Page 1

PERFORMANCE CENTRE C OAC HI NG A ND M ENTO R ING HA NDBO OK

FEBRUARY 2008

21DDRfat 6: 210108


Contributors to the Performance Centre Coaching and Mentoring Handbook To produce a document of this size and scope requires the expertise and opinions of a variety of people from a number of backgrounds, including other sports, industry, business and the military. On occasions the influence has been very direct, with people being personally consulted in their area of expertise. In other areas the influence is indirect, with philosophies and techniques being applied from published sources or the Internet. Our thanks therefore are extended to everyone who has collaborated to produce this document, especially the following people: Ian Wright

National Head Coach

Julia Strong

Club Support Manager

Martin Andrew

Junior Performance Head Coach

Bronwyn Lundy

EIS Nutritionist

Tom Causer

World Class Start Head Coach

Eric Brown

Schools and Youth Board

Brian Hooper

Talent Project Co-ordinator

Tanya Woodward

Horsham Arun Badminton Club

Harry Jarvis

Talent Project Co-ordinator

Nick Chambers

Horsham Arun Badminton Club

Alison Pearson

Talent Project Co-ordinator

Katherine Taylor

Head of Coaching

Andy Allford

EIS Strength/Conditioning Coach

Dawn Airton

EIS Athlete Support Manager

Gary Walker

EIS Exercise Physiologist

Juliette LLoyd

EIS Psychologist

Chelsea Warr

UK Sport Performance Consultant

BADMINTON England Development Team

Gill Bartlett

Hertfordshire Consortium

Applying the methods outlined in this guidance document can make a valuable contribution to the standard of coaching within Performance Centres. This in turn will lead to improved playing standards amongst a larger body of players across the country.

Mike Woodward National Development Coach BADMINTON England

1


Contents (1) Contributors to the Performance Centre Coaching and Mentoring Handbook

1

Contents

2-3

Introduction

4-5

Player Pathways

6

Club/Performance Pathways

7

Stage 1: Identifying the Right Raw Talent

8-10

Stage 1: The Raw Talent Identification Tool

11-12

Stage 2: Raw Performance Programme

13

Stage 2: Raw Performance Review Tool

14-16

Stage 3: Developing Performance Programme

17

Stage 3: Developing Performance Review Tool

18-20

Stage 4: Emerging Performance Programme

21

Stage 4: Emerging Performance Review Tool

22-24

Stages 5, 6 and 7: World Class Programmes

25

The Coaching Team

26

The Right Coach, Right Participant, Right Time

27-28

Performance Centre Coaching Team Structure

29

Recruiting a PC Coaching Team

30-31

Suggested Work and Person Specifications

32-34

2


Contents (2) Coaching Practice

35

Embedding the Coaching Process

36

Introduction to Planning

37

Long Term Planning

38-39

Medium Term Planning

40-41

Short Term Planning

42-44

Coach Education

45

Continuous Professional Development

46

1. Obtaining up-to-date qualifications

47-48

2. Obtaining additional qualifications

49

3. Using alternative resources

50

4. Committing to reflective practice

51-54

Mentoring

55-58

Miscellaneous information

59

Exemplar schedules and costings

60-65

Creating and Developing Relationships

66

Sports Science

67

Contacts

68

Resources

69

3


Introduction The overall vision The BADMINTON England document “The 100 Point Plan ….. A decade of delivery” provides: “ …. a long term vision for badminton in this country, from those playing at the grass roots level through to the International arena, in order to achieve SUCCESS”. In order to ensure success it is important that the sport creates a quality environment that supports player development along the whole pathway from grass roots to elite level. The current situation At the grass roots level there is a tremendous interest in the sport of badminton. Participation rates are high and it can rightly claim to be Britain’s most popular racket sport. Anecdotally badminton in schools is becoming more popular. This situation is driven by BADMINTON England’s extensive Development Network, plus teachers, coaches and a large number of dedicated volunteers around the country. At elite level a small band of around 90 players (junior and senior) have trained within the World Class programmes since the start of the millennium. In that period of time there have been numerous successes, including: Olympic Medallists World Champions World Medallists All England Champions European Individual Senior Champions European Individual and Team Junior Champions Commonwealth Games Medallists (including Gold) World Junior Medallists U-17 6 Nations Winners U-15 8 Nations Winners 16 players from the World Class Start and Potential Programmes now in full-time training This is a phenomenal list of successes for such a small band of elite players. Despite this BADMINTON England is neither complacent nor satisfied. We want to raise standards so we are able to compete against the best in the world in all events. How these players develop at the moment There are many inter-linked aspects that contribute to the development of a top player. Some of these are listed below. Talented raw material

Luck and chance

Pressure from other sports

Population

Population density

Transport network

Local tradition in badminton

Facilities

Wealth or lack of it

Strong leagues

Role models

Family support

Schools and teachers

Other support: e.g. medical

Active volunteers

Quality coaches using quality work practices

A coherent player development system

A effective talent identification and selection system

4


Obviously there are some of these factors that are more easily influenced than others. Some areas of the country have distinct geographical, demographic, economic and sociological advantages over others. These advantages can mask shortcomings in talent identification, player development and coaching. In other areas a lot of extremely good work in is being done in the areas of talent identification, player development and coaching but the impact is lessened by demographic factors that are hard to overcome. Whatever the reasons these players develop, it is important that the sport of badminton works hard and smart so that the factors of “luck” and “chance” are less prevalent. Where we want to target improvement We want to create an environment that produces more players who can seriously challenge the top 90 elite players. Those players will then have to raise their own standards in order to remain within that elite band, the knock-on effect being that they are able to compete more effectively internationally. Improvements in singles are a priority, not only to produce better singles players, but also to provide more mobile, mentally strong doubles players. How BADMINTON England Performance Centres can help to achieve this BADMINTON England Performance Centres are integral to achieving the aim of improving the standard of players so more pressure is exerted on the top elite band. They can do this by setting new standards in their operations, with particular emphasis on: Identifying the right raw talent Implementing the right player pathway to support player development Involving the right coaches who: Set the highest standards of professionalism Are committed to all aspects of the coaching process (plan, do, review and evaluate) Support players as they move along the player pathway Commit to Continuous Professional Development (CPD) Contribute positively to a mentoring system This document supports the Performance Centre operations, placing particular emphasis on the areas listed above. For each area (i.e. talent identification, player pathway, coaching) it defines: What the right standards are How to work towards these standards The methods by which progress against these standards will be monitored are included in the Performance Centre Declaration and Evidence checklist.

5


Player Pathways

6


Club/Performance Pathways The Performance Centre structure includes two different player development pathways that should be mutually supportive: the Club Pathway and the Performance Pathway. The nature of these player development pathways is described in the diagram below.

World Class Performance World Class Start & Potential

The World Class Start and Potential Programmes (stages 5, 6 and 7) The ultimate aim of these programmes is to develop players capable of competing on a World Stage.

LINK Club/Performance Pathway (stages 2, 3, 4) Emerging Performance

Elite Club

Competitive Club

Developing Performance

Social Club

Raw Performance

Club Pathway

Performance Pa athway

LINK Identification from: progression Schools New participation

7

The Club Pathway is for all players whose predominant needs are social and competitive. They have some motivation to learn skills but their drive/ability to practice is not highly developed. Players on the Performance Pathway have social/ competitive needs but exhibit a greater ambition/ability to achieve high standards of play through practice. Depending on progress, players on this pathway travel through the Raw, Development and Emerging Programmes. Movement between the Club and Performance Pathways is likely. Players dropping from the Performance Pathway can be retained in the sport via the Club Pathway, whereas players on the Club Pathway showing the correct aptitudes may move across to the Performance Pathway.

Raw Talent Identification (stage 1) The Performance Centre Player Pathway begins with the identification of potential new players. A simple identification method, known as the “Raw Talent Identification Tool� can be used to support the identification of talent.


Stage 1: Identifying the Right Raw Talent

World Class Performance World Class Start & Potential LINK

Emerging Performance

Elite Club

Competitive Club

Developing Performance

Raw Talent Identification Tool Social Club

Raw Performance

     

Club Pathway

Wants to play badminton Trainability/task mastery Winning characteristics Co-ordination Athleticism Tactical Aw areness

Performance Pa athway

LINK Identification from: progression Schools New participation

8


Raw Talent Defined In order to identify raw talent it is first necessary to define what this is. In badminton terms, raw talent can be defined as: “A person displaying high levels of competence in generic sporting abilities that underpin badminton specific skills”. This definition is consistent with motor learning theory. Abilities are seen as relatively stable and genetically endowed whereas skills are taught. Existing raw talent identification systems have tended to focus on people who have already had significant badminton skills coaching, so in that sense we have not truly been identifying raw talent. A significant step would be for badminton to introduce strategies that identify raw talent that has not necessarily been exposed to badminton skills training to any large degree. This raw talent may come from: Children (6 +) who may have had little exposure to sports coaching Older people (11+) who have had a lot of exposure to sport but not necessarily in badminton The Raw Talent Identification Tool The aim of the Raw Talent Identification Tool is: “To identify people who demonstrate a high level of competence in core abilities that underpin excellence in badminton skills”. The tool was devised by looking at the existing tools used by BADMINTON England and then consulting a number of people with a wide variety of expertise. The “abilities” chosen are: Wants to play badminton Trainability/Task Mastery Winning Characteristics Co-ordination Athleticism Tactical Awareness These 6 criteria form a very simple Raw Talent Identification Tool that can be used to identify talent in a variety of environments, including: Schools Bisi festivals Taster sessions

9


The page overleaf indicates a Raw Talent Identification Tool that has been completed for 28 players observed at a Bisi festival. The more ticks that appear for a player, the more likely the Performance Centre should consider inviting the player to become involved in the Performance Programme. Other players who have attracted few ticks but have indicated that they “want to play badminton” could be directed to the Performance Centre Club Pathway activities or to other clubs that have a working relationship with the Performance Centre. Note that the “Trainability and Task Mastery” section may not be filled out during a taster session or Bisi festival, as this is a one-off. A teacher who has worked with a person for an extended period of time could complete this information with greater accuracy.

Referring to the Raw Talent Identification Tool overleaf: Players 2, 3, 10, 18, 20 and 25 indicate a high level of ability and are keen to play badminton. They could be invited to attend the Performance Centres Raw Performance Programme Players 4, 6, 7, 12, 14, 22, 23 and 28 are keen to play badminton but exhibit less of the required abilities to enter the Raw Performance Programme. These children could be encouraged to attend activities at other clubs or accommodated in the Club Pathway of the Performance Centre Talent Transfer Raw talent is not only identifiable in very young children, but also in older people who have displayed a great deal of sporting ability in other sports. By promoting badminton creatively in schools it should be possible to attract a number of older athletes with excellent badminton potential. Nationally initiatives are being investigated across a number of sports and Performance Centres will ultimately be involved in this innovative approach to uncovering and developing new badminton talent.

