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Heidi M. Flores Portfolio


Geodesic Shells

Situated Technologies Graduate Research Group Buffalo, NY Faculty: Nicholas Bruscia Partner: Rania Moussa

The design studio focused on the development of shell structures as a response to internal displacement caused by natural disasters and conflicts. Through paper and digital simulation form finding, the geodesic shell came about. Through various prototype analysis, composite material application, clustering patterns, and fabrication workflow, the final form is optimized and assembled as a proposal for internally displaced people.

Pinching paper model to create the flat to form movement


Cut made from a single sheet

Division of the sheet from the middle

Splitting the paper into two pieces

Overlaying the pieces onto each other

The overlayed pieces become one single unit

The unit is sewn together and another copy mirrors the original unit

The two units are brought together

The two units are sewn together to form one unit

Folding the units together to form a book

The final unit to be pinched into form

Creating a new seam from the original form finding model while keeping the overlap to create the new flat to cluster


One unit

Double unit

Triple unit

Quadruple unit

Shell analysis of the various units


Clustering patterns created by the one, two, three, and four units


6’-1 1/8”

2’4”

1’-10 3/8”

3’-8 3/8” 2’1/4”

9’2”

Top View

9’2” 1’-7 3/4”

6’4” 3’-4 1/4”

4’-8 1/4”

5’-4 3/8”

9’-1 1/2”

Elevation

Plan

3’-8 3/8”

2’2”

2’-4 3/8”

2’-7 1/4”

9-3/4”

6’4”

4’8”

6’4” 4’8”

2’-8 3/8” 9’-1 1/2”

Section A

Orthographics of the shell structure

Section B


15 seam schemes for the application of the fiberglass cloth according where reinforcement needs to be applied


The two opposing panel angles allow for the gap to play a critical role in bringing in light as well as two different lighting conditions


3'-0"

3'-0"

2'-8 1/4"

2'-7 1/2"

3'-2 1/2"

7'-7 7/8"

3'-10 1/2"

A

B

7'-7"

C

7'-10 3/8"

D

C

A

B

Panelization drawing demonstrating the two sides connecting to form the final shell composition

D


3'-6"

3'-6"

3'-3" 2'-6 7/8"

3'-5 1/2"

3'-1"

E

6'-11 7/8"

F

3'-7 3/4"

6'-11 1/2"

G

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I

I

E

F

G

H


Light entering the space from the oculus


Pluvious

Situated Technologies Graduate Research Group Buffalo, NY Faculty: Mark Shepard and Jason Geistweidt Team: Shayan Amirirad, Aubrey Fan, Zach Fields, Ramola Khamitkar, Frank Kraemer, Jelani Lowe, Rania Moussa, Nishika Niraj Dhariwal, Devanshi Shastri Published in Intersight 21

Pluvious (adj): of or relating to rain Pluvious is a responsive environment that evokes the childhood sensation of playing in the rain. The installation, generated out of a graduate architecture studio in situated technologies, integrates sound, light, and motion with sensing technology to investigate questions of spatial contingency and the limits of predictability through an interactive, multi-sensory experience.

Motion-sensing technology activating the rainsticks suspended from the ceiling. Photograph by Douglas Levere


The initial position of the rainstick began at -30 degrees and when activated, its maximum position reached 165 degrees. This movement causes the pebbles to fall and hit the thorns resulting in the sound of rain


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Plan diagram demonstrating the address of the Grid-EYEs and rainsticks

Through the analyzation of the studio space using various sensors, the acoustic installation was created. The installation consisted of 8 Grid-EYE sensors that created a thermal mapping of the space that individually activated 56 servo motors according to the heat signatures created by the visitors. As each servo motors was activated, the attached rainstick would produce the sound of rain.

The amplification of the human senses was directed by the creation of sound and the playful use of the fiber optic lighting


