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      Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report   12th  -­‐  14th  of  April  2014,  Nurbuling  

 

     

Helambu  Education  and  Livelihood  Project  

           


Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Table  of  Contents   Introduction ...................................................................................... 3   Aims ...............................................................................................................3   Results  and  Achievements ..............................................................................4  

Participants ....................................................................................... 5   Budget .............................................................................................. 7   Management..................................................................................... 8   Planning/  Preparation ....................................................................................9   Logistics..........................................................................................................9   Food ............................................................................................................................ 9   Toilet  Facilities ............................................................................................................ 9   Accomodation........................................................................................................... 10   First  Aid..................................................................................................................... 10   Volunteers ................................................................................................................ 10   Guests ....................................................................................................................... 10  

Events ............................................................................................. 11   Results..........................................................................................................12  

Key  Recommendations.................................................................... 14   Planning/  Preparation ..................................................................................14   Management ................................................................................................14  

Appendix  I-­‐  Medalists  by  events  and  categories .............................. 15    

                   

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Introduction     Himalayan   Olympics   (HO)   is   an   inter-­‐school   competition   between   HELP's   partner   schools,   involving   both   extra-­‐curricular   and   co-­‐curricular   activities,   with   the   aim   of   enabling   schools   to   create   a   more   vibrant   learning   environment   through   the   inclusion   of   regular   extra-­‐curricular   activities.   AT   the   moment,   the   HO   only   includes   students   from   the   Helambu/   Gunsa   region,   where   HELP   works,   but   plan  to  widen  its’  scope  to  a  more  ‘Himalayan’  range.  Unlike  the  Olympics,  which  are  held  once  every   four  years,  we  plan  to  make  the  HO  an  annual  event.       The   first   Himalayan   Olympics   were   organized   by   HELP   and   hosted  by  Nurbuling  School  in   February   2012.   This   year,   we   handed   over   responsibility   for   organisation   to   Nurbuling   School   (the   host   school),   which   was   voted   to   host   the   event   during   our   annual   interaction   programme   of   the   headmasters   and   the   SMC   Chairmen.   This   was   done   in   the   hope   of   empowering   our   partner  schools  to  organize  extra-­‐curricular  events  and  competitions  throughout  the  year,  and  ensure   the   sustainability   and   longevity   of   HO.   HELP   remained   a   sponsor   and   coordinator   of   funding   after   organizing  all  the  other  processes  prior  to  the  actual  event.  Having  begun  the  preliminary  processes   almost   a   year   ago,   HO   II   was   one   of   the   most   anticipated   events   for   students,   schools   and   HELP   alike.   Throughout  the  process,  we  worked  in  cooperation  with  the  District  Education  Office,  who  provided   us  with  valuable  feedback  and  direction.     Owing   to   the   success   of   the   first   HO,   we   received   support   and   encouragement   from   both   donors   and   partner   schools   eager   to   take   part.   The   funds   were   generated   through   various   channels,   primarily   through  our  international  partner,  Mondo  Challenge  Foundation  and  Helambu  Project,  co-­‐sponsor  of   both  the  versions  of  HO,  Melamchi  Drinking  Water  Project's  Social  Upliftment  Programme  (SUP),  as   well  as  donations  from  past  volunteers  and  supporters.     The  event  was  also  to  support  the  national  agenda,  "School  to  Olympics",  an  initiative  by  the  National   Sports   Council   (NSC),   to   improve   Nepal's   performance   in   the   international   sports   arena   by   encouraging  school  level  sports  activities  and  introducing  sports  as  part  of  the  curriculum.  Our  vision   of   inspiring   children   to   strive   for   their   hopes   is   similar   to   the   slogan   of   the   latest   London   Olympics   2012-­‐  "Inspire  a  generation".  Our  aim  was  to  make  the  event  relevant  both  at  a  national  and  global   level.    

Aims       1. To   create   a   platform   for   students   from   various   schools   to   showcase   their   talents   in   different   events  and  thereby  help  them  nurture  their  skills  and  abilities  in  sports.     2. To   help   the   students   build   up   their   personal   and   physical   abilities,   confidence,   team   skills   and   create  an  environment  to  bring  out  such  hidden  talents.   3. To  encourage  our  partner  schools  to  organize  intra  school  events  on  a  regular  basis.     4. To   empower   and   encourage   local   schools   to   host   events   of   this   sort   within   their   school   and   between  schools.     5. To   identify   students   with   potential   and   encourage   and   inspire   them   to   pursue   a   career   in   the   field  of  sports,  identifying  what  kind  of  environment  is  necessary  for  them  to  reach  that  goal.    

 

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Results  and  Achievements      

1. Despite   room   for   improvements,   the   event   was   successfully   organized   with   wider   level   engagement  of  participating  schools  from  the  planning  phase  through  to  the  completion  of   the   events.   The   event   was   accomplished   within   the   allocated   budget   and   events   were   organized  within  the  expected  time  frame.     2. The  number  of  participants  was  encouraging  even  though  it  didn't  meet  the  target,  but  this   lack  in  quantity  was  well  compensated  with  the  quality  of  participants.   3. All  the  events,  of  the  17  planned  with  different  categories,  were  organized  within  the  given   time  frame,  except  3  that  were  cancelled  due  to  some  complications.     4. The   games   and   events   were   conducted   in   a   professional   manner.   In   particular,   we   introduced   the   culture   of   warming   up   every   morning   and   before   the   events   and   shaking   hands   with   the   opponents   and   referees   before   and   after   the   event.   This   ethos   of   professionalism  around  sports  was  something  all  participants  and  teachers  could  take  back   to  their  own  schools  and  implement  in  the  organization  of  sporting  events.     5. Tartong,   a   small   primary   school   HELP   has   been   supporting   since   2009,   was   able   to   secure   first   place   in   the   Primary   division,   demonstrating   encouraging   results   of   HELP’s   long-­‐term   involvement   and   efforts   at   the   school.   Similarly,   Nurbuling,   a   lower   secondary   school   HELP   has   been   supporting   since   2009,   was   able   to   secure   first   place   in   the   lower   secondary   division,  despite  fierce  competition.      

