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TABLE of  CONTENT the  LEARNING  FRAMEWORK   the  hellosmile  CURRICULUM   the  CLINICAL  LEARNING  MAP the  PAYER  LANDSCAPE the  CLINICAL  MODULES the  PATIENT  AUDIT  CHECKLIST the  RESOURCE  PLANNING  GUIDE PPO  IINSURANCE   MEDICAID  INSURANCE   HEALTHPLEX/DORAL  INSURANCE   Guide  0-­‐3  years  Old Guide  3-­‐6  years  Old Guide  6-­‐12  years  Old TOOTH  ANATOMY   NEW  PATIENT  PROCESS CLAIM  AUDIT

Tuesday, February 22, 2011


the Learning Framework

TRANSFORMATION SPIRITUAL MEDICAL HX

SOCIAL CLINICAL BASICS

IMPRESSIONS EMOTIONAL

INVENTORY

KNOWLEDGE VALUES

JUDGEMENTS

HUMAN

DISTINCTIONS

INSURANCE

communicaQon conversaQon language

FINANCIAL

TECHNOLOGY OPENDENTAL BLOG PHONE SYSTEM

GOOGLE MOODLE

LAB CASE  ADMIN TREATMENT  BASICS

COMMUNITY

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

PROTOCOLS

DENTAL HX


the hellosmile curriculum

We are  commiCed  to  crea+ng  a  company  culture  that  establishes   las+ng  rela+onships  with  our  employees,  our  partners,  and  the   families  in  our  community.  We  ac+vely  seek  individuals  that     believe  in  making  our  world  a  beCer  place  and  are  eager  to   become  changemakers  in  their  communi+es.  We  look  to  hire   entree  level  employees  who  are  part  of  the  neighborhoods  we   serve.  These  individuals  understand  the  history  and  context  of  the   communi+es  and  are  therefor  best  suited  to  empathize  with  the   families,  mothers,  fathers  and  children  in  these  neighborhoods.   Trainees  that  join  our  team  are  advantageously  posi+oned  to   grow  to  be  company  and  community  leaders  within  3-­‐5  years.   We  enable  this  transforma+on  by  providing  the  necessary   training,  mentorship,  and  coaching  through  an  in-­‐house  blended   learning  program,  that  combines  online,  one  on  one,  and  group   sessions.  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Our educa+onal  programs  are  grounded  in  a  model  of   transforma+ve  learning  rather  than  just  informa+ve  learning.     Informa+ve  or  addi+ve  learning  increases  what  people  know,  adds   to  their  skills,  and  brings  new  knowledge  to  an  exis+ng  worldview,   paradigm  or  frames  of  reference.   By  comparison,  transforma+onal  learning  gives  people  an   awareness  of  the  basic  structures  in  which  they  know,  think,  and   act  in  the  world.  From  that  awareness  comes  a  fundamental  shiA   that  leaves  people  more  fully  in  accord  with  their  own  possibili+es   and  those  of  others.  This  shiA  in  paradigm  is  the  single  most   powerful  aCribute  of  hellosmile  programs.  Trainees  find   themselves  able  to  think  and  act  beyond  exis+ng  views  and  limits   in  their  personal  and  professional  lives,  rela+onships,  and  their   communi+es.   Standard  educa+onal  methods  oAen  leave  you  having  to   remember  the  concepts  you  were  taught  or  trying  to  figure  out   how  to  apply  them.  hellosmile's  method  leaves  you  applying  what   you  learned  naturally.  Similar  to  what  happens  when  you  first  ride   a  bicycle,  in  our  programs  you  learn  by  direct  personal  discovery:a   moment  occurs  when  a  new  ability  is  yours.  


the CLINICAL LEARNING MAP

TOUCH POINTS   what  conversa/ons  are  taking  place?   what  occurs  during  this   ac/vity   ? where  does  the  ac/vity   take   place? who   performs  the  ac/vity  (staff   role)?during  this   what  should  be  an/cipated  

Member Coordination Map member journey

Kids Health Center clinical flow

interaction categories

ac/vity? clinical instruments  ? computer   interac/on  ?

member (patient) inventory use scenarios

situation orientation new member

check-up computer input treatment

interactions overview =#/%4!#,$-&#+-),$%

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DENTAL HISTORY FOODS & DRINKS member interaction docs

MEDICAL

WELCOME

How often does your child have these foods, snacks drinks? 1. Almost everyday 2. A few times a week 3. A few times a month

A

Tiene alguna preocupación acerca de los dientes de su hijo hoy?

Siente su hijo algún dolor en sus dientes hoy?

YES

NO

?

YES

NO

?

V/

th

St.

R TR

AIN

S

Sta tio

n

SI

B

C

NO

Ave. 38th

Ave. 38th

37th Ave.

TYPE OF VISIT DATE

DOCTOR

Ave.

l use 718-838-9823 cal anytim

TYPE OF VISIT

7 TRAIN

SI

NO

Using the right amount of fluoridated tooth paste is very important for a good clean brushing.

NO Tiene su hijo caries que no se han tratado? SI

Si la ultima visita fue en los últimos seis meses:

38th

Han habido algunas rupturas o heridas en los dientes de su hijo?

SI

Rd

?

65

Ave.

il Ra

NO

Member

37th

d an

YES

D

Floss teeth daily, especially where teeth are in contact.

FACT #1

BRUSH 2 times a day 2 minutes at a time 2 teeth at a time

FACT #2

7 TRAIN 61st St.

Woodsid

lt ave

Rooseve

e Station

kids DENTAL & BRACES 39-05 61st STREET WOODSIDE, NY

DATE

DOCTOR

PASSPORT

TYPE OF VISIT

www.hellosmile.com DATE

FACT #3

FACT #4

DOCTOR

FACT #5

FACT #6

FACT #7

NO

Le sacaron algunas radiografias en esa visita?

F G

Tiene Usted caries que no han sido tratadas?

Es esta su primera visita al dentista?