Roof Structure

Grid-EYES

Ceiling Panels, Fiber Optic Lighting, and NeoPixels

Servo Arms and Rainsticks

Fleece Inner Layer

Wall Structure

Crosby 220

Exploded axon demonstrating the layers of construction


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#include <Wire.h> #include <Adafruit_PWMServoDriver.h> #include <Adafruit_AMG88xx.h> #include <ESP8266WiFi.h> #include <PubSubClient.h> #include <ArduinoJson.h> #define pub_topic “pluvious/” #define sub_topic “pluvious/#” #define mqtt_server “mediatedspaces.net” #define mqtt_user “hcdeiot” #define mqtt_password “esp8266” #define unique_client_passwd “pluvious1” //pluvious2 //pluvious3 //pluvious4 #define MIN_PULSE_WIDTH 650 #define MAX_PULSE_WIDTH 2350 #define DEFAULT_PULSE_WIDTH 1500 #define FREQUENCY 60 #define triggerTemp 22 //WiFi WiFiClient espClient; PubSubClient client(espClient); //Time unsigned long previousMillis = 0; const long interval = 500; //Messaging char message[300]; char incomingMessage[300]; //WiFi #define wifi_ssid “UB_Connect” #define wifi_password “” Adafruit_PWMServoDriver pwm = Adafruit_PWMServoDriver(); Adafruit_AMG88xx amg1; Adafruit_AMG88xx amg2; float pixels[AMG88xx_PIXEL_ARRAY_SIZE]; int pulseWidth(int angle) { int pulse_wide, analog_value; pulse_wide = map(angle, 0, 180, MIN_PULSE_WIDTH, MAX_PULSE_WIDTH); analog_value = int(float(pulse_wide) / 1000000 * FREQUENCY * 4096); return analog_value; } boolean debug = true; class Rotator { Adafruit_PWMServoDriver driver; unsigned long previousMillis = 0; int num; float initPos; float maxPos = 165; float currentPos; float vel; int velocity = 2; boolean dir = true; public: boolean state = false; Rotator(Adafruit_PWMServoDriver n, int nm, float iP) { driver = n; num = nm; initPos = iP; } void setState(boolean s) { if (s == true) { state = true; } else { state = false; } } void mover() { if (state == true) { if (dir == true) { currentPos += velocity; } if (dir == false) { currentPos -= velocity; } if (currentPos <= initPos) { dir = true; } if (currentPos >= maxPos) { dir = false; } } if (state == false && dir == true) { currentPos += velocity; if (currentPos >= maxPos) { dir = false; } } if (state == false && dir == false) { currentPos -= velocity; if (currentPos <= initPos) { currentPos = initPos; } } driver.setPWM(num, 0, pulseWidth(currentPos)); } void initIt() { driver.setPWM(num, 0, pulseWidth(initPos)); } }; //Rotators Rotator s01(pwm, 0, 15); Rotator s02(pwm, 1, 15); Rotator s03(pwm, 2, 15); Rotator s04(pwm, 3, 15); Rotator s05(pwm, 4, 15); Rotator s06(pwm, 5, 15); Rotator s07(pwm, 6, 15); Rotator s08(pwm, 7, 15); Rotator s09(pwm, 8, 15); Rotator s10(pwm, 9, 15); Rotator s11(pwm, 10, 15); Rotator s12(pwm, 11, 15); Rotator s13(pwm, 12, 15); Rotator s14(pwm, 13, 15); void setup_wifi() { delay(10); Serial.println(); Serial.print(“Connecting to “); Serial.println(wifi_ssid); WiFi.begin(wifi_ssid, wifi_password); while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) { delay(500); Serial.print(“.”); } Serial.println(“”); Serial.println(“WiFi connected”); Serial.println(“IP address: “); Serial.println(WiFi.localIP()); } void reconnect() { while (!client.connected()) { Serial.print(“Attempting MQTT connection...”); if (client.connect(unique_client_passwd, mqtt_user, mqtt_password)) { Serial.println(“connected”); client.subscribe(sub_topic); } else { Serial.print(“failed, rc=”); Serial.print(client.state()); Serial.println(“ try again in 5 seconds”); delay(5000); } } } void setup() { #ifndef ESP8266 while (!Serial); #endif if (debug) { Serial.begin(9600); } setup_wifi(); client.setServer(mqtt_server, 1883); client.setCallback(callback); pwm.begin(); pwm.setPWMFreq(60); bool status1 = amg1.begin(0x69); if (!status1) { Serial.println(“Could not find a valid AMG88xx sensor, check wiring!”); while (1); } bool status2 = amg2.begin(0x68); if (!status2) { Serial.println(“Could not find a valid AMG88xx sensor, check wiring!”); while (1);

