2 missing at Wilson’s Creek and sustained 26 causalities at Richmond and 95 at Murfreesboro. Of the 254 who saw action at Chickamauga, 42 percent were disabled. Its force had been greatly reduced when it surrendered on April 26th, 1865. Letter of authenticity from Kent Wall. Fred R. Edmunds has examined this revolver and pronounced it correct in all respects except for the previously noted replacement wedge. Letter and research materials from R&L Military Research are included. $22,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1029

A Native American Confederate – Double Armed and Ready for Battle with Colt Dragoons ‘He-Sar-Tos-Kee’ of the 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles, Company D under General Stand Watie This is an extremely rare albumen photograph of a Native American Confederate Cavalryman, double-armed and ready to fight for the Confederacy. There were very few Cherokee Indians who fought for the Confederacy and it is almost unheard of to find an image of one from the Civil War. This soldier is armed with a half-cocked Colt Dragoon pistol and cavalry carbine with sling – and another Colt Dragoon on his waist! Dressed in a Confederate cavalry great coat and cape, he wears a paisley beaded shirt and beaded sash around his waist. He mustered in to Stand Watie’s 1st Mounted Cherokee Rifles at Fort Gibson on 25 October 1861 in Company D. He was from the Delaware District, Indian Territory which is now part of the Ozark area of present-day Oklahoma. Identified as ‘He-Sar-Tos-Kee’ of the 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles, this soldier would have been under the direct command of Confederate General Stand Watie who also served as the principal chief of the Cherokee Nation during the Civil War. Watie was one of only two Native Americans to rise to general’s rank during the Civil War, the other being Ely Parker, a Seneca who fought for the Union. Watie personally organized a regiment of cavalry and led his troops which would have included this cavalryman, ‘He-Sar-Tos-Kee’, at the Battle of Pea Ridge; the largest Civil War battle west of the Mississippi. Watie’s regiment would fight in more battles west of the Mississippi than any other regiment. This soldier would have been one of the last Confederate troops to surrender as Watie was indeed the last Confederate general to do so. His regiment was known for the ruthlessness in battle. There are many instances documented where the Indians cut throats and disemboweled their opponents in battle, especially black Union soldiers. It must be remembered that Watie and the Cherokees were a slave-holding tribe. This is a remarkable image in itself but made even more special due to the rarity of the image. This is quite possibly a once in a lifetime chance to own an image of a Cherokee Confederate armed to the teeth. $3,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1030

A Very Rare “Signed Photograph” of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in the Last Year of his Life Possibly the last photograph taken of him before his death in 1889, and one of his Last Signatures This signed cabinet card of Confederate President Jefferson Davis taken from life, may very likely be the last photograph taken of the President of the Southern Confederacy before his death in 1889. Photographed by the noted William Washburn Studios at 111 Canal Street in New Orleans, the image is signed in iron gall ink by Davis at the top in a very feeble hand. Davis still looks resolute and dignified with even a slight smile, seated with a book at his right hand. The image is very clear with some slight foxing at the left of the face and above Davis’ head, all else clear and distinct. This is a very rare last photograph of the Confederate president as he lived his last days in New Orleans. $1,750

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Lot 1030a (not shown)

Two Very Rare Period Photographs of Jefferson Davis’ Catafalque Views of his funeral procession on the occasion of his re-burial Jefferson Davis, first and only president of the Confederacy died on December 6, 1889 in New Orleans, Louisiana, forever believing the South had a constitutional right to secede from the Union. Davis had a substantial career before the Civil War. A West Point graduate, he had served as a colonel in the Mexican War and later as Secretary of War for the United States. It was while serving as a United States Senator from Mississippi that he stood with the South and the states’ rights to secede. Selected as the first president of the Confederate States of America, he would be known to most for his service in that office alone. These two historic photographs commemorate an important point in American history during a time when Southern pride was still very much evident in the postReconstruction South. Davis had died in New Orleans after a short journey and was subsequently interred at Metarie Cemetery in there in 1889 with great mourning among Southerners. But it was in 1893 that his wife Varina decided to re-inter her husband in the home of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia. His remains were removed from the Metarie Cemetery on May 27, 1893. It was during the transport of his body as escorted by veterans of the Army of Northern Virginia that these historic photographs were taken in Raleigh, North Carolina. The funeral cortege was viewed 24 hours a day through the entire route by sympathetic Southerners. It was their chance to be near their long lost president one last time. From the beginning of the route down Canal Street in New Orleans all the way to the train station, thousands lined the streets to say their goodbyes. When the funeral train arrived in Montgomery, Alabama, there were at least 15,000 people there to meet it. His body lay in state inside the state capitol, the first capitol of the Confederacy. The funeral train made its way through South Carolina and on to Raleigh, North Carolina where it would pick up the former Confederate General Robert F. Hoke who by then was Governor of the state. It was at that occasion that these two photographs were taken on Fayetteville Street. Davis’ body was then taken on to Richmond for burial at the historic Hollywood Cemetery – an estimated 25,000 people filing past the bier. These are two very historic and rare photographs of the catafalque of Confederate President Jefferson Davis taken at a time when Confederate sentiment still ran strong. $2,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1031

A Remarkable Full-plate Ambrotype of Confederate Captain James Biggs White Quartermaster for General John B. Magruder, Later on Staff of General Robert E. Lee Includes his Confederate commission signed by Judah P. Benjamin, Confederate Quartermaster’s record book showing payments for slave labor; Post-war ‘Oath of Allegiance’, oil portrait and letters James Biggs White, a Virginia-born Confederate captain was first assigned to General John B. Magruder’s regimental cavalry staff in Virginia as Quartermaster. When Magruder was sent to Texas to successfully defend Galveston, White was assigned to Robert E. Lee’s staff and then sent to North Carolina as Quartermaster; an unusual assignment since no Quartermaster was heretofore known to be assigned to a state which was making such a substantial contribution to the Confederacy. This unique grouping includes this very large, full-plate ambrotype, White’s commission and later historic articles concerning White which are a very important insight into one of the Confederacy’s most prominent citizens who played an important role during the war. The ambrotype depicts White in his Confederate cavalry uniform along with his wife Sarah Ann and his two daughters Sarah Edna and Caroline making this a very rare war-date photograph of a Confederate officer with his entire family. The ambrotype measures approximately 10 x 8 inches and is in its original gilt frame and in very good condition. White’s Confederate officer’s commission is signed by Confederate Secretary of War Judah Benjamin and by General John Magruder. A very interesting part of this collection is White’s Quartermaster ‘Cash Book A’ which consists of approximately 150 pages of cash transaction notations made by White during the course of the war. They begin at Yorktown, Virginia on May 9, 1862 and then move to Henderson, North Carolina on May 18, 1863. Examples of transactions include transfers of funds from the ‘Treasurer of the Confederacy’ for horse purchases, payrolls, tents, clothing; even wages paid to owners of slaves and servants for the labor the slaves provided for the war effort. The book even includes records kept by White for the payment of board for the plantation slaves. The collection also includes important post-war artifacts owned by Captain James Biggs White as well. His signed ‘Oath of Allegiance’ to the USA declaring his allegiance as an American citizen again after the Confederacy fell is included here. A letter addressed to White by a Union Provost Marshal is a remarkable historical treasure. It directs White on how to distribute remaining Confederate “property in his hands” to the people of Granville County, North Carolina. A 24 x 30 inch oil portrait of Captain White in uniform completed by the noted period portraiture artist Thomas Emile Dodamead is included, handsomely displayed in a gilt frame. This is overall one of the very most important collection of a Confederate officer who played a significant war role in the Confederacy both in Virginia and North Carolina. $25,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1032

Confederate Navy Construction Sketch Design to Apply the Iron Plates for the First Ironclad CSS Virginia in 1862 This is the original Confederate Navy manuscript scroll for the engineer’s construction model to apply the iron plate to the CSS Virginia, the name given to the captured and re-fitted USS Merrimack. The Virginia struck a decisive blow to the USS Monitor in the most famous naval battle of the Civil War, the Battle of Hampton Roads. This sketch design is hand-drawn and signed by Captain John Porter who was the Chief Naval Constructor (Engineer) for the Confederate Navy. The ironclad design for the Virginia was his idea - an ocean-going warship that was undefeatable by the great Union Navy sailing warships. The Confederate government considered the ironclad to be their most powerful weapon designed during the war, not only to break through Lincoln’s blockade that was starving the Confederacy, but one that could defeat the US Navy at sea as well. This is the paper sketch design scroll constructor’s model of how and where to apply the iron cladding to the CSS Virginia at the Confederate Naval Yards. This is the only CS Navy constructor’s model still in private hands. The Mariner’s Museum in Norfolk, Virginia has the balance of Porter’s drawings along with the Library of Congress. However, they do not have this drawing of how to apply the iron to the sides of the ship. Measuring 1 x 3 feet, it is descended and purchased directly from Chief Engineer Porter’s family. Unique and archivally framed, this is an important, one-of-a-kind historical object from the Civil War. $125,000