Himalayan  Olympics  I    

 

 

 

 

 

18,  19  and  20  February  2012  

The   first   Himalayan   Olympics   was   welcomed   as   a   very   positive   initiative   by   participants,   observers   and   supporters   alike,   and   provided   guidelines   for   organizing   the   second   Himalayan   Olympics.   David   Tashi  Lama,  with  effective  co-­‐ordination  from  Chiring  Lama,  organized  the  event  that  was  hosted  by   Nurbuling   School.   The   event   had   23   events,   of   which   20   were   organized   but   only   had   two   categories,   boys   and   girls.   The   event   was   inaugurated   by   respected   Mr.   Pradeep   Kumar   Rai,   writer   of   the   current   National  Anthem  by  kicking  a  football  into  the  post  and  concluded  in  presence  of  renowned  guests   from  various  walks  of  life.      

Major  changes  from  the  first  Himalayan  Olympics  

From   the   experiences   of   the   first   HO,   we   were   able   to   implement   the   following   major   structural   changes  in  the  Second  HO:   1. Increase   in   the   number   of   partner   schools   involved   from   12   (of   15   invited)   to   20   (of   21   invited),  which  also  increased  the  number  of  participants  from  around  200  to  nearly  400.   2. Categorization   of   schools   into   primary   and   lower   secondary   categories   with   separate   boys   and  girls  categories  within  these.   3. Changes   in   event   list   based   on   their   popularity   last   year   e.g.   removal   of   games   like   Javelin   throw,  sack  race,  etc.  and  addition  of  newer  events  such  as  Bagh  chal,  triple  jump,  relay  race.   4. Handing  over  the  responsibility  for  organization  and  coordination  to  the  host  school   New  initiatives:   1. Allowing  warm  up  time  for  all  the  games  and  activities   2. Introducing   new   rules   such   as   the   shaking   of   hands   with   the   opponents   at   the   end   of   the   game  to  teach  the  value  of  sportsmanship.     3. Engaging  teachers  from  participating  schools  in  organizing/  coordinating  the  event.  

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Participants   Invitations   were   sent   to   all   the   partner   schools   HELP   is   actively   involved   with,   both   at   primary   and   lower   secondary   levels.   Altogether,   20   schools;   10   primary   and   10   others   that   go   up   to   lower   secondary  level  or  higher  participated  in  the  HO.  Despite  also  having  primary  school  children,  Lower   Secondary  schools  were  only  able  to  send  participants  to  compete  in  the  Lower  Secondary  category.   Each  of  the  schools  could  submit  a  maximum  of  20  participants,  which  was  quite  unfair  for  primary   level  students  from  schools  that  go  up  to  lower  secondary  category  schools,  as  the  students  had  to   compete  with  their  seniors  to  get  a  place  in  their  team  to  participate  in  the  Himalayan  Olympics.       200   180   160   140   120   100  

Girls  

80  

Boys  

60   40   20   0   Primary  

LS  

 

Total  

 

Figure  1:  Participants  by  gender  in  Primary  and  Lower  Secondary  categories  

 

In  total,  141  girls  and  175  boys  participated  in  the  HO.  As  seen  in  Figure  1,  there  were  an  encouraging   number   of   female   participants,   especially   in   the   primary   category,   were   there   were   actually   more   female   participants.   In   the   lower   secondary   category,   mainly   because   of   2   team   events,   organized   only  for  boys,  the  number  of  male  participants  was  much  higher.       Though   the   schools   in   both   categories   could   bring   up   to   20   students,   most   primary   schools   brought   a   smaller   number   of   students   as   they   didn't   compete   in   all   the   activities.   In   the   lower   secondary   category,   depending   on   whether   one   single   player   competed   in   the   different   events   or   different   players  competing  in  the  different  activities,  the  total  number  of  participants  ranged  from  14  to  22   (see  figure  2  and  3).    

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

    Some  clauses  for  participation  were:       1. Each  school  must  select  a  maximum  of  20  participants  by  conducting  an  intra  school  competition   to   make   sure   each   student   felt   they   had   been   given   a   fair   chance,   while   ensuring   that   at   least   40%  of  these  participants  were  girls.     2. Each  school  must  provide  five  adults  involved  in  the  school,  including  at  least  one  male  teacher,   one  female  teacher,  an  SMC  member  and  volunteers  to  manage  and  take  care  of  the  students.   Every  team  was  required  to  arrive  at  the  venue  a  day  before  the  start  of  the  event.     3. Each   school   must   deposit   a   non-­‐refundable   participation   fee   of   Rs.   5,   000   per   school   and   a   refundable  security  deposit  of  Rs.  2,  000.     4. All  the  schools  must  submit  relevant  paperwork  for  their  participants  at  least  a  month  in  advance   of  the  event,  and,  in  the  case  of  any  changes,  to  notify  the  organizer  at  least  a  day  before  the   event.   20   18   16   14   12   10   8   6   4  

Girls  No.     Boys  No.     Total    

2   0  

 

Figure  2:  Primary  Level  participants  by  gender  

25   20   15   10  

Girls  No.     Boys  No.    