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if (client.connect(unique_client_passwd, mqtt_user, mqtt_password)) { Serial.println(“connected”); client.subscribe(sub_topic); } else { Serial.print(“failed, rc=”); Serial.print(client.state()); Serial.println(“ try again in 5 seconds”); delay(5000); } } } void setup() { #ifndef ESP8266 while (!Serial); #endif if (debug) { Serial.begin(9600); } setup_wifi(); client.setServer(mqtt_server, 1883); client.setCallback(callback); pwm.begin(); pwm.setPWMFreq(60); bool status1 = amg1.begin(0x69); if (!status1) { Serial.println(“Could not find a valid AMG88xx sensor, check wiring!”); while (1); } bool status2 = amg2.begin(0x68); if (!status2) { Serial.println(“Could not find a valid AMG88xx sensor, check wiring!”); while (1); } delay(1000); } void loop() { unsigned long currentMillis = millis(); if (!client.connected()) { reconnect(); } amg2.readPixels(pixels); float rs01 = (pixels[1] + pixels[2] + pixels[9] + pixels[10] + pixels[3] + pixels[4] + pixels[11] + pixels[12]) / 8; float rs02 = (pixels[5] + pixels[6] + pixels[13] + pixels[14] + pixels[7] + pixels[8] + pixels[15] + pixels[16]) / 8; float rs03 = (pixels[17] + pixels[18] + pixels[25] + pixels[26]) / 4; float rs04 = (pixels[19] + pixels[20] + pixels[27] + pixels[28] + pixels[21] + pixels[22] + pixels[29] + pixels[30]) float rs05 = (pixels[34] + pixels[33] + pixels[42] + pixels[41] + pixels[36] + pixels[35] + pixels[44] + pixels[43]) float rs06 = (pixels[38] + pixels[37] + pixels[46] + pixels[45] + pixels[40] + pixels[39] + pixels[48] + pixels[47]) float rs07 = (pixels[52] + pixels[51] + pixels[60] + pixels[59] + pixels[54] + pixels[53] + pixels[62] + pixels[61]) int R1, R2, R3, R4, R5, R6, R7; amg1.readPixels(pixels); float rs08 = (pixels[0] + pixels[1] + pixels[2] + pixels[3] + pixels[8] + pixels[9] + pixels[10] + pixels[11]) / 8; float rs09 = (pixels[4] + pixels[5] + pixels[6] + pixels[7] + pixels[12] + pixels[13] + pixels[14] + pixels[15]) / 8; float rs10 = (pixels[18] + pixels[19] + pixels[20] + pixels[21] + pixels[26] + pixels[27] + pixels[28] + pixels[29]) float rs11 = (pixels[32] + pixels[33] + pixels[34] + pixels[35] + pixels[40] + pixels[41] + pixels[42] + pixels[43]) float rs12 = (pixels[36] + pixels[37] + pixels[38] + pixels[39] + pixels[44] + pixels[45] + pixels[46] + pixels[47]) float rs13 = (pixels[50] + pixels[51] + pixels[52] + pixels[53] + pixels[58] + pixels[59] + pixels[60] + pixels[61]) float rs14 = (pixels[54] + pixels[55] + pixels[62] + pixels[63]) / 4; int R8, R9, R10, R11, R12, R13, R14; if (rs01 >= triggerTemp) { s01.setState(1); R1 = 1; } if (rs01 < triggerTemp) { s01.setState(0); R1 = 0; } if (rs02 >= triggerTemp) { s02.setState(1); R2 = 1; } if (rs02 < triggerTemp) { s02.setState(0); R2 = 0; } if (rs03 >= triggerTemp) { s03.setState(1); R3 = 1; } if (rs03 < triggerTemp) { s03.setState(0); R3 = 0; } if (rs04 >= triggerTemp) { s04.setState(1); R4 = 1; } if (rs04 < triggerTemp) { s04.setState(0); R4 = 0; } if (rs05 >= triggerTemp) { s05.setState(1); R5 = 1; } if (rs05 < triggerTemp) { s05.setState(0); R5 = 0; } if (rs06 >= triggerTemp) { s06.setState(1); R6 = 1; } if (rs06 < triggerTemp) { s06.setState(0); R6 = 0; } if (rs07 >= triggerTemp) { s07.setState(1); R7 = 1; } if (rs07 < triggerTemp) { s07.setState(0); R7 = 0; } if (rs08 >= triggerTemp) { s08.setState(1); R8 = 1; } if (rs08 < triggerTemp) { s08.setState(0); R8 = 0; } if (rs09 >= triggerTemp) { s09.setState(1); R9 = 1; } if (rs09 < triggerTemp) { s09.setState(0); R9 = 0; } if (rs10 >= triggerTemp) { s10.setState(1); R10 = 1; } if (rs10 < triggerTemp) { s10.setState(0); R10 = 0; } if (rs11 >= triggerTemp) { s11.setState(1); R11 = 1; } if (rs11 < triggerTemp) { s11.setState(0); R11 = 0; } if (rs12 >= triggerTemp) { s12.setState(1); R12 = 1; } if (rs12 < triggerTemp) { s12.setState(0); R12 = 0; } if (rs13 >= triggerTemp) { s13.setState(1); R13 = 1; } if (rs13 < triggerTemp) { s13.setState(0); R13 = 0; }