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1033

JEB Stuart – Patent for a Sword Belt being his retained letter from Stuart’s own files completely written by him and in Pristine Condition Before the Civil War Lieutenant J.E.B. Stuart was stationed out west with Robert E. Lee and others, fighting Comanche Indian’s in Kansas and Texas. In 1859 he Patented a Sword Belt hanger which he tries in the letter to sell to the US Cavalry! He was in the Capitol and took this opportunity to write the Adjutant General of the War Department this amazing letter as follows: “Col. I have the Honor herewith to submit a manual for “Stuarts Sabre attachment” which submitted to the Cavalry Board at Carlisle, but was not considered by them as they had no power to act upon it. They however individually suggested that I submit it to you to be acted upon contemporaneously with the Proceedings of the Board. In case the latter are approved the service will require some such system as the one here presented. Most respectfully – J.E.B. Stuart 1st Lt of 1st Cavalry.” Shortly after writing this Stuart was called into emergency service by Colonel R. E. Lee to put down an uprising at the Harpers Ferry Arsenal where an Abolitionist named John Brown had captured the Arsenal and its weapons. JEB had previously met John Brown in Kansas, and personally read the Terms of Surrender to him, but a tip of JEB Stuart’s hat was the signal that brought John Brown to the hangman’s noose. $12,500

Lot 1034

Stonewall Jackson’s Uniform “Virginia” Coat Button made into a Ladies Hat pin General T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Uniform Virginia Coat Button, marked “Mitchell & Tyler” Richmond on verso shanked and made into a Ladies Hat pin. After “Stonewall’s” death and funeral in Lexington, VA in 1863, many mementos were given away to friends and family, this being one from his uniform which he was buried in. It is from the famous and early Stewart Collection, and attached to his collection card. Ex: William A. Turner Collection.

$4,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1035

J.E.B. Stuart Signed Book from his Library at his home in Patrick, Virginia A very rare signed book by this famous hard fighting Confederate Cavalry General, the most famous cavalry officer in the Confederate Army JEB Stuart proved himself a hundred times as R E Lee’s strike force, he was Killed in Action in 1864. His personal Battle Flag sold for a million dollars, a lock of his hair went for $50,000 +. This book was acquired directly from a member of his family many years ago, and signed books by him are almost non-existant. This 1846, book in Latin on the Greek Philosophy illustrates his intelligence, Jeffersonian in nature he could read both Greek and Latin. Completely original bindings with no defects and a real showpiece of this great Cavalry General. $9,500

Lot 1036

General Robert E. Lee–Signed Book about his father “Light Horse” Henry Lee also presented and signed by his wife, Mrs. Lee Magnificent condition and beautifully signed by General Lee in 1869 while he was President of W & L. He republished this book after the Civil War about his father Henry Lee an American Patriot during the struggle for Independence from England in 1776. Light Horse Harry Lee most certainly was an inspiration to his son that latter became the Commander–in– Chief of all the Confederate Armies. Henry Lee was also the 9th governor of the state of Virginia and a interesting family tree as Henry’s wife R E Lee’s mother was a direct descendant of King Robert II of Scotland, Mary Custis Lee of course was related to our 1st president George Washington via his marriage to Martha Custis Washington. A superb showpiece of American History during the Civil War. Mrs Lee presents this book in ink “Edward Joynes from his friend Mary Custis Lee” the pages are uncut and untrimed all engravings are intact with tissue, some foxing and it has been rebound with the Lee Family Coat of $9,500 Arms embossed on the cover.

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1037

A Very Rare Confederate Holster for a heavy caliber LeMat Revolver Hand stitched with roller buckle and brass rivet belt loop intact Confederate holsters are very rare and extremely desirable among collectors but this holster is made even more special since it was made for the famous LeMat revolver. This superb example has the intact hand stitching, the original buckle clasp and belt loop at the rear. Designed to accommodate the famous LeMat revolver with a shotgun barrel in the center. Designed and imported by the famous New Orleans Confederate General P G T Beauregard, many a Confederate Officer carried these deadly weapons. Their holsters are rarer than the rare handguns themselves. Missing inalmost every museum & private collection, an unobtainable Confederate Holster. $4,500

Lot 1039

A Confederate General’s Sash – Excellent condition with White Silk Tassels This is an excellent example of a white silk Confederate General’s sword belt sash with knotted silk tassels. In remarkable condition, the sash shows no damage, little wear and slight color fading. These general’s sashes are not common, especially in this mint condition. $3,500

Lot 1038

The Famous July 4, 1863 Vicksburg ‘Daily Citizen Wallpaper’ Newspaper Announcing the “Fall of Vicksburg” & General Grant dinning in the captured city July 4th, 1863 This famous example of a ‘Wallpaper Edition ’ newspaper from Vicksburg, Mississippi was published on July 4, 1863, the date of the surrender of Confederate forces to General Ulysses S. Grant’s Union “Siege Army”. The city had long run out of newsprint and had resorted to using wallpaper beginning as early as mid-June 1863 (see Library of Congress checklist of known examples). While there are many copies purporting to be the real wallpaper newspaper of the day, this is indeed the real thing, rare and amongst the most important printed article from the Civil War. Signed and dated by the Union solider who sent it home J. M. Fraley in August 1863. The Fall of Vicksburg and Lee’s Defeat at the Battle of Gettysburg on the same date was in fact the “High Tide” of the Southern Confederacy, the war was all but over, yet many more would die in the continued struggle. The fall of Vicksburg divided the Confederacy in-half East from West, the loss of the Battle of Gettysburg demoralized the Army and the Citizens. Perfect for display, stained upper portion from being saved inside a book.a very interesting and important article from the Civil War. Captured by Union soldier, J.M. Fraley in August 1863 $3,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1040

Complete Set of Harpers Ferry Pikes – The Finest original matching set that exists, c. 1860 A complete and original set of 4 Harpers Ferry pikes, c. 1860. All on original, matchinglong oak hafts, one having a retractable blade, diamond point, spear point and cutting edge point. They just don’t come any nicer or more perfect than this. Some museums have put mixed sets together over the years, but this one is an original matched set and is what both the US and the CS armies used in battle. Over 7 feet long, they could penetrate an infantry or cavalry charge. Set of 4 matched pikes from the US Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, VA (now West Virginia), all with original oak hafts and the last vestige of ancient American warfare. $25,000

Lot 1041

Confederate General A.P. Hill check signed TWICE in 1861 before he went south. The famous A.P. Hill, high ranking divisional commander and general in the Confederate Army. An unusual financial document, being a check he cashed at the Bank of the Metropolis in Washington DC, on March 11th, 1861. Made out to himself and signed by him. Thus 2 signatures, just weeks before he joined the Confederate Army. A great pair of his signatures dated 1861 as he was selling his money out of D.C. $2,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1042

Southern Double Barrel Percussion Shotgun by Frank Shumann, Memphis, Tennessee Outstanding Southern 10 gauge double barrel shotgun made by Frank Shumann of Memphis, Tenn. The checkered stock is in excellent condition with a beautiful brown finish. Both locks are well marked in two lines, “FRANK SHUMANN MEMPHIS TENN.” The firm is well known for the production of fine arms. The butt plate, trigger guard and two thimble guides are iron. The barrel is double keyed with brass inlaid protectors. The ramrod appears to be original to the shotgun. The barrel length is 42 inches, the overall length of the shotgun is 59 inches. A beautiful example of a Southern double barrel shotgun which is seldom seen on the market, yet carried by many a Confederate soldier into battle. $2,500

Lot 1043

A Confederate Homespun Butternut Vest For the Confederate collector, examples of the homespun woolen jean cloth are the most desirable items to own. Rarely have they survived the post-war use of the struggling unreconstructed Rebels. This wonderful example is in very good condition, the only flaws being that the adjustment buckle is a replacement with the adjustment strap having a repair. As would be expected, it has some minor mothing and many of the buttons are now lose inside the pocket from old cotton thread used to sew them on. The vest still sports three of its original eagle buttons, many others are in the pocket. Overall the vest is in excellent condition and would make a great display to any Confederate uniform collection. $3,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1044

Lot 1045

Confederate Infantry Lieutenant with Light Blue High Standing Collar - 1/6 Plate Cased Ambrotype

‘Ruby Ambrotype’ – A Young Confederate Officer a 1/6 Plate cased image

This attractive ambrotype is of a Virginia 1st lieutenant with his kepi showing a laurel wreath on the front of his kepi. The attractive case and ambrotype make this an enduring vision from the civil war. $1,500