5  

Total    

0  

Figure  3:  Lower  Secondary  Level  participants  by  gender  

 

 

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Budget     Like   many   of   our   programmes,   HO   II   was   run   on   a   limited   budget,   which   had   to   cover   not   only   the   running   of   the   event   itself,   but   also   providing   equipment   and   training   to   schools   before   the   event.   The  total  budget  for  HO  II  was  Rs.  627500,  (equivalent  to  around  $6570  or  £3920)  and  considering  a   total  of  316  children  participated  in  the  event,  this  amounts  to  around  Rs.  1985,  equivalent  to  £  12  or   $  20  per  child  over  three  days.    

   

Funding  Partners   350000   300000   250000   200000  

316000  

150000  

60000  

75000  

15000   Host  School     Contribulon  

91500  

Melamchi  Drinking   Water  Project  

MondoChallenge    

0  

Individual  HELP   Supporters  via   MondoChallenge  

70000  

Schools'  Entry  Fee  

50000  

Helambu  Project    

100000  

Figure  4:  Funding  partners  and  their  financial  contribution  

                                               

  As   seen   in   Figure   4,   the   primary   source   of   funding   for   HO   II   came   from   past   HELP   supporters   and   volunteers   via   MondoChallenge   Foundation.   This   included   £700   donated   by   Osamu   Yamagati,   £800   raised   by   Jimmy   Lama   through   former   HELP   volunteers   and   supporters,   and   £500   donated   by   the   Loughbourough   University   Action   Project   Volunteers.   MondoChallenge   Foundation   also   provided   significant  funding  for  sports  equipment  prior  to  the  event.  The  Helambu  Project,  a  main  sponsor  of   the   first   HO,   contributed   a   significant   amount   of   funding   for   HO   II,   specifically   to   support   girls’   participation.  The  Social  Upliftment  Programme  (SUP),  the  local  body  of  the  Melamchi  Drinking  Water   Project,  a  government-­‐run   project,   joined   as   a   local   finance   partner   of   HO   II.  The  remaining  budget   was  raised  through  charging  participant  schools  an  entry  fee  and  a  contribution  from  the  host  school.      

AllocaWon  of  Funds   250000  

 

200000  

 

150000  

Figure  5:   Allocation  of   funds  

100000   50000   0  

 

 

196625   62500  

104705  

98900   37500  

44700  

70298   12300  

       

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

  As  seen  in  Figure  5,  the  majority  of  the  budget  was  spent  on  food  for  the  participants,  followed  by   expenditure  on  sports  equipment  (both  in  preparation  for  the  event  and  during  the  event)  and   expenditure  on  trophies  and  cash  prizes  for  the  winners.    

Management      

 Initially,   HELP   planned   to   be   the   main   organiser   of   the   event,   as   it   had   been   for   HO   I,   but   later   decided   to   hand   over   responsibility   for   organisation   and   management   of   the   event   primarily   to   the   host  school,  acting  as  a  sponsor  and  key  partner  instead.  Giving  the  host  school  more  responsibility   was  empowering  and  gave  them  real  experience  in  organizing  and  managing  an  event  of  this  scale,   which  was  one  of  the  core  aims  of  the  event.  The  organising  committee  was  led  by  Nurbuling’s  SMC   Chairman,  Mr.  Chiring  Lama,  and  included  HELP  members,  selected  teachers  and  headmasters  from   many   participating   schools   as   well   as   members   of   the   District   Education   Office.   The   Sindhupalchok   District   Education   Office   acted   as   a   strategic   partner,   while   HELP   acted   primarily   as   the   funding   co-­‐ ordinator  for  the  event.        

Himalayan  Olympics  II  Calendar  of  major  activities     S.  No.     Date  and  Venue   1.   17  August  2013,   Bhumeshwori   Resource  Centre,   Kiul   2.    19  and  20   December  2013,   Bhumeshwori   Resource  Centre,   Kiul   3.   13  March  2014,  Kiul   Resource  Centre   and     4.   12  March  2013,   Shree  Satkanyamati   LSS,  Gunsa   5.   24  March,  Shree   Satkanya  LSS,  Gunsa     6.   25  March,  Kiul   Resource  Centre   7.   11,  12  and  13  April   2014,  Nurbuling   School   8.   21  April  2014,  Kiul   Resource  Centre    

Programme   Himalayan  Olympics  II  Feasibility   Study  Meeting  

What  happened   Preliminary  discussion  and   identifying  list  of  activities   to  be  conducted  

Annual  Interaction  Programme  of   Deciding  on  date  and  venue   the  partner  schools   for  the  event  further   discussion  

Materials  distribution  for  practice   sessions     Materials  distribution  for  practice   sessions  

Himalayan  Olympics  II  

Briefing  on  HO  procedures,   distribution  of  forms  and   equipment  handover  for   schools  in  Helambu  valley   and  upper  Indrawati  valley   respectively   Detailed  training  for  a  male   and  a  female  teacher  each   from  participating  schools;   separately  in  the  two  valleys   The  actual  3  days  event  

