Issuu on Google+

CONTACT: Jacquelyn Mack Synergy, Inc Public Relations Contact 321-299-3112 jacquelyn@synergyprograms.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Brain Health, The Critical Fitness Quotient for the New Millennium The Real-World Approach to Brain Training that Makes Staying SHARP Simple SAN DIEGO (June 13, 2011) – Dr. Heidi Hanna’s new book entitled SHARP: Simple Strategies to Boost Your Brainpower (Synergy, June 2011), focuses on topics such as nutrition, fitness, and performance psychology to provide a common sense approach to understanding the concepts of brain health and mental training for improved health, happiness, and performance. Dr. Hanna brings the same personal passion to SHARP that has made her a successful performance coach and keynote speaker for the past decade. In SHARP: Simple Strategies to Boost Your Brainpower, readers will: • Understand how the demands on your time and energy impact your mental capacity. Learn the critical components of brain health that provide a foundation for improved cognitive functioning. • Utilize the power of brain training to stimulate mental energy with exercises that improve learning in areas that have the most impact on performance. • Create an actionable plan for implementing a sustainable brain health and training program that can be applied to your everyday life. Matters of the Mind The constant state of busyness that we live in has created a chronic level of stress on our brain – so toxic, in fact, that experts believe more than 75% of medical visits are stress related. Honestly, most of us are too busy to notice, and will not realize the devastating impact of stress on our lives until it takes a serious toll on our health, happiness, or performance. Stress is literally making us sicker. Constant distractions and lack of focus causes us to multitask, a dangerous result when we look at things like driving and texting. Busyness also has harmful effects when it comes to our relationships, as people are constantly using what I call subtle insults – sending the very quiet message that what I’m doing right now is more important, so I cannot give you my full attention. What’s more, research suggests that our mental abilities such as judgment, reasoning, memory, learning, and language, begin to decline in healthy, educated adults when they’re in their 20’s and 30’s. As baby boomers start to turn 65, the risk of Alzheimer’s disease for this group increases significantly. By the age of 85, the risk is basically a coin toss. We Have More Control Than We Think Scientists used to believe our brain was hardwired to function in a very specific way. But new research and the ability to use scanning technology shows that the brain is actually radically adaptable if we train it appropriately – like we do our bodies. The brain is part of the body, after all, but it is also the control center of our entire life. It is the “hardware” of our operating system, while our mind and our mental abilities are the “software,” or programming, that runs our system. According to Dr. Hanna, we are all in need of an upgrade. The “fitter” our brain is, the more energy efficient it becomes, and the easier it is to do important mental tasks such as focusing attention and being creative. Dr. Hanna wrote SHARP: Simple Strategies to Boost Your Brainpower to provide tools to enhance focused attention and creativity, while improving health a nd happiness. These same strategies help develop healthy – MORE –


– CONTINUED –

brain functioning throughout the aging process, potentially delaying the onset of cognitive decline, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s disease. In order to keep concepts simple, and applicable, Hanna walks you through a 7-step process to becoming, and staying, SHARP. Step 1 – Understand brain basics Step 2 – Assess brain health Step 3 – Create a healthy foundation Step 4 – Build mental muscle (strength training) Step 5 – Develop resilience (flexibility training) Step 6 – Make it last (endurance training) Step 7 – Design your training program SHARP Highlights: Cognitive Fitness is important for three (3) critical outcomes. Performance Everybody is looking for an edge to help them stand out from the competition. Researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology and physiology have demonstrated that brain-training exercises can have both immediate and long-term effects when practiced regularly. And this couldn’t come at a better time, as the strain on mental energy is at an all time high. Improvements in mental focus, concentration, and memory help individuals reach their most important goals now, while boosting their mental capacities in the future. Resilience The unmanaged stress of our current work environment has caused serious disengagement in people’s personal lives. According to the 2008 State of Health in the American Workforce Survey, ⅓ of employees report that their work has a primarily negative impact on their lives off the job by draining energy, so they don’t have enough left over for their personal or family life. Employees are doing more with less as businesses cut back support staff, increase minimum production levels, reduce compensation structures, and so on.  If we don’t manage the drain on our mental energy, we will quickly burn out our most important resource – personal energy, or “human capital.” Longevity As if busyness and stress wasn’t enough, we all know that…well…we aren’t getting any younger. This year marks a turning point for our large baby boomer population: the first year that this generation starts to turn 65, the approximate age when the risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease begins to increase significantly. Not only are we aging, the current lifestyle only enhances this deterioration process. From 2000 to 2006, major health issues significantly decreased in scope other than one, Alzheimer’s disease, which nearly doubled (46%). About Dr. Heidi Hanna As a global performance coach and keynote speaker, Dr. Hanna has trained thousands of professionals on the role of nutrition and exercise for increased productivity, engagement and performance. Dr. Hanna is CEO and founder of SYNERGY, a coaching and consulting company that specializes in customized health and wellness solutions for individuals and organizations. She has been featured at many national conferences, including the Fortune Magazine Most Successful Women in Business Summit and the ESPN Women’s Leadership Summit. Dr. Hanna specializes in incorporating the psychology of behavior in the development of sustainable wellness strategies. Her vast coaching experience and passionate coaching style help motivate leaders to make systemic lifestyle changes and create company-wide strategies to support health and engagement initiatives. If you’d like more information, or to schedule an interview with Heidi Hanna, please contact Jacquelyn Mack, Synergy, Inc. at 321-299-3112 or email jacquelyn@synergyprograms.com. SHARP: Simple Strategies to Boost Your Brainpower (Synergy, June 2011) by Dr. Heidi Hanna. Release Date: June 1, 2011 Price: $15.95, 208 pages paperback ISBN# 978-0615481623