10


Wants to play badminton

Trainability and Task Mastery

Winning characteristics

Tactical Awareness

Co-ordination

Athleticism

o o o o o o

28

27

School Magnus

25 26

24

23

School Sconce Hill

21 22

20

19

School Sconce Hill

17 18

16

15

School Chuter Ede

13 14

12

11

9 10

School Chuter Ede

8

Reviewer: Fred Common

7

170208 5 6

Date:

School Grove

4

Wimbledon 3

Venue:

School Grove

1 2

11

BADMINTON England Raw Talent Identification Tool

X    X   X X  X  X  X X X  X     X  X X 

Willing/able to learn Open to advice/evaluates advice A creative problem solver Learns from successes and failures Progresses quickly Persistent

o Enjoys competitive challenges o Dismisses mistakes, stays positive o Tough but fair

 



 

o o o o o

Uses height/width/depth effectively. Aware of own/opponent’s positioning Creative problem solver Uses strengths-exploits weaknesses Organises team strategy

o o o o o o

Efficient/natural throwing action Tracks objects efficiently Good hand-eye-foot co-ordination Good posture and balance Agile responses to object in flight Quick hands/feet in response to object in flight

  

o o o o o o o o

Athletic build Fast first step/Quick feet Able to accelerate/decelerate rapidly Powerful legs Powerful hitting/throwing action High endurance/recovery Good range of movement Agile performing pre-set routines

 







































 










BADMINTON England Raw Talent Identification Tool Venue: Date: Reviewer: Wants to play badminton

Trainability and Task Mastery

Winning characteristics

Tactical Awareness

Co-ordination

Athleticism

o o o o o o

Willing/able to learn Open to advice/evaluates advice A creative problem solver Learns from successes and failures Progresses quickly Persistent

o Enjoys competitive challenges o Dismisses mistakes, stays positive o Tough but fair

12

o o o o o

Uses height/width/depth effectively. Aware of own/opponent’s positioning Creative problem solver Uses strengths-exploits weaknesses Organises team strategy

o o o o o o

Efficient/natural throwing action Tracks objects efficiently Good hand-eye-foot co-ordination Good posture and balance Agile responses to object in flight Quick hands/feet in response to object in flight

o o o o o o o o

Athletic build Fast first step/Quick feet Able to accelerate/decelerate rapidly Powerful legs Powerful hitting/throwing action High endurance/recovery Good range of movement Agile performing pre-set routines


Stage 2: Raw Performance Programme The Goal of the Raw Performance Programme To build on identified abilities, developing basic movement and hitting skills that are sustained under largely predictable environments. Where players come from Players gain entry on the Raw Performance Programme having been assessed positively by the Raw Talent Identification Tool. The number of players There should be a minimum of 32 Players on the Raw Performance Programme. Duration of Planned Activities The Raw Performance Programme should consist of a minimum of 2 years of planned activities. Player involvement Players should be included on the Programme for a minimum of 1 year and a maximum of 3 years. Each year should consist of 38 weeks of activity. Session duration Raw Performance sessions should total 4 hours per week, with a maximum of 1½ hours per session. Resources The Raw Performance Programme can be supported by activities in BADMINTON England’s Badminton for Teachers resource materials and the BADMINTON England Level 1 Coach Handbook. Player monitoring Players should be monitored using the Raw Performance Review Tool. An electronic copy of each player’s completed monitoring tool should be sent to BADMINTON England on an annual basis. Performance Centres will be encouraged to internally use these monitoring tools more often. A completed version of this tool is included on page 15. Player Progression Players progress onto the Developing Performance Programme or, after a maximum of 3 years, are invited to participate in activities within the Club Pathway. Other notes It is suggested that players in this squad may be split into further Sub-groups: Raw Performance A Basic generic movement skills Sending and receiving skills Striking skills Spatial awareness: generic

13

Raw Performance B Badminton-specific movement patterns Badminton stroke development Spatial awareness: badminton specific

Raw Performance C Fast track programme (i.e. older players from other sports)


Stage 2: Raw Performance Review Tool The purpose of the Raw Performance Review Tool is to provide a mechanism by which: the progress of a player can be monitored future training can be targeted to the needs of the player coaching effectiveness can be evaluated informed selections for movement of players into the Developing Performance Squad can be made players can be filtered into the Club Pathway a player’s nomination for inclusion on National Development Days can be supported Rationale The Raw Performance Review Tool builds on the core headings established by the Raw Talent Identification Tool, with some subtle changes to reflect the shift from a generic to a more sports specific tool. Guidance on usage Using the monitoring tool conscientiously and as accurately as possible on a regular basis is of vital importance, otherwise the goals set above cannot be met. Responsibility for reviewing players should be shared amongst coaches within the coaching team, with the process being overseen by the Performance Centre Head Coach. Data will be collated nationally by the National Development Coach in order to monitor player progress and identify areas where coach education can be targeted most effectively. Please note that the competition and results section is not a deciding factor for progression at this stage. Progression Players are regarded as sufficiently skilled to move up to the Developing Performance Squad if they meet the following criteria: Trainability and Task Mastery

Must be 3 or 4

Winning Characteristics

Must be 3 or 4

Racket Skills, Athleticism and Tactical Awareness

None of these areas can be a 1.The overall for these areas combined must be 7 or more

Players who show slow progression, low attendance etc. should be offered playing opportunities on the Club Pathway. Other notes “~” means inconsistent, as in “~ use of space” meaning “inconsistent use of space” “n” shortens words such acceleration (acc n), coordination (coord n) etc. “” means “above”, as in “ average” meaning “above average” “” means “below”, as in “ average” meaning “below average” “ROM” means “Range of Movement”

14


Player

Jimmy Ridle 1

Motivatn Trainability and Task Mastery

Feedback Learning

Winning Characteristics Competition/ Results Profile Tactical awareness Basic grip Thumb grip Grip length BH serve FH serve Racket Skills

BH NS FH NS BH Lift FH Lift FH OH BH Drive Split-step Posture + balance Quick feet

Athleticism

Speed Jump/land Lunge

Motivation to train is questionable Resistant to feedback: doesn’t act upon it Slow learner in most areas Lacks motivation in competition Competes regularly on BE circuit in bronze singles events Lacks spatial awareness – just hits the shuttle Clear PH grip – needs big change to achieve basic grip Thumb rarely established correctly on back of handle Very short grip (towards ferrule) BH LS - long swing – clear drop/throw of shuttle FH HS: uncoordinated Net shots lack touch and control Net shots lack touch and control Lift backswing takes hand behind body Lift backswing takes hand behind body Disjointed, unnatural + long throwing action No thumb grip, floppy wrist, long swing from shoulder No split-step, slow to move off Upper body leads, legs follow Very slow feet Covers ground slowly Uncoordinated jumps + unbalanced landings Lunging misaligned, little ROM, off balance recovery

Reviewer

Alison Spinkie

2

Date

3

220809 4

~ motivation to train

Consistently motivated to train



Highly self motivated in training

~ response to feedback, sometimes acts upon it ~ ability to learn – some good/some weak areas ~ desire to compete

Responds to feedback and often acts upon it Good learner in many areas of the game Usually keen to compete



Seeks out, accepts and quick to act upon feedback Consistently quick learner in most areas of the game Highly self motivated to compete

Competes regularly on BE circuit in silver/gold singles events Some spatial awareness - ~ application Slight PH – still needs some change to achieve basic grip Thumb used inconsistently on back of handle Short grip – mid-handle position BH LS – small shuttle drop + good reach – long hit FH HS: full swing and weight transfer developing Basic net shots but hard hands – little feel to shots Basic net shots but hard hands – little feel to shots Lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Tight but compact preparation, long action Thumb grip used but tight, wrist “stronger”, long swing Balanced split step – high jumping action Legs drive movement, upper body un-controlled  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Basic jumps coordinated with balanced landings Lunge aligned but limited ROM







      

In a year/season 3 singles ¼ finals are reached in designated U11/12/13/14/15/17/19 tourneys Uses/covers space effectively but predictable patterns of play Basic grip established but rather tight Use of thumb grip in evidence but tight Grip towards bottom of racket handle BH LS - good reach/short hit from hand by hand/fingers FH HS: fluent hit – capable of producing high flight path Basic net shots played with feel (soft hands) Basic net shots played with feel (soft hands) Lift backswing - racket head in front of body Lift backswing - racket head in front of body Relaxed, compact preparation and compact throw Thumb grip relaxing, forearm rotation developing Balanced and timed split step, jump less pronounced Legs drive but upper body controlled but stiff  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Range of jumps expanding – coordination/balance sustained Aligned lunge with good range

Overall score

15

Raw Performance Review Tool

 





 

3



Has achieved 4+ singles wins against top 5 in age group in 1 year Uses/covers space effectively and adapts play instinctively Relaxed basic grip Relaxed thumb grip allowing thumb/fingers to interact Long grip using handle to its full extent BH LS + flick: consistent, short deceptive flick from hand FH HS: natural and flowingeasily adjusted low and flick Can play net shots with accuracy when off the net Can play net shots with accuracy when off the net Lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Clear, smash and drop have basic similarity in execution Hit using thumb grip, forearm rot. + elbow extension Timed split step, lower jump/ short ground contact Legs drive - controlled/relaxed upper body Quick feet, able to make rapid and instinctive adjustments Maintains speed in activities with some unpredictability Explosive and well timed jumps, balanced landings Aligned lunge, good range and recovery under pressure

4

2

2

  4 


Player

Reviewer 1

Motivation Trainability and Task Mastery

Feedback Learning

Winning Characteristics Competition/ Results Profile Tactical awareness Basic grip Thumb grip Grip length BH serve FH serve Racket Skills

BH NS FH NS BH Lift FH Lift FH OH BH Drive Split-step Posture + balance Quick feet

Athleticism

Speed Jump/land

16

Lunge

Motivation to train is questionable Resistant to feedback: doesn’t act upon it Slow learner in most areas Lacks motivation in competition Competes regularly on BE circuit in bronze singles events Lacks spatial awareness – just hits the shuttle Clear PH grip – needs big change to achieve basic grip Thumb rarely established correctly on back of handle Very short grip (towards ferrule) Cramped preparation, long swing, shuttle drop, tight grip. FH HS: uncoordinated Net shots lack touch and control Net shots lack touch and control Lift backswing takes hand behind body Lift backswing takes hand behind body Disjointed, unnatural + long throwing action No thumb grip, floppy wrist, long swing from shoulder No split-step, slow to move off Upper body leads, legs follow Very slow feet Covers ground slowly Uncoordinated jumps + unbalanced landings Lunging misaligned, little ROM, off balance recovery

2

Date 3

4

~ motivation to train

Consistently motivated to train

Highly self motivated in training

~ response to feedback, sometimes acts upon it ~ ability to learn – some good/some weak areas ~ desire to compete

Responds to feedback and often acts upon it Good learner in many areas of the game Usually keen to compete

Seeks out, accepts and quick to act upon feedback Consistently quick learner in most areas of the game Highly self motivated to compete

Competes regularly on BE circuit in silver/gold singles events Some spatial awareness - ~ application Slight PH – still needs some change to achieve basic grip Thumb used inconsistently on back of handle Short grip – mid-handle position Small shuttle drop - tight grip improved reach FH HS: full swing and weight transfer developing Basic net shots but hard hands – little feel to shots Basic net shots but hard hands – little feel to shots Lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Tight but compact preparation, long action Thumb grip used but tight, wrist “stronger”, long swing Balanced split step – high jumping action Legs drive movement, upper body un-controlled  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Basic jumps coordinated with balanced landings Lunge aligned but limited ROM

In a year/season 3 singles ¼ finals are reached in designated U11/12/13/14/15/17/19 tourneys Uses/covers space effectively but predictable patterns of play Basic grip established but rather tight Use of thumb grip in evidence but tight Grip towards bottom of racket handle Good reach - short hit from hand mainly using hand/fingers/wrist FH HS: fluent hit – capable of producing high flight path Basic net shots played with feel (soft hands) Basic net shots played with feel (soft hands) Lift backswing - racket head in front of body Lift backswing - racket head in front of body Relaxed, compact preparation and compact throw Thumb grip relaxing, forearm rotation developing Balanced and timed split step, jump less pronounced Legs drive but upper body controlled but stiff  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Range of jumps expanding – coordination/balance sustained Aligned lunge with good range