Arduino code programming the sensors and actuators for the Pluvious installation

/ / / /

8; 8; 8; 8;

/ / / /

8; 8; 8; 8;

if (rs14 >= triggerTemp) { s14.setState(1); R14 = 1; } if (rs14 < triggerTemp) { s14.setState(0); R14 = 0; } //Rotators s01.mover(); s02.mover(); s03.mover(); s04.mover(); s05.mover(); s06.mover(); s07.mover(); s08.mover(); s09.mover(); s10.mover(); s11.mover(); s12.mover(); s13.mover(); s14.mover(); if (currentMillis - previousMillis >= interval) { previousMillis = currentMillis; sprintf(message, “{\”node1\”: [%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d,%d]}”, R1, R2, R3, R4, R5, R6, R7, R8, R9, R10, R11, R12, R13, R14); //node2\ //node3\ //node4\ client.publish(“pluvious/node1”, message); //pluvious/node2 //pluvious/node3 //pluvious/node4 } } Collapse Message Input Message Heidi Floresvoid setup() { // put your setup code here, to run once: } void loop() { // put your main code here, to run repeatedly: }


Trypho-Networks

Technical Methods Seminar Buffalo, NY Faculty: Nicholas Bruscia Partner: Rania Moussa

Part of the Situated Technologies, the seminar explored various ways of abstracting and visualizing natural forms through the use of parametric modeling and post-processing. The modeling of the luffa gourd and egg textures were meshed together to create an abstract representation of the two using Grasshopper and various plugins. The final form resulted in two fiber systems intersecting and overlapping to form a three dimensionality network of fibers. The final composition demonstrates the structural performance of the fibers while indicating thickness, depth, and materiality.

Close up of fibers


Luffa image under microscope. Image courtesy of 3dham.com

Cross section of a luffa gourd demonstrating the directionality of the fibers working as structure

Close up of luffa fibers at 10 µm. Image courtesy of the Royal Society of Chemistry

Density of fibers resemble that of the luffa’s at 40 µm. Image courtesy of ResearchGate

Image of an egg showing the thin shell membrane as a smooth surface at a 1:1 scale

Precedents used to create the grasshopper script of the hybrid fiber texture

Under microscope at 50 µm. The shell is composed of intertwining fibers. Image courtesy of Advanced Science News


Area highlighted demonstrates the overlap and intersection of the two fiber systems


Ribbons

Third Year Undergraduate Design Studio Cleveland, OH Faculty: Stephanie Cramer

Through the use of wrapping, spaces obtain certain levels of privacy in the direction that the ribbon wraps in. By rotating these ribbons according to the program occurring within these spaces as well as the surrounding context of the site, deliberate views are created at the different heights that these ribbons are located in. The titanium cladding protects and shields the program while still giving it a soft, sleek, and materialistic look to make the different theater experiences much richer.

Zoomed in view of the wooden rib structure of the theater space


Wrapping of the surface provides specific views and privacy


Model demonstrating the wrapping of the spaces and the structure reinforcing the specific views


Elevation with an opacity to demonstrate the three different levels accessing the building

Washington Avenue

A. The art gallery wraps to allow a direct view into the exterior gallery infront

Diagrams demonstrating the wrapping of the main spaces

Washington Avenue

B. The black box space wraps to prevent any direct views towards Washington Avenue making it private


B. C. D.

A.