###


Q&A with Dr. Heidi Hanna Q. With so much health advice out there, how do people know where to focus their attention so they don’t feel overwhelmed? A. One of the problems I’ve noticed is that oftentimes, the more people read about health advice, the less they actually know. Anything new sounds promising, especially to someone who feels like they have tried everything else already without success. With so much information out there, people can easily get wrapped up in the fad of the day, or assume that because something worked for one person it will work for them. Instead of trying to do everything perfectly, I recommend trying to understand the most important concepts of healthy living, and then pick one or two key strategies to incorporate into their routine consistently for 90 days, so that they become habits. Q. Explain what you mean by “cognitive fitness.” A. When we use the word “fitness” we are usually referring to physical fitness, or the capacity to do work. The components of health-related physical fitness are strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness, or endurance. In order to be physically fit, all three need to be developed and maintained through training. So what does it take to be cognitively fit? Not surprisingly, the components aren’t that different. Cognitive fitness is the ability of the brain to focus mental energy on the things that matter most, in order to maximize health, happiness, and performance. Just like physical fitness, cognitive fitness requires several complementary elements of training to optimize the strength, flexibility, and endurance of the brain. Q. Can you tell me more about the dimensions of cognitive fitness? A. Brain strength refers to abilities such as focus, concentration, and attention. Mental strength training exercises enhance the communication pathways in the brain for more secure connections that are easier and easier to navigate. The SHARP strength training program consists of specific strategies that help build stronger neurons, recruit additional neurons for increased speed and accuracy, and improve our resistance to harmful things like distractions and multitasking. 

Similar to flexibility training for the body, improving mental flexibility develops our ability to be resilient and to manage stress more effectively so that it enhances us rather than hinders us. Strategies such as positivity training, initiating the relaxation response, and using a growth mindset help to provide resilience to stress and increase balance in our lives. 

Finally, like endurance training for the body, which improves the efficiency of our heart and lungs to keep us going over time, mental endurance training requires a similar approach so that we can maintain longevity, staying healthy throughout the aging process. This type of training incorporates elements of strength and flexibility in a “crosstraining” format for maximum impact, and emphasizes strategies and techniques that maximize sustainability. In order to have peak cognitive fitness, we must include a variety of training approaches that support and build upon each other. 

Q. When evaluating brain-training tools, what should consumers keep in mind to make the best choices about their training program? A. With such a rapidly growing aging population, the brain training industry is a booming market, which means consumers might soon feel overwhelmed trying to decide which programs to choose. There are three key principles that are important for any training program to include, whether it’s boosting physical fitness or cognitive fitness.

1. It must be specific – You wouldn’t work out your bicep muscles and expect to get bigger calves. If you want to be more focused, do focusing exercises. To have a more optimistic outlook, do positivity training.

2. It must be challenging – If you do something the way you’ve always done it, your brain (or body) doesn’t have to


Page 2

work at it. In order to stimulate growth, it’s important to do exercises and activities that cause a bit of discomfort. Then you’ll stimulate the adaptation process that will lead to improvements. Playing cards or doing crossword puzzles can be considered mental strength training when they are challenging. But if you’ve become a master card player, then you are pretty much playing with your auto-brain, and you will not see much cognitive benefit.