Has achieved 4+ singles wins against top 5 in age group in 1 year Uses/covers space effectively and adapts play instinctively Relaxed basic grip Relaxed thumb grip allowing thumb/fingers to interact Long grip using handle to its full extent As in 3 but has deceptive flick FH HS: natural and flowingeasily adjusted low and flick Can play net shots with accuracy when off the net Can play net shots with accuracy when off the net Lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Clear, smash and drop have basic similarity in execution Hit using thumb grip, forearm rot. + elbow extension Timed split step, lower jump/ short ground contact Legs drive controlled/relaxed upper body Quick feet, able to make rapid and instinctive adjustments Maintains speed in activities with some unpredictable Explosive and well timed jumps, balanced landings Aligned lunge, good range and recovery under pressure

Overall score

Raw Performance Review Tool


Stage 3: Developing Performance Programme The Goal of Developing Performance Programme To expand the range of movement and hitting skills and engrain learning so skills are sustainable under increasingly unpredictable, game-like situations. Where players come from Players gain entry on the Developing Performance Programme having been assessed positively by the Raw Performance Review Tool. No. of players There should be up to 18 Players on the Developing Performance Programme. Planned activities The Developing Performance Programme should consist of a minimum of 2 years of planned activities. Programme duration Players should be included on the Developing Performance Programme for a minimum of 1 year and a maximum of 3 years. Each year should consist of 38 weeks of activity. Session duration Developing Performance sessions should total 4 hours per week of which 2 hours should be singles based training. Resources The Developing Performance Programme should be supported by the techniques and tactics outlined in BADMINTON England’s Level 1 and Level 2 Coach Handbooks. Player monitoring Players should be monitored using the Developing Performance Review Tool. An electronic copy of each player’s completed monitoring tool should be sent to BADMINTON England on an annual basis. Performance Centres will be encouraged to internally use these monitoring tools more often. Player Progression Players progress onto the Emerging Performance Programme or, after a maximum of 3 years, are invited to participate in activities within the Club Pathway. Other notes The programme should consist of: Expanding the movement and hitting skills established in the Raw Performance Squads Challenging players to sustain these skills in less predictable situations Developing improved tactical awareness by the application of conditioned games

17


Stage 3: Developing Performance Review Tool The purpose of the Developing Performance Review Tool it to provide a mechanism by which: the progress of a player can be monitored future training can be targeted to the needs of the player coaching effectiveness can be evaluated informed selections for movement of players into the Emerging Performance Squad can be made players can be filtered into the Club Pathway a player’s nomination for inclusion on National Development Days can be supported Rationale The Developing Performance Tool retains the 6 key headings established in the previous Raw Performance Review Tool. Guidance on usage Using the monitoring tool conscientiously and as accurately as possible on a regular basis is of vital importance, otherwise the goals set above cannot be met. Performance Centre Coaches will be required to complete a relevant Developing Performance Review for each player and submit this electronically to BADMINTON England annually. Responsibility for reviewing players should be shared amongst coaches within the coaching team, with the process being overseen by the Performance Centre Head Coach. Data will be collated nationally by the National Development Coach in order to monitor player progress and identify areas where coach education can be targeted most effectively. Progression Players are regarded as sufficiently skilled to move up to the Emerging Performance level if they meet the following criteria: Trainability and Task Mastery

Must be 3 or 4

Winning Characteristics

Must be 3 or 4

Competition and Results

Must be 2 or more

Racket skills, Athleticism and Tactical Awareness

None of these areas can be a 1. The overall score for these areas combined must be 8 or more

Players who show slow progression, low attendance etc. should be offered playing opportunities on the Club Pathway.

18


Player

Reviewer 1

3

4

Trainability/task mastery

~ motivation to train

Consistently motivated to train

Highly self motivated in training

~ response to feedback, sometimes acts upon it

Responds to feedback and often acts upon it

Seeks out, accepts and quick to act upon feedback

Slow learner in most areas

~ ability to learn – some good/some weak areas

Good learner in many areas of the game

Consistently quick learner in most areas of the game

Focus

Poor focus: easily distracted, lacks persistence

~ focus, sometimes distracted, variable persistence

 average focus/persistence, occasionally distracted

Focuses effectively: cuts out distractions, highly persistent

Expression

Player rarely expresses their views or ideas

~ expression of views/ideas – needs prompting from coach

Will often express views/ideas

Open, honest + 2 way commn between coach and player

Competition

Lacks motivation in competition

~ desire to compete

Usually keen to compete

Highly self motivated to compete

Lacks emotional control: often displays –ve emotions

~ control of emotions

Reasonable control of emotions: usually +ve

Controls –ve emotions, displays +ve emotions

Little belief in own ability to succeed: unconfident

~ self belief which is often lost under moderate pressure

Self belief sustained under moderate levels of pressure

Unshakeable belief in their own ability to achieve

Often backs down from challenges

Sometimes rises to the challenge

Often takes on challenge: above average success

Tough: enjoys taking on a challenge/ often succeeds

Loses control under pressure

Makes many errors of judgement under pressure

Often displays ability to think clearly under pressure

Thinks Clearly Under Pressure (TCUP)

Realism

Unrealistic goals: subjective, emotional, shallow assesst

Realistic goals: subjective, shallow, emotional assesst

Realistic goals: is developing objectivity + ability to evaluate

Realistic but challenging goals: objective, calm assessment

Losses

Losses/setbacks do not hurt, learns little from experience

Upset at losses/setbacks, learns slowly from experiences

Upset at losses/setbacks, gradually learns from experience

Upset at losses/setbacks – then considered, +ve response

Unwilling/unable to accept accountability for actions

Sometimes accepts accountability for own actions

Generally accepts accountability for own actions

Accepts accountability for own actions + responds effectively

Competes regularly (3 or more) on BE circuit in bronze singles events Doesn’t hit to space, covers own space ineffectively Unaware of own strengths/weaknesses Unaware of opponent’s strengths/weaknesses Poor at using basic doubles formations

Competes regularly on BE circuit (3 or more) in silver/gold singles events

• In a year/season 3 singles ¼ finals are reached in designated U11/12/13/14/15/17/19 tourneys Beginning to apply understanding of use of space Beginning to use strengths/ cover weaknesses effectively Spots strengths/ weaknesses and can sometimes exploit Covers court/situations effectively with partner

Has achieved 4+ singles wins against top 5 in age group in 1 year

Motivation Feedback Learning

Emotions Winning Characteristics

Belief Challenge Pressure

Accountable Competition/ Results Profile Tactical Awareness

Spatially Aware Self aware Opponent aware Partner aware

Motivation to train is questionable Resistant to feedback: doesn’t act upon it

2

Date

Beginning to gain understanding of covering/using space Aware - strgths/ wknss – finds it hard to use practically Aware of opponent’s stgths/wknss – finds it hard to use practically Use of basic doubles formations but regimented

Excellent use of space and adapts use of space instinctively Maximises own strengths/ minimises weaknesses Spots + exploits opponent’s strengths/weaknesses Adapts instinctively in games to different situations/partners

Overall scores

19

Developing Performance Review Tool (A)


Grips BH serve FH serve BH NS FH NS Racket Skills

Racket skills

BH lift FH lift FC range of strokes FH OH

FH OH range BH Drive BH OH DS Acc n Leg Power Endurance Agility Athleticism

Split-step Posture + balance Quick feet Speed Patterns Jump/ land

20

Lunge

Player

Reviewer 1

Grips incorrect/tight Cramped preparation, long swing, drops shuttle, tight grip. Uncoordinated, shuttle thrown BH NS lacks touch and control FH NS lacks touch and control BH lift backswing takes hand behind body FH lift backswing takes hand behind body Very narrow range of strokes in forecourt Disjointed, unnatural + long throwing action Very narrow range of oh ‘s No thumb grip, floppy wrist, long swing from shoulder Floppy wrist, elbow up early, minimal forearm rotation Slow and/or uncontrolled accn and decn Limited leg power – low jump scores Low endurance frequently a factor in losses Very limited agility No split-step, slow to move off Upper body leads, legs follow Very slow feet Covers ground slowly Few engrained patterns of movement Uncoordinated jumps + unbalanced landings Lunging misaligned, limited range, off-balance recovery

2 Basic/thumb grips in evidence but tight Small shuttle drop - tight grip – reach in preparation improving Full swing and weight transfer developing (hip-hit) Basic BH NS but hard hands – little feel to shots Basic FH NS but hard hands – little feel to shots BH lift backswing - racket head goes behind body FH lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Some variety of fc strokes (eg some of spin ns, x-net, held net+ lift) Tight but compact preparation, long action Some variety of oh’s : (e.g. some of clips, slices, held clear, stopdrop) Thumb grip used but tight, wrist “stronger”, long swing Stable wrist, long swing, little use of forearm rotation, flow developing Control of accn + decn improving but slow  average leg power -  average jump scores Below average endurance sometimes a factor in losses Basic agility in predictable situations (e.g. shadowing) Balanced split step – high jumping action, Legs drive movement, upper body un-controlled  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Some patterns of movement, linking specific court areas Basic jumps coordinated with balanced landings Lunge aligned but limited range, offbalance recovery

Date 3 Relaxed grips maintained in predictable situations Good reach - short hit from hand mainly using hand/fingers/wrist Fluent hit – capable of producing high flight path Basic BH NS played with feel (soft hands) Basic FH NS played with feel (soft hands) BH lift backswing - racket head in front of body FH lift backswing - racket head in front of body Wide range of fc strokes (eg most of spin ns, x-net, held net/lift) Relaxed, compact preparation and compact throw Wide range of oh’s: (e.g. most of clips, slices, held clear, stopdrop) Rlxd thumb grip, forearm rotation developing, long follow through Stable wrist, uses arm rotation, compact hit, flows Controlled accn + decn - above average speed Good leg power –  above average jumps Copes well with long rallies/matches/tournaments Agility developing in unpredictable situations Balanced and timed split step, jump less pronounced Legs drive - upper body controlled but stiff  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Good patterns of movement but lacks instinctive variation Range of jumps expanding – coordination/balance sustained Aligned lunge with good range, adequate recovery

4 Relaxed grips / grip changes in unpredictable situations As in 3 but has deceptive flick Natural and flowing- easily adjusted to low and flick Can play BH NS with accuracy when off the net Can play FH NS’s with accuracy when off the net BH lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action FH lift flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Wide range of strokes in fc used effectively Clear, smash and drop have basic similarity in execution Wide variety of oh ‘s used effectively As for 3, but with crisp hit and limited follow through Consistent bh oh ds, straight and cross Rapid but controlled accn + decn Explosive leg power – excellent jump scores High endurance: thrives in long rallies/matches/tournaments Excellent agility: quality high in matchplay Timed split step, lower jump/ short ground contact Legs drive - controlled/relaxed upper body Quick feet, able to make rapid and instinctive adjustments Maintains speed in activities with some unpredictability Excellent patterns adapted instinctively to situations Explosive and well timed jumps, balanced landings Aligned lunge, good range/ recovery under pressure

Overall scores

Developing Performance Review Tool (B)


Stage 4: Emerging Performance Programme The Goal of the Emerging Performance Programme To refine movement and hitting skills and enhance tactical awareness so these skills are adapted successfully in competition. Where players come from Players gain entry on the Emerging Performance Programme having been assessed positively by the Developing Performance Review Tool. No. of players There should be up to 10 Players on the Emerging Performance Programme. Planned activities The Emerging Performance Programme should consist of a minimum of 2 years of planned activities. Programme duration Each year should consist of 38 weeks of activity. There is no upper limit to the age for players on the Emerging Performance Programme, although Performance Centre may wish to place their own limit. Session duration Emerging Performance sessions should total 4 hours per week of which 2 hours should be singles based training. Resources The Emerging Performance Programme should be supported by activities in BADMINTON England’s Level 1 and Level 2 Coach Handbooks. Player monitoring Players should be monitored using the Emerging Performance Review Tool annually. Players in this squad should be given more responsibility and review their own progress as well as the coach completing the review. Player Progression Players reaching the required standard can be nominated for National Training Days Other notes The programme for the Emerging Performance may be more individualised, with players being given more responsibility for their own development with the support of coaches.