Superior Viaduct

Washington Avenue

Washington Avenue

Land Studio

C. The lobby space allows a direct view into the main street, Washington Avenue inviting people into the building

D. The theater space is a flexible area that allows the Land Studio bike path to become a platform for performances but also an area to display a more private showing


Program: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1 2

Administration Offices Storage Exhibition Outdoor Exhibition Balcony Projection Room Sloped Floor Theater

8. Back of House 9. Flat Floor Theater 10. Atrium 11. Lobby 12. Female Bathroom 13. Male Bathroom

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3

Washington Avenue

5

6

7

Land Studio

0

Bike path plan

15'

40'

100'


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12

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Ground floor plan


Detailed section


Final building on the Cleveland site model


BVisual Cybernetic Factory

Situated Orchard Faculty: Partner:

Technologies Graduate Research Group Park, NY Omar Khan Rania Moussa

Stafford Beerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Viable Systems Model (VSM), is a concept in which a change or variation is introduced into an environment. The management, operators and environment have a homeostatic relationship in which they accept the variety and adapt to it resulting in a new state change. The Boston Valley Terracotta factory is reimagined to handle variety as a Cybernetic factory with the introduction of an automated extrusion workflow. The design of the factory as two workflows with a central cart system allows for visual communication, resulting in a fluid factory producing terracotta.

Terracotta facade on model


Visibility = Latitude

Adjacency = Longitude

VSM adjacency in the factory in the longitude and visibility in the latitude

CNC Mold Making & Storage Slip Cast, RAM Press & Lunch Room Hand Press & Storage Dry Mixing Wet Mixing Aut. Rain Screen Extruder

Finishers Dryers Glazing & R&D Kilns

Aut. Dryer Aut. Glazing

Sizing Aut. Kiln

Storage & Shipping Courtyard

Offices

Machine placement and process of the two workflows


Close up, plan view of the cart system and workflows in the model

Ribbon view of the model


Chromoxic City

Second Year Undergraduate Studio Buffalo, NY Faculty: Gregory Delaney

As one of the most used materials in the world, the unnatural, man-made plastic starts to harm the environment and the human body. The winter pavilion is composed of polypropylene sheets because it is the most recycled type of plastic in use today. Through the use of compression and expansion in the three intersecting triangles, users can experience the effects plastic has on our environment while bringing awareness to the dangers of the constant use of this material over time.

Pavilion rendering in Seneca Bluffs


Three different sized triangles to create three contrasting spaces

The smallest and biggest triangles intersect the middle one

An entrance and exit door are created to direct people into the space

Structure is created to hold the form

The final form put together Exploded axon of the three triangles becoming a pavilion


22â&#x20AC;&#x2122;-6â&#x20AC;?

A pound of the confetti is used to represent 50 pounds of trash that is collected in Buffalo

Section and plan of the pavilion


Microclimate Voronoi

Graduate Study Abroad Program Madrid, Spain Faculty: Miguel Guitart Partner: Rania Moussa

Using compiled data into seeds, the groundwork for the voronoi was established for the University at Buffalo Cultural Campus landscape. The use of the voronoi as the form and circulation create the necessary connection and fluid transition between the natural landscape and city into a continuous movement. The density of the vegetation on the campus helps promote a green landscape while providing privacy for the students.

Close up of the vegetation around the voronoi buildings


The final placement of the program spaces was determined by their relationship to one another as and the site

The voronoi generated by just the program resulted in large spaces

Through manipulation, multiplication and division of the voronoi spaces, the formation of thick and thin pathways promoted public and private circulation

Offices Dorms Gallery The final landscape was generated and redivided to enhance and surround the program with natural vegetation

Lecture Hall Classrooms Plaza Cafe Gym Library

Diagram of program placement generating the final form


Program spaces

Circulation

Vegetation

Final composition on site

Exploded axon of the different layers


East elevation

West elevation

East section

North section

Elevations and sections demonstrating the vegetation within the campus


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Site plan of the cultural campus

15'

40'

100'


Plan view of the model


Construction Technology

Construction Technology Course Faculty: Annette LeCuyer

By analyzing construction drawings, materials, and systems of particular buildings, a technically accurate axonometric drawing is created.