This young Confederate 2nd Lieutenant looks resplendent in his ninebutton jacket. Cased and near mint condition. $1,250

Lot 1046

Lot 1047

A 1/6 Plate Ambrotype of 1st Sergeant Thomas F. Goodman, 12th Virginia Rifles

A 1/9 Plate Ambrotype – Included in William Albaugh’s book Even More Confederates

Sergeant Goodman was a soldier in the Company C, the 12th Regiment of Virginia Rifles. There is a penciled notation to that effect on the inside of the ambrotype case. This image was obtained from his descendants. Born in 1832 he enlisted in 1861 as a sergeant. Partially obscured in the photograph is his Model 1839 forage cap. A superb and published image of him ready for war. $1,750

This very rare image is of a Confederate Zouave Major, double-armed with knife & pistol. This image was formerly in the collection of Steve Mullinax author of numerous books on Confederate weaponry. $1,250

Lot 1048

A Union large 1/4 Plate Ambrotype A full-standing Union enlisted man Holding his US Army issue Springfield rifle with leather shoulder strap US Army issue US oval belt plate, this is a perfect example of a fully outfitted Union army enlisted man. From his cap box and bayonet – to his uniform is similar to 57th Indiana pictured on page 65 of this catalog – he wears the regulation 9-button coat and sky blue trousers with a regulation dark blue kepi. Cased. $650

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Lot 1049

An Extremely Rare Confederate Whitworth Sniper Rifle The Confederate government purchased only 250 of these British-made, very accurate rifles used by their sharpshooters to pick off Union officers first; then everyone they could from very long range, especially artillerymen. Making them rarer is the fact that no more than thirty actually made their way through the Union blockades and into Confederate service. Very sought after by collectors of rare weapons as much as by Civil War collectors, these sniper rifles bear Birmingham proof marks and heavy hexagonal barrels and are beautiful showpieces. Designed by Sir Joseph Whitworth, a British engineer and prominent gunsmith, his hexagonal barrel was designed to improve upon earlier British Enfield rifles used during the Crimean War. An expensive weapon for its day, the British began selling them to the French army and then to the Confederacy. But much to the chagrin of the sharpshooters who were eagerly awaiting them in the South, very few such as this one made their way into combat. Weighing in at nine pounds, the Confederate snipers had to support these rifles with a forked prop or rest them against a tree branch or log. The .451 caliber shell with a 1:20 twist was deadly accurate at long range. The ‘Whitworth Sharpshooters’ as the Confederate snipers became known were responsible for at least two well-known deaths of noted Union commanders. One, General William Lytle was killed at Chickamauga. But perhaps the best known kill was the death of General John Sedgwick who was killed at Spotsylvania Court House while scolding his troops for taking cover at the distinctive sound of the Whitworth bullets whizzing by. Just as Sedgwick declared, “They couldn’t hit an elephant at this range!” he was killed with a shot below his left eye. Five Confederate soldiers would claim credit for the killing shot, all of the Whitworth Sharpshooters. This is a chance to own a significant historical weapon used by a Confederate sniper during the Civil War, pitted yet stock is in fine condition.

$8,500

Lot 1050

Rockbridge Artillery –Map of the battle of New Market Drawn by VMI Cadet This is a rare battlefield diary, that of Private James M. M. Davis of the 1st Virginia, Rockbridge Artillery; General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. This was his 100-page manuscript pocket diary tracing the final days of the Confederate Army from the viewpoint a young artilleryman in Lieutenant Colonel Robert Hardaway’s Battalion. Young Davis was a student at the University of Virginia in 1862 to 1863 when he joined up with the Virginia Military Institute cadets, fighting his first battle by their side at New Market in 1864 and remaining with them until the end of the war, surrendering with General Lee at Appomattox. Private Davis’ diary is well written by a well-educated young man just 17 years old and shooting cannon at the Yankees. He begins his accounts of the war with meeting the local citizens and University of Virginia students at Thomas Jefferson’s home ‘Monticello’. He goes on to describe fighting against Union General Custer’s raiders. He had formally left the University on June 26, 1864 to fight at New Market. In the diary, he brags that he shot a cannon ball through the porthole of the USS Mendota. He also describes incidents such as going to Richmond to get new guns, four ten-pounder Parrott rifled canons; firing 20 rounds at the Union sharpshooters who were lying around the fort at 300 yards; an account of “Griffin’s Battery had one killed and one wounded although we loaded on our knees, Dance’s battery got in a very hot place and had twenty killed, etc”. Private Davis’ diary includes a hand-drawn sketch of battle completed while on the field. Young Davis walked home from Appomattox arriving on Good Friday and attended Cumberland Church where General Weisiger spoke. The record of this speech is the last entry in the diary. Davis finished his college education at University of Virginia Law School and became an attorney. This is a great battle diary with fascinating accounts of wartime events. $4,500

Lot 1051

Confederate Officer’s Richmond Arsenal Two-Piece ‘CS’ Sword Belt Set with Original Officer’s Sword Hangers This Confederate belt set is a rarity. It has its original brass sword mounts, hangers and buttons with excellent clarity. The belt has very supple leather and is in good presentation condition. The well-struck, two-piece interlocking gilt ‘CS’ buckle with the laurel wreath is in excellent condition making this a rare and desirable collector’s belt set. The buckle is the first Richmond style as identified in Steve Mullinax’s book on Confederate buckles. This is a superb CS Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Officers belt set. $12,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1052

A Rare Confederate Cavalry Guidon – Dalton Georgia Arsenal Issue This Confederate guidon with its 10 stars and red and white swallowtail field is a very attractive Confederate Cavalry flag. Dalton Arsenal Made of completely hand sewn cotton, it has faded due to exposure and much use. Archivally framed, this a very nice presentation piece. Very few if many Confederate Calvary guidons survived the war making this flag even more collectible. 12 x 20 inches. $20,000 Lot 1053

A Union New Jersey Cavalry Guidon 12th New Jersey Volunteers - Gettysburg This beautiful cavalry guidon incorporates all of the elements of the national flag. The stars and stripes form a distinctive flag around which Union troops would rally. In very good condition considering its Civil War service, this flag is a rare collector’s item. The 12th New Jersey volunteers was a historic unit that distinguished themselves at Gettysburg. As noted on the monument erected there honoring them: Erected by the State of New Jersey, 1888, in honor of the 12th Regiment of volunteers, a detachment of which in the afternoon of July 2nd, 1863, charged the Bliss house and barn here capturing the enemy’s skirmish reserve of 7 officers and 85 men stationed therein. On the morning of July 3, another detachment of the regiment charged, capturing the buildings, one officer and one man, and driving back the skirmish reserve. The regiment lost in their charges 60 officers and men. This is a historic guidon flown by a very important regiment during the war. $10,000

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Lot 1054

Rare 1st National Confederate Flag–Stars Made of Quatrefoil Circa 1863 silk Confederate 1st National Flag. This flag was taken as a war souvenir by a Northern soldier to his home in Maine. The flag was displayed for a number of years at a GAR Post in Maine in a late 19th century oak frame. The flag measures 18½” on the hoist by 32” on the fly. The blue canton contains 13 stars, 12 in a circle around a 13th star in the center. The size of the blue canton is 13” by 12,” interestingly there is a 1½” by 2¼” album photograph of President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis. The flag is fragile but stable within its frame. The center red stripe has faded to the same as the two white strips. The borders of the flag and canton are trimmed with a gold quatrefoil. The flag is machine stitched. The white silk stars are individually sewn with the same gold quatrefoil boarding. On the hoist are five (5) hand-sewn grommets, there are portions of a heavy gold colored cord attached to the hoist. The overall size of the flag in its frame is 24¾” by 38½.” $12,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1055