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Stage 4: Emerging Performance Review Tool The Purpose of the Emerging Performance Review Tool is to provide a mechanism by which: the progress of a player can be monitored future training can be targeted to the needs of the player coaching effectiveness can be evaluated players can be filtered into the Club Pathway a player’s nomination for inclusion on National Development Days/World Class Potential and Performance Programmes can be supported Rationale The Emerging Performance Tool retains the 6 headings established in the previous Developing Performance Review Tool, but includes a further category of “Lifestyle Factors”. Guidance on usage Using the monitoring tool conscientiously and as accurately as possible on a regular basis is of vital importance, otherwise the goals set above cannot be met. Performance Centre Coaches will be required to complete a relevant Emerging Performance Review for each player and submit this electronically to BADMINTON England annually. Responsibility for reviewing players should be shared amongst coaches within the coaching team, with the process being overseen by the Performance Centre Head Coach. Data will be collated nationally by the National Development Coach in order to monitor player progress and identify areas where coach education can be targeted most effectively.

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Player

Reviewer 1

Trainability -task mastery

Motivation Feedback Learning Focus Expression Competition

Winning Characteristics

Emotions Belief Challenge Pressure Realism Losses Accountable Self reliance

Lifestyle factors

Nutrition Lifestyle Managing time Plan Competition/ Results Profile

Tactical Awareness

Spatially Aware Self aware Opponent aware Partner aware

Motivation to train is questionable Resistant to feedback: doesn’t act upon it Slow learner in most areas Poor focus: easily distracted, lacks persistence Player rarely expresses their views or ideas Lacks motivation in competition Lacks emotional control: often displays –ve emotions Little belief in own ability to succeed: unconfident Often backs down from challenges Loses control under pressure Unrealistic goals: subjective, emotional, shallow assesst Losses/setbacks do not hurt, learns little from experience Unwilling/unable to accept accountability for actions Relies heavily on others to manage commitments Poor application of nutritional advice Lifestyle issues frequently affect sports performance Lacking in time management skills Disorganised: little evidence of /adherence to a plan Competes regularly on BE circuit in bronze singles events Doesn’t hit to space, covers own space ineffectively Unaware of own strengths/weaknesses Unaware of opponent’s strengths/weaknesses Poor at using basic doubles formations

2

Date 3

4

~ motivation to train

Consistently motivated to train

Highly self motivated in training

~ response to feedback, sometimes acts upon it ~ ability to learn – some good/some weak areas ~ focus, sometimes distracted, variable persistence ~ expression of views/ideas – needs prompting from coach ~ desire to compete

Responds to feedback and often acts upon it Good learner in many areas of the game  average focus/persistence, occasionally distracted Will often express views/ideas Usually keen to compete

Seeks out, accepts and quick to act upon feedback Consistently quick learner in most areas of the game Focuses effectively: cuts out distractions, highly persistent Open, honest + 2 way commn between coach and player Highly self motivated to compete

Reasonable control of emotions: usually +ve Self belief sustained under moderate levels of pressure Often takes on challenge: above average success Often displays ability to think clearly under pressure Realistic goals: is developing objectivity + ability to evaluate Upset at losses/setbacks, gradual learns from experience Generally accepts accountability for own actions Self manages the majority of areas

Controls –ve emotions, displays +ve emotions Unshakeable belief in their own ability to achieve Tough: enjoys taking on a challenge/ often succeeds Thinks Clearly Under Pressure (TCUP) Realistic but challenging goals: objective, calm assessment Upset at losses/setbacks – then considered, +ve response Accepts accountability for own actions + responds effectively High level of self management

Tries to implement sound nutritional advice Lifestyle issues occasionally affect sports performance Usually good at managing time

Very committed to applying sound nutritional advice Lifestyle issues rarely affect sports performance Consistently effective time manager Highly effective planner: sticks to plan in committed fashion 4+ singles wins against top 5 in age group (or against higher ranked senior players) in 1 year Excellent use of space - adapts use of space instinctively Maximises own strengths/ minimises weaknesses Spots + exploits opponent’s strengths/weaknesses Adapts instinctively in games to different situations/partners

~ control of emotions ~ self belief which is often lost under moderate pressure Sometimes rises to the challenge Makes many errors of judgement under pressure Realistic goals: subjective, shallow, emotional assesst Upset at losses/setbacks, learns slowly from experiences Sometimes accepts accountability for own actions Shows some evidence of self management ~ approach to effective nutritional advice Lifestyle issues sometimes affect sports performance Needs frequent support to maintain effective time managt Some planning but inconsistent adherence Competes regularly on BE circuit in silver/gold singles events Beginning to gain understanding of covering/using space Aware - strgths/ wknss – finds it hard to use practically Aware of opponent’s stgths/ wknss – finds it hard to exploit Use of basic doubles formations but regimented

Planning in evidence and usually adheres to plan In a year/season 3 singles ¼ finals are reached in designated U11/12/13/14/15/17/19 tourneys Beginning to apply understanding of use of space Beginning to use strengths/ cover weaknesses effectively Spots strengths/ weaknesses and can sometimes exploit Covers court/situations effectively with partner

Overall Score

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Emerging Performance Review Tool (A)


Grips

Player

Reviewer 1

Grips incorrect/tight

Net shots lack touch and control – hard hands Lift backswing takes hand Lifts (BH+FH) behind body FC range of Very narrow range of strokes in forecourt strokes Disjointed, unnatural + long FH OH throwing action Very narrow range of oh FH OH range strokes No thumb grip, floppy wrist, BH drive long swing from shoulder Floppy wrist, elbow up early, BH OH minimal forearm rotation Only uses extremes of pace Pace strokes – fast or slow Turning the Struggles to turn the shuttle away from an attacker shuttle Slow and/or uncontrolled accn n Acc and decn Limited leg power – low jump Leg Power scores Low endurance frequently a Endurance factor in losses Very limited agility Agility NS (BH+FH)

Racket skills Athleticism

Split-step Posture + balance Quick feet Speed Patterns Jump/land Lunge

No split-step, slow to move off Upper body leads, legs follow Very slow feet Covers ground slowly Few engrained patterns of movement Uncoordinated jumps + unbalanced landings Lunging misaligned, limited range, off-balance recovery

2 Basic/thumb grips in evidence but tight Basic net shots – hard hands but touch/feel developing Lift backswing - racket head goes behind body Some variety of fc strokes (eg. some of spin ns, x-net, held net+ lift) Tight but compact preparation, long action Some variety fh oh’s: (e.g. some of clips, slices, held clear, stopdrop) Thumb grip used but tight, wrist “stronger”, long swing Stable wrist, long swing, little use of forearm rotation Able to vary pace on strokes in predictable practices Technically proficient turning the shuttle in predictable practices Control of accn + decn improving but slow  average leg power -  average jump scores Below average endurance sometimes a factor in losses Basic agility in predictable situations (e.g. shadowing) Balanced split step – high jumping action Legs drive movement, upper body uncontrolled  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Some patterns of movement, linking specific court areas Basic jumps coordinated with balanced landings Lunge aligned but limited range, offbalance recovery

Date 3 Relaxed grips maintained in predictable situations Basic net shots played with feel (soft hands) Lift backswing - racket head in front of body Wide range of fc strokes (e.g. most of spin ns, x-net, held net+ lift) Relaxed, compact preparation and compact throw Wide range fh oh’s: (e.g. most of clips, slices, held clear, stopdrop) Rlxd thb grip, forearm rotation developing, long follow through Stable wrist, uses arm rotation, compact hit, developing power/variety Able to vary pace on strokes in less predictable practices Able to turn the shuttle in less predictable practices Controlled accn + decn - above average speed Good leg power –  above average jumps Copes well with long rallies/matches/tournaments Agility developing in unpredictable situations Balanced and timed split step, jump less pronounced Legs drive but upper body controlled but stiff  average foot quickness compared to peers  average speed covering ground compared to peers Good patterns of movement but lacks instinctive variation Range of jumps expanding – coordination/balance sustained Aligned lunge with good range, adequate recovery

4 Relaxed grips / grip changes in unpredictable situations Can play net shots with accuracy when off the net Lifts flicked with a short, deceptive hitting action Wide range of strokes in fc used effectively Clear, smash and drop have basic similarity in execution Wide variety fh oh’s strokes used effectively in match play As for 3, but with crisp hit and limited follow through As for 3, but has variety/power /control Able to vary pace on strokes effectively in match play Able to turn the shuttle effectively in match play Rapid but controlled accn + decn Explosive leg power – excellent jump scores High endurance: thrives in long rallies/matches/tournaments Excellent agility: quality high in match play Timed split step, lower jump/ short ground contact Legs drive - controlled/relaxed upper body Quick feet, able to make rapid and instinctive adjustments Maintains speed in activities with some unpredictability Excellent patterns of movement adapted instinctively to situations Explosive and well timed jumps, balanced landings Aligned lunge, good range/ recovery under pressure

Overall Score

Emerging Performance Review Tool (B)

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Stages 5, 6 and 7: World Class Programmes The World Class Programmes are UK Sport lottery funded programmes, these programmes being divided into three parts: WORLD CLASS START

World Class Start is for players up to U-15 level. There are two squads: U15 and U13.The aim of the World Class Start programme is to identify exceptionally talented young performers and give them a comprehensive basis on which to build future World Class success.

Nominations for National Development Days are made via: Tournament results (at least 3 singles ¼ finals in designated U11/12/13/14/15/17/19 events with 1 year {1st Jan/31st Dec} or over 1 season {st Sept to June 1st}) Submission of a supporting Raw (U11), Developing (U13) or Emerging (U15) Review Tool to the National Development Coach Entry onto the World Class Start Programme is obtained by a combination of: Recommendation following observations at National Development Days Tournament observations Performances against Home Country opposition Performances against foreign opposition “Wild card” selections from the World Class Start Head Coach, National Development Coach and relevant National Age Group coaches combined ( in extenuating circumstances only) WORLD CLASS POTENTIAL

World Class Potential is for players aged between 15 and 24. At the World Class Potential level there are U24 Squad, U19 Squad and U17 Squads. The aim of the World Class Potential programme is to select performers with great potential and develop their talents in order to give them the greatest chance of achieving major senior international success.