Close up of the peeled back axon drawing


1. 3’ x 12” Cast in Place Concrete Footing #4 hairpin @ 10” o.c. #4 ties @ 10” o.c. 4 #5 rebar on top half 4 #5 continuous rebar on bottom 2. First Floor Assembly Type 1 4” concrete slab on grade with 6“ mesh 4” crushed gravel 2“ sand Raised floor jacks @ 24” o.c. 3. Window Aluminum curtain wall system 2“ x 2” aluminum frame 4. Exterior Wall 4” metal studs @ 16” o.c. R-11 batt insulation 8” CMU 8” x 24” Interior vapor barrier 5/8” gypsum wall board 5. Exterior Door 6. Exterior 16” diameter concrete column up to balcony 8 #8 vertical reinforcement #4 spiral ties with 3” pitch 7. Raised Floor System 8“ hollow core concrete slab 2.5” topping slab 2’ x 2‘ floor tiles with carpet finish Resilient base Carpet finish Suspended ceiling wood panel system #1 8. Exterior Wall Metal studs 5/8” exterior gypsum wall board sheathing on 5/8” exterior cement board Interior 5/8” gypsum wall board 9. Window Aluminum storefront sill Header 5/8” gypsum wall board Spandrel glass 10. 3’ x 3’ Cast in Place Concrete Beam 6 #5 rebar on top half 6 #5 rebar 6” below top half 6 #5 rebar on bottom half 11. Aluminum Curtain Wall System 207B 3’x8’ door aluminum frame type: ACW-5 12. Exterior Balcony 10“ concrete slab deck 1 1/2x2” steel flat bar top stanchions 1/2” metal bars 1 1/2“ steel handrail 13. Roof Assembly Type 2 Suspended ceiling wood panel system #1 Sloping 8” hollow core concrete planks @ 1/4”:1’ 2.5” concrete topping slab R-30 rigid insulation Single ply vented roofing membrane 4” insulation 5- 2x4 stacked pressure treated wood curb Roof membrane 14. Roof Edge Down spout Drip at sloping concrete planks along west elevation Pressure treated wood 1” insulation Metal edge flashing Flashing membrane on metal edge flashing Metal fascia system Roofing membrane Outline Specifications


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Pierce County Environmental Services, The Miller Hull Partnership

2’

5’

10’


1. Footers for Perimeter Foundation 12” x 36” deep concrete Reinforced with 3 #5 bars 2. Underground Wall Sections Two 8” CMU blocks Reinforced floor slab 4” deep 3. Ground Floor Wall Cast concrete sill flush Aluminum framed window 5/8” glass window pane 8” & 16” CMU beams reinforced with #5 bar Through wall flashing applied under 8” by 4” CMU block 2” thick rigid insulation 2” air space Weep holes 32” o.c. 4. Ground Floor Ceiling Finished 5/8” gypsum board 2” by 4” joists 16” o.c. Joists tied into 2” by 6” bolted to CMU blocks 48” o.c. 5. First Floor Finished 2” by 10” floor joists Ridge board attached to concrete slab along wall 3/4” sheathing on top of joists 3/4” flooring on top of sheathing 6. Second Floor Window 2’ by 6” cast concrete sill flush with interior wall Steel sash enclosing window panes Four 2’ by 4’ by 5/8” panes vertically placed Reinforced concrete sill and site cast 16” bond beam 7. Second Floor Ceiling Construction 2 courses of 8” CMU on exterior 16” bond beam reinforced with #5 bars 3 courses of 8” CMU on interior 8” bond beam on interior wall Through wall flashing applied under 8” by 4” CMU block 2” thick rigid insulation attached to exterior face of 8” CMU block Wire ties connecting interior and exterior walls ever 2 courses 8. Roof 5/8” gypsum board 2” by 4” joist 16” o.c. running north to south 2” by 6” rigid beam attached to CMU blocks via concrete screws 2” by 2” blocking Batt insulation covering entire ceiling construction 2” by 6” rafters 16” o.c. attached to 8” bond beam 2” by 6” rafter attached to bond beam by 3/4” bolts Built up roof on 5/8” plywood deck secured to rafter Edge flashing covering extended walls and continuing onto built up roof 9. Roof Exterior Slopped concrete cast on top of concrete wall Top tapered 8 #5 bars with #3 ties 16” o.c. 4” by 6” joist attached 10. Parapet Metal snap on coping with blind joints pre-formed corners secure to both mass walls Continuous cap flashing placed Nailed down 12” away from 5/8” plywood deck

Outline Specifications


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7 6

5

4

3

2

1

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Croffead Residence, Clark & Menefee Architects

1’

3’

5’

Profile for Heidi Flores

Heidi M. Flores | Architectural Portfolio  

Work from Master of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Architecture and Plan...

Heidi M. Flores | Architectural Portfolio  

Work from Master of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Architecture and Plan...

Profile for heidiflo
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