Reflection  on  the  Himalayan   Olympics  II    

Post  Event  Briefing  with   participating  schools  

Sports  Teachers  Training   Sports  Teachers  Training  

 

     

 

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Planning/  Preparation       We  distributed  sports  materials  to  all  the  participating  schools,  and  briefed  sports  teachers  about  the   rules  of  the  various  games  and  how  they  could  best  train  their  students.     After   the   schools   selected   their   participants   through   an   internal   sports   day,   we   organized   more   in-­‐ depth  sports  training  for  sports  teachers  to  help  them  prepare  their  students.  For  the  training  on  24th   and   25th   March   (10   and   11   Chaitra),   we   hired   two  professional   sports   trainers   to   organize   trainings   in   two   hub   schools   in   the   two   valleys-­‐   Helambu   (Bhumeshwori   School)   and   upper   Indrawati   valley   (Gunsa  A).       The   host   school   had   expanded   their   playground   and   fenced   it   with   8'   wire   nets   in   preparation   for   HO   II,   which   made   it   much   easier   and   safer   to   conduct   games.   We   later   learned   that   students   from   the   host   school   engaged   themselves   during   their   holidays   to   fence   the   playground   and   to   make   other   arrangements   in   preparation   for   the   event,   which   demonstrates   the   high   level   of   pride   and   excitement   they   felt   about   their   school   and  the  event.       Throughout   the   process   of   planning,   all   participating  schools  were  told  they  would  be   expected   to   arrange   some   logistics   such   as   blankets,  plates  and  spoons,  torch  lights,  etc.  themselves.      

Logistics   Food    

Food   presented   the   highest   cost   during   the   HO   II.   Members   of   Nurbuling’s   School   Management   Committee  were  allocated  to  work  as  full  time   staff   for   the   three   days.   Nurbuling   school’s   kitchen  staff,  three  local  community  members   and  three  other  volunteers  prepared  food  for   the   crowd   of   around   400   people   including   students,   teachers   and   guests.   It   was   difficult   to   maintain   a   balanced   diet   that   was   appropriate   for   the   activities   the   children   were   participating   in.   Food   was   very   important  to  the  children,  and  was  one  of  the   first  things  they  all  mentioned  when  asked  to   evaluate   the   event   overall.   Ideally,   the   food   routine   should   be   synchronised   with   the   schedule   of   events,   in   order   to   ensure   that   children   participating   in   strenuous   events   have   enough   food   at   the   right  time  and  don’t  suffer  from  fatigue.    

  Toilet  Facilities     Despite  the  school  having  a  10,000L  water  tank,  there  were  some  difficulties  in  managing  the  water   supply.   On   the   first   night   we   ran   out   of   water,   which   was   mainly   because   the   children   were   doing   their   own   dishes   and   using   too   much   water.   One   of   the   major   improvements   over   the   1st   HO   was   the  

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

  new  toilet  building  at  Nurbuling.  With  4  Boys  toilets,  5  girls'  toilets,  1  each  for  male  and  female  staff,   all  fed  by  water  from  a  10,000L  tank,  it  made  the  whole  event  much  more  manageable.        

Accomodation     The   host   school   had   not   made   any   major   changes   in   facilities   for   accomodation   since   the   first   HO,   however,  twice  as  many  participants  had  to  be  accommodated  in  the  same  limited  space.  Girls  from   several   schools   slept   together   in   classrooms   and   most   of   the   boys   slept   in   the   newly   completed   greenhouse  structure.  For  the  future,  rooms  should  be  managed  so  that  participants  from  the  same   schools  or  from  nearby  schools  can  be  together,  and  more  attention  should  be  paid  to  details  such  as   ensuring  light,  ventilation  and  a  comfortable  temperature  allow  participants  to  get  enough  sleep.    

First  Aid     Purna  Magar,  one  of  the  teachers  at  the  school,  previously  a  student  of  pharmacy,  handled  of  first  aid   services  throughout  the  programme.  The  event  only  had  one  trained  medical  staff,  while  a  number  of   sport   activities   were   being   organized   simultaneously-­‐   most   of   the   time.   Thankfully,   nothing   happened,   but   it   would   have   been   much   better   to   be   prepared   at   least   in   this   issue.   In   the   future,   there   should   be   at   least   one   female   medical   staff   present   to   handle   female   students’   problems.   Participants  should  be  told  about  the  hazards  of  their  new  environment,  and  trained  on  how  to  make   sure  they  don’t  get  ill  (i.e.  drinking  enough,  staying  warm  at  night  etc).    

Volunteers  

Smooth  running  of  the  event  relied  primarily  on  teachers  and  volunteers  from  participating  schools.   As  well  as  this,  HELP  staff,  10  local  volunteers  and  5  foreign  volunteers,  four  from  the  Loughborough   University   Action   Project   and   one   who   had   just   completed   their   teaching   placement,   aided   in   the   coordination   of   events.     Mr.   Tshering   Lama,   a   former   national   marathon   runner,   helped   to   make   many  of  the  athletic  events  more  professional  and  systematic.    