WORLD CLASS PERFORMANCE

BADMINTON England supports a number of senior players on the Lottery Funded World Class Performance programme. The main training centre is the National Badminton Centre in Milton Keynes. Other High Performance Centres (HPC’s) have been established in co-operation with the English Institute of Sport and are at the following locations: Bath University Loughborough University EIS Sheffield

London - Brunel University Manchester University Birmingham University

World Class Performance Players are required to participate in daily training within the network of National/High Performance Centres. Entry onto the World Class Potential and Performance Programmes is obtained by a combination of: Tournament results Review of a completed Emerging Review Tool Tournament observations Training camp observations “Wild card” selection from the Junior Performance Head Coach, National Development Coach and relevant National Age Group coaches combined

25


The Coaching Team

26


The Right Coach, Right Participant, Right Time Introduction The coaching structure of BADMINTON England’s Performance Centres is based on the same model outlined by sports coach UK in the new United Kingdom Coaching Framework initiative. It is useful therefore to gain a quick insight into this before seeing how this can shape and influence coaching within BADMINTON England Performance Centres. UK Coaching Framework vision is to establish: The world’s leading coaching system by 2016 “a cohesive, ethical and valued coaching system where skilled coaches support participants at all stages of development in sport” Underpinning this vision is the need to establish a UK Coaching Model, the main purpose being: “To enable the Right Coach to be working with the Right Participant at the Right Time” The two aspects of this purpose can be broken down as follows: Right Coach: this reflects the stage of development of the coach Master Coach UKCC Level 4

Plan, implement, analyse and revise multi-annual coaching programmes. Demonstrate advanced coaching competence, innovation and leadership

Senior Coach UKCC Level 3

Plan, implement and review annual coaching sessions. Demonstrate advanced coaching competence

Coach UKCC Level 2

Prepare for, deliver and review coaching sessions. Demonstrate basic coaching competence

Assistant Coach UKCC Level 1

Assist more qualified coaches delivering aspects of coaching sessions, normally under direct supervision. Acquire and practice basic coaching competences

Right Participant at the Right Time: this reflects how a coach adapts their role to meet the developmental stage of the player Coach Role

Developmental stage of the player

Children’s Coach

Pre-Fundamentals/Fundamentals/Learning to Play: Ages 5 -11

Participant Coach

Learning and Relearning to Participate: Age 11 and over Young People and Adult Participation: Age 11 and over

Performance Coach

Talent Development: Training to Train, Training to Compete Young People/Adult Performance

Elite Performance Coach

27

Training To Win, Peak Performance


In addition to the above categories, provision needs to be made for the coaching of players with disabilities. This is reflected in the table below, which allows you to conduct a simple analysis of the extent to which a team of coaches provides the Right Coach, for the Right Participant at the Right Time. Note also how within each box of the model there is a shaded area to identify coaches who provide expertise to support disabled players.

Coach knowledge / level of competence

Right coach/ Right participant/ Right time analysis

Master Coach UKCC Level 4

Environment / target group Children’s Coach

Participant Coach

Performance Coach

Coach A

Senior Coach UKCC Level 3

Coach UKCC Level 2

Elite Performance Coach

Coach D

Coach B

Coach C

Coach B

Assistant UKCC Level 1

Coach A is a highly competent and knowledgeable coach, qualified at UKCC Level 4. This coach has tailored much of their Continuous Professional Development work in a childorientated way and has become something of an expert in the acquisition of movement and hitting skills of young children. Coach D has also achieved a good level of knowledge and competence and is qualified to UKCC Level 3 status. She has concentrated her Continuous Professional Development on elite performers and is particularly interested in sports psychology, tactics and notational analysis of games. Coaches B and C have both qualified to UKCC Level 2 status. Coach B gained much of their experience as an Assistant Coach working in Adult Education and enjoys teaching the game to adults, either beginners or rusty players returning to the game after a number of years. He’s great at devising fun, game-like activities that help adults to get going quickly. This coach is also keen on providing coaching for disabled athletes and has some experience in this area. Coach C however worked for a number of years as an Assistant Coach for a very young County Squad and is adept at motivating skilful children to stay focussed on practices to refine and expand these skills further. The main point here is that it is not necessarily true or desirable for the highest qualified coaches to work with the best players. What is required is that the right coaches are placed in the right environments where they can best meet the target group’s needs.

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Performance Centre Coaching Team Structure The successful identification and nurturing of players can only be achieved with quality coaches running the Performance Centres. The potential effect of the Performance Centre Project on coaching nationally can be gauged by the diagram below (based as an example on 50 Performance Centres and 6 coaches per centre).

150 Level 1, 100 Level 2 and 50 Level 3 = 300 coaches in total

150 Level 1 Coaches (3 per centre)

100 Level 2 Coaches (2 per centre)

50 Level 3 Coaches (1 per centre) 3-year duration

This model is based on a Performance Centre Coaching Team having the following structure.

National Development Coach

Head Coach (Level 3)

Coach (Level 2)

Assistant Coach (Level 1)

Coach (Level 2)

Assistant Coach (Level 1)

Note this is a suggested structure only.

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Assistant Coach (Level 1)


Recruiting a Performance Centre Coaching Team The goal when building a Performance Centre Coaching Team is to select a group of coaches who: Can work in a team Collectively have a cross-section of skills that meets the needs of all players in the Performance Centre environment It is recommended that Performance Centres follow the guidelines for safe recruitment outlined on the BADMINTON England website under the section “Counties, Leagues and Clubs/Safeguarding and Protecting Children”. A great deal of thought needs to be given as to how these coaches should be selected. Two very useful questions to ask are: Does the person we are considering appointing to a particular coaching role truly match the work and person specification associated with that role? Does the person we are considering appointing to a particular coaching role have the potential to match the work and person specification associated with that role? If the answer to either of these questions is “no” then due consideration should be given as to the suitability of that coach for the role offered. Analysing an existing team Simply applying the Right Coach/Right Participant/Right Time Analysis to an existing Coaching Team can start to have immediate benefits as it helps you to identify: Strengths of the Coaching Team For example, do we have a number of coaches who are most effective and committed to working at the Participation Level? Development areas For example, do we have members of the coaching team who have the expertise and are genuinely interested in working with children? Implications for training and recruitment For example, if a simple analysis of the coaching team does identify a gap in children’s coaching, this should prompt action such as: Recruiting suitable coaches to fill the gap Developing existing coaches to fill the gap An example of a simple, completed analysis is shown overleaf. What would be your strategy if the analysis of your existing coaching team looked like this?

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Coach knowledge / level of competence

Right coach/ Right participant/ Right time analysis

31

Environment / target group Children’s Coach

Participant Coach

Performance Coach

Elite Performance Coach

Master Coach UKCC Level 4

Senior Coach UKCC Level 3



Coach UKCC Level 2



Assistant UKCC Level 1

 




Work and Person Specifications: Performance Centre Assistant Coach Title

Performance Centre Assistant Coach

Location (enter venue names as appropriate)

Based at < based around < may be necessary.

Terms and Conditions

The post is on a casual basis, with an annual average of 3-4 hours per week being likely

Liaising with

Performance Centre Coach

Purpose of the job

To assist more qualified coaches delivering activities within coaching sessions, normally under direct supervision

Responsibilities

Adhere to the BADMINTON England Coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Code of Conduct, in particular:

> Performance Centre. Activities largely >, although coaching in other venues

Sell, with an enthusiastic and positive approach to the sport, other coaches and the National Governing Body Provide an effective role model for players Contribute to ensuring a safe and equitable working environment for all people within the coaching environment Adopt coaching practices that follow BADMINTON Englandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guidelines for Safeguarding and Protecting Children Duties

Plan, deliver and review the effectiveness of coaching activities that integrate with planned sessions Commit to Continuous Professional Development (CPD), agreeing, addressing and reviewing their development needs on an on-going basis with their appointed mentor, support coach or advisor Attend Performance Centre Coaches meetings as and when required

Essential

UKCC Level 1 in Coaching Badminton (or achieved in 1 year) Attendance at BADMINTON England recognised child protection training (within last 3 years) A current member of the Coaching Register A BADMINTON England Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check in place (within last 3 years)

Desirable

BADMINTON England recognised Emergency First Aid training Attendance at sports coach UK Equity in your Coaching Workshop Attendance at sports coach UK How to Coach Disabled People in Sport

Personal Qualities

Committed team ethic Good communicator Energetic Ambition to progress in coaching Reliable Motivated and a motivator Open to new ideas and working practices

32


Work and Person Specifications: Performance Centre Coach Title

Performance Centre Coach

Location (enter venue Based at < names as appropriate) based around < be necessary.

> Performance Centre. Activities largely >, although coaching in other venues may

Terms and Conditions

The post is on a casual basis, with an annual average of 3-4 hours per week being likely

Liaising with

Performance Centre Head Coach

Purpose of the job

Prepare for, deliver and review coaching sessions

Responsibilities

Adhere to the BADMINTON England Coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Code of Conduct, in particular: Sell badminton, with an enthusiastic and positive approach to the sport, other coaches and the National Governing Body Provide an effective role model for players Contribute to ensuring a safe and equitable working environment for all people within the coaching environment Adopt coaching practices that follow BADMINTON Englandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guidelines for Safeguarding and Protecting Children

Duties

Attend Performance Centre Coaches meetings as and when required Plan, deliver, review and evaluate the effectiveness of linked coaching sessions Help other coaches to learn Contribute to Raw Performance Identification and Raw Performance Player Reviews Commit to Continuous Professional Development (CPD), agreeing, addressing and reviewing their development needs on an on-going basis with their appointed mentor, support coach or advisor

Essential

Help other coaches to learn UKCC Level 2 in Coaching Badminton ( or commits to achieving this in 1 year) Attendance at BADMINTON England recognised child protection training (within last 3 years) A current member of the Coaching Register A BADMINTON England CRB check in place (within last 3 years) BADMINTON England recognised Emergency First Aid training Evidence of successful coaching within at least one of the 4 spheres outlined in the United Kingdom Coaching Framework Model (children, participation, performance or elite performance)

Desirable

Attendance at sports coach UK Equity in your Coaching Workshop Attendance at sports coach UK How to Coach Disabled People in Sport Attendance at 4 Nations Disability Badminton Workshop

Personal Qualities

Committed team ethic Good communicator Energetic Ambition to progress in coaching Reliable Motivated and a motivator Open to new ideas and working practices

33


Work and Person Specifications: Performance Centre Head Coach Title

Performance Centre Head Coach

Location (enter venue Based at < names as appropriate) based around < be necessary.

> Performance Centre. Activities largely >, although coaching in other venues may

Terms and Conditions

The post is on a self-employed basis (in direct consultation with Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs), with an annual average of 9 hours per week being likely

Liaising with

National Development Coach

Purpose of the job

Plan, deliver and review annual coaching programmes in a Performance Centre

Responsibilities

Adhere to the BADMINTON England Coach’s Code of Conduct, in particular: Sell badminton, with an enthusiastic and positive approach to the sport, other coaches and the National Governing Body Provide an effective role model for players Contribute to ensuring a safe and equitable working environment for all people within the coaching environment Adopt coaching practices that follow BADMINTON England’s Guidelines for Safeguarding and Protecting Children

Duties

Plan, deliver and review annual coaching programmes Plan and lead the mentoring process for Level 1 and 2 Coaches Lead Performance Centre Coaches meetings as and when required Lead Talent Identification programmes + Player Performance Reviews Commit to Continuous Professional Development (CPD), agreeing, addressing and reviewing their development needs on an on-going basis with their appointed mentor, support coach or advisor Work with National Development Coach to ensure coaching practices within the Performance Centre are in line with National Standards

Essentials

UKCC Level 3 in Coaching Badminton (or commits to achieving this in 18 months) Attendance at BADMINTON England recognised child protection training (within last 3 years) A current member of the Coaching Register A BADMINTON England CRB check in place (within last 3 years) BADMINTON England recognised Emergency First Aid training Evidence of successful coaching within at least one of the 4 spheres outlined in the United Kingdom Coaching Framework Model (children, participation, developing or elite) Attendance at sports coach UK Equity in Your Coaching Workshop Attendance at sports coach UK How to Coach Disabled People in Sport Attendance at 4 Nations Disability Badminton Workshop

Personal Qualities

Committed team ethic Good communicator Energetic Ambition to progress in coaching Reliable Motivated and a motivator Open to new ideas and working practices

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Coaching Practice

35


Embedding the Coaching Process There are many differing models of how people learn. One popular model is shown below.

