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Contributed by Anitra Green

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Salzburg: More than Mozart Mountains, markets, museums, magnificent beer, marvellous shopping, and music, music, music – it’s no wonder Salzburg is such a popular tourist destination.

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or a small city, Salzburg is remarkably busy. With a resident population of only 150,000 or so, it attracts up to 8 million visitors a year, even in winter, for the ski slopes are not far away. Most people make a beeline for the old city centre; the old houses and streets have great charm, and it comes as no surprise to know this part of the city is on UNESCO’s world heritage list as particularly worthy of protection. The old city is tucked into a small area between a cliff – the Mönchsberg – and the River Salzach. To get a view over the entire area, you don’t even have to walk up the cliff, as there’s a set of lifts built inside the rock that whisk you to the museum and restaurant at the top in a matter of seconds. From here you can get an excellent idea of the shape of the city, with the Kapuzinerberg and its monastery on the other side of the river, the profusion of church spires, steeples and domes, the modern city spreading out to the left, and the Hohensalzburg

Hohensalzburg

fortress that dominates scene, with snow-covered mountain peaks in the background. It’s said that this huge 900-year old fortress has never fallen, and looking at its situation and the way it’s built you can easily believe it. But it did surrender a couple of times, once to Napoleon.

EUROPE

Down in the city again, we took a walk down Getreidegasse, like everyone else. I could easily have spent half the day there looking at all its lovely little shops and taking photos of the gorgeous signs over the street, and maybe even investing in another dirndl. There plenty of enticing little alleyways leading to little squares with yet more shops, or perhaps providing a short cut to the market square.

Getreidegasse

Mozart and music The house where Mozart was born, now a museum with four new permanent exhibitions, is said to be the most photographed building in the place. In his short life, he composed 350 of his best-loved works in this city, and his name can be seen literally everywhere. There’s plenty of opportunity to hear his music: the world famous “Salzburger Festspiele” held in July and August

every year lasts six weeks, there are the Mozart weeks in January, an Easter music festival at Easter and another at Whitsun (artistic director this year is none other than Cecilia Bartoli) – and any number of special events like promenade concerts, open-air events, a Mozart dinner with concert, and much more. MozartKugeln, the chocolate balls with marzipan that have become so popular, are on sale everywhere. They’re nothing to do with Mozart: they were first made by one Paul Fürst in 1890 and are still produced in the same way to the original recipe – and in a blue and silver wrapper, rather than the gold and red one you usually see. There have been all kinds of imitations and lawsuits over what may be called a Mozartkugel and what not over the years; as far as I’m concerned they’re all delicious. But back to music: it doesn’t always have to be Mozart. Most English-speakers immediately recognise Salzburg as the place where The Sound of Music was filmed; curiously, this film is virtually unknown in the German-speaking world. There’s a healthy jazz culture in the city as well, culminating in a

Hello Switzerland for Expatriates, Summer Edition 2012  

Hello Switzerland is written by expats for expats living in Switzerland. Designed mainly for English speakers, the magazine contains feature...

Hello Switzerland for Expatriates, Summer Edition 2012  

Hello Switzerland is written by expats for expats living in Switzerland. Designed mainly for English speakers, the magazine contains feature...

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