General George Thomas’ Presentation Sword carried during the capture of Nashville The ‘Rock of Chickamauga’ – Commanding General of the Army of the Cumberland General George Henry Thomas was born in Southampton County, Virginia in 1816, a true Southerner, although one whose future greatness rested with the preservation of the Union. Forever associated with a single battle, for his heroism there he will always be known as the ‘Rock of Chickamauga’ for his stand against the Confederates. Indeed President Abraham Lincoln remarked, “It is doubtful whether his heroism and skill exhibited last Sunday afternoon, has ever been surpassed in the world.” But this was a professional soldier who had exhibited bravery in the United States Army for many years before – during the Seminole War, the Mexican War and in the American West where he was wounded in action against the Kiowa Indians. Thomas saw bloodshed early on in his life in Southampton County during the Nat Turner Rebellion. He once remarked that he sympathized with the slaves’ plight, remarking that he too would have fought for his freedom if he found himself in similar circumstances. Whether or not that incident had an impact on Thomas’ decision to accept an appointment to West Point in 1836 is not clear, be he did so turning away from a law career to become a professional soldier. Graduating twelfth in his class of 1840 which included William Tecumseh Sherman, he wasted little time in seeing combat. Joining Major D. A. Wade’s command in Florida, he was cited in dispatches for his bravery in capturing seventy Seminoles on November 6, 1841. He earned his first promotion to Brevet First Lieutenant for that action. He was soon after transferred to New Orleans and on to Fort Moultrie in South Carolina. After other assignments and with war between Mexico and the United States on the horizon, Thomas’ regiment was dispatched to Texas in June 1845. With the outbreak of war Thomas was in the thick of it, fighting at Fort Brown, Resaca, Monterrey and Buena Vista where he was commended for his service by Generals Zachary Taylor and John Wool. Mexico would be the proving ground for many leaders of the Civil War including Braxton Bragg, a future Confederate opponent with whom Thomas served in Mexico. It was written that Thomas, perhaps above all other future Civil War generals, learned more tactical lessons in Mexico than anyone – pontoon train pursuit at Resaca, trapping an enemy at Monterrey and the importance of artillery at Buena Vista and Vera Cruz. It was after the close of the war on July 31, 1849 that he was named commander of Company B, 3rd US Artillery. But he had returned to his home in Virginia in the interim bringing clothes and shoes for the slaves on the farm he had left. He felt a strange disassociation from Virginia which perhaps explains his remaining in the Union Army serving as an instructor at West Point beginning in 1851. His star pupils would become some of the great leaders of the Confederacy; JEB Stuart, Stephen Lee, John Bell Hood as well as Union leaders such as Philip Sheridan. Thomas was known as a very fair man, earning him the respect of not only his pupils but of Robert E. Lee who became Superintendant in 1852. They would become close friends, later serving together in Texas. It was during Thomas’ West Point years that he married Frances Lucretia Kellogg and to them was born a daughter through whom this sword was descended. This Model 1860 Staff and Field Officer’s sword with its 31 ½-inch blade and sharkskin, twisted wire grip is in near mint, untouched condition. The inscription on the

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face of the inboard folding counterguard reads: Geo. H. Thomas Major General U. S. Army The hand-engraved blade is profusely etched with detail work. Just above the ricasso on the reverse is the maker’s name, ‘Ames Mfg. Co./Chicopee/Mass’. The elaborate scabbard is blued with cast decoration on the brass mounts. A famous painting executed in 1866 in Nashville depicts General Thomas holding this very sword. Painted by the artist George Drury and authorized by the Tennessee legislature, the painting hung in the Tennessee State Capitol until restored in 1963. We know that this particular sword was carried throughout the Civil War due to the excellent provenance provided with it. The sword was given to General Thomas’ aide-de-camp and nephew Colonel S. C. Kellogg by Thomas himself. Inscribed on the pommel cap of the sword is the following: This saber was used by General Thomas all through the Civil War and presented to Colonel Sanford C. Kellogg, US Army The sword descended through his daughter, Mrs. Julia Kellogg Bradley and then to the collector, Dr. William Mitchell Hoover in 1946. The sword was sold to the noted Civil War expert and collector Norm Flayderman in 1966. (Notarized statement from Dr. Hoover is included) General George Thomas would have carried this sword through his storied service in the Civil War, firstly at the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky in January of 1862; the first decisive Union victory. Thomas’ forces drove the Confederates across the Cumberland River forcing them to abandon precious equipment and supplies. Already a Brigadier General, Thomas would be promoted to Major General for this action. From there it was on to Stones River where he helped Rosecrans gain a much-needed victory in January of 1863. But it was at Chickamauga that Thomas’ star would shine brightest. With the Union Army already being broken in two, Thomas nevertheless held on causing a Union officer and future President of the United States James Garfield to report to his commander General Rosecrans that Thomas was “standing like a rock”. Thereafter the name ‘Rock of Chickamauga’ was attached to Thomas and a legend was born. Thomas’ stand at Chickamauga and Chattanooga saved Tennessee from the being taken. He commanded the Army of the Cumberland throughout the Atlanta Campaign after which he was sent to pursue the Confederate army of General John Bell Hood which he routed at Franklin and Perryville, effectively eliminating a once powerful force. This historical importance of this General Thomas sword with its impeccable provenance cannot be overstated. Thomas was a powerful force in the Union Army and played a significant role in the Union victory. His experience in three wars and West Point education served him well. Even though he was a native born Virginian, he stayed true to the cause of preserving the Union. By the close of hostilities he had been made a Major General in the regular army and went on to command the Military Division of the Pacific, even though the Tennessee State Convention had nominated him for president. Being ever the officer and gentleman, this was an accolade he declined. $125,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1056

General Charles C. Dodge’s Cavalry Uniform–7th New York Cavalry–21 years old Includes his extra tall Cavalry boots, spurs and red leather gilt belt set One of the youngest generals in American history, Charles Cleveland Dodge was commissioned a captain in the 7th New York Mounted Rifles, a volunteer cavalry unit in December 1861. After organizing more companies to his unit, the young captain was wounded when his unit took part at the naval engagement involving the clash of the ironclads, firing from the shore as the CSS Virginia and USS Monitor fought it out at Hampton Roads. After participating in the capture of Norfolk, Dodge was promoted to colonel and then general in November of 1862 at the age of 21 years. General Dodge’s cavalry famously chased General Longstreet and enjoyed much success at the Battle of Suffolk and at Hertford, North Carolina. He served the remainder of the war efficiently help quell the Draft Riots in New York City General Dodge’s double-breasted cavalry uniform is in very good condition with its velvet collar and cuffs and 16 large ‘eagle’ staff buttons, each backmarked ‘Extra Quality’. The shoulder straps each have the gold bullion single star of a brigadier general with the frock coat having three smaller eagle buttons at each cuff and four additional buttons at the tail. The dark blue wool fabric is in excellent condition, a well constructed frock coat with sleeve linings and sturdy, six-piece paneled construction. Included with this historic frock coat are General Dodge’s extra large 32” tall cavalry boots with his spurs still attached. Though popular during the war, they are rarely found today. In addition, this uniform set includes General Dodge’s crimson officer’s sash, his red and gold officer’s dress belt with sword hangers and his gold general’s sash. This is a complete and historic uniform collection worn by a 21 year old Union general during the Civil War. $65,000

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Phone Orders Accepted Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Phone Orders Accepted Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Lot 1057

An American militia shako circa 1830-40 Tapered cylindrical shako of black leather, the crown trimmed with large brass shield, the lower edge with black leather band. Crown pierced in the front for a plume. Large, fluted brass frontplate below a leather cockade with small brass eagle and shield button retaining the original woven cords. Large brass visor, the underside painted green. Interior retains portions of the leather sweatband. A remarkable militia hat. $2,500

Lot 1058

A Massachusetts militia officer’s bell-crowned shako by John E. Baker of Boston circa 1840 The black leather helmet covered in navy blue wool, the crown and brim with brass trim. Die-struck silver-plated brass frontplate bearing the coat-of-arms of the State of Massachusetts, Chief Massasoit standing with his bow below the state crest, a mailed arm holding a sword and inscribed below Massachusetts Militia. Leather chinstrap with gilt buttons bearing the state crest and backmarked A&W Robinson. The sides with larger buttons below the crown and inscribed Mass. Volunteer Militia. Front of the crown pierced and fitted with plume of cock feathers dyed light blue. Interior of crown with label Saddlery and Cap/Establishment/John Baker/No. 12 Court St. Boston/Saddles/ Bridles/Harnesses. A superb militia hat. $6,500

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Lot 1059

A Very Rare Early War “Light Blue” Union Shako with Embroidered Officer’s Seal This 1859 pattern Union officer’s shako is very unique in that it includes the distinctive sky blue pompon at the top of the crown. This shako is in overall excellent condition and is a very attractive headgear with the tall stovepipe crown, beautiful gold embroidered eagle officer’s seal and infantry bugle, all in excellent detail and condition. The heavy leather chin strap and visor are in equally remarkable condition as are the gold eagle staff buttons at each side. This is a rare and early Civil War officer’s hat. $5,500

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Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1060

15th New York Medical Officer’s Kepi Worn by Surgeon Herman Ideler Chief Surgeon 15th New York Heavy Artillery – accompanied by his green Medical Officer’s sash This rare Medical Officer’s kepi was worn by Surgeon Herman Ideler of the 15th New York Heavy Artillery who saw bloody duty at The Wilderness and Petersburg and the surrender at Appomattox Court House. Born in Berlin, Germany he immigrated to America before the civil war, practicing medicine in New York City, and originally joined the 45th New York Volunteers as their field surgeon, then moved into the famous 15th NY Heavy Artillery (3rd German Heavy Artillery, New York). The kepi comes with his equally rare Medical Officer’s sash worn by Surgeon Ideler. The black wool felt kepi is an early war construction and is in excellent condition. Ideler was commissioned on June 6, 1863 and mustered out with his unit on August 22, 1865 he died just a few months latter. Given his assignment with the 15th New York he would have performed life-saving and bloody service during the some of the most gruesome battles of the second half of the civil war. $18,500

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Lot 1061

The Kepi of Colonel Amasa Tracy – Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor Colonel Amasa Tracy was born in Dover, Maine in 1829 and enlisted in a company of Maine volunteers at the outbreak of the Civil War, ultimately elected First Lieutenant. He rose through the ranks and was brevetted Colonel for his heroic action at Petersburg. But it was at Cedar Creek where Tracy’s brigade was formed as the spearhead of General Sheridan’s lines that he would most known for, an action for which Tracy would be awarded the Medal of Honor. This kepi has a silver 2nd Corps Infantry badge made by Tiffany of New York. This Colonel’s kepi is from the 2nd Regiment of the Vermont Volunteers, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 6th Corps. Tracy was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry at Cedar Creek which has been well documented in the annals of Civil War history where as his citation states, he “Took command of and led the brigade in the assault on the enemy’s works”. Tracy personally designed the 6th Corps badge for this kepi he wore during battle. Colonel Tracy’s uniform is pictured on page 64.