SI

Hearing Loss or Hearing Problems Sinusitis Frequent Ear or Throat Infections (more than twice a year)

Psychological / Neurological / Developmental

Ear / Nose / Throat (ENT)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) Specific Phobias or other Anxiety Disorders Depression Speech Delay other Developmental Delay Cerebral Palsy Pervasive Developmental Delay (PDD) Autism, Asperger Syndrome Mental Retardation (MR) Seizure Disorder or Epilepsy Vision / Eye Problems Growth Hormone Deficiency

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

?

F Has your child been diagnosed with any of the following conditions? Respiratory / Cardiovascular / Hematogoic

staff scheduling

about your child's health or medical condition?

Asthma or other breathing problems Heart Murmur or other Heart Condition Anemia (Sickle Cell, Aplastic, Hemolytic, Thalessemia) Von Willebrand disease, Hemophilia, or other Clotting Disorders Hepatitis (A, B, C) or other Liver problems HIV / AIDS Cystic Fibrosis

I AM THE CHILDS (PARENT / GRAND PARENT / GUARDIAN / ... )

or been Hospitalized?

E Is there anything else we should know

Kidney Disease, Bed-wetting, Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Crohn's Disease Lactose Intolerance or frequent Diarrhea or Constipation Adrenal Insufficiency

YOUR FIRST NAME

D Has your child ever had surgery

Urinary / Gastrointestinal

AGE

has your child ever had a bad reaction to any drugs/medicines/antibiotics?

Leukemia or other Cancer Diabetes Childhood Obesity Cleft Lip or Plate Other Syndromes

CHILD’S FIRST NAME

NO

C Does your child have any allergies or

Other Chronic / Acute Conditions

As a parent or guardian I commit to having an active role in the health and wellbeing of my child. I know there is a charge for a missed appointment and I have read and understand the terms of joining hellosmile.

YES

FACT #10

Isl

Thank you for bringing your child to a hellosmile kids dental health center!

?

NO

member interaction docs ng

drugs, vitamins or supplements?

Like a friendly neighborhood doctor, we believe it is important to have an active role in the life of a child - from early childhood all the way up until they are young, independent adults. This is the most important journey your child will ever make, and this is why we are here to guide and to coach your child to stay healthy and happy throughout this early adventure of their life.

lab case admin

YES

B Is your child currently taking any medications,

FACT #9

Lo

inventory admin

A Does your child have a primary pediatrician?

FACT #8

Este formulario nos ayudara a entender las necesidades de su hijo, para que podamos estar seguros de proveer el cuidado necesario y hacer un plan de entrenamiento para la salud de su hijo y futuras visitas.

St

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SI

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NO

NO SI NO

Le hicieron algún tratamiento en esa ultima visita? SI (( %&'%

H

Se cepilla sus propios dientes su hijo? SI

I

NO

J SI

NO

Sweets as snacks are best taken at breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Not in between meals.

SI NO

Se acuerda cuando fue la ultima vez que visito al dentista?

NO

!"#$

Esta su hijo usando el biberón todavía?

Sabes el nombre o la SI información de la oficina NO del proveedor dental anterior? Has your child ever been treated for cavities?

SI NO

Fue esa visita una buena experiencia para su hijo?

SI NO

Usa tu hijo/a la seda dental o enjuague de boca antes o después de cepillarse los dientes?

L

SI NO

Se chupa el dedo, el chupete/ bobo, la almohada o alguna otra cosa favorita su hijo? SI

NO

K

Germs that cause cavities can be passed on through saliva from Mother to child AND between friends.

Most children can not brush their teeth PROPERLY until they can tie their own shoes.

Drinking from a bottle containing juice or milk at night time can cause SEVERE dental cavities.

A child should be seen by a dentist by their first birthday.

Protecting baby teeth are important since most of them don’t fall out until age 10-12.

Replace sugary and unhealthy snacks with cheese, nuts, fresh fruits and vegetables.


the CALL CENTER WHY? Cost of technology -> no longer barrier to entry Besides, we want to be awesome!!!

Extended Hour  HealthCoaching  Line   hellosmile  call  center  and  our  Heath  Coaches  are  key  to  our  member   loyalty/rewards  programs.    Our  belief  is  that  the  telephone  is  one  of  the   best  tools  for  communica/on  and  engagement.  For  the  first  /me  in  history   phones  we  have  the  opportunity  to  u/lize  mobile  technology  to  establish   deeper  rela/onships  with  the  parents  and  children  we  serve.   Being  available  to  our  community  through  the  phone  we  have  our   members  undivided  aFen/on  for  5  to  10  minutes,  and  if  we  get  this   experience  right,  what  we’ve  found  is  that  our  members    remember  the   experience  for  a  very  long  /me  and  they  tell  their  friends  about  it..    It  also   allows  our  HC’s  to  create  more  efficiencies  in  our  clinics  by  addressing   simple  inquiries  over  the  phone  (Situa/onal  Triage).    Many  health  care   organiza/ons  feel  that  their  call  centers  are  an  expense  to  minimize.  We   believe  that  it’s  a  huge  untapped  opportunity  for  us,  not  only  because  it   results  in  word  of  mouth  conversa/on  about  hellosmile  products  and   services  but  because  of  its  poten/al  to  increase  the  health  and  happiness   of  the  parent/child.   We  believe  that  through  the  phone  we  will  be  able  to  create  what  we  refer   to  as  PEC  personal  emo/onal  connec/ons  that  will  move,  touch  and  inspire   our  families  towards  healthier  happier  lifestyles  and  dis/nguish  hellosmile   as  a  premier  service  provider.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011


the hellosmile MENU New PaQent  Exam  /  Re-­‐Care  /  Primary   PrevenQon  Category

Secondary PrevenQon  Category

Dental Disease  Invasive  Treatment  -­‐   (involves  cuUng  tooth  structures)

Emergency Visit     0-­‐2  Well  Oral  Health  Check  Up 2-­‐3  Well  Oral  Health  Check  Up 3-­‐6  Oral  Health  Check  Up 7-­‐9  Oral  Health  Check  Up Pre-­‐Adolescent  Oral  Health  Check  Up Adolescnet  Oral  Health  Check  Up

Sealants Preven8ve  Visit  pointers  &  procedures:     Fluoride  Varnish Space  Maintenance  pointers  and   procedures Early  Orthodon8c  Evalua8on  &  Therapies   &  Referrals