 

Guests     The  District  Education  Officer,  Mr.  Gehenath  Gautam,  was  the  Chief  Guest,  along  with  Mr.  Ang  Babu   Lama,   SAARC   gold   medalist   in   Karate,   originally   from   Helambu   and   Mr.   Gopal   Lama,   Founder   of   Yangrima   Boarding   School.   Mr.   Gehanath   Gautam   and   Ang   Babu   Lama   lit   the   Olympic   torch   to   inaugurate  the  event.  During  the  closing  ceremony,  Mr.  Ramhari  Lamichhane  ,  Director  of  CTEVT,  was   present  as  the  chief  guest,  along  with  Mr.  Upendra  Tamang,  Chairman  of  SUP.  The  two  guests  along   with  Jimmy  Lama,  Director  of  HELP,  presented  the  medals  and  certificates  to  the  winners.    

 

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Events     In  the  Primary  category  around  130  children  from  10  schools   competed   against   each   other   in   badminton,   table   tennis,   long  jump,  high  jump,  skipping  (only  for  primary  level  girls),   long-­‐distance  running,  short  distance  running,  4x  relay  race   and   shot   put,   as   well   as   less   directly   sport   oriented   events   such  as  bagh  chaal  and  chess.         In  the  Lower  Secondary  category,  around  190  children  from   10  schools  competed  against  each  other  in  all  the  activities   listed  above,  as  well  as  triple  jump  (a  new  addition  to  HO),   football,   volleyball,   which   were   only   organised   for   the   lower   secondary   category.   Alongside   sports   events,   competitions   in  co-­‐curricular  activities  such  as  quiz,  drawing,  essay  writing   (only  lower  secondary  level)  and  dictation  (only  for  primary   level).  These  co-­‐curricular  activities,  as  well  as  chess  and  bag   chaal   were   part   of   an   ‘open   category’,   meaning   that   boys   and   girls   competed   against   each   other,   rather   than   in   separate  categories  as  for  the  sports  events.     Other   planned   events,   namely   the   dance   competition,   the   singing   competition   and   the   elocution   contest   had   to   be   cancelled   owing   to   lack   of   suitable   judges   and  musicians.       For   many   of   the   events,   conditions   were   less   than   ideal,   and   therefore   ways   of   getting   around   the   limited   space   and   resources   had   to   be   inventive.   For   instance,   as   the   length   of   the   playground   was   only   48   meters,   participants   in   the   short   distance   running   ran   to   the   other   end   of   the   playground,   touched   a   line   marked   at   that   end   and   finished   at   their   original   position   returning   on   the   same   track.   Many  of  the  participants,  especially  from  smaller,  less  developed  school,  lacked  basic  sports  clothing   and  shoes,  giving  participants  from  more  developed  school  a  sometimes  unfair  advantage.    

  All  running  events  were  held  on  the  third  day,  and  thorough   warm-­‐ups  were  organised  for  the  participants  beforehand  to   reduce  the  risk  of  injury.  Volunteers  woke  up  at  5AM  to  make   tracks   and   prepare   the   ground   for   the   days   activities   and   also   invigilated  events  to  ensure  all  participants  were  convinced  of   the  fairness  of  the  results.        

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Results   Based   on   the   overall   medal   counts,   Nurbuling   secured   the   first   position   in   the   lower   secondary   category  followed  by  Yangrima  and  Bhumeshwori  in  second  and  third  position  respectively.     In  the  primary  category,  Tartong  secured  first  position  followed  by  Churetar  and  Thangpalkot.     For  a  more  detailed  explanation  of  medallists  in  all  events,  please  see  Appendix  1.       6  

 

5  

 

4  

 

3   2  

  Gold   Silver   Bronze  

1  

     

0  

     

Figure  6:  Primary  Schools'  Medals  Tally  

 

9  

 

8   7  

 

6  

 

5  

 

4  

Gold  

3  

Silver  

 

2  

Bronze  

 

1   0  

Figure  7:  Lower  Secondary  Schools'  Medals  Tally  

               

   

   

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

    7  

25  

6  

20  

5   15  

4   3  

Total  Girls   Medalists  

10  

Total  Girls   participants  

2  

Total  Boys   Medalists  

5  

Total  Boys   participants  

1   0  

0  

  Figure  8:  Open  categories  participants  by  gender   gender  

 

Figure  9:  Open  category  medalists  by  

 

In  the  open  categories,  besides  encouraging  participation,  girls  made  observable  presence  in  the   medals  tally  as  shown  in  figure  7.  Interestingly,  girls  won  60%  of  the  gold  medals,  and  30%  each  of   silver  and  bronze  medals.      

                   

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Key  Recommendations      

Planning/  Preparation     • • • • • •

Allow  longer  for  the  internal  school  selection  of  participants  to  ensure  enough  time  for   practice  and  preparation  before  the  event.   Adjust  the  current  categorisation  to  ensure  that  primary  level  students  at  lower  secondary   schools  also  have  a  chance  at  participating  in  the  primary  category.     Provide  funds  to  poorer  schools  to  cover  basic  equipment  (such  as  appropriate  clothing  and   footwear)  before  the  event.   Ensure  that  participating  schools  have  enough  sports  equipment  and  encourage  sports  on  a   regular  basis  throughout  the  school  year.     Increase  the  participation  of  local  volunteers  and  community  members  to  create  a  greater   sense  of  ownership  of  the  event  (for  instance  in  activities  such  as  stage  decoration)   Increase  the  participation  and  sense  of  ownership  of  participating  schools,  especially  in  the   planning  process,  potentially  by  including  at  least  one  member  from  each  school  in  the   planning  committee.     Encourage  schools  and  teachers  to  organise  smaller  scale  inter  and  intra-­‐school  sports   competitions  on  a  more  regular  basis,  to  build  up  an  understanding  and  appreciation  for  the   importance  of  such  events  amongst  students,  teachers  and  parents.    

