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SUMMER ART 2020


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Editorial

ear Readers,

For Henri Cartier-Bresson, “the camera is a sketchbook, an instrument of intuition and spontaneity. For Ansel Adams, “you don’t take a photograph, you make it”. And for Abraham Lincoln, “there are no bad pictures; That’s just how your face looks sometimes”. For Vincent van Gogh, on the other hand, the question arose as to “what would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything”? All the above are statements and questions that drifted through our minds (amongst many) as we prepared this new Summer Art Edition 2020, to which we welcome you wholeheartedly. With our potpourri of varying artists, topics, mainly photography, but also other media, we have tried to put together a little summer reading and dreaming. Our lives have changed so much since the beginning of the year, and the beauty of Art may be the small joy that we at H Edition are currently able to provide during these more than turbulent times. Diverse artists that, showcased by galleries and museums around the world in support of individuality creating the unimaginable, can transport you to an alternate universe.

This summer we all face a new normal, and it doesn’t look like we will be heading back to a ‘similar as before’ anytime soon. Yet our lives continue. Whether this means lying in the sun, swimming, or lingering with family and friends - or the simple contemplation of what was, what will be, and the hope that our loved ones will remain safe. One thing we certainly will all continue to do is to dream of all things beautiful in this world. Art is an integral part of this, and should this year not allow us to meander amongst the magnificence in person; then we wish to at least be informed, to dream, to languish in the beauty created by those that have made it their vocation. Let us all continue to enjoy the simple moments of life this summer. Wishing you all good health, Much love always,

Malike Sidibe, New York, USA


www.hedition.net

SUMMER ART 2020

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Cover: Sean Connery, 1971 © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

CONTRIBUTORS A big thank you for your time, your effort, your knowledge, and your imagination. Clementine Fitzgerald, writer at large Matthew Gill, writer at large Adam Jacot de Boinod, Art & Travel Iwana Krause, writer at large Alexa Lewis, PR & Communication Nina Miller, Proofreader Silvia Montgomery, writer at large Patrick Simmons, writer at large Matthew Gill, writer at large Paolo Marchetti, Art Director Karina Valeron, H-Edition Director You are all invaluable! Alexandra della Porta Rodiani, Editor Mark Robinow, Co-Editor Florentyna von Schöneberg​, Editor in Chief

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He remains misunderstood. Even now. Vincent Van Gogh

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007 Mastermind Ian Fleming

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Iconic Images Gallery The world of 007

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Black Art Matters The influence of black culture on society

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spirational exclusivity Roberto Pucciano, CEO H Fusion Media Group

H Edition is published eight times per year and offers advertisers an exclusive audience of affluent readers. Whilst every attempt has been made to ensure that content in the magazine is accurate, we cannot accept and hereby disclaim any liability to loss or damage caused by errors resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. All rights are reserved. No duplication of this magazine can be used without prior permission of H Edition. All information is correct at time of press. Views expressed are not necessarily those of H Edition Magazine.

MEDIAKIT For editorial and advertising enquiries please email info@hfusionmediagroup.com www.hedition.net

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Passion for the beauteous Venetian Love & Fondation Valmont

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Huis Marseille ◆ Viviane Sassen

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Summer Art 2020 What’s trending

62 Artology Terry O’Neill, Irene Kung, Dylan Don, Anke Schaffelhuber, Sebastian Copeland, André de Plessel

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Yossi Milo Matthew Brandt, Meghann Riepenhoff, Kyle Meyer, Allison Rossiter

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Sean Kelly James Casebere, Candida Höfer, Alec Soth

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Magnum Photos Eve Arnold, Ian Berry, Burt Glinn, David Allan Harvey, Dennis Stock, David Seymour, René Burri, Nikos Econopoulos

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Torch Gallery Popel Coumou, Ellen Koii, Eddy Posthuma

142 Artfinder Nadia Attura, Dasha Pears, Adam Firman

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And still... he remains

misunderstood Even now.

Vincent Van Gogh by Adam Jacot de Boinod

Above, Vincent van Gogh, Self-portrait, oil on cardboard, 1887 Left, Vincent van Gogh, The Olive Trees, Oil on canvas, 1889