Minor treatment  visits  pointers  &  procedures Major  treatment  visits  pointers  &  procedures   Nitrous  Minor    visit  pointers  and  procedures Nitrous  Major  visit  pointers  and  procedures Passive  Stabiliza8on    (papoose)  Pointers  and   Procedures Dental  Treatment  Under  General  Anesthesia   (with  Nap8me  Dental)

Tuesday, February 22, 2011


the PAYER LANDSCAPE Insurance Strategy   hellosmile  believes  in  strategically  opening  offices  in  both  underserved  and  middle  income  neighborhoods   in  order  to  diversify  the  payer  mix  of  pa/ents.    This  will  enable  hellosmile  to  meet  its  mission  of  serving  all   children  and  providing  quality  care  at  a  low  cost.    It  will  also  protect  hellosmile  financially  if  federal   insurances  where  to  adjust  fee  schedules  and  regula/ons.    

Medicaid

SCHIP Managed Care administrator

PPO

Union

Private Patients

administrator

Fee For Service Sliding Fee Minimum Fee

Tuesday, February 22, 2011


the Clinical Modules Radiographs /  X-­‐RAYS  /  Oral  Assays  /  DiagnosQcs Take  Bite-­‐wing  (BWG),  Peri-­‐apical  (PA)  and  Occlussal  Radiographs Take  and  Panoradiographs Teke  Cephalometric  Radiographs            Develops  Radiographs  with  automa=c  developer  /  digital  Radiography  Mounts  film  X-­‐Rays  properly;   Processes  (in  Digital  Management  Sobware)  Labeling  X-­‐ray  w/  correct  pa=ent  informa=on Download  digital  radiographs  &  PT  photos  into  pt  files  on  PC Upload  Radiograph  items  in  PC  into  pt  files Ability  to  Evaluate  Radiographs  at  Basic  levels  1 Ability  to  Evaluate  Radiographs  at  Basic  levels  2 Ability  to  Evaluate  Radiographs  at  Basic  levels  3

RadiaQon Health  and  Safety  (RHS) Iden=fy  major  anatomical  landmarks  of  the  teeth,  jaws,  oral  cavity,  and  adjacent  structures   of  the  skull Recognize  basic  radia=on  biology  concepts Prac=ce  radia=on  safety  procedures  for  both  the  operator  and  pa=ents Manipulate  key  components  of  radiographic  exposure  equipment Iden=fy  and  correct  common  intraoral  and  extraoral  radiographic  exposure  errors Manipulate  key  components  of  radiographic  processing  equipment  and  digital  equipment Iden=fy  and  correct  common  radiographic  processing  errors Mount  and  label  dental  radiographs Apply  effec=ve  infec=on  control  techniques Iden=fy  necessary  Quality  Assurance  procedures

CLINICAL DATA  COMMUNICATION  &  PT  CARE New  Pa=ent  Process Hand  Off  Form   Dental  Hx  Process Medical  Hx  Process Insurance  Process   Char=ng  &  Tx  Planning  Process   Perform  Clinical  Schedule  Audit Are  able  to  correctly  and  efficiently  check  out  pa=ent  with  direct  consulta=on  and   confirma=on  with  a,ending  den=st

OPERATORY SETUP  AND  PREPARATION  

Clinical Supply  Categories  

Fill Water  Bo,les  with  Tab  water  for  delivery  carts Turn  on  Vacuum,  Suc=on  and  Water  Filter  Unit  from  Front Turn  on  Nitrous  Oxide  from  Front  &  Open  Tanks  in  closet Turn  on  Nitrous  main  switch  in  Front   Turn  Large  Autoclave  ''ON"  if  filled  with  dis=lled  water  and  ready  to  go  from  end  of  last  day Stock  treatment  rooms  with  basic  consumable  supplies  (non  restora=ves) Clean  and  set  up  chairs  in  treatment  Rooms  and  set  up  suc=on,  water  syringe,  pt  bib  for  basic  exam/ prophy/cleaning   Fill  Ultra  Sonic  1  bright  shield  and  1  Enzyme  cleaner   Set  up  basic  instruments  for  exam  and  cleaning  w/  floss  and  tooth  brush  and  Dr's  Gloves  on  tray Have  Pa=ent  Miror  and  glasses  in  place Turn  on  Pt  Light  and  posi=on  light  and  Provider's  Chair  as  needed            Clean/wash/decontaminate  instruments,  cold  sterilize,  bag  and  autoclave  instruments,  re-­‐stock   kitchen  and  treatment  rooms  with  instruments Wipe  and  clean  all  equipment,  cabinets,  counter  tops,  and  floor  as  needed  in  the  clinical  areas   Empty  and  change  all  garbage  bags:  under  counter,  baskets,  taped  on  wall     Plug  in  aroma  dispencer Turn  On  Back  Computers,  Open  Open  Dental,  Picasa,  Pandora,            Familiar  w/  OSHA  standards  of  pa=ent  safety  and  infec=ous  controls  regula=ons            Set  Up  operatory  for  various  procedure  /treatments  (Nitrous,  Major,Minor  filling,  Sealents,   extrac=on,  space  maintenance,  orthodon=c  bandind  and  bonding,  ortho  evalua=on) Turn  on  Each  Chair  Unit,  Plug  in  Isolite,  Turn  on  Digital  Radiography  Scanner,  Pano/Ceph  On  &  Correct   Posi=on

Goals Objec,ves  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

At the  conclusion  of  this  course,  the  learner  will  be  able  to: 1.

Understand the  Inventory  Ordering  Process

2.

Request needed  items  to  be  ordered  

3.

IdenCfy what  materials  and  supplies  are  used  for  specific  procedures  

4.

List the  various  categories  of  supplies  used  in  the  pracCce  

5.

Enter payments  into  inventory  data  sheet  

6.

Know the  common  supply  waste  mistakes  

7.