3. It must be practiced consistently – Just like the muscles in our body, the brain follows a “use it or lose it” philosophy. Experts have long said that when it comes to the brain, “what fires together, wires together” and “what fires apart, wires apart.” In order to maintain previous gains and continue to see improvements, it is important to be consistent with your training program.

Q. Considering how hard it is to make changes, how do you suggest readers implement these concepts into their daily life? A. The biggest mistake I see people making is trying to change too many things at once. Our brain is adaptable, but if we perceive change as requiring a huge time and energy investment, we’ll quickly come up with dozens of reasons why we shouldn’t bother trying. The brain’s main goal is to protect us, and spending our most valuable resources – if we don’t see a great enough return on investment – can run us down. This is why activities that are easy to add to our normal routine and provide a quick benefit are going to keep us motivated to continue working towards our goals. Chose one or two small things that seem realistic to add to your routine, try to tie them in with other current activities (such as putting your multivitamins next to your coffee pot). Also, make sure you really believe that what you’re attempting to do is important. If you don’t believe it’s going to benefit you in a way that really matters, chose another strategy. It’s better to do something right consistently than to keep trying to do something you think you should do, but are never able to actually make part of your lifestyle. Q. What are the SHARP Simple Strategies to Boosting our Brain Health? A. Each section of the book describes the reason why the strategies are important, and then outlines the top exercises for each training dimension. SHARP Sprints are also included for those occasions when time is limited, requiring just 30 seconds to get a significant brain boost. Examples include brain games and puzzles for strength training, gratitude lists and thank you notes for flexibility training, and simple meditation and mantras for endurance training. Online exercises are available at our SHARP Brain Gym, at www.synergyprograms.com/sharp. Q. What is the monkey brain, and how can one learn to control it? A. Our brain can be separated into three sections: lizard, monkey, and human. The “lizard brain” is found at the base; it contains the cerebellum and brain stem, which control our most basic instincts. The next part, the “monkey brain,” includes the majority of our tissue and controls more complex tasks as well as emotions. Most mammals lead with their “monkey brain,” which fuels our most basic responses to fear and desire. The most advanced part, the “human brain,” consists of the outer layer surrounding the “monkey brain.” This area allows for logical, emotionless thought, such as delayed gratification. By using our “human brain” we are able to think through our responses, rather than just reacting.

When we are faced with threats to our system, we don’t have time to stop and analyze what’s going on. During these times we are glad to have our “lizard” and “monkey” brains to quickly get us to safety, employing our fight-or-flight response. Because we have so many things going on at one time, when we multitask we can easily find ourselves using our “monkey brain.” We make mindless decisions that may end up causing serious problems with important tasks, or even worse, with important relationships. Next time you find yourself trying to do a million things at once and getting irritable or grumpy with someone you care about, remind yourself that you’re using your “monkey brain” – and work on acting more like a human. (Although I’d caution against calling your spouse a monkey when he or she is acting up, it might be a good code word for times when you feel like the other person isn’t giving you the full attention you really want.)

We can train ourselves to use our “human brain” more regularly by becoming more focused, resisting distractions, and using a flexible, optimistic mindset. Each of the training strategies discussed in SHARP train our brain to be stronger and more flexible, which keeps us out of survival mode and able to focus on the moment.


Page 3

Q. Research suggests that less than 50 percent of our memory and brain function is inherited. What are the SYNERGY Fab 5 strategies and why are they so important to our brain health? A. Of the top 10 risk factors for dementia, only three of them are outside of our control. We can’t do anything about our age, gender, or genetics, but the other seven factors, including nutrition, physical activity, stress management, sleep, and social connections (the SYNERGY Fab 5) may actually impact the way our genes are expressed – which means we may have even more control over our memory and brain function than we think. Q. Why is stress management so important to brain health, and how can we shift our perception from stress being a threat to a challenge? A. Stress is not bad. In fact stress is a critical part of the growth process. But, when we have too much stress and not enough recovery, we end up with a system overload. Unmanaged stress is literally toxic to the brain, and not only impacts how our brain performs but also the long-term health and sustainability of our mental functioning. Studies have shown that certain stress hormones like cortisol have a devastating impact on brain cells, and can even destroy them upon contact. Our brain is able to withstand stress that lasts less than 30 seconds – we basically get a surge of hormones that help us fight or flight, and we deal with the problem and move on. In today’s society, we are bombarded by stress constantly, which leaves stress hormones in our system for a much longer time frame than we can tolerate.