PLAN (Apply what you have learnt)

DO (Experience)

EVALUATE (Make sense of analysis, by self and through discussion)

REVIEW (Analysis and Reflection)

The model stresses that to be effective activities need to be planned, delivered, reviewed and the implications of the review considered in the evaluation phases. One key to the model being effective is that what is learnt from the review and evaluation then informs future planning. This is reflected by the cyclical nature of the model. This simple model has been transplanted from education and applied in many other spheres. In sports coaching this model tends to be called “The Coaching Process”. Why do we need to use this? If we look at the Coaching Process model as a whole, the culture of coaching badminton in England is heavily weighted to the “Do” section. With some occasional exceptions planning, reviewing and evaluating is less emphasised. The main consequences of neglecting these areas are: Without planning goals for training are vague, meaning the training lacks focus Without reviewing there is no commitment to questioning the effectiveness of: what is being delivered how coaching is being delivered Without evaluation there is no attempt to make sense of the review outcomes with no subsequent effect upon future planning and delivery Performance Centres provide a very positive opportunity to embed this model effectively within their operations, providing benefits to the players by improving the quality of coaching delivery.

36


Introduction to Planning Planning defined Planning can be defined as “constructing an intended course of action”. Why is planning so important? Planning is necessary to: Provide goals that focus and motivate both players and coaches Allow coaches and players to select appropriate activities that support the achievement of goals Help support effective progression of skills Consider factors that influence the achievement of goals, such as: Numbers of participants Courts Availability of equipment Time Provide a “benchmark” against which coaching effectiveness can be judged For some the degree of planning required in Performance Centres represents a considerable change in coaching culture. The benefits to the players (outlined above) of making this change are undeniable however. In the 1st year it would be prudent to allow more time for planning. Subsequent years will then be a refinement of what has been produced and learnt from that year’s activities. Planning or a Plan? Obviously the outcome of planning is a written plan, but it’s useful here to consider the following quote:

“In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” General Eisenhower, 34th American President The point is that the value of planning is not necessarily in the final piece of paper that is produced, but in the thought processes that went into producing it. Who should be involved in the planning process? All members of the coaching team should be involved in the planning process. However, the Head Coach has overall responsibility for the annual plan and should expect support from Level 2 coaches in the designing of linked sessions. Level 1 coaches should be involved as much as possible to help in their development.

37


Long term Planning In Performance Centre terms long term planning is annual planning or longer. Annual planning is the responsibility of the Head Coach, although involvement of Level 2 and Level 1 coaches is desirable to help support their development. The schedule overleaf demonstrates an annual operational plan for Performance Centre coaching. Note that the plan embraces the Coaching Process Model, scheduling in the elements of: Plan Do Review Evaluate Planning for squads Having outlined the plan for the Annual Coaching Operations as a whole, plans for individual squads need to be considered. The overall goals for the 3 Performance Pathway squads are: Raw Performance To build on identified abilities, developing basic movement and hitting skills that are sustained under largely predictable environments Developing Performance To expand the range of movement and hitting skills and engrain learning so skills are sustainable under increasingly unpredictable, game-like situations Emerging Performance To refine movement and hitting skills and enhance tactical awareness so these skills are adapted successfully in competition It will then be necessary to subdivide these goals into annual planning goals. Creating effective goals Well-constructed and effective goals have the following characteristics: Specific as this helps focus on the task Measurable, not necessarily numerically (e.g. can be measured via observation) Agreed between both players and coaches Realistic Timed Exciting Recorded

38


Sample Annual Operational Plan Cycle

Week no. 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

1

2

3

4

5

39

Week comm. 110808 180808 250808 010908 080908 150908 220908 290908 061008 131008 201008 271008 031108 101108 171108 241108 011208 081208 151208 221208 291208 050109 120109 190109 260109 020209 090209 160209 230209 020309 090309 160309 230309 300309 060409 130409 200409 270409 040509 110509 180509 250509 010609 080609 150609 220609 290609 060709 130709 200709 270709 030809

Plan

Deliver

Review session

Evaluate

Player Review

Coach Review

Potential Additional activity Summer Camp

PC early season champs.

Informal

Christmas camp

Easter Camp

PC Late season champs.

Formal

Summer Camp


Medium term planning Once you have decided on the annual goals it is necessary to divide the year up into more manageable sections. Planning for these sections is the responsibility of both Level 3 coaches, with the involvement of Level 2 and Level 1 coaches being desirable to support their development. A possible template for a squad annual plan is shown overleaf. Note how the year is split into more manageable sections (e.g. weeks 36-44, 45-1, 2-10 etc.). Within each section you set a series of smaller goals designed so that if you achieve them you are making progress towards the overall programme goal. How many goals to set for each section is fairly arbitrary, but a minimum of 4 goals per section might be appropriate to start with. Coaches completing the UKCC Level 3 course however will understand that sections can be viewed in a more sophisticated way. For example, in the Emerging Performance squad there may be an element of designing training cycles to help peak for particular events. At the end of each cycle of delivery progress against the goals set should be evaluated. The outcome of this evaluation may mean the goals for the next section are adjusted accordingly.

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41

Level of Squad? (R,D,E)

Cycle

1

2

3

4

5

Week no. 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Season (e.g. 07/08)

Annual goal:

Goals for Specific Cycles of Training (Minimum 4 per cycle)


Short term planning Short term planning can be defined as “planning an individual activity or session.” Performance Centres are expected to provide evidence of session planning and this task is the responsibility of both Level 2 and Level 3 coaches, with Level 1 coaches being involved in the process to support their development. It is important when producing session plans that the level of detail is sufficient to indicate a thoughtful approach to the session, but does not go overboard. The latter point is important since a plan containing masses of detail is unlikely to be useful since it is: Not sustainable as the planning takes too long Not feasible to remember everything on the plan, meaning much of what is written is wasted effort A sample session plan template is shown overleaf. Session Planner: Initial information The second and third rows of the session planner are for initial information required to help organise the session. All but the safety box can be completed well in advance of the session taking place. Goals Much of the left hand column of the session plan is concerned with setting goals. Note that there are sections for setting coaching as well as playing goals. In the case of the “prepare to play” and “cool-down” sections the goals are already set, since these goals are fairly consistent across all sessions. The nature of the practice The central column is a tick box section, giving the coach the opportunity to select from a number of frequently used practices. This saves a lot of writing. The abbreviations used in this column stand for: H/R Feed

Hand and/or racket feed

CR

Continuous rally

CR: EOD

Continuous rally: elements of doubt

PRO

Play the Rally Out

CG/MP

Conditioned game/Match Play

Notes The right column highlights the area that can be used for writing any notes to give additional pointers regarding activity content. For example, this might be to include practices other than those listed in the central column, suggest very specific aspects of a skill that should be emphasised or to elaborate on how the practice might be organised (e.g. 2 vs. 1). Occasionally this could be blank but this would be the exception rather than the rule.

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Performance Centre Session Planner Level of squad (R, D or E)

Venue and date

Coaches supervising session (initial)

Safety check made (tick or cross) + any actions noted

Player: court ratio (e.g. 18:4) Equipment

Specify any specialised equipment required?

Personal attire Register Environment

Coaching Goal (s)

Recap

Time

To remind both coaches and players of the content of previous sessions To highlight how this session builds/progresses from previous session Session Goal (s) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; be specific Prepare to play / warm up To prepare players physically and psychologically for the forthcoming session

Cooldown

Practice Content Activity Stretch Stability Speed Shadow Knock-up Shadow H/R Feed CR CR: EOD PRO CG/MP Shadow H/R Feed CR CR: EOD PRO CG/MP Shadow H/R Feed CR CR: EOD PRO CG/MP Gradually reducing exercise

To reduce pooling of fluids in extremities Support gradual return of bodily functions to resting levels

Static stretch

Session Reflections Playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opinions on the quality of the session Reflections on the player performance

Reflections on the coaching performance

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Notes (make specific comments re practice content)

Time


It is useful to utilise abbreviations to save time spent writing. Examples of the most commonly used abbreviations are included in the following table.

Term forehand backhand forecourt midcourt rearcourt split-step round to head smash clear dropshot net shot

Abbreviation fh bh fc mc rc ss rth sm clr ds ns

Timings The column on the right is used for approximate timings of activities. Session Reflections The bottom three rows of the session planner are concerned with session reflections. There are sections for: Player Opinions. Asking players what they liked or disliked about the session is invaluable feedback that coaches should encourage. Avoid closed questions such as “did you enjoy the session?” that illicit very little useful information. Use questions such as “what parts of the session did you enjoy/find most useful?” or “what parts of the session did you not enjoy/find least useful?” which generate more useful information Reflections on Player Performance: This should focus on how well the players did when measured against the goals that were set for the session. This influences the setting of future goals and also gives an indication of coaching effectiveness Reflections on Coaching Performance In order to carry on improving, coaches need to reflect on their own coaching performance. Note the reflections here should relate to the coaching goal set at the start of the session. Comments in this section should consider aspects such as: Effectiveness of communications Group management Ability to differentiate practices within a group Catering for differing learning styles Ability to develop practices etc.

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Coach Education

45


Continuous Professional Development (CPD) Whatever your coaching level or role, keeping up to date and continuously developing your skills is vital, especially if we are to reach the goal of having ‘the best coaching system in the world’. Because people learn in very different ways, Continuous Professional Development (CPD) can assume all sorts of formats, such as short CPD workshops and conferences, working with other coaches, as well as self-directed learning using resources available such as the internet, books, other sports etc. Underpinning this commitment to CPD will require a solid mentoring system, a subject that is developed later in this document. The eventual introduction of a ‘Standard for Coaches’ as a development to the Coaching Register will seek to give credit for those coaches who really invest in their own development. In Performance Centre terms, CPD can be divided into 4 broad categories. These categories are explained over the next few pages.

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1. Obtaining up to date coaching qualifications Performance Centre coaches are expected to have or be working towards the achievement of BADMINTON England coaching awards that have United Kingdom Coaching Certificate (UKCC) endorsement. The framework and guidelines that underpin the UKCC coaching qualifications were the result of a significant period of consultation involving people from a variety of backgrounds, including coaches from a range of sports, coach educators and sports scientists. 31 sports have already developed and are now delivering UKCC endorsed qualifications at some levels. It is anticipated that more sports will join at a later stage – however all of the ‘big’ sports are currently involved. Many coaches operating in Performance Centres will have existing BADMINTON England or Badminton Association of England qualifications from older systems and will have to undertake bridging activities in order to be awarded a qualification that has UKCC accreditation. To facilitate this process BADMINTON England are introducing a process whereby we are able to recognise and accredit previous learning experiences. This has involved a process of matching the content of older qualifications with that in the UKCC qualifications so that a revised and tailored learning programme can be followed. This process is commonly known as Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) or Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL): Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) is the generic term used for the award of credit on the basis of demonstrated learning that has occurred at some time in the past Accreditation of Experiential Learning (APEL) recognises the value of learning that takes place outside formal education institutions. It enables adult learners to identify the skills and knowledge acquired informally and to reflect upon their learning processes, enabling them to make the transition from informal to formal learning In both cases evidence must be presented to demonstrate that learning has taken place. Please note that under no circumstances will anyone be awarded a coaching qualification without successfully completing the relevant assessment. BADMINTON England Level 1 qualifications progressing to Level 2 (UKCC) It is permissible for a coach qualified with the previous level 1 qualification to apply for the Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (UKCC). The coaches must meet the pre-requisites for the course: Be at least 18 years old Should have experience of coaching as an assistant coach In order to bridge some of the gaps between the old Level 1 course and the UKCC Level 1 a short home study pack has been developed, along with some short answer questions to check for understanding. This will be sent to candidates once they have registered for the course and should be completed before the start date of the Level 2. Whilst it does not form part of the formal assessment the tutor will look at the responses to tailor the course accordingly. At the moment there is no plan to charge coaches for the bridging pack when they are progressing up a level from the old Level 1 to UKCC Level 2. Applications for the UKCC Level 2 from coaches with older Level 1 equivalent qualifications (e.g. Leaders award) will be considered on individual merit. BADMINTON England Level 2/Part 1 qualifications being upgraded to UKCC Level 2 We are currently finalising the process of mapping the old Level 2 and the Coach Part 1 awards to the UKCC Level 2. This will enable us to finalise the content of a learning programme to bridge the gap between them. For those coaches who hold the old BADMINTON England Level 2 qualification this will be covered through the completion of a Home Study course and for those with the Coach Part 1 there will be a taught course. This will be followed by completion of the assessment for the UKCC Level 2 qualification. There will be a cost for this process to cover the 1st4sport qualifications candidate registration fees as well as the assessment costs.

