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Cambs Badminton Academy Players’ Goals Sheet Player: Short Term Goals

Gender

Age of player

Date Agreed

Goal

Time Frame

Attained

Date

Goal

Time Frame

Attained

Date

Goal

Time Frame

Attained

Date

Outcome Goals (see p.2) Performance Goals (see p.2) Process Goals (see p.2) Medium Term Goals Outcome Goals Performance Goals Process Goals Long Term Goals Outcome Goals Performance Goals Process Goals

Agreed by Player: Agreed by Coach

Date Agreed Date Agreed

Head Coach, Neil Critchell, 0774 0303 774


Cambs Badminton Academy

How to complete your goal sheet Enter items under ‘Goals’ and ‘Time Frame’ as described below. Do not complete the ‘Attained’ and ‘Date’ columns. Please fill out as many of the other columns as you can. Your goals should be discussed with your coach with appropriate time frames agreed between you and your coach. Short Term Goals – these are goals that can typically be achieved within 6 weeks. Most short-term goals would fall under “process goals”. These goals will need to be discussed with your coach. Examples: Being able to complete 20 press ups within 60 seconds. Medium Term Goals – these are goals that typically take between 1 and 6 months to achieve. Most medium-term goals would fall under “performance goals” and “outcome goals”, and will need to be discussed and agreed with your coach. Examples: Being able to hit a backhand fast drop shot 9 times out of 10 to a target (performance goal) or beating a certain player in matchplay situation (outcome goal).. Long Term Goals – these are goals that typically take between 6 months and up to 5 years to achieve. Most long-term goals would fall under “performance goals” and “outcome goals”, and will need to be agreed with your coach. Examples: To win the U17 National Championships (outcome goal). Time Frame – all goals must have a date by which they should be completed. This must be realistic and achievable. Your coach will advise you and work with you to achieve this. Outcome Goals – are where you are looking for a particular outcome or result when competing against other players. As you do not have control over these others players you cannot directly measure your own performance against them. Example: Beat player X in a competition at the start of next season. Performance Goals – are where you can directly measure your own performance improvements, as it does not involve comparing yourself against others. Examples: Reach level 10 on the Badminton Bleep Test or hit a Clear to within 6inches of the back line 8 times in 10 whilst under movement pressure. Process Goals – are typically the steps you need to take in order to attain your Performance or Outcome goals. These are best set and agreed with your coach. Examples: Become grade 3-ranked player by Dec 2011 (Your Outcome goal could be to play in U15 nationals) or skip for 15 minutes every day (your Outcome goal could be to reach the badminton bleep test level 10). Conclusion If you have set yourself goals to work towards that are both achievable and realistic you will be able to measure your progress against your OWN criteria rather than attempting to measure yourself against others’ progress. Everyone develops and progresses in different ways and in different timeframes and it’s far too easy to look at another player and compare yourself to them when their life, their opportunities and their needs could be entirely different to yours. It is so important to not judge yourself against others but to look at achieving ONLY what outcomes you want in your sport – or your life in general – and ticking each one off, one at a time. But, most importantly, to achieve your ultimate goal, or even the smallest short term goal, it’s important that you stick to what you have agreed between yourself and your coach. Your coach is there to help you achieve whatever you want to achieve and having a set of goals in your kit bag is the most valuable tool you can possess. Good luck!

Head Coach, Neil Critchell, 0774 0303 774


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