By practicing mental strength and flexibility, we can actual train our brain to be able to focus on the positive more regularly, which can help us to see the potential benefits of challenging situations. We can also train ourselves by using positive mantras, which provide both focus and positivity training, to help us trigger the relaxation response, which helps put our body, and mind, back into a more balanced state.

Q. What do sleep depravation and brain health have to do with one another? A. Sleep is not just about giving our system a rest. In fact, it’s during sleep that our body and brain do some of their most important work repairing and rebuilding muscle tissue, and creating stronger neural connections in the brain that improve learning and memory. The area of the brain that may be most affected by sleep, or the lack of it, is the prefrontal cortex – responsible for your “executive functioning” processes such as learning, judgment, reasoning, and memory consolidation.

Lack of sleep has been correlated with obesity, increases in smoking and alcohol use, inactivity, inflammation, heart disease, and blood sugar imbalances. A lack of sleep puts your body under additional stress, which may trigger the stress response: increasing adrenaline, cortisol, and other stress hormones during the day, which can be devastating to brain health.

Q. You speak about loneliness and the negative effect that is has on our brain. Why is community so important to our overall brain health? A. Throughout history, our survival has been dependant on belonging to a group that can help support us. Whether we’re on a hunt for food or trying to overcome economic challenges, having people in our life that we can depend on is essential to our protection. A lack of connection to other people sends a clear message to the brain that we could be in danger. Recent studies have shown that a lack of social connection is just as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, and worse than obesity or a sedentary lifestyle. Q. You mention that a training log is an essential part of any training program. Why is this training log so important? A. We’ve all heard that what gets measured, gets done. We track everything that is important to us, such as our finances, our schedule, and our work. However, most people don’t pay much attention to planning, let alone tracking, how they take care of their most valuable resource – their personal health and energy. In order to see if what we’re doing is having an impact, it is important to track our progress with behavior goals, and a training log is a great way to make sure you’re keeping yourself on track and accountable. A training log provides feedback to help identify things that are going well so you can celebrate your success. It also brings challenges to light so we can make adjustments quickly, before we get frustrated with a lack of progress.


Page 4

Q. Can you address the mindset makeover and the importance of rewriting our stories? A. While most people are unaware of it, we all have a personal narrator constantly making comments to us about what we think and do. Our “inside voice” drives our behavior. We may say that taking care of our body is important, but if we are actually telling ourselves that “I’ll get to it later,” “It won’t make a difference – I’m already too old,” or “I’ve got too many other things to do,” we will never see progress. This inner dialogue can be called our story, and it will determine what direction we go in. In order to get rid of the “big buts” of life (I should eat better, but…, I should work out, but…, I should get more sleep, but…), we have to make sure that the story we tell ourselves is one that we truly believe, and that is consistent with our deepest values. Q. You speak about mindfulness, meditation, and the practice of gratitude as a way to improve our brain health. How do these practices help me improve my mental acuity?

Mind-body practices such as mindfulness, meditation, and practicing gratitude have been demonstrated in many studies to boost mental focus by training concentration, and enhancing our ability to avoid distractions. They also build a more optimistic mindset, which has been shown to increase mental flexibility (seeing multiples perspectives), and our ability to be creative and think outside the box. While improving our performance, these mind-body strategies also stimulate the relaxation response in the body, which decreases the negative impact of stress and enhances our health and longevity.

Q. How has mental strength training help you personally in overcoming your personal fears of flying and public speaking? A. Like many other coaches and counselors I know, I first entered the field of psychology because I wanted to better understand how my own mind worked. I struggled with depression and anxiety at a very early age, and began experiencing panic attacks around the age of 12. The brain training exercises that I discuss in SHARP that help mental strength, flexibility, and endurance are the same strategies that I’ve found to be helpful in managing the challenges I’ve faced, particularly with my anxiety about flying and public speaking. While I still get very nervous, I’ve been able to train my brain to respond to the nerves in a much healthier way, which not only allows me to perform better, but also decreases the negative impact of stress that once was debilitating.

I never would have dreamed that I would be living the life I am now, in a career that requires me to do the things I most fear on a regular basis. But I see the value in what I’m doing; not only for myself but also for the clients I have the opportunity to meet along the way. Because I have used these brain training techniques, I am now able to share my experiences with others, with the hope that I can lend support to people who might be struggling with some of these same challenges.