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BADMINTON England Level 2 qualifications progressing to Level 3 (UKCC) It is a long time since a qualification has been offered beyond Level 2 and as a result everyone coming onto the Level 3 qualification will have a very different background both in terms of their previous qualifications as well as their coaching experiences. In order to ensure that coaches have the best experience from the Level 3 qualification the first stage in the process will be an evaluation day for all coaches. There will also be a needs analysis for each coach to complete. Once this process has been completed coaches will be assisted in developing an action plan for their own development. For some the next step will be the first module of the Level 3 programme, whereas for others it may be recommended that further learning or experience is gained before progressing onto Level 3. What about if I have been coaching for years without a qualification? We would always encourage people to enrol on the Level 1 qualification if they have no previous formal coaching qualifications, but at the same time we appreciate how powerful learning through experience can be. We would certainly advocate that all coaches should hold a recognised qualification, to demonstrate their professional competence as well as to be able to be appropriately insured. In the instance that someone feels that they are already able to demonstrate the competences that will be learnt through the respective learning programmes, they should complete an AP(E)L application form, where they will be required to outline their previous experience to date, other relevant qualifications, a coaching needs analysis as well as providing references which substantiate their application. A decision will be made as to whether the coach should be allowed to progress straight through to the assessment or whether they should attend all or parts of the learning programme beforehand. Under no circumstances will anyone be awarded a coaching qualification without completing the relevant assessment. There will of course be a cost to this process, and it should not be seen as the “cheap” option. The fees will cover the cost of the 1st4sport qualifications candidate registration fee as well as the assessment and administration costs. Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Badminton The Level 3 qualification will be available from April 2008. The UKCC descriptor for a Level 3 coach is as follows: ‘Plan, implement, analyse and revise annual coaching programmes’ The qualification has been designed to be completely modular, meaning coaches can complete it in a timescale that suits them. It is likely to take upwards of 6 months to complete but coaches may take up to 2 years if they choose. The level 3 coach will be expected to be able to: plan an annual programme that recognises the total life cycle of the participant, for example school year, competitive programme deliver an annual programme that develops progressive sessions using a range of informed coaching methods to meet all participants needs evaluate the effectiveness of the coaching sessions and programme to modify future plans to ensure participant progression and development evaluate participant’s performance by making a detailed assessment of progression to ensure participants long-term development. The majority of the assessment will be based on coaching at least one singles and one doubles player, developing, delivering and reviewing their coaching plans. This will all be recorded in a coaching log that will be submitted as part of the final assessment. There will also be some practical assessment where all of the “how to coach” skills will be assessed, such as demonstration, observation and analysis, feedback etc.

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2. Obtaining additional qualifications/certifications that expand coaching knowledge and skills (e.g. first aid, child protection etc.) Obtaining additional qualifications/certification to complement the core UKCC coaching awards is recommended, but this should not simply be for the purposes of â&#x20AC;&#x153;CV fillingâ&#x20AC;?. Thought should be given about how the qualifications and awards truly help to develop the coach and how obtaining these Awards will be of benefit to the players. The descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of the Performance Centre Coaches (Levels 1, 2 and 3) contain clear guidelines as to the essential and desirable qualifications/certifications that each level of coach should seek to obtain in the early stages of Performance Centre operations.

49


3. Using alternative resources that could help to expand knowledge (e.g. books, internet, other sports, educational resources etc.) Coaching practice can be improved by gaining then using knowledge gleaned from more sources than just coaching qualifications and workshops. Resources from the following subject areas can be invaluable, examples being: Long term athlete development Biomechanics Exercise physiology General education Child development Psychology Motor learning Other sports A key point here is not to select resources that simply represent a means of filling a CV. The resources should be selected and used to fill clearly identified gaps in that particular coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s methods of practice. Identification of these development areas can be achieved by adopting some of the techniques outlined in the next section on reflective practice.

50


4. Committing to reflective practice when coaching (e.g. self reflection, working with a mentor etc.) Coaching Awards and additional qualifications are just a small part of the coach development pathway. Continually reflecting on your own coaching performance, supported in many cases by a mentor, is invaluable as a method of improving coaching practice as it: Heightens your awareness of development areas in your coaching practice Encourages you to search out methods by which these development areas can be addressed Motivates by setting goals for the achievement of improvements in the identified development areas Performance Centres should embed reflective practice in their operations via the following methods: Reflecting on coaching as well as player performance: at the end of sessions, after a series of linked sessions annually Using reflections to help formulate individualised coach action plans and amend future coaching programmes To make reflective practice does require all parties to commit wholeheartedly to the philosophy. Regular, honest and well considered appraisals of coaching practice are invaluable to improving coaching, whereas rushed and ill-considered comments motivated simply by a need to â&#x20AC;&#x153;fill out the formâ&#x20AC;? have little value. The methods described over the next few pages illustrate how to embed review and evaluation into Performance Centre Operations.

51


a)

Complete a coach self-evaluation form to assess where you are at the moment. This is vital since if you don’t know where you are starting from it’s impossible to plan a route of any type! A coach evaluation form is shown below.

Coach self evaluation form Name of Mentor Date Performance Centre Assess current coaching practice (1 = I rarely, 2 = I sometimes, 3 = I frequently, 4 = I always) Planning Use short, medium and long term goal setting to focus my coaching Pre-plan sessions in advance of delivery Delivery Role Model Provide a positive + energising role model for players Encourage appropriate player preparation at the start of sessions Session content Adapt planned session activities and timings to meet player needs Encourage players to complete sessions with an appropriate cool-down Differentiate practices within a group to cater for individual needs Group Promote effective group dynamics by rotating practice partners Management Bring together and disperse the group efficiently Adapt verbal communication skills accordingly (e.g. simple words – children) Verbal Use verbal instruction sparingly (e.g. to provide essential teaching points) Communication Use questioning, particularly open questioning, to support my coaching Use short, precise feedback sparingly + strategically to support learning Paraverbal skills Am aware of + use paraverbal skills (tone, inflection) to assist my coaching Provide accurate demonstrations from a variety of viewing angles Non verbal Am aware of + control my own body language to the benefit of players communication Observe player body language + use this to help meet player needs Listening skills Listen attentively and consider the opinions of players Coaching Style Adapt my coaching style (tell, sell, share, allow) to suit the players’ needs Learning Style Adapt my coaching to players’ learning style (auditory, visual, kinaesthetic) Feeding skills Feed using a variety of methods to provide meaningful practice opportunities Review Review my own coaching practice at the end of each session Review my own coaching progress at timed intervals (e.g. bi-annually) Formulate an action plan on the basis of my coaching review Act upon the contents of the action plan I have devised Coach Education and Development Collaborate with other coaches outside my usual coaching team Am open to the ideas/opinions of coaches outside my usual coaching team Attend coaching education and workshops on a regular basis Regularly read materials that help develop my coaching expertise Professional Conduct Adhere to the principles of the BADMINTON England Code of Conduct Other areas of coaching interest Name of Coach

1 2 3 4

Coach signature

52


b) In conjunction with your mentor and using the coaching self-evaluation form, complete a Coach Development Action Plan as shown below. An example of a completed version of this is shown overleaf.

Coach Development Plan Name of Coach Date

Name of Mentor Performance Centre Coaching achievements since last review (including progress against goals)

Strengths

Development area Title

Coach signature

53

How I will work on this

Mentor Signature

Agreed support from mentor

Date

Achieved by:


Coach Development Plan Name of Coach Date

Name of Mentor Performance Centre

Barney Ruble 14/07/08

Felicity Ladywell Carlisle

Progress against goals set in last review Improved understanding and ability to design/apply progressive technical practices Reduced talking when coaching and used demonstration more effectively Completed bridging pack and assessments so upgraded to UKCC Level 1

Strengths Open to constructive criticism Committed to self improvement Builds good working relationships with young players – excellent motivator

Development area Title Improve understanding and ability to apply effective questioning

Improve understanding and ability to design/ apply progressive tactical practices

Expand underpinning coaching knowledge in specialist areas

Coach signature

Research use of questioning as a learning tool on internet/UKCC Levels 1 and 2 manuals Devise typical questions - use to support delivery of activities

Agreed support from mentor Test knowledge via questioning Observe +feed back on design / application of 3 tactical practices

Read tactical sections of UKCC Level 2 manual Devise 6 tactical practices and use them with players Review the effectiveness of the practices

Test knowledge via questioning Observe + feed back on design / application of 3 tactical practices

How I will work on this

Attend and complete a: Basic First Aid Course “Equity in Coaching” workshop

B Ruble

Mentor Signature

No mentor input required although check to see completed at next review

F Ladywell

Date

Achieved by: 14/08/08

14/12/08

14/01/09 14/03/09

11/11/08 03/02/09

14/07/08

c) Supported by your mentor, commit to and complete the tasks outlined in the agreed action plan d) Complete session plan reflections on a regular basis. The relevant section of the session planner is included at the bottom of the session planner e) Review progress against action plan and document progress on a 6 monthly basis

54


Mentoring One key area that will help to benefit badminton coaching in England is via the introduction of an effective mentoring system to support coach development. Performance Centres represent an excellent opportunity to start embedding effective mentoring into our coach education system. Mentoring defined Mentoring can be defined as: “a person who encourages the coach to examine their own coaching practice and take responsibility for their own development and performance.” The better the mentor understands how people learn the more effective they will be at fulfilling the mentoring role. Therefore spending a little time clarifying how people learn is valuable. Learning defined Learning can be defined as: “Demonstrating a permanent change in behaviour as a result of gaining and applying knowledge” The diagram below shows the process which people go through in order for learning to take place.

PLAN (Apply what you have learnt)

DO (Experience)

EVALUATE (Make sense of analysis, by self and through discussion)

REVIEW (Analysis and Reflection)

Different people will learn more effectively at different stages of the cycle because people have differing learning styles. There are many different theories about learning styles, but what is generally accepted is that: Most people have a preferred learning style, but use other styles to compliment and support that preferred style The preferred learning style may change for a person depending on what they are learning

55


Teaching style/learning style Creating an environment where teaching is taking place does not automatically mean that effective learning is also happening. This will only be the case if the teaching matches the preferred learning style of the target audience. The table below indicates, for example, the relative effectiveness of 3 different teaching methods.