$12,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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We offer Fully Insured FedEx® delivery service.

Phone Orders Accepted Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861

Lot 1062

A Very Rare Union “Ordnance” Hardee Pattern Hat–Magenta Officer’s Hat Cord The Hardee hat is one the most attractive and recognizable headgear of the Civil War. It is rare to find one in as superior condition as this showpiece, but even rarer for the Hardee to have belonged to an Ordnance officer in charge of all things explosive. This dark wool Hardee is in excellent condition and retains its distinctive Ordnance “ Flaming Bomb – Grenade” insignia at the front of the tall crown. It has ‘US Army’ and ‘Extra Manufacture’ hand stamped in gold inside the crown of the hat. The gold gilt eagle cockade pin is appropriately affixed to the left side of the hat anchoring the double twisted magenta officer’s hat cord with tassels; all in excellent condition. This is a remarkable showpiece Hardee, and a rare addition to a great collection. $8,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1063

Mounted Rifles Hardee Hat of the 1st Regiment, Company G, New York Mounted Infantry–Green Officer’s Hat Cord This Hardee from the 1st Regiment, Company G of the New York Mounted Rifles is in excellent condition. It has ‘US Army’ and ‘Extra Manufacture’ hand stamped in gold in the crown of the hat, size 4. The green hat cord is in very good condition as well with the brass infantry bugle appearing below the ‘1’ and ‘G’ gold gilt insignia, all in superb condition. $8,500

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1064

A Union Infantry Officer’s Slouch Hat Brass Embroidered Infantry Bugle and Gold hat cord This is a wonderful example of a Civil War officer’s slouch hat with its 2 ½ inch wide brim and 5 ¾ inch crown. Crafted of black fur felt that has aged to a nice black/gray tone, the officer that wore this hat used a center-tucked crown. With a black ribbon hand-sewn edging, there is a shadow of a band at the base of the crown. The embroidered infantry bugle is set on a dark blue velvet background on the front above the black and gold officer’s hat cord made of gilt wire wrapped around a cotton core. The acorns at the end are of gold braid over a wooden form. Affixed to the wearer’s left front of the hat and at the base of the crown there is a black ostrich plume sewn to the cord. The plume is held at its base with a black ribbon cockade which is in turn sewn to the hat cord. The sweatband is constructed of black leather and is three inches wide and in good condition. Considering its Civil War usage, this hat is in overall very good condition and a very attractive and a original Union Officer’s hat. $9,500

Lot 1065

A “Green” McDowell Style, Mounted Rifle Kepi This McDowell style kepi has the gilt bullion infantry horn embroidered onto a black patch at the front and is of a distinctive yet faded greenish color. In very good condition, these kepis with the long pointed visor represent the Mounted Rifles and are a rarely offered. $8,500

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Lot 1066

A Rare “US Engineer’s Hardee Hat”–Yellow Officer’s Hat Cord This is perhaps one of the most beautiful Hardee hats we have ever seen. A rare find in that this Hardee hat was worn by a US Army Engineer during the Civil War, the hat is made even more special due to the superb condition. This flamboyant soldier had his green ostrich feather plume at the front of the yellow hat cord with large tassels to complement the large Engineer’s insignia at the base of the tall crown. Alternatively known as the Model 1858 hat, ‘Jeff Davis’ or the Hardee hat after its designer William Hardee, then of the Union Army but destined to soon become a Confederate General, this example is a rare design for Army Engineer of Company A that wore it. The brass cockade pins the hat at the left side and is in excellent condition as well. ‘A & K US Army Manufacture’ inside the crown in gold stamping and is sized 7 1/8. $6,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1067

A Civil War Union Ordnance/Artillery Shako – Model 1859 Distinctive Brass Eagle, Ordnance and Artillery Devices including red Horse Hair Plume This Union Ordnance/Artillery shako is original with the as-issued chest cords and red, dyed horsehair plume. It has the distinctive flaming bomb of the ordnance division at the top of the leather band near the crown above the brass crossed cannon of infantry as well. The maker’s name of ‘Horstmann, Bros. and Company Manufacturer of Military Goods 5th and Cherry Street Phila.’ appears inside this beautiful shako. With the accompanying artillery [eagle buttons on each side of visor, this is a beautiful Civil War shako in excellent condition. $5,500 Lot 1068

A Very Rare Havelock from the Civil War Worn by Captain John D. Ottiwell The havelock was designed to cover the soldier’s cap and shield his neck from the sun. They were used for a very short time early in the civil war since it did not take soldiers very long to realize that they only made them even hotter. Since they were made of linen, most all of them were subsequently torn up and used as gun cloths or as bandages. This example survived the war due to the relatively short service of its owner, Captain John D. Ottiwell of New York City. Ottiwell mustered in the service at New York City on April 19, 1861 as captain of Company D of the 12th New York Volunteer Militia (3 months). His regiment sailed for Fortress Monroe, Virginia on April 29, 1861 and took part in the occupation of Arlington Heights. The 12th New York was involved in a skirmish near Martinsburg on July 12 and near Bunker Hill on July 15, 1861. He mustered out on August 5, 1861 with the rest of his unit in New York City taking this rare surviving Havelock with him. Ottiwell would go on to be a delegate to the 1868 Republican Convention where former Union General Ulysses S. Grant was nominated and eventually elected president. This is a very rare Civil War uniform headgear owned and worn by a Union officer who saw action in Virginia against Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. $8,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1069

A US Engineer’s Forage Cap This Union Engineer forage cap has the very distinctive and attractive engineer’s device at the front of the crown. The eagle buttons at each side of visor are in excellent condition. The brown linen lining is in good condition making this a sound, attractive US Engineer hat. $5,500

Lot 1070

US Staff Officer’s Cap Us Eagle “I” Buttons With the Warnock maker’s label inside, this Union officer’s cap has the attractive ‘US’ inside the laurel wreath in gold bullion at the front. The rare gilt US Eagle “I” buttons at each side of the chinstrap make this a special Union. A superb Infantry Officer’s officers hat in every resect with Warnock eembossed label inisude the crown. $3,750

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1071

A US Naval Ensign’s Kepi ca. 1863 US Naval Buttons and Cap This is a rare US Navy officer’s cap from the Civil War. Even rarer are the naval buttons at the chinstrap which depict the federal eagle and fowled anchor. At the front is a gilt hand sewn wreath sewn onto black patch. A single gilt strand surrounds the perimeter of entire kepi. The inside of this beautiful kepi is quilted in brown linen. There appears to be a Bent Brothers, Boston maker’s label stamped in silver on the inside. This is a rare opportunity to own a kepi from the Civil War United States Navy perhaps a 100 times rarer than any of the the US Army gear. $7,500

Lot 1072

Kepi and Documents from the 179th New York Infantry, Company C This kepi grouping is accompanied by an original cased tin-type of the soldier enlisted man. The kepi has the distinctive brass regimental number of ‘179’ at the crown along with the ‘C’ denoting his company. This grouping comes with the soldier’s cap box, cartridge box, two family photo albums and remarkably 12 of his .58 cal. paper wrapped cartridges. Made even more special is the inclusion of his original discharge papers signed by the Governor of New York in 1865. The entire archive as one lot; Hat, documents, bullets his cartridge box amazing archive. $7,500

Lot 1073

A Union Medium Blue Infantry Kepi – ‘44th’ This Union kepi of the 44th Infantry has an attractive infantry horn at the front of the crown along with the regimental 44 inside. The cap is in good condition with eagle buttons at each side of the leather chinstrap and patent leather visor. $6,000