Q. You also mention a personal connection to Alzheimer’s disease. Can you tell us more about this, and how people can get more information and resources? A. Part of the reason I became so passionate about this topic was because I have had three grandparents diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Another grandparent was misdiagnosed with the disease due to a medication mishap, which is why it is so important to detect changes in cognitive functioning early for further assessment. Becoming educated on the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia is an important part of early diagnosis, which can lead to quicker treatment. When I began doing research to better understand Alzheimer’s disease, I discovered that most of the same strategies I recommend that people use for cognitive fitness training might also help prevent, or at least postpone, the development of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. For the past two years I have been involved with the Alzheimer’s Association, and 50% of the proceeds from SHARP will be donated to this organization to help continue to provide critical resources to caregivers and patients struggling with this horrible disease. For more information, please visit www.alz.org. SHARP: Simple Strategies to Boost Your Brainpower (Synergy, June 2011) by Dr. Heidi Hanna Release Date: June 1, 2011 Price: $15.95, 208 pages paperback ISBN# 978-0615481623


Heidi Hanna, PhD

Keynote Speaker, Author, Performance & Wellness Coach

As a performance coach and keynote speaker, Heidi has trained thousands of individuals on practical ways to incorporate nutrition, exercise, and positive psychology strategies to improve their health, productivity, and performance. Her vast coaching experience and passionate coaching style help motivate individuals and teams to develop sustainable success at both a personal and professional level. Heidi is CEO and founder of SYNERGY, a coaching and consulting company that specializes in customized health and wellness solutions for individuals and organizations. In the spring of 2011, Heidi authored her first book, SHARP: Simple strategies to boost your brainpower, and the follow up title, The SHARP Diet: Food for thought. From 2003 through 2011, Heidi worked as a trainer, coach, keynote speaker and consultant for the The Human Performance Institute in Orlando, Florida. As an experienced speaker, Heidi has been featured at many national and global conferences, including the Fortune Magazine Most Powerful Women in Business Summit and the ESPN Women’s Leadership Summit. Heidi has fundraised, trained, and served as a mentor and nutritionist for several non-profit organizations, including the Leukemia Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training, Livestrong Foundation, and the Challenged Athletes Foundation. She also is an advocate and speaker on topics related to eating disorders awareness and prevention, as well as a volunteer speaker for the Alzheimer’s Association.

Do you feel SLUggiSH and LeSS proDUCtive than you used to feel? are you more easily DiStraCteD? Does it seem to take Longer to do the things you once did with ease? Upgrade Your Brain

This actionable user’s guide draws on the proven techniques and time-tested approaches of a physical fitness program to target one of the most important parts of the body that often get’s left behind in our training efforts—our brain. Like millions of others, you may be in serious need of an upgrade. It’s time to create a new operating system for your life, one that works best with this fast-paced, constantly connected, 24/7 on-the-go lifestyle.

Matters of the Mind Daily mental multitasking and our constant state of “busyness” can create a chronic level of stress on our brain, causing us to be unfocused, distracted and less productive. What’s more, research suggests the brain’s ability to perform regular functions like judgment, reasoning, memory, learning, and language begins to decline in healthy, educated adults as early as in their 20s and 30s.

we Have More Control than we think While cognitive decline may be an inevitable part of the aging process, studies show that we can prevent or postpone it through intervention. Our brain is actually radically adaptable if we train it appropriately—as we do our bodies. The “fitter” our brain is, the more energy efficient it becomes and the easier it is to do important mental tasks, such as focusing attention and being creative.

Learn How to Stay SHARP

Set the right foundation of brain health

Build your brain fitness with specific training

Develop a sustainable action plan

SHARP: Simple Strategies to BooSt Your Brainpower

Heidi holds a bachelors degree in communications from Penn State University, where she competed on the Big 10 softball team and received academic All-American honors. She holds a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Rollins College and a Ph.D. degree in holistic nutrition from Clayton College of Natural Health. Clients have included Johnson & Johnson, PepsiCo, Cisco, Dell, Intel, Proctor & Gamble, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Merrill Lynch, ESPN and Starbucks, as well as professional and amateur athletes. In 2006, Heidi partnered with Janus Capital to develop the Ironman Advisor program, which teaches financial advisors how to better manage their personal energy, particularly during periods of stress, and recently launched the BrainWorks program, based on her SHARP book series. SHARP:

about Heidi Hanna, phD

www.synergyprograms.com

Heidi Hanna, PhD

As a global performance coach and keynote speaker, Heidi has trained thousands of professionals on the role of nutrition and exercise for increased productivity, engagement and performance. Heidi is CEO and founder of SYNERGY, a coaching and consulting company that specializes in customized health and wellness solutions for individuals and organizations. She has been featured at many national conferences, including the Fortune Magazine Most Successful Women in Business Summit and the ESPN Women’s Leadership Summit.