Know the  best  pracCces  to  increase  supply  efficiency

CATEGORIES OF  SUPPLIES   General  Supplies/Disposables     Fillings   Metal  Instruments   Cement   Sana=zers     Prophy         Sterilizing     Anesthesia   X-­‐Rays Office  Supplies     Kids   Barriers   Misc


Patient Audit Check List commlog   -­‐check  commlog  for  communica8on   hx insurance    

-­‐eligibility -­‐for  medicaid  pts  check  ins  for  1  year   anniversary  date  remind  pa8ent   -­‐for  healthplex  pt  is  assigned   treatment  plan  review -­‐fee  schedule  is  properly  checked  in   insurance  window -­‐fee  schedule  is  updated  in  tx  plan   window   -­‐well  care  visits  have  had  6  months   prior  to  their  last  visit   -­‐tx  plan  properly  broken  down  for   invasive  tx   dental  hx -­‐has  been  to  den8st  Yes  No   -­‐If  Yes  when-­‐>  less  than  6  months  -­‐>   where  -­‐>  what  tx  was  done  -­‐>   papoose  used?  -­‐>  xrays  taken? Meidcal  hx -­‐chart  noted  with  any  problems  or   NSF  no  signigigant  facts   -­‐make  sure  PCP  is  in  the  referral  box   Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Radiograph Review -current bitewings for tx -PA for major tx or n2o Pano can substitute -check for Pano patients that are 6-9-12 only take pano if 6 year molars are visible -radiographs must be organized properly in the open-dent image module Behavior hx -for all patients under 12 years old beh. hx added to the notes for every visit ++/-+ +-/--for NP anesthesia -for tx quick notes are used to indicate type amount and site of anesthesia Sealants -patients with 6 year molars and 11/12 year molars checked for sealant authoriazation -whenever tx plans for sealants are made pano must be tx planned

passport communication -communicate how many more visits till passport prize Sibling review -always audit siblings accounts when communicating with patients (repeat audit for all siblings)


Resource Planning & Scheduling Tool Location: Dropbox hellosmile shared folder Team Members  understand  pa/ent  flow   as  it   relates   to   overall  financial  goals. Team   members   understand   op/mal   resource   management  that  will  empower   ever   member   to  fully   aware  of  their  personal  /me  management.   Understanding   the   importance   and   correla/on   of   collec/on  rate  to  overall  prac/ce  performance.   Determining  the  most  op/mal  pa/ent  flow  .  

Op,mal TEAM  Scheduling  Woodside  KIDS  Dental  clinic   Clinical  Team  

Pa,ent Coordinator

L1

Dr

L3

L2

L1

SCHEDULING GOALS -3 NP or WC per 30 min -1 major per hour -1 minor per hour -6/8 total Pts per hour -$600 hour Dec -$625 hour Jan -$650 hour Feb -$675 hour Mar

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

T


Medicaid: Medicaid is the joint federal-state program established in 1965 to provide health insurance to lowincome populations. Medicaid programs may be operated as traditional fee-for-service, capitation or a combination of the two. Although Medicaid program design and fee levels vary from state-to-state, Medicaid generally is viewed differently by private dental offices than by safety net dental clinics. Relative to their alternatives of full-fee patients and indemnity insurance patients, most private dentists do not consider Medicaid reimbursement to be desirable. Consequently, most private dentists do not choose to participate in Medicaid. On the other hand, safety net dental clinics often find Medicaid to be their prime source of reimbursement compared with sliding fee schedule discounts and minimum pay patients, which do not cover overhead cost. In 2001, Congress established a new Medicaid prospective payment system (PPS) for Federally Qualified Health Centers, which differs from the prior Medicaid cost system.

Learning ObjecQves Eligibility   Coding   EOB-­‐  explana=on  of  benefits   Denials   Referral  (To  and  From)   Payments   Payer  Mix  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

MEDICAID AUDIT  CODES   "MEDICAID  AUDIT  REASON” 162   919   705   142   1197   1313   715   712   1172   135   68   1608   1357   140   144   204   932   746   2050   142   186   717   62   175   68   935  

RECIPIENT INELIGIBLE  ON  DATE  OF  SERVICE INVALID  COMBINATION  OF  TOOTH  SURFACE  CODES SERVICE  PAID  CURRENT  OR  PREVIOUSLY  CONFLICTING  CLAIM RECIPIENT  DOB  DIFFERS  FROM  NYS  MASTER  FILE SERVICE  CONFLICT  IN  COMBINATION  PRIOR  SERVICE/CLAIM;  PAY/RECORD  FOR  NO IMPROPER  TOOTH  FOR  PROCEDURE  INDICATED PROCEDURE  CONFLICTS  WITH  PREVIOUS  SERVICE PROCEDURE  CODE  EXCEEDS  SERVICE  LIMITS PRE-­‐PAID  CAP  RECIPIENT-­‐SERVICE  COVERED  WITHIN  PLAN  (DENY) PROCEDURE  CODE  UNACCEPTABLE  FOR  PROVIDER  SPECIALTY SERVICE  DATE  NOT  WITHIN  90  DAYS  OF  RECEIPT  DATE   NUMBER  OF  EXCEEDS  MAXIMUM  OF  25  FOR  DOCUMENT   Provider  ID  and  servicing/a,ending  ID  are  iden=cal RECEPIENT  ID  NOT  ON  FILE recipient  sex  differs  from  nys  master  file procedure  not  available  on  date  of  service   no  service  authoriza=on  on  file   INVALID  NPI  AND  MMIS  BILLING  PROVIDER  ID  COMBINATION   RECIPIENT  DOB  DIFFERS  FROM  NY  CITY  MASTER  FILE   PROCEDURE  REQUIRES  PRIOR  APPROVAL  AND  IT  IS  NOT  ON  INVOICE   PROCEDURE  CONFLICTS  WITH  PREVIOUS  SERVICE   SERVICE  PROVIDER  ID  INVALID   SERVICE  PROVIDER  ID  NOT  ON  MASTER  NYS  FILE   Needs  to  submi,e  claim  with  a  90  days  le,er..We  can  do  it  by  paper  or  by  Epaces.. improper  #  of  surfaces


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


STEP 1 Determine what pt is being referred for (i.e.: endo, omfs, etc.); Explain to pt parent that we must submit a request for referral to insurance (healthplex) and wait approximatly 3-4 weeks; STEP 2