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Lot 1074

A 6th US Artillery Kepi Gilt Embroidered Crossed Cannon This beautiful kepi is almost ornate with its quatrefoil crown, double flat braid. The heavy bullion crossed cannon at the front with the number “6” inside are quite striking. The cannon insignia is affixed to Union artillery kepi in excellent condition. $3,500

Lot 1075

An Excellent Union Kepi Michigan Militia State Seal Buttons This understated, yet beautiful Union kepi has calico lining in very good condition and a single gilt quatrefoil around the perimeter at the base of the crown. The Michigan state militia buttons make this a rare and historical kepi. A single strand of gold bullion thread midway around the crown makes this an attractive showpiece from the home state of Custer ca. 1861. $7,500

Lot 1076

A Civil War 7th Maine Officer’s Kepi

This beautiful kepi is made of medium gray wool and has an attractive red band at the base of the crown. A bullion infantry bugle is sewn to a velvet oval at the front and a single strand of flat gold quatrefoil appears at the top. The leather chinstrap has gilt Maine state buttons at each side. This is a very attractive kepi worn by a Maine officer during the Civil War. $7,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1077

General George H. Thomas’ Chapeau de Bras Hat The ‘Rock of Chickamauga’ Officers Hat inside the Original Enameled Triangular Hat Box General George H. Thomas was arguably one of the best field commanders the Union Army had on the field in the Civil War. This formal ‘chapeau de bras’ was owned by General Thomas and is accompanied by the original box with the label of ‘Warnock & Co. 519 Broadway, New York’. Written in period script on the label is ‘Gen. Geo. H. Thomas’. In near-perfect condition, the chapeau measures 18 ½ inches and is 5 ¾ inches high at the front, 6 ½ inches at the back. A very attractive formal general’s hat, the chapeau has stylish gold bullion tassels at each end, a 2 ¼ inch wide bullion fabric strap at the wearer’s left side secured by an eagle staff button. On the fabric riband is a federal eagle, all attached to a black silk cockade with a black feather plume. The interior of this beautiful hat has a red silk lining and a black leather sweatband, all in good condition but showing some wear. The Warnock label is also in very good condition along with the original Warnock Company blue enamel box which is equally perfect for display. This is a very rare and important US General’s chapeau owned and worn by a great historical figure who played a pivotal role in the civil war from the capture of Nashville thru all the battles of the Army of the Cumberland vs The Army of Tennessee. $7,500

Lot 1078

A French-made U.S. Model 1860 Foot Officer’s chasseur shako and epaulets This black leather shako with reinforcing bands, ventilation ports, eagle and bugle horn front plate and painted tricolor cockade was used by Union troops at the beginning of the Civil War. The brim has a reinforced rim and green painted underside. The black leather sweatband and interior retains the strap and buckle ends of the chinstrap. Together with green wool epaulets with yellow crescents and brown polished cotton lining, this is a very attractive and historic infantryman’s shako sold to American Troops by the French at the beginning of the war ca. 1861. $2,500

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History Collected by Gary Hendershott • Sale 153 • www.GaryHendershott.NET


Lot 1079

A Union Artillery Shell Jacket This beautiful shell jacket has a heavy wool lining, bright eagle buttons down the front and beautiful red chevrons at each cuff. The red piping of the artillery appears at the back and at the collar where two additional eagle buttons are affixed. A remarkable US Army arsenal issue uniform in near mint condition. $2,500 Lot 1080

A US Cavalry Bugler’s Shell Jacket This is a beautiful Civil War cavalry bugler’s shell jacket. The herringbone yellow front, cuff chevrons and standing collar make this a great display uniform. The lining is $12,500 a remarkable/displayable if not unique magenta and black checkerboard design.. A mint and remarkable Union Cavalry uniform in every way, Lot 1081

An Artillery Musician Bugler’s Shell Jacket Much like the artilleryman’s shell jacket, this artillery bugler’s jacket is even more attractive with the red herringbone pattern at the front. When accentuated with the eagle buttons at the collar, cuffs and front, this is an excellent Civil War showpiece with a checkerboard interior design in magenta and black. A truly beautiful Union Army uniform, and unique as such, a showpiece. $12,500

Interest Free Layaway Available “ I have never charged a collector or a museum Interest and I NEVER will”. I sell the “Old Fashion Way”, all prices are NET with NO hidden fees and NO buyers premium

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1082

A Beautiful, Double-Breasted Union Infantry “Colonel’s”Uniform The turned down collar and magnificent condition of this coat make it a desirable Union Infantry Officers uniform. The bright blue bullion colonel’s infantry shoulder straps are affixed to the wide shoulders of this frock coat. The double-breasted front has two rows of seven eagle buttons with the second button being buttoned down in a fashionable way for summertime. Three smaller eagle buttons are at each cuff. This is a beautiful greenish blue Civil War Union infantry officers uniform. $9,500

Lot 1083

A Union Cavalry Captain’s Uniform This single-breasted cavalry captain’s frock coat has nine eagle ‘C’ cavalry buttons down the front. In overall very good condition, the coat has excellent yellow cavalry captain’s shoulder straps. The low collar is typical of cavalry officers’ uniforms of which this is an excellent example. $9,500

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Phone Orders Accepted Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861 62 |

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Lot 1084

Union Captain Oliver C. Livermore’s Frock Coat Gettysburg Worn – Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville Collection Includes Extra Shoulder Boards, CDV and Medal & Escutcheon Captain Oliver C. Livermore enlisted on April 2, 1861 as a 2nd Sergeant and earned promotions eventually achieving Captain Oliver C. Livermore enlisted on April 2, 1861 as a 2nd Sergeant and earned promotions eventually achieving the rank of Captain on May 1, 1863, just in time for the Battle of Gettysburg. During his service, Captain Livermore served as Assistant Adjutant General, Inspector and Aide-de-Camp on the staff of brigade commanders. Most notably, he was serving on General Gabriel Paul’s 1st Corps staff at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was actively engaged on the first day of battle, miraculously escaping death while his comrades were falling all around him. The action took placed at Oak Hill near the railroad cut where General Paul was blinded by rifle fire from the attacking Confederates. Captain Livermore’s blue frock coat is in remarkable condition with nine brass eagle staff officers buttons down the front and three smaller buttons at each cuff. The medium blue wool fabric is almost pristine. The Captain’s shoulder boards each have the two gold and silver bars indicating that rank. There are extra shoulder boards with this collection. A red woven silk officers sash with tassels accompanies this superb uniform. Additionally a signed photograph of Livermore as a Lieutenant is included along with his hat cord and his framed hand-painted military escutcheon. The Captain’s Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States medal comes with the collection as well and is in excellent condition. A superb Exhibition uniform set $18,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1085

The Frock Coat of Medal of Honor Recipient Colonel Amasa S. Tracy 2nd Vermont Shrapnel wounds at the left side of this uniform Received for gallantry at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia This magnificent frock coat was worn by one of the most gallant Union officers of the Civil War, Colonel Amasa Sawyer Tracy of the 2nd Vermont Volunteers. Born in Dover, Maine in 1829, Tracy was elected First Lieutenant of his unit which became part of the 2nd Vermont Infantry in June of 1861. He charged headlong into the war seeing action at Bull Run on July 21, 1861. Tracy would be promoted to captain and major in 1862 during heavy fighting at Savage’s Station, White Oak Swamp and being wounded at Fredericksburg. But it was after being promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1864 that he would earn a place in history. The medium blue frock coat is made from wool, has a standing collar and has seven buttons down the double-breasted coat. The eagle bullion shoulder straps are in excellent condition with four eagle buttons at the back of the coat. On October 19, 1864 at Cedar Creek, Virginia, Tracy assumed command of the 2nd Vermont and charged the Confederate positions. Although wounded by shrapnel as is evident in this frock coat, he forged ahead and contributed greatly to the Union victory, effectively ending the Valley Campaign and the defeat of Jubal Early’s Confederates. Cedar Creek was a crushing defeat for the Confederates and came at critical time for President Lincoln who was seeking reelection with this battle effectively ensuring his victorious campaign. So severe was the action and level of heroism that day, twelve Union enlisted men and nine officers including Tracy were awarded the Medal of Honor. There is much documentation of Tracy’s deeds that day from Major General Merritt Barber. He wrote to Major General U. S. Grant, praising Tracy’s actions. Barber wrote to Grant, “ the Command of the Brigade was turned over to Lieut. Col. A. S. Tracy of the 2nd Vt., who led the assault on the enemy’s works with a gallantry that was worthy of the troops under his command. Too much praise cannot be awarded to this gallant officer for the manner in which he handled the command in that most trying of all moments.” Included with this historic frock coat is a volume of research concerning Colonel Tracy, his war service and his Medal of Honor citation. There are copies of correspondence between the Vermont Governor’s office and the US War Department and even a letter of thanks from Tracy to the War Department upon receiving his Medal of Honor via registered mail. Copy photographs of Tracy from the US Army Military History Institute are included as well. This is a very important uniform, shell-shot and worn by one of America’s greatest war heroes. (see his Tiffany made Officers kepi on pg. 51) $25,000