Simple Strategies to BooSt Your Brainpower Heidi Hanna, PhD


Do you feel SLUGGISH and LESS PRODUCTIVE than you used to feel? Are you more easily DISTRACTED? Does it seem to take LONGER to do the things you one did with ease? Upgrade Your Brain

This actionable user’s guide draws on the proven techniques and time-tested approaches of a physical fitness program to target one of the most important parts of the body that often get’s left behind in our training efforts—our brain. Like millions of others, you may be in serious need of an upgrade. It’s time to create a new operating system for your life, one that works best with this fast-paced, constantly connected, 24/7 on-the-go lifestyle.

Matters of the Mind

Daily mental multitasking and our constant state of “busyness” can create a chronic level of stress on our brain, causing us to be unfocused, distracted and less productive. What’s more, research suggests the brain’s ability to perform regular functions like judgment, reasoning, memory, learning, and language begins to decline in healthy, educated adults as early as in their 20s and 30s.

we Have More Control than we think

Upgrade Your Brain

While cognitive decline may be an inevitable part of the aging process, studies show that we can prevent or postpone it through intervention. Our brain is actually radically adaptable if we train it appropriately—as we do our bodies. The “fitter” our brain is, the more energy efficient it becomes and the easier it is to do important mental tasks, such as focusing attention and being creative.

Learn How to Stay SHARP This actionable user’s guide draws on the proven techniques and time-tested approaches of a physical fitness program to target one of the most important parts of the body that often gets left behind in our training efforts – our brain. Set the right foundation of brain health

Build your brain fitness with specific training

Develop a sustainable action plan

SHARP: Simple Strategies to BooSt Your Brainpower

Do you feel SLUggiSH and LeSS proDUCtive than you used to feel? are you more easily DiStraCteD? Does it seem to take Longer to do the things you once did with ease?

SHARP:

Simple Strategies to BooSt Your Brainpower Heidi Hanna, PhD

about Heidi Hanna, phD

Daily mental multitasking and our constant state of “busyness” can crate a chronic level of stress on our brain, causing us to be unfocused, distracted and less productive. What’s more, research suggests that our mental abilities such as judgment, reasoning, memory, learning, and language, begin to decline in healthy, educated adults when they’re in their 20’s and 30’s.

Heidi Hanna, PhD

As a global performance coach and keynote speaker, Heidi has trained thousands of professionals on the role of nutrition and exercise for increased productivity, engagement and performance. Heidi is CEO and founder of SYNERGY, a coaching and consulting company that specializes in customized health and wellness solutions for individuals and organizations. She has been featured at many national conferences, including the Fortune Magazine Most Successful Women in Business Summit and the ESPN Women’s Leadership Summit.

Matters of the Mind

www.synergyprograms.com

We Have More Control Than We Think

While cognitive decline is an inevitable part of the aging process, studies show that we can prevent or at least postpone its development through intervention. Our brain is actually radically adaptable if we train it appropriately – like we do our bodies. The “fitter” our brain is, the more energy efficient it becomes, and the easier it is to do important mental tasks such as focusing attention and being creative. Dr. Hanna wrote SHARP with this goal in mind. In order to keep concepts simple, and applicable, Hanna walks you through a 7-step process to becoming, and staying, SHARP.

Learn How to Stay SHARP

Set the right foundation of brain health

Build your brain fitness with specific training

Develop a sustainable action plan

Praise for SHARP

“What I love about SHARP is the comprehensive approach to health, happiness, and performance of mind and body. We all know we can do better with our nutrition, exercise, and mental health, but time and execution prevent man of us from being the best we can be. I am a big proponent of SHARP, and believe if you have any desire to get change in gear, this is the way to go. It is simple,sustainable, and will change your life. It changed mine.” – Larry Milder, National Sales Director, Legg Mason “For us business people, 10 percent of our time drives 90 percent of our productivity ... What Dr.. Hanna has done here is show us how to make that 10 percent of time perform magnificently.” – John Evans, Executive Director, Janus Labs


SHARP Press Kit