Management      

• • • • •

     

Create  a  detailed  plan  for  each  event,  including  materials  and  manpower  required,  and   assigning  volunteers  beforehand.   Prepare  a  more  detailed  games  schedule  to  ensure  there  is  enough  time  for  everything,  and   timings  are  followed  more  closely.     Ensure  pitches  and  grounds  are  ready  before  the  events  begin,  so  that  students  can  practice   and  familiarise  themselves  with  the  new  environment.   Organise  fun  events  for  participants  during  the  evenings  to  allow  them  to  relax,  bond  and  get   to  know  each  other.     Award  medals  to  winners  immediately  after  the  completion  of  individual  events,  when  the   excitement  amongst  the  winners  and  the  spectators  is  at  the  peak.  For  this,  management  of  a   simple  winners'  podium  can  add  to  the  excitement  level.     Greater  attention  to  detail  in  all  aspects  of  the  event.    

         

 

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

Appendix  I-­‐  Medalists  by  events  and  categories       Event  

Category  

Badminton  

Primary  Girls     Primary  Boys     LS  Girls     LS  Boys    

Table  Tennis  

Referee/s:   Primary  Girls     Primary  Boys     LS  Girls     LS  Boys    

Long  Jump  

Referee/s:   Primary  Girls     Primary  Boys     LS  Girls     LS  Boys    

Triple  Jump  

High  Jump  

Referee/s:   Primary  Girls     Primary  Boys     LS  Girls   LS  Boys   Referee/s:   LS  Girls     LS  Boys     Match   Referee/s:  

 

Medals   Gold   Silver   Bronze   Kanchhimaya   Sherpa   (194),   Bipina   Shyangbo   (074),   Dolma   Tamang   (063),   Tartong   Kumbheshwori   Bhirkharka   Pode   Tamang   (069),   Gunsa   Bijaya   Basnet   (105),   Karsang   Tamang   (041),   B   Thangpalkot   Dhundeni     Pema   Omu   Hyolmo   (95),   Kopila  Lama  (224),  Gunsa  A   Karmu   Tamang   (180),   Yangrima   Pating   Pema   Tashi   Hyolmo   (080),   Dipak   Shrestha   (144),   Ram   Poudel   (276),   Yangrima   Bhotenamlang   Nurbuling   Tshering  Lama  (A)  and  Narayan  Bhandari   Yangzen   Lama   (189),   Susma  Lama  (073),  Gunsa  B   None   (the   event   only   Tartong   had  2  participants)   Bishal   Pandit   (111),   Sanu  Sherpa  (188),  Tartong   Sanjaya   Gole   (068),   Thangpalkot   Gunsa  B   Dawa   Hyolmo   (277),   Binda  Tamang  (91),  Yangrima   Junmaya   Tamang   (226),   Nurbuling   Gunsa  A   Ram   Poudel   (276),   Dawa  Hyolmo  (084),  Yangrima   Sonam   Tamang   (014),   Nurbuling   Bhumeshwori   Tshering  Lama  (A),  Chiring  Lama   Lhajen   Sherpa   (193),   Sita   Jyoti   (008),   Churetar,   Susma  Lama  (73),  Gunsa   Tartong-­‐  10'4"   9'11"   (B),  9'10"   Saurav   Jyoti   (001),   Lale   Tamang   (237),   Gufa-­‐   Sanjaya   Gole   (068),   Churetar-­‐  13'2"   11'8"   Gunsa  (B)-­‐  11'7"     Dawa   Hyolmo   (277),   Dolma   Lama   (123)   Timbu-­‐   11'   Kopila   Lama   (224),   Nurbuling-­‐  11'  4"   2"   Gunsa  (A)-­‐  10'8"     Bishal   Sunar   (284),   Pema   Dorje   Lama   (081),   Sonam   Lama   (014),   Nurbuling-­‐  15'  8"   Yangrima-­‐  15'  2"   Bhumeshwori-­‐  14'  8"   Chiring  Lama,  Narayan  Bhandari,  Manjit  Tamang     Pasang   Dolma   Tamang   Pasang   Gyalmu   Sherpa   (191),   Sunmaya   Gole   (077),   (064),  Bhirkharka-­‐  3'   Tartong-­‐  2'  11''   Gunsa  (B),  2'  9"   Saurav   Jyoti   (001),   Bishal   Tamang   (241),   Gufa-­‐   3'   Nawang   Tsering   Lama   Churetar-­‐  3'  6''   5''   (157),  Serkathali-­‐  3'  3''   Samjhana   Guragain   (031),   Sirimaya   Tamang   (253),   Phurdiki   Tamang   (210),   Bhumeshwori-­‐  3'  4.5"   Solsing-­‐    3'  4''   Ichowk-­‐  3'  4''   Tsering   Hyolmo   (082),   Marpen  Tamang  (170),  Pating   Sonam   Tamang   (014),   Yangrima-­‐   Bhumeshwori     Chiring  Lama,  David  Tashi  Lama,  Narayan  Bhandari,  Manjit  Tamang     Sirimaya   Tamang   (253),   Dawa   Hyolmo   (277),   Phurdiki   Lama   (210),   Solsing-­‐  26'  7"   Nurbuling-­‐  25'  3"   Ichowk-­‐  23'  9"   Bishal   Sunar   (284),   Marpen   Tamang   (170),   Pating-­‐   Ramesh   Tamang   (248),   Nurbuling-­‐  31'  5"   31'  3"   Solsing-­‐  29'  11"   Chiring  Lama,  Narayan  Bhandari,  David  Tashi  Lama,  Manjit  Tamang    