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Lot 1086

A Civil War Uniform of the 57th Indiana Infantry – In Every major battle of the Western Theater Sergeant William Wesley Seward, Company F – Killed at the Battle of Murfreesboro Nine-button enlisted man’s frock coat/sky blue kersey trousers The 57th Indiana served in almost every battle of the Western Theater, finishing their war service in San Antonio, Texas. Organized in Richmond, Indiana in November 1861, the regiment saw hard combat at Shiloh through Missionary Ridge, on to Atlanta, Franklin and then Nashville. After the Nashville Campaign they were ordered to New Orleans and then on to San Antonio, Texas where they were occupying forces at the end of the war. Worn by Sergeant William Wesley Seward of Company F, this uniform is in excellent condition and thanks to Civil War muster rolls, newspaper clippings and family history we know much about Sergeant Steward. Seward enlisted at Rush County, Indiana on October 15, 1861 aged twenty-three and stood a tall 6’ 1”, a big man for his day. Sadly, this uniform was brought back from the battlefield at Murfreesboro along with Sergeant Steward’s body by his father. Indeed his muster rolls show the inventory taken at the time of his death when his body was removed to Pleasant Home, Indiana where he was buried. Period newspaper clippings of the obituary are included with this uniform. As the muster rolls, copies of which accompany this uniform quote that he was killed by a “musket ball passing through the head”. The uniform descended through the family, a letter from whom is included with the uniform set. This beautiful nine-button frock coat and accompanying sky blue kersey trousers were worn by Sergeant William Wesley Seward and are in excellent condition. Very similar to the coat and trousers worn by Corporal Anderson Davis of the 57th Indiana pictured here atop Lookout Mountain (he was later killed at Kennesaw Mountain), this uniform was worn by a soldier who saw much action throughout the war. With the nine eagle buttons down the front, the sky blue Kersey trousers make this a very attractive uniform worn by a soldier from a very historic and important unit. $22,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1087

A Mint Union “Artillery” Captain’s Uniform with brilliant red shoulder bars This remarkable Civil War Union Artillery officer’s frock coat has the sharp, vermillion and bullion captain’s straps at each shoulder. The nine-button, single breasted coat with four buttons at the back is in overall excellent condition. The dark blue wool shows is fresh and is a great showpiece. $9,500

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Lot 1088

A Civil War hand painted flag of the New Hampshire ‘Lafayette Artillery’ ‘Lyndeborough, New Hampshire’ A flag of early New Hampshire militia unit, that dates back to 1804 and was in continuous service through the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Named for the Revolutionary War hero Marquis de Lafayette, the ‘Lafayette Artillery’ served at Fort Constitution during the Civil War with many of the members going on to fight and die with separate units that were dispatched to the front. They went to war with their 1844 Ames cannon which survive to this day, occupying a special space in Lyndeborough. This beautiful guidon measures 25” x 26” with its construction dating from the period of 1863 to 1864. It is known that the guidon saw service in the Civil War. With a colorful fringe, the entire guidon is encased in a modern frame measuring 33.5” square covered by Plexiglas. The guidon is in overall fine condition with some minor wrinkling and small holes appearing with a few minor tears as appropriate for wartime use. The guidon has a field of 13 stars amid a ray of light on top of two crossed cannon. While the base is made of a slightly faded beige silk, the top scroll bears the title of ‘Lyndeborough New Hampshire’. This is a historic guidon carried during the Civil War by a unit that in many ways still exists today. While the members of the GAR lodge have all passed away, the patriotic organization of Lyndeborough still holds reenactments. $32,500

Lot 1089

An 1863 Civil War Regimental Marker Flag 34 Stars This beautiful Civil War regimental marker flag has seen much field use. While the blue canton and its hand-sewn 34 stars are still vibrant, there is some apparent bullet hole loss at the top of the canton and at the top of the red and white striped field. The gold twisted silk fringe makes this a distinctively attractive flag. The size indicates that it would have been used at the each side of the regiment in order for commanders to identify the locations of the borders of their regiment. This is a great Civil War survivor that has seen much action. Approx. 20 x 36 inches framed. $5,500 Lot 1090 (no photo)

A Beautiful ‘Double-Helix’ Stars and Stripes Flag Kansas Statehood This 34-star remarkable flag is designed in the ‘double-helix’pattern distinctive and commemorative of the addition of Kansas to the Union in 1861. Carried during the Civil War, this is a regimental size flag made of wool with strong brass grommets. A beautiful stars and stripes with a unique pattern, very distinctive on the battlefield. Ex: The Connerly Collection

$6,500

Lot 190a (no photo)

A 34-Star Regimental Stars and Stripes Flag This wool bunting stars and stripes regimental flag has seen extensive usage. With brass grommets at the hoist, it was a war horse for whatever unit used it during the war.

$2,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1091

Army of the Potomac – 5th Corps Flag with “Battle Honors” carried by the 56th Pennsylvania Volunteers use during the Battle of Petersburg in 1864 This is the “Headquarters Flag of Colonel/Brevet Brigadier General J.W. Hoffman” who commanded the 56th Pennsylvania Volunteers and led their charge on June 18th, 1864 against the Confederate lines at Petersburg. His men also fired the first shot at the Battle of Gettysburg. A hard fighting unit from 2nd Bull Run to Antietam, Gettysburg, The Wilderness and the siege of Petersburg, culminating with the “Battle Honors” on this rare flag –Peeble’s Farm, Hatcher’s Run and Weldon Railroad. Accompanied by an 1881 exhibit tag when this flag was put on Exhibit in Philadelphia for the American Bi-Centennial. The flag was designed by Colonel Hoffman to combine and merge the 1st and 5th Corps designs into one, as the 1st Corps was decimated at the battle of Gettysburg where they fired the first shot of the battle and merged into the 5th corps, the dark blue border designates the 3rd Brigade which he commanded and he used this as his Headquarters Flag from Petersburg to Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. It comes with lengthy documentation including authentication by Fonda Thomsen of Textile Preservation and the late Howard Madaus. The flag is triangular form and it is 55 inches in length, 44 inches tall on the hoist with cotton tie, the 5th Corps Maltese Cross is a foot tall, and the lettering is hand painted in gothic 2 inch tall Gold lettering. Corps Flags were rarely saved after the war, to find one with Battle Honors is an opportunity of a lifetime of collecting. Firmly documented and the subject of an article in 1988 issue of the famous North-South Trader magazine. $35,000

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Phone Orders Accepted Call Gary Direct (501) 258-1861 Lot 1092

Regimental Artillery Flag with hand painted “Crossed Cannon” on gold silk This is a large part of the central section of an even larger silk US Army Artillery flag, US Army arsenal made for a Regiment of Artillery. “U.S. REGIMENT ART.” in red ribbons with gold trim over crossed cannon. The flag has fringe on top and bottom, lacking the fly and the hoist of flag. Beautifully hand painted and very exhibitable. Quite large and framed approximately 4 x 6 feet. $9,500

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Lot 1093

Headquarters Flag of the 14th Army Corps, the Army of the Cumberland 1863 A superb non-regulation Headquarters flag for the Staff Officer of the famous 14th Army Corps of Tennessee. Headquarters Flag of the 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland in Tennessee in 1863. This is an unofficial swallow tail corps flag to mark the locations of the key Staff Officers in camp and battlefield. it was a common practice for staff officers to have a flag made to designate their position both on and off the battlefield. This striking headquarters flag is well made of cotton bunting with a Red Acorn on a Blue field, with a sleeve hoist 19 x 28 inches, framed and in excellent condition. The 14th was under the command of General George H. Thomas and was the first to break through the Confederate defenses at Murfreesboro to begin the campaign for Chattanooga, they also were the principal force in storming Missionary Ridge, and went with Sherman to the siege of Atlanta and the March to the Sea. A fine and historical Union Army Corps flag. $9,500

Lot 1094

A Rare 5th Corps Head Quarters Flag with a “Maltese Cross,” Virginia 1864 Beautiful headquarters flag of the Staff Officer of the 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, being a non-regulation swallowtail corps flag adopted due to the absence of orders marking the location of key staff officers in camp and occasionally in the field. It was a common practice for quartermasters and several other types of staff officers to create their own flag in order to readily identify their headquarters. This striking headquarters flag with a dark blue bunting swallowtail field with white inset and red bunting Maltese cross corps design is a vivid example. Emanating from the Campaign of 1864, it flew over many battlefields of the Civil War including Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and the Weldon Railroad Operations. A superb example of an undoubtedly unique headquarters flag from the famous 5th US Army Corps. Framed 18” x 31,” accompanied by the late Howard Madaus Letter of Authentication. $9,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1095