Fill out Section I (with all of the patients information): Write patient name, relationship to employee, "self", patients dob in mm/dd/ccyy format, STEP 3

Fill out Section II: (Referred by Dr. ) Ali Attaie (Referred to Dr. ) i.e.: Kenneth Liao (Address) i.e.: 37-14 28th Ave, Astoria, NY 11103 (Service Requested) i.e.: root canal therapy for tooth #30 (Provider Office #) our site number goes here A6472 (Specialty) i.e.: Endodontist (Telephone number) 718278-5858 (signature of patient) PATIENT PARENT MUST SIGN!!!! Non-Emergent Tx needed: 1. Determine what pt is being referred for (i.e.: endo, omfs, etc.); 2. Explain to pt parent that we must submit a request for referral to insurance (healthplex) and wait approximatly 3-4 weeks; 3. Fill out Section I (with all of the patients information): Write patient name, relationship to employee, "self", patients dob in mm/dd/ccyy format, . (Employee/Subscriber Name) Enter patient first, middle and last name, Employees/Subscriber Social Security number) Enter pt Healthplex Insurance Id as it appears on healthplex website. (Name of Group Dental Program) i.e.: Amerigroup, (Group No.) i.e.: GG-466-CHP 1 4. Fill out Section II: (Referred by Dr. ) Ali Attaie (Referred to Dr. ) i.e.: Kenneth Liao (Address) i.e.: 37-14 28th Ave, Astoria, NY 11103 (Service Requested) i.e.: root canal therapy for tooth #30 (Provider Office #) our site number goes here A6472 (Specialty) i.e.: Endodontist (Telephone number) 718278-5858 (signature of patient) PATIENT PARENT MUST SIGN!!!! Mail claim referral form to: HealthPlex Pre-Auth Department 333 Earle Ovington Blvd., Suite 300 Uniondale, New York 11553-3608

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

STEP 1


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Preferred provider organization (PPO): Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) is a subscription-based medical care arrangement. A membership allows a substantial discount below their regularly-charged rates from the designated professionals partnered with the organization. Preferred provider organizations themselves earn money by charging an access fee to the insurance company for the use of their network. They negotiate with providers to set fee schedules, and handle disputes between insurers and providers. PPOs can also contract with one another to strengthen their position in certain geographic areas without forming new relationships directly with providers. This will be mutually beneficial in theory, as the insurer will be billed at a reduced rate when its insured utilize the services of the "preferred" provider and the provider will see an increase in its business as almost all insureds in the organization will use only providers who are members. In PPO's, the policyholder must pay a deductible if the insurance requires one which it does in most cases. The deductible is the portion of any claim that is not covered by the insurance provider. It is the amount of expenses that must be paid out of pocket before an insurer will cover any expenses

Learning ObjecQves Eligibility   Coding   EOB-­‐  explana=on  of  benefits   Denials   Referral  (To  and  From)   Payments   Payer  Mix   Tuesday, February 22, 2011

PPO


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Guide 0-­‐3  years  Old   Teething A  baby’s  first  set  of  teeth  normally  appear  in  the  mouth  some=me  between  five  and  eight  months  aber  birth,  although  it  can  be  as  late  as  12  months.   Teeth  will  con=nue  to  appear  un=l  the  child  is  around  three  years  old  and  all  20  milk  (primary)  teeth  are  in  place. Teething  can  make  your  baby’s  gums  inflamed  and  sore  as  the  teeth  push  through.  You  might  no=ce  your  baby  is  more  bad-­‐tempered  than  usual,  or   has  trouble  sleeping.  He  or  she  might  start  to  chew  on  their  toys  or  fingers  and  dribble  more  than  usual.  However,  if  your  child  has  a  fever  or  is   nauseous,  do  not  assume  this  is  down  to  teething  and  make  sure  you  take  them  to  the  doctor. If  your  baby  seems  uncomfortable  or  in  pain,  there  are  ways  you  can  help.  To  soothe  your  baby,  try  giving  him  or  her  something  safe  to  bite  on  such  as   a  teething  ring  (preferably  cooled  in  the  fridge  first).  You  can  also  clean  your  baby’s  mouth  several  =mes  a  day  with  a  clean,  damp  gauze  pad  to  help   limit  bacteria  around  the  swollen  gums  and  new  teeth. • Baby  BoFle  Syndrome  is  a  destruc=ve  pa,ern  of  tooth  decay  that  can  occur  in  babies  and  young  children.  It  is  caused  when  a  child’s  teeth  are   regularly  exposed  to  sugary  liquids  for  long  periods,  such  as  juice  or  milk  (even  breast  milk).  In  par=cular,  problems  arise  when  children  are   allowed  to  fall  asleep  with  a  bo,le  of  milk  or  juice.  The  teeth  are  then  bathed  in  the  liquid  overnight,  allowing  the  decay-­‐causing  bacteria  on  the   teeth  to  feast  all  night  long.  The  best  solu=on  to  this  is  not  to  use  a  feeding  bo,le  as  a  pacifier  or  allow  children  to  go  to  bed  with  anything  but   water  in  a  bo,le.  For  the  same  reason  you  should  also  avoid  giving  your  baby  a  pacifier  that  has  been  dipped  in  anything  sweet. Pacifiers  and  thumb-­‐sucking,  provided  their  use  is  limited,  should  not  pose  a  problem  for  the  first  few  years  of  a  child’s  life  before  the   permanent  teeth  erupt.  Sucking  is  a  basic  and  natural  ins=nct  of  babies  and  most  health  prac==oners  agree  that  it  should  not  cause  a  problem,   provided  the  pacifier  is  kept  clean,  free  from  cracks,  is  designed  not  to  cause  airway  obstruc=on  and  is  never  =ed  around  your  child’s  neck.   However,  the  longer  a  child  sucks  on  a  pacifier  or  finger,  the  more  likely  that  it  could  cause  problems  in  the  development  of  their  adult  teeth,   and  might  push  them  out  of  posi=on.  If  you  are  concerned  about  your  child’s  sucking  habits,  you  should  consult  your  den=st  or  doctor. It  can  oben  be  confusing  to  know  exactly  what  you  should  be  doing  for  your  baby’s  oral  health  and  when  you  should  be  doing  it.  Star=ng  a  good  oral   health  regime  early  will  set  your  children  up  for  life  and  give  them  the  best  chance  of  having  healthy  teeth  and  gums  into  old  age.   Oral  hygiene You  should  start  to  clean  your  baby’s  teeth  and  gums  as  soon  as  the  first  teeth  start  to  show.  Not  only  does  this  remove  food  debris  and  bacteria,  but  it   also  helps  to  establish  tooth  brushing  as  a  normal  part  of  your  child’s  daily  rou=ne. • Gently  clean  your  baby’s  teeth  and  gums  morning  and  night,  using  a  moist  gauze,  sob,  moist  cloth  or  sob  baby  toothbrush.  Firmly  wipe  away   liquid  and  food  debris,  paying  par=cular  a,en=on  before  bed=me  to  ensure  the  teeth  are  not  leb  dirty  overnight  (see  above:  Baby  Bo,le   Syndrome).

