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Figure 1 Basic Types of Growth Patterns -

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Curve A represents an idealized form of the normal physical growth pattern in nature which our bodies follow, as well as those of plants and animals. We grow fairly quickly during the early stages of our lives, then begin to slow down in our teens, and usually stop growing physically when we are about twentyone. This, however, does not preclude us from growing further qualitatively" instead of "quantitatively." Curve B represents a mechanical or linear growth pattern, e.g., more machines produce more goods, more coal produces more energy. It comes to an end when the machines are stopped, or no more coal is added. Curve C represents an exponential growth pattern which may be described as the exact opposite to curve A in that it grows very slowly in the beginning, then continually faster, and finally in an almost vertical fashion. In the physical realm, this growth pattern usually occurs where there is sickness or death. Cancer, for instance, follows an exponential growth pattern. It grows slowly first, although always accelerating, and often by the time it has been discovered it has entered a growth phase where it cannot be stopped. Exponential growth in the physical realm usually ends with the death of the host and the organism on which it depends.

Based on interest and compound interest, our money doubles at regular intervals, i.e., it follows an exponential growth pattern. This explains why we are in trouble with our monetary system today. Interest, in fact, acts like cancer in our social structure.

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Margit Kennedy (!) - Interest and Inflation Free Money  

Copyright 1995 by Margrit Kennedy) (Published by Seva International; ISBN 0-9643025-0-0; 1 2 LIST OF FIGURES:..................................

Margit Kennedy (!) - Interest and Inflation Free Money  

Copyright 1995 by Margrit Kennedy) (Published by Seva International; ISBN 0-9643025-0-0; 1 2 LIST OF FIGURES:..................................

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