5th Connecticut Lost his leg at Culp’s Hill, Georgia - 12th and 20th Corps Badge Grouping Lieutenant Perry’s 5th Connecticut Infantry would fight valiantly throughout the war, especially at Gettysburg. This tremendous grouping includes Lieutenant P. P. Wilson’s two Corps badges, his lieutenant’s shoulder straps and his Bowie knife. He was wounded at Culp’s Farm, Georgia during the Atlanta Campaign and had his leg amputated. The two Corps badges are made of red wool. His IXL Bowie knife is made by Washington Works in Sheffield, England which is inscribed with his initials on the cross guard; all in a original 19th century oak frame as preserved by Wilson’s family. $4,500

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Lot 1096

The Rarest Union Corps Badge - 1864 - The Black Heros of Petersburg and Richmond United States Colored Troops Medal was designed and presented by General Benjamin Butler. This badge was struck in pure silver and depicts two black US Army soldiers charging a fortification like Battery Wagner. It has the original silk ribbon and silver clasp. “Army of the James” pin with an Eagle claw is holding the uncirculated and mint medal to the ribbon. Interesting to note that many of these medals were presented to US Colored Troops in Brownsville, Texas during the final days of the war! Only 197 of these silver medals were commissioned by General Butler. They were made by the Boston jeweler Bigelow and Kennard, and engraved by artist, Anthony Paquet. This the first medal ever presented to US Colored Soldiers in the field. A remarkable and historical showpiece. This is a bargain. A similar medal as this recently sold for $45,000. $37,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Brig. Gen. Cornelius G. Atwood, Boston / Private Co A, 1st Reg, M.V.M. Sep. 29. 1856. 2nd Lt. Co. D. 3rd Batt. Rifles M.V. Apl. 22. 1861 / Capt. Co. C. 25 Reg. M.V. Oct. 12. 1861

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Lot 1097

General Cornelius G. Attwood’s Two Swords AND His Ornately Engraved, Cased Colt Revolver 25th Massachusetts, Heckman’s Star Brigade His Foot Officer’s Sword – And His Staff Officer’s Sword – And His 1851 Navy Colt Engraved Revolver Original and War-Date Oil Painting of Attwood; His Epaulets, Sash & Photographs It is very rare to have all the swords an officer used during his service in the Civil War. Here we indeed have the wartime swords of Brigadier General Cornelius G. Attwood. Born in Bangor, Maine in 1836, Attwood would go on to have a storied career with the Union Army in the Civil War. In his youth he joined the local militia and in October 1861 he was appointed captain of Company C, 25th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The regiment merged into the 18th Corps and fought in Heckman’s Brigade becoming one the Union’s top fighting regiments. During General Attwood’s career he acquired two swords, both of which are offered here. The first is a foot officer’s sword which is inscribed ‘Lieut. C. G. Attwood’. The second, a staff and field officer’s sword inscribed on the top mount ‘Capt. C. G. Attwood, Boston’. It is elaborately inscribed down the steel scabbard with all of the general’s promotions and battles in which he participated.

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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While these two swords are a remarkable piece of history in themselves, acquired from a descendant in Maine, the swords are accompanied by the general’s gold bullion epaulets encased in an identified carrying tin. Also included in this collection are Attwood’s Lieutenant Colonel’s epaulets, several cartes de visite, a signed regimental history, a war-dated oil painting of the then-Major Attwood as painted by well-known artist Alexander Ransom and a large escutcheon in hand-written calligraphy with photograph, promotions, battles and references to the GAR and MOLLUS medal. Remarkably, we are also offering General Attwood’s ornately engraved 1851 Model Colt Navy revolver with these historic swords. This wonderful pistol is elaborately engraved and includes General Attwood’s name “Lieut, C. G. Attwood” on the backstrap with “Boston, Mass.” on the inner backstrap. All parts have the matching serial number of 140534 with the small dot at the base indicating the factory engraving which is stunningly sharp on the pistol, 100% intact. The action is particularly crisp and the weapon has an overall pleasing, smoky gray patina. The rolled cylinder scene of a wagon and figures is in excellent condition as well. The fancy bone grips have a nice yellowish color with a very thin crack down the left side near the top of the backstrap from being fired. The hexagonal barrel shows some wear at the muzzle, pos-

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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sibly from carry in a holster. The serial number of 140534 is a wartime number and Attwood would have carried this pistol throughout the war. The favored revolver of Union Army officers, this pistol comes with its original cased walnut box complete with its bullet mold, powder flask, a few ball shot and cap tin. This model with its fancy engraving, octagonal barrel and bone grips is particularly attractive and historic as well. This is a remarkable collection of historical objects relating to a major figure in the Civil War. By war’s end the 25th Massachusetts had fought in more than 25 battles and skirmishes including Roanoke Island, New Berne, Goldsboro, Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor where then-Major Attwood was wounded. Withdrawn from the trenches at Petersburg, the gallant 25th was mustered out on October 20, 1864. Major Attwood was brevetted Lieutenant Colonel and soon after Brigadier General for his ‘gallant and meritorious service during the war’. After the war Attwood served as Inspector general of Massachusetts where he was principally in charge of the militia. He held multiple GAR offices including Post Commander, National Quartermaster and National Adjutant General. He died on January 19, 1888 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. $175,000

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Lot 1098

A Civil War era tobacco lot Comprising: 1 Unopened plug of chewing tobacco, 2 1/4” x 4”, silver foil wrapper with illustration of a woman holding a bunch of grapes, H. Mickle & Sons/Grape/Fine Cut Chewing/Tobacco and on the side No. 36 Broadway/New York. 2) Packet of smoking tobacco, the dark grey/green wrapper imprinted Mrs. G.B. Miller & Co./Smoking and No. 110 Water Street/A. H. Mickle & Sons’ Successors, Manufactory/97 Columbia Street. 3) A light orange paper-wrapped packed of Queen of the Valley Chewing Tobacco, with illustration of a lady and marked ...Suffield, Conn/J.W. Loomis. 4) A pale yellow paper package of Pure Yellow Bank Tobacco and marked Wm. H. Goodwin & Co./207 & 208 Water Street, New York. 5) A pipe with small burlwood bowl and curved 13 inch gutta percha (?) stem marked Marco-Polo and with clover-shaped maker’s mark. $950 Lot 1100

An Election poster for the National “Republican Ticket for 1864 – Abraham Lincoln for President” A rare campaign poster in support of the Abraham Lincoln/ Andrew Johnson Republican presidential ticket for the 1864 election, this broadside commemorates Lincoln’s decision to replace Hannibal Hamlin as his running mate. Within a year Johnson would ascend to the presidency at Lincoln’s $950 assassination.

Lot 1101

A superb, large albumen photograph of the famous Alexander Webb, the Hero of Gettysburg A superb, large albumen photograph of the famous Alexander Webb, who saved the day at Gettysburg and held back Pickett’s Charge! Civil War photography does not come any nicer than this. It is as mint as the day it was taken, and a large albumen. General Webb was a Lt. Colonel when he commanded the Union Line on Cemetery Ridge that held the center of Pickett’s Charge. He received the Congressional Medal of Honor for his gallantry that day. After the war he made history again as the president of City College in New York, the first public university in America. Taken in March 1865 as Brevet Major General. Size 6 x 8 inches, mint. Ex: William A. Turner Collection. $750

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Lot 1102

A Silver “Lehnert” Civil War Bugle This attractive Civil War bugle was manufactured by the Henry Lehnert Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Stamped with Lenhert’s maker’s mark just behind the horn, this bugle has an overall light gray patina and is in excellent condition considering age, fully functional. The Lehnert Company was famous musical instrument maker during the Civil War. $6,500

Lot 1103

A Brass Civil War Bugle This brass bugle still retains it gold gilt inner area of the horn and has seen much use. With no maker’s mark apparent, it is an attractive musician’s display piece from the Civil War. That called many a soldier into the line of battle. $2,500

Lot 1104

A Civil War Backpack – Beverly Light Infantry Made of leather, tarred linen and heavy linen, this knapsack was a necessary tool for the infantryman during the Civil War. Few have survived since many were discarded, lost or ruined due to exposure during the war. This is a remarkably preserved well example which still retains its leather straps and buckles, an interesting and rare addition to any collection. $5,500

Gary Hendershott • 501.224.7555 • P.O. Box 22520 - Little Rock, AR 72221 • Email: g.hendershott@comcast.net

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Gladium III Catalog  

The American Civil War and Indian War were the only wars fought on American soil by Americans, almost 1 million died during these wars. They...

Gladium III Catalog  

The American Civil War and Indian War were the only wars fought on American soil by Americans, almost 1 million died during these wars. They...

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