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worked methodically and in Arles even wrote that “the most beautiful paintings are those one dreams of while smoking a pipe in one’s bed”. Vincent was not a loner without friends. Not questioned is his awkward personality, which caused some friendships to end badly. Nor did his habit of travelling help him sustain them. He did, however, know many people and he had several intimate friends like the artist Emile Bernard. The two first met in Paris and, although Vincent was fifteen years older, they stayed in touch right to the end. Van Gogh was also, as opposed to the myth, not actually poverty-stricken. Yes, financial problems forever beset him, but for most of his life, he had a decent income. He was employed as a young art dealer in London. Aged only twenty he earned an annual salary of £90 - four times that of a workman in those days, and more than his father made as a vicar (though that came with free accommodation). Vincent did suffer abject poverty working as a preacher in the mining area of the Borinage. Still, once he decided to become an artist, he was supported by a regular allowance from his brother Theo. In Arles, Van Gogh received around 2,500 francs (£100) for the first year. It was thus not so much that he was poor, but rather, that he was hopeless with money. For all, there is the tale that Van Gogh went mad. Of course, he had intense and severe mental health issues, but it’s far too crude an assessment to say that he was in fact, crazy. Better to say that he suffered several psychological crises or breakdowns. During his first neurotic episode, before Christmas in 1888, Vincent cut off a part of his ear. He subsequently suffered eight further attacks, ending with him shooting himself in his chest. However, most of the time, he was relatively sane. The world of medicine has yet to agree on a diagnosis. However, it would appear to be a case of bipolar disorder. So mad constitutes an unhelpful description and demonstrates our failure to diagnose his condition correctly. It is also not accurate to proclaim that one sees Vincent's mental problems in his paintings. Yes, he painted some canvases while undergoing treatment in the asylum at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, and these indeed demonstrate his mental instability. But the vast majority don’t. There exist statements that his twisting mountains and swirling skies indicate an inner turmoil. However, around Saint-Rémy, the limestone hills are dramatically rugged, and the Mistral blows forcefully. In his painting The Olive Trees with Les Alpilles, it’s

must have visited Amsterdam twenty times or more, but each revisit is never a repeat. This wondrous city dons a myriad of canals with its very own phlegmatic and sociable inhabitants. It is undoubtedly a city for all seasons. I love going back in the winter months when the gabled facades of the narrow houses are highlighted against the clear, crisp skies. There is the jubilant Light Festival before Christmas with its luminescent sculptures projecting across the canals from the zoo to the station. Then in early Spring, the time is ideal for visiting Bloemenmarkt on Singel, the only floating flower market in the world, with an astonishing display of different coloured tulips arriving from the famous nearby Keukenhof. I adore the canals with their distinctive bridges and narrow red-bricked houses with old trading gables. They provide a real sense of what was once a fantastic global trading business and empire. I can picture the efficiency of boats unloading and markets divulging their products to and from all corners of the earth. And then I love unearthing the classic Dutch houses within the historic neighbourhoods. Popping in on Our Lord in the Attic is an absolute must, as it is not only ancient (17th Century) but also extremely remarkable. Behind the characteristic facade of the house lies a mostly original home with the wonderful surprise of a hidden church located up the stairs. I like to stroll through Spiegelkwartier, once an impoverished quarter but now filled with art and antique shops. In thanks chiefly to its proximity to the Rijksmuseum – Amsterdam’s main art gallery – this neighbourhood has had a massive upgrade and redesign. Rembrandt's Night Watch receives heightened prominence, and there are new displays for most of Holland’s finer antiquities. Directly across the green lawns of the Rijksmuseum and housed in a large structure befitting the magnitude of the artist, is the Van Gogh Museum. It is a magnet for all art lovers and a favourite in any guidebook. In essence, it is his pilgrims true Mecca: the location finally managing to acknowledge his creative genius in all his glory. These memorable lyrics were my clarion call throughout my teenage years (and ever since) to devote myself to studying Van Gogh’s life and works. I have discovered several misconceptions, some widely held, that I wish to put right. There is an urban myth that Van Gogh painted in a furious frenzy. He didn’t. Indeed, he’s often thought of as impulsively lashing paint onto a canvas and virtually assaulting the art. But his pictures were, in fact, carefully planned oeuvres from hours of intense reflection as well as advice from his fellow artists. He typically

Vincent van Gogh, Girl in white, Oil on canvas, 1890. Right, Vincent van Gogh, Starry Night over the Rhone, 1888

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This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you. 'Starry, Starry Night', Don McLean

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Museum Ons' Lieve Heer op Solder. A 17th Century canal house with a Catholic church in the attic. Bloemenmakrt should be Bloemenmarkt Flower Market in Amsterdam. Amsterdam at night. Amsterdam canal. Traditional Dutch windmill in Zaanse Schans, Amsterdam area. Right, Vincent van Gogh, Wheatfield with Crows, Oil on canvas, 1887

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the falling clouds that give the work its sense of movement. The depiction of the sky is thus merely there to create an effect, rather than to reveal his uncontrolled distress. For a long time, his work Wheatfield with Crows was considered his final painting as it suggests impending doom. The fact that he shot himself out in the wheat fields surrounding the village of Auvers-Sur-Oise has only enhanced the symbolic perception of the artwork (although this is not the paintings precise creative location). It is thus much more credible that his last canvas was either Tree Roots or else Farms near Auvers. After all, Theo’s brother-in-law – Andries Bonger – recorded them as his last works not long after the artist’s death. Some believe that Vincent was murdered rather than committing suicide. But this recent theory has little credence against the