lose tooth 6-7 years old

lose tooth 6-7 years old

lose tooth 7-8 years old

lose tooth 7-8 years old

With babies  and  young  children,  it  is  oben  easier  to  clean  their  teeth  from  behind,  with  the  child’s  head  in  your  lap.  You  can  make  a  game  of   looking  at  each  other’s  face  upside  down.

Before the  age  of  two,  a  toothbrush  is  not  strictly  necessary.  Once  your  child’s  back  teeth  have  come  through,  however,  you  should  ensure  you   are  using  a  sob  baby  toothbrush  to  keep  them  clean.  This  will  also  help  your  baby  get  used  to  having  a  toothbrush  in  his  or  her  mouth,  meaning   you  are  less  likely  to  have  problems  brushing  their  teeth  later  on.

If appropriate,  take  your  child  to  visit  your  local  dental  health  prac==oner  as  soon  as  possible,  preferably  around  the  age  of  one,  so  that  they   can  assess  your  child’s  emerging  teeth  and  give  you  more  informa=on  about  how  best  to  care  for  them

Diet  recommenda,ons Healthy  ea=ng  habits  can  help  to  maintain  healthy  teeth  and  gums. • Don’t  put  anything  apart  from  milk  or  water  into  your  baby’s  bo,le.  Juice,  or  even  weak  squash,  is  acidic  and  sugary,  which  can  damage  your   child’s  teeth. •

Be a  role  model  –  babies  don’t  know  about  sweets  and  fizzy  drinks;  they  learn  from  people  around  them.  Chances  are  that  if  you  eat  well   yourself,  your  children  will  copy  you.

Of course,  it  is  impossible  (and  very  boring!)  to  avoid  all  poten=ally  damaging  foods;  balance  is  the  key.  Enjoy  treats  as  part  of  your  meals,  not  in   between,  and  limit  the  worst  offenders  such  as  s=cky,  sugary  foods.  Most  children  need  snacks  to  meet  their  nutri=onal  needs  as  they  grow,  but   you  should  try  to  avoid  them  grazing  all  day  long.  When  your  child  is  old  enough,  ensure  you  give  him  or  her  nutri=ous  and  healthy  snacks  such   as  vegetables,  yoghurt  and  fruits,  which  are  also  be,er  for  their  oral  health.  In  par=cular,  dairy  products  contain  calcium,  which  is  essen=al  for   building  strong  teeth.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

lose tooth 9-11 years old

lose tooth 10-12 years old

lose tooth 10-12 years old

lose tooth 10-12 years old


Guide 3-­‐6  years  Old   By the age of three, your child should have all 20 of their primary (baby) teeth in their mouth. During this time, their permanent teeth will be developing in the jaw below the gums and the first adult teeth will be getting ready to emerge in the mouth around the age of six. Why are primary teeth important? As primary teeth fall out, it is a common misconception that they do not matter, as long as the permanent teeth are well looked after when they come through into the mouth. This is not true. The primary teeth have a number of important roles to play: Primary teeth are essential in the first step of digesting food: chewing, biting and grinding. Primary teeth act as guides for the permanent teeth; by keeping proper spaces in the mouth, they help ensure permanent teeth enter the mouth in the correct places. If primary teeth are lost early through decay there is more chance of them affecting the position of permanent teeth, so they may become crooked or even blocked by other teeth. Primary teeth can also influence the development and growth of the face and jaw muscles. Tooth decay Your child's teeth are vulnerable to decay (particularly if the child is eating sweet and sticky food), as the enamel on milk teeth is not as hard as it is on adult teeth. If you are keeping your child’s teeth clean by twice daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste they are far less likely to suffer tooth decay. However, if you think your child might have tooth decay (e.g. you can see stains on the teeth) or if he or she is in any pain, you should take him or her to visit your local dental practitioner if possible. Tooth decay and disease present in primary teeth can be passed on to the permanent teeth as they erupt. Primary molars remain in the mouth until around 10 to 12 years, with lots of opportunity to pass decay on to their new permanent neighbours. If it spreads to the root, an infection in a primary tooth can actually damage the permanent tooth lying directly underneath. Thumb-sucking If your child is still sucking his or her thumb towards the end of this period, you may want to think about gently persuading them to stop. This can be tricky, so try not to make it too traumatic. You could start by drawing attention to the habit and help them stop when they are ready to do so. If your child is regularly sucking his or her thumb when the permanent teeth come through, it can sometimes cause problems with tooth positioning. Seek advice from a dental health professional if you are worried about this. My child won’t let me brush his or her teeth. If your child doesn’t like having his or her teeth brushed, you’re not alone. The following tips might help: Make it less of a battle by inventing games around tooth brushing. Brush your teeth with your child so that they can see you do it too. Explain gently to your child what you’re doing and why. Give reasons that will make sense to your child and appeal to them – super-strong teeth can be exciting to children obsessed with superheroes! Make sure that brushing is a regular part of your child’s routine, not something that stops and starts. Why not try our Brushing Contract and Toothometer to encourage the twice daily brushing routine?