Telling

Showing

Experiencing (Physically/ Mentally involved)

Recall after 3 weeks

70%

72%

85%

Recall after 3 months

10%

32%

65%

Note how the most effective method of teaching is to allow the learner to be mentally and/or physically involved in the learning process. This is an important point to bear in mind when considering the role of the mentor. The Mentoring Role Sometimes people are given the title of mentor where in actual fact they are not fulfilling that role in its truest sense. The diagram below includes 3 roles, which are linked to a particular style of teaching

Technical Advisor

Support Coach

TELL

SHOW

Mentor INVOLVE

Technical advisers will provide knowledge-based information (e.g. techniques, sports science etc.). Their predominant style is often telling, so the amount of learning taking place is minimal. Learning is focused around the technical advisor, who provides all the answers. Support coaches often work in a team and provide opportunities for other coaches (e.g. Assistant Coaches) to observe a more experienced coach in action. Since this has a large element of showing then the learning experience is more effective than that offered by the technical advisor. Learning is still focused around the support coach, who provides all the answers. A mentor aims to encourage the coach to examine their own coaching practice and take responsibility for their own development and performance. The most important thing therefore is that mentoring is centered on the coach, focusing on the coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agenda, with the mentor helping the coach to explore their own solutions, whilst also growing their confidence and competence.

56


What are the characteristics of a good mentor? A good mentor will be able to: build rapport use questioning to raise awareness listen set goals action plan use a framework to help coaches to learn help coaches review and take responsibility for their behaviour and development make others feel valued manage emotions understand the learning process It is tempting to assume that only those with exceptional sports-specific knowledge and experience are able to be mentors. Whilst this is essential for those who are providing technical advice it is less critical for a mentor. It is the skills and attributes of the mentor that are more important, such as the ability to establish relationships built on trust, respect and understanding, as well as the skills to encourage a coach to reflect on their own coaching practice and to be involved in their own learning and development. It is quite possible for a mentor to come from a completely different background to their mentee, for example a coach from a different a different sport. The Mentoring Process A diagram that sums up the mentoring process is shown below. Note the similarities with the Learning Process model. This is understandable, since mentors are there to support learning.

ACTION PLAN Set goals based on previous evaluation Set target dates for meetings

EVALUATE Make sense of reflections Compare progress against set goals

DO Let coach take action

REVIEW Coach reflections on learning activities undertaken

Mentoring Support (based on ground rules - honesty, mutual respect and trust)

57


The “GROW” model The grow model offers useful advice on how to structure an effective mentoring session.

Goal Find out what they want to work on/discuss, and their specific goal for the mentoring session and the short and long term goals

Reality Ask questions that help the coach to think about the current situation related to the goal. This means asking questions that raise awareness and promote self-reflection and thinking.

Options Encourage the coach to generate as many options as possible without judging them. This is the time to help them to “think outside the box” to find more creative solutions. If the coach has run out of ideas, the coach may ask you for further ideas or you may wish to offer suggestions (if agreed)

Will Use questions to help the coach determine which option to take, how and when to take it. Agree the first step(s) Mentoring in Performance Centres In the first instance, Performance Centres should take a lead in the mentoring process, providing time for both them and the coaches within their team to plan, deliver, review and evaluate the development of coaches within the team.

58


Miscellaneous Information

59


Exemplar Scheduling and Costings Each different Performance Centre will face different challenges when creating the right weekly training schedule. Variables will include: Availability of coaches, courts and volunteers Costs of coaches, courts and shuttles The local geography and travelling times Local economics Commitment of players to other training The commitment of volunteers The aim of this section therefore is not to directly instruct how sessions should be organised and funded in a Performance Centre. It is intended as a trigger from which Performance Centres can build, tailoring their operations to fit the constraints/opportunities afforded by their local environment. Weekly schedules and costings The weekly schedule and costings outlined in the next 4 pages are based on the following suggested coaching rates: Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Head Coach: Level 2

£7.00/hr

£14.00/hr

£17.00/hr

£17.00/hr

Head Coach: Level 3 £20.00/hr

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61 Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

9.00

10.00

Raw Performance Session C, 4 courts, L3 + volunt

Turn up and Play (supervised by volunteers)

11.00

12.00

13.00

14.00 Turn up and Play (supervised by volunteers)

15.00

16.00

17.00

Raw Performance Squad Session A 32 players, 4 courts, 3 coaches (1 level 3, 2 level 1’s)

18.00

19.00

20.00

21.00

Developing Performance Squad Session D 18 players, 4 courts, 2 coaches (1 Level 3, 1 Level 1)

Emerging Performance Squad Session G 10 players, 3 courts, 1 coach (Level 3)

Raw Performance Squad Session B 32 players, 4 courts, 3 coaches (1 Level 2, 2 level 1’s) Dev.Perf. Squad Session E 9 plyrs, 3 courts, 1 coach (L2)

Dev.Perf Squad Session F 9 plyrs, 3 courts, 1 coach (L2)

Emerging Performance Squad Session H 10 players. 4 courts, 1 coach (Level 3)

Women’ s only session

Coaching players with a disability


Raw Performance Squad Session A Hourly costs

Session B

L1 Assistant Coach/hr

Volunteer

Volunteer

L1 Assistant Coach/hr

£ 7.00

£ 7.00

L2 Coach/hr L3 Coach/hr Coach costs/hr Court costs/hr (£8/hr)

Session C Volunteer

£14.00

£20.00

£20.00 £27.00 £32.00

Total costs/hr Session duration (hrs)

X 1.5

Total cost / session Sessions / season

X 38

£21.00 £32.00

£20.00 £32.00

£59.00

£53.00 X 1.5

£52.00 1

£88.50

£79.50 X 38

£52.00 X 38

Session cost / season Revenue (A/B £5,C £3.50: 80% attend.)

£3,363.00 £4,864.00

£3,021.00 £4,864.00

£1,976.00 £3,404.00

Season surplus/deficit for each session

+£1,501.00

+ £1,843.00

+ £1,428.00

Total surplus/deficit for Raw Performance

+ £4,772.00

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63 Developing Performance Squad Session D Hourly costs

L1 Assistant Coach/hr

Session E

Session F

£ 7.00

L1 Assistant Coach/hr L2 Coach/hr L3 Coach/hr Coach costs/hr Court costs/hr Total costs/hr Session duration (hrs) Total cost / session Sessions / season Session cost / season Revenue (£7 /session – 85% attendance) Season surplus/deficit for each session Total surplus/deficit for Developing Performance

£14.00

£14.00

£20.00 £27.00 £32.00

£14.00 £24.00 £59.00

X2

£14.00 £24.00 £38.00

X2 £118.00

X 38

£38.00 2

£76.00 X 38

£76.00 X 38

£4.484.00 £4,070.00

£2,888.00 £2,035.00

£2,888.00 £2,326.00

-£414.00

-£853.00

-£853.00

- £2120.00


Emerging Performance Squad Session G Hourly costs

Session F

L1 Assistant Coach/hr L1 Assistant Coach/hr L2 Coach/hr L3 Coach/hr Coach costs/hr Court costs/hr

Total costs/hr Session duration (hrs) Total cost / session Sessions / season Session cost / season Revenue (£9/session – 90% attendance) Season surplus/deficit for each session Total surplus/deficit for Developing Performance

£20.00

£20.00 £20.00 £24.00

£20.00 £32.00 £44.00

X2

£52.00 X2

£88.00 X 38

£104.00 X 38

£3,344.00 £3,078.00

£3,952.00 £3,078.00

-£226.00

-£874.00

-£1100.00

64


Estimated Surpluses The Raw, Developing and Emerging Squads

£1552

Women only (break even)

0

Players with a disability

0

Turn up and play

£750

Potential other revenues (e.g. Badminton Bonanza)

£400

Total This surplus should then be used to fund: Shuttles Planning Session reviewing Player reviewing Mentoring External courses

65

£2702


Creating and Developing Relationships In order to produce good players we have to ensure that their needs are being met and this often involves working with other squads, cells, academies, schools, clubs and County Associations. By doing so the players benefit because: The players feel confident that they are backed by a team who have their best interests at heart Playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; training goals and schedules can be coordinated Competition schedules can be coordinated Coaches can share best practice and enhance their coaching skills Sparring opportunities for players are created It is very important that Performance Centres take a positive lead in creating and developing relationships. A few aspects to bear in mind are: Keep the best interests of the players at the forefront of the discussion Bear in mind that most â&#x20AC;&#x153;difficult peopleâ&#x20AC;? think it is everyone else being difficult! At all costs maintain lines of communication View issues as objectively as possible Compromise is sometimes necessary Persistent and undue criticism of other coaches should be avoided, particularly if the coach concerned is not in a position to defend themselves, as it is unprofessional and reflects badly on the whole sport. Meetings amongst coaches to resolve differences of opinion are recommended and frequently result in a win-win-win situation: both coaches gain a greater understanding of each other and, most importantly, the players benefit.

66


Sports Science The progress of players within Performance Centres will undoubtedly be enhanced with the application of Sports Science. This could include areas such as: Physical conditioning, including: Stability and Strength Flexibility Speed and agility Endurance Plyometrics Fitness testing Sports Psychology Player Profiling Match Analysis Diet and Nutrition Lifestyle Management Parent Education Whilst all these areas are important, to try to implement all these facets at once would not be sensible. For many, the operational procedures outlined in this handbook already represent a considerable change in the areas of Talent Identification and Selection, Coaching and Coach Education. For that reason aspects of sports science will be integrated into Performance Centre operations over an extended period. The following aspects should be noted: Some aspects of Sports Science are actually included in this document, most notably player review and goal setting Note that in many cases the aspects of Sports Science will not necessarily be simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;boltonsâ&#x20AC;? (e.g. diet and nutrition lectures) but will be more embedded to help players on a long term basis

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Contacts Name

Telephone

Mobile

E-mail

Website

BADMINTON England

01908 268400

N/a

enquiries@badmintonengland.co.uk

www.badmintonengland.co.uk

Julia Strong Club Support Manager • Operational aspects of Performance Centres outside Coaching

01908 268427

07921 289618

juliastrong@badmintonengland.co.uk

Mike Woodward National Development Coach • Talent Identification • Operational delivery of coaching/mentoring within Performance Centres

01908 268435

07725 413545

mikewoodward@badmintonengland.co.uk

Katherine Taylor Coaching Manager • UKCC Coaching Qualifications • Coaching Register • Child Protection

01908 268423

07738 890309

katherinetaylor@badmintonengland.co.uk

sports coach UK • Coaching skills courses

0113 274 4802

runningsports • Support for organising/ running sports • Advice on attracting/ working with volunteers

0800 363373

1st4sport • Sports coaching resources

0113-201 5555

enquiries@1st4sport.com

www.1st4sport.com

Awards for All • Grant opportunities on a local basis

0845 600 20 40

general.enquiries@awardsforall.org.uk

www.awardsforall.org.uk

coaching@sportscoachuk.org

www.sportscoachuk.org www.runningsports.org

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Resources BADMINTON England Resources

UKCC Level 1 & Level 2 Coach Handbooks Power & Precision Magazines Technique DVD Tactics DVD (available late Spring 2008) Long Term Athlete Development model: Basics to Brilliance Mental skills: A guide to Badminton Coaches An Introduction to Nutrition in Badminton Introduction to Basic Techniques and Strokes Fitness testing procedures www.badmintonengland.co.uk Other resources www.1st4sport.com This is an excellent website for ordering a host of sports coaching related texts.

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