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Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

    Category  

Medals   Silver   Bronze   LS  Boys   Pema   Dorje   Hyolmo(081),   Sonam   Tamang   (014),   Pema   Tashi   Hyolmo(080),   Ramlal   Tamang   (016),   Tshering   Hyolmo   (082),   Bijay   Sagar   Tamang   (018),   Tamang   (088),   Resham   Bishal   Tamang   (023),   Tamang   (089),   Ngetup   Hyolmo   Ramhari   Baruwal   (024),   (083),   Nima   Dhindu   Hyolmo   Saroj  Lamichhane   (019),   (085),   Nurbu   Hyolmo   (087),   Renjen   Tamang   (017),   Chhewang   Hyolmo   (086),   Anil   Bhandari   (025),   Yangrima   Bhumeshwori   Match   David   Tashi   Lama,   Narayan   Bhandari,   Tshering   Lama   (B)   ,   Jacob   Hartley,   Nabin   Gole,   Referee/s:   Rabindra  G.C.,  Ramesh  Shrestha     LS  Boys     Bishal  Tamang  (023),  Renjen   Madhu   Nepali   (),   Aishing   Gyamjo   Tamang   (),   Tamang   (017),   Ramlal   Tamang(),   Ram   Poudel   (),   Marpen   Tamang   (),   Tamang   (016),   Ramhari   Tashi   Tamang   (),   Sher   Bd.   Dawa   Tamang   (),   Baruwal   (024),   Sonam   Darnal   (),   Nobabu   Tamang   (),   Buddhiman   Tamang   (),   Tamang  (015),  Anil  Bhandari   Bishal  Sunar  (),  Nurbuling   Raju  Tamang  (),  Sun  Bd.   (025),  Bhumeshwori   Tamang   (),   Rajkumar   Tamang   (),   Sanchaman   Tamang  (),  Pating   Referee/s:   Binod  Bhandari,  David  Tashi  Lama     Primary   Pode   Tamang   (069),   Gunsa   Sun   Bd.   Tamang   (060),   Sonam   Dorjee   Lama   Level   B   Bhirkharka   (156),  Serkathali   LS  Level     Sujan   Bhandari   (021),   Maya  Tamang  (176),  Pating   Ramesh   Tamang   (248),   Bhumeshwori   Solsing   Referee/s:   Sanu  Babu  Khadka,  Ishwor  Dahal,  Pushpa  Pokhrel  and  Tejnath  Bhandari     Primary   Dawa   Tamang   (058),   Pemba   Gyalbu   Sherpa   (187),   Ramesh   Nagarkoti   Level   Bhirkharka   Tartong   (113),  Thangpalkot   LS  Level   Deepak  Gole  (215),  Gunsa  A   Chhiring   Lama   (082),   Jaya   Tamang   (281),   Yangrima   Nurbuling   Referee/s:   Chiring  Lama,  Ishwor  Dahal,  Sanu  Babu  Khadka  and  Tejnath  Bhandari     Primary  Girls   Renuka   Tamang   (039),   Mithila   Dong   (109),   Ranju   Tamang   (232),   Lekharka-­‐  3002   Thangpalkot-­‐  2375   Gufa-­‐  1525   Referee/s:   Anita  Pandey,  Pushpa  Pokhrel,  Sanu  Babu  Khadka     Primary  Girls     Sita  Joti  (008),  Churetar   Fulmaya  Tamang  (231),  Gufa   Dawa   Dolma   Tamang   (062),  Bhirkharka   Primary  Boys     Lale  Tamang  (237),  Gufa   Saurav  Joti  (001),  Churetar   Dawa   Jangbu   Lama   (157),  Serkathali   Gold   Ram   Poudel     (276),   Jay   Tamang   (281),   Madhu   Nepali  (280),  Aising  Tamang   (278),   Bijay   Sunar   (275),   Tashi   Tamang   (279),   Sher   Bd.   Darnal   (273),   Nobabu   Tamang   (286),   Bishal   Sunar   (284),  Nurbuling  

LS  Girls    

Padma   Tamang   (254),   Sunita  Tamang  A  (173),  Pating   Mangali   Tamang   Solsing   Ichowk   LS  Boys   Pema   Tashi   Lama   (080),   Nire   Tamang   (138),   Sonam   Tamang   Yangrima   Bhotenamlang   Bhumeshwori   Referee/s:   Chiring  Lama,  Pushpa  Pokhrel,  Sanu  Babu  Khadka,  Narayan  Bhandari     Primary  Girls     Pasang   Dolma   Tamang   Sita  Joti  (008),  Churetar   Sangay   Tamang   (158),  Bhirkharka   Dhudeni   Primary  Boys     Saurav  Joti  (001),  Churetar   Lale  Tamang  (237),  Gufa   Namgel   Tamang   Dhundeni   LS  Girls     Sangay   Hyolmo   (93),   Sangita   Tamang   (152),   Nima   Tamang  

Short   Distance   Running  

Long  Distance   Running  

Skip ping  

Chess  

Bagh   Chaal  

Volleyball  

Football  

Event  

 

16  

(211),   (014),  

(054),   (040),   (255),  


Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

 

 

LS  Boys    

4  X  Relay  

Event  

Referee/s:  