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

My child hates the taste of toothpaste Make sure you are using toothpaste specifically designed for children. These generally have a more gentle taste to appeal to children. If your child doesn’t like the taste of your normal toothpaste, try shopping around for different flavours to tempt them. If that doesn’t work, you could try brushing their teeth with water, but reintroduce toothpaste as soon as possible, as the fluoride it contains is vital for strengthening teeth. Don’t despair: some children just take a while to get used to it – seeing a sibling, cousin or friend around the similar age enjoying the toothpaste can sometimes be enough to make it taste better! Oral hygiene The most important thing you can do is brush your child’s teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste: in the morning and last thing before bed. By this age, children are generally able to grasp their own toothbrush and participate in brushing. However, they don’t have the dexterity to clean their teeth effectively, so will still need your help. You can help your child with a small soft toothbrush specifically designed for children, as they have a smaller head to fit in your child’s mouth. It is best to use toothpaste specifically designed for children as it contains the appropriate amount of fluoride and will have an appealing, gentle taste. Use no more than a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. Get your child to help clean their own teeth and explain to them what you are doing. You should ensure, however, that you also clean them thoroughly. Clean the teeth gently but firmly, and don’t forget to brush the gums. You can also use your child’s toothbrush to clean their tongue. Lots of plaque and bacteria live on the tongue, so it is well worth gently brushing it on a regular basis. Diet recommendations Healthy eating habits can help to maintain healthy teeth and gums. Be a role model – children don’t automatically want sweets and fizzy drinks; they learn from people around them. Chances are that if you eat well yourself, your children will copy you. Of course, it is impossible (and very boring!) to avoid all potentially damaging foods: balance is the key. Enjoy treats as part of your meals, not in between, and limit the worst offenders such as sticky, sugary foods and fizzy drinks. Most children need snacks to meet their nutritional needs as they grow, but you should try to avoid them grazing all day long. When your child is old enough, ensure you give him or her nutritious and healthy snacks such as vegetables, yoghurt and fruits, which are also better for their oral health. In particular, dairy products contain calcium, which is essential for building strong teeth.


Guide 6-­‐12  years  Old   These following six years mark a period of mixed tooth sizes, with both primary and permanent teeth in the mouth together. Primary teeth will loosen and fall out throughout this period. The roots are gradually reabsorbed until the tooth is loose enough to fall out (or be gently pulled out). Permanent teeth will arrive in the mouth throughout this period. It is very important that these new teeth are kept as clean as possible, as they are not fully mature and more vulnerable to decay. The ‘6-year molar’ is the first permanent tooth to arrive. It erupts at the back, behind the baby teeth, so it’s more difficult to reach and easier to ignore! It is vital that this tooth is kept clean and healthy, as it is the one most likely to suffer from cavities. By the age of 12, the last primary tooth has usually been lost and from this point on children have a set of 28 adult permanent teeth. The final four teeth (also known as ‘wisdom’ teeth) may come through sometime between the ages of 18 and 25 (if at all). Tooth decay It is particularly vital to keep the mouth clean and healthy during this stage. The irregular mix of primary and permanent teeth in the mouth makes children’s teeth particularly vulnerable. Decay is more likely if the child is eating sweet and sticky foods. If your child is keeping his or her teeth clean by twice daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste they are far less likely to suffer tooth decay. However, if you think your child might have tooth decay (e.g. you can see stains on the teeth) or if he or she is in any pain, you should take him or her to visit your local dental practitioner if possible. Tooth decay and disease present in primary teeth can be passed on to the permanent teeth as they erupt. Primary molars remain in the mouth until around 10 to 12 years of age, with lots of opportunity to pass decay on to their new permanent neighbours. If it spreads to the root, an infection in a primary tooth can damage the permanent tooth lying directly underneath. My child won’t brush his or her teeth: If your child doesn’t like brushing his or her teeth, the following tips might help: Make it less of a battle by inventing games around tooth brushing. Brush your teeth with your child so that they can see you do it too. Explain gently to your child why it’s so important to brush their teeth, with reasons they can relate to, according to their age. Super-strong teeth can be motivating for six-year-olds keen on superheroes, while an attractive appearance and fresh breath may be more important to older children who are becoming more aware of themselves. Make sure that tooth brushing is a regular part of your child’s routine, not something that stops and starts. Why not try our Brushing Contract and Toothometer to encourage the brushing twice daily routine? My child hates the taste of toothpaste If your child doesn’t like the taste of your normal toothpaste, try shopping around for different flavours to tempt them. The fluoride in toothpaste plays a vital role in strengthening teeth and is particularly important as your child’s permanent teeth start to arrive.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Oral hygiene The most important thing is to ensure that your children brush their teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste – once in the morning and again last thing before bed. By this age, children are capable of brushing on their own. Although you might not be brushing their teeth, they still need your help to establish the brushing twice daily habit for life. You should encourage your children to brush their teeth morning and night, as it is particularly vital to keep the mouth clean and healthy during this stage. The irregular mix of primary and permanent teeth in the mouth makes children’s teeth vulnerable. Decay is more likely if the child is eating sweet and sticky foods. Use a toothbrush especially designed for children as they will have a smaller head to fit in a child’s mouth. Use a normal-sized amount of toothpaste. You can now use an adult toothpaste; however, if your child doesn’t like the taste of adult toothpaste, you can use toothpaste designed specifically for children of this age as this will not only contain the appropriate amount of fluoride but also have an appealing gentle taste. Explain to your child how to clean their teeth and why it’s important that they do it regularly. You should check that they are doing a thorough job and might suggest using plaque disclosing tablets to show them the areas they are missing. Help your child to clean their teeth gently but firmly, and don’t to forget to brush the gums. Help your child to move around the mouth systematically. Start with the last tooth and move towards the front teeth brushing first the outside, then the inside tooth surfaces. They should work their way through the mouth quarter-by-quarter. Remind them to brush the biting surfaces of the teeth, as these can be particularly vulnerable to decay – it’s difficult to keep these clean when tooth sizes are uneven. You should also encourage your child to use their toothbrush to clean their tongue. Lots of plaque and bacteria live on the tongue, so it is well worth gently brushing the tongue on a regular basis. Speak to your local dental health practitioner for more information on how best to keep your child’s teeth clean. Diet recommendations Healthy eating habits can help to maintain healthy teeth and gums. Be a role model – children may want to eat the same things as their friends, but you can still be a good influence. Chances are that if you eat well at home, your children will learn to think of this as ’normal’. Of course, it is impossible (and very boring!) to avoid all potentially damaging foods: balance is the key. Enjoy treats as part of your meals, not in between, and limit the worst offenders such as sticky, sugary foods and fizzy drinks. Most children need snacks to meet their nutritional needs as they grow, but you should try to avoid them grazing all day long. When your child is old enough, ensure you give him or her nutritious and healthy snacks such as vegetables, yoghurt and fruits, which are also better for their oral health. In particular, dairy products contain calcium, which is essential for building strong teeth. Your child will often be eating away from home, particularly during the day. Explain to your child why it’s important not to eat and drink too many foods and liquids that could damage their oral health, and to brush their teeth at least twice a day, so that they can have healthy teeth and gums.


tooth ANATOMY CENTRAL INCISOR PRIMARY  DENTITION  

LATERAL INCISSOR CANINE FIRST  MOLAR

incisors

canines

MAXILLARY   TEETH  

MANDIBULAR TEETH

B

molars

E

F

G

H

SECOND MOLAR I J

A

SECOND MOLAR T

K S

premolars

C

D

R

Q

P

O N

M

L

FIRST MOLAR CANINE LATERAL  INCISOR   CENTRAL  INCISOR  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011


SAMPLE Dental Health Certificate- Optional

The New York State Dental Association (NYSDA) has been the voice for the dental profession in New York State since its founding in 1868. With 14,000 members (76 percent of practicing dentists in the state), NYSDA is one of the largest state constituents of the American Dental Association. Visit the New York State Dental Association online at www.nysdental.org. As dentistry's premier philanthropic and charitable organization, the American Dental Association Foundation is a catalyst for uniting people and organizations to make a difference through better oral health. Visit the ADA Foundation online at http://www.ada.org/ada/adaf/index.asp. The New York State Dental Foundation is an active member of the New York State Oral Health Coalition. The Coalition has in turn established an agenda that will help the State implement, review and update the NYSOHP. Visit the NYS Oral Health Coalition at www.nysohc.org The goals of the Center for Best Practices for the Prevention of Childhood Overweight and Obesity are to increase the public’s awareness about the public health threat of early childhood obesity and to increase obesity screening and counseling among health care providers in our six target counties: Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Warren and Washington. Visit the NYS Oral Health Coalition at www.healthykidsny.org The mission of the Foundation for Healthy Living is to increase and disseminate knowledge about health care and to improve the health of our communities.

Parent/Guardian: New York State law (Chapter 281) permits schools to request a dental examination in the following grades: school entry, K, 2, 4, 7, & 10. Your child may have a dental check-up during this school year to assess his/her fitness to attend school. Please complete Section 1 and take the form to your dentist for an assessment. If your child had a dental check-up before he/she started the school, ask your dentist to fill out Section 2. Return the completed form to the school's medical director or school nurse as soon as possible.

   

Last

Child’s Name: Birth Date:

/ Month

/ Day

First

Sex: Year

Male

Middle

Will this be your child’s first visit to a dentist?

Yes

School:



Have you noticed any problem in the mouth that interferes with your child’s ability to chew, speak or focus on school activities?

                  

No

Female

  

Name

Grade Yes

I also understand that receiving this preliminary oral health assessment does not establish any new, ongoing or continuing doctor-patient relationship. Further, I will not hold the dentist or those performing this assessment responsible for the consequences or results should I choose NOT to follow the recommendations listed below.

Parent’s Signature______________________________________________________________ Date

Section 2. To be completed by the Dentist I. The Dental Health condition of _______________________________ on _________________ (date of exam) The date of the exam needs to be within 12 months of the start of the school year in which it is requested. Check one: Yes, The student listed above is in fit condition of dental health to permit his/her attendance at the public schools. No, The student listed above is not in fit condition of dental health to permit his/her attendance at the public schools. NOTE: Not in fit condition of dental health means that a condition exists that interferes with a student's ability to chew, speak or focus on school activities including pain, swelling or infection related to clinical evidence of open cavities. The designation of not in fit condition of dental health to permit attendance at the public school does not preclude the student from attending school.

Dentist’s Signature

     

Optional Sections - If you agree to release this information to your child’s school, please initial here.

II. Oral Health Status (check all that apply). Yes Yes

Yes

No Caries Experience/Restoration History – Has the child ever had a cavity (treated or untreated)? [A filling (temporary/permanent) OR a tooth that is missing because it was extracted as a result of caries OR an open cavity]. No Untreated Caries – Does this child have an open cavity? [At least ½ mm of tooth structure loss at the enamel surface. Brown to darkbrown coloration of the walls of the lesion. These criteria apply to pits and fissure cavitated lesions as well as those on smooth tooth surfaces. If retained root, assume that the whole tooth was destroyed by caries. Broken or chipped teeth, plus teeth with temporary fillings, are considered sound unless a cavitated lesion is also present]. No Dental Sealants Present

Other problems (Specify):_______________________________________________________________________________

III. Treatment Needs (check all that apply) No obvious problem. Routine dental care is recommended. Visit your dentist regularly. May need dental care. Please schedule an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible for an evaluation. Immediate dental care is required. Please schedule an appointment immediately with your dentist to avoid problems.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

No

I understand that by signing this form I am consenting for the child named above to receive a basic oral health assessment. I understand this assessment is only a limited means of evaluation to assess the student’s dental health, and I would need to secure the services of a dentist in order for my child to receive a complete dental examination with x-rays if necessary to maintain good oral health.

Dentist’s name and address (please print or stamp)

Visit the Foundation at www.foundationforhealthyliving.org Donated Dental Services helps those in need. Have you registered? Donated Dental Services, which has been endorsed by NYSDA, is a nationally recognized program run by dentists in our area donated charity care to those who need it. Care is given at your office. On your time, on your terms. To volunteer for the DDS program, go to www.nfdh.org, or call (303)534-5360.

Section 1. To be completed by Parent or Guardian (Please Print)


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011


Tuesday, February 22, 2011

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