  Category   Gold   Primary  Girls     Yangzen   Sherpa   (189),   Pasang   Gyalmu   Sherpa   (191),   Pemba   Lhamu   Sherpa   (192),   Lhajen   Sherpa   (193)-­‐   Tartong   Primary  Boys     Birkha   Bd.   Tamang   (238),   Bishal  Tamang  (241),  Nirmal   Magar   (240),   Lale   Tamang   (237)-­‐  Gufa  

LS  Girls    

LS  Boys  

Referee/s:  

Dicta tion  

Art  

Quiz  

Shot  Put  

LS  Girls    

Essay  

Yangrima   Bhotenamlang   Solsing   Pema   Tashi   Lama   (),   Sher   Bd.   Sunar   (273),   Lakpa  Dorje  Lama  (118),   Yangrima   Nurbuling   Timbu   Tshering  Lama  (A),  Tshering  Lama  (B),  Rabindra  G.C.,  Narayan  Bhandari    

LS  Boys   Match   Referee/s:   Primary   Level   Lower   Secondary   Referees:   Primary   Level   Judge/s:   Primary   Level   Judge/s:   LS  Level   Judge/s:  

 

Medals   Silver   Susma   Lama   (073),   Muna   Shyangbo   (071),   Sunmaya   Gole   (077),   Pramila   Lama   (072)-­‐  Gunsa  B  

Bronze   Devaki   Joti   (009),   Samjhana   Joti   (007),   Rita   Joti   (013),   Sita   Joti   (008)-­‐  Churetar  

Sanu   Sherpa   (188),   Pemba   Gyalbu   Sherpa   (187),   Dawa   Pema   Sherpa   (196),   Lhakpa   Shingi  Sherpa  (190)-­‐  Tartong  

Nawang   Tsering   Lama   (157),   Dawa   Renjen   Lama   (162),   Dawa   Jangbu   Lama   (160),   Lakpa   Tshering   Lama   (169)-­‐  Serkathali   Lakpa   Lama   (097),   Sangay   Renuka   Guragain   (026),   Rita   Pasang   Lhamu   Lama   Lama   (093),   Dolma   Lama   Joti   (029),   Dolma   Tamang   (119),   Nima   Dolma   (094),  Binda  Tamanag  (099)-­‐   (028),   Indu   Joti   (030)-­‐ (120),   Karmu   Lama   Yangrima   Bhumeshwori   (136),   Dolma   Lama   (094)-­‐  Timbu   Pema   Dorje   Lama   (081),   Sher   Bd.   Darnal   (273),   Bishal   Saurav   Tamang   (140),   Pema   Tashi   Lama   (080),   Sunar  (284),  Bijay  Sunar  (275),   Maila   Tamang   (142),   Chhiring   Lama   (082),   Netup   Madhu   Nepali   (280)-­‐   Bishal   Tamang   (137),   Lama  (083)-­‐  Yangrima   Nurbuling     Ambar   Tamang   (147)-­‐   Bhotenamlang   Tshering   Lama   (A),   Tshering   Lama   (B),   Rabindra   G.C.,   Narayan   Bhandari,   David   Tashi   Lama     Dawa   Hyolmo   (277),   Lhamu   Hyolmo   (259),   Nakote-­‐ Mangali   Tamang   (211),   Nurbuling-­‐  5.90m   5.84m   Ichowk-­‐  5.45m   Madhu   Nepali   (280),   Pema   Dorje   Lama   (081),   Gyalbu   Lama   (132),   Nurbuling-­‐  9.50m   Yangrima-­‐  9.28m   Timbu-­‐  9.10m   Chiring  Lama,  Manjit  Tamang,  Dilip  Gole     Sanjila   Waiba   (101),   Ngima   Dolma   Lama   (158),   Buddhi   Tamang   (044),   Thangpalkot   Serkathali   Dhundeni   Junmaya   Tamang   and   Gaurab   Tamang   and   Bishal   Ram  Poudel  and  Pasang   Srijana  Tamang,  Gunsa  (A)   Tamang,  Bhotenamlang   Hyolmo  (),  Nurbuling   Narayan   Bhandari,   Nima   Tshering   Lama,   Pushpa   Pokhrel   (scorer),   Som   Bd.   Joti   (time   keeper)  (Quiz)   Yangzen   Lama   (189),   Sonam   Waiba   (102),   Maya   Tamang   (065),   Tartong   Thangpalkot   Bhirkharka   Nima  Tshering  Lama     Sanjila   Waiba   (101),   Saurav  Joti  (001),  Churetar   Ngima   Dolma   Lama   Thangpalkot   (158),  Serkathali   Narayan  Bhandari,  Pushpa  Pokhrel,  Sanu  Babu  Khadka   Dorje   Dolma   Lama   (268),     Ram  Poudel  (276),  Nurbuling   Tshering   Tamang   (173),   Nakote   Pating   Co-­‐ordinator-­‐  Nima  Tshering  Lama,  Judges:  Jimmy  Lama,  Hari  Kumar  Sharma  and  Purna    

17  


Second  Himalayan  Olympics  Report,  2014  

 

   

    Many  thanks  to  all  our  participants,  partner  schools,  supporters,  guests  and  volunteers  for   making  the  Second  Himalayan  Olympics  such  a  memorable  event!  We  look  forward  the   next  Himalayan  Olympics  in  the  near  future!      

 

   

 

               

18  


Second Himalayan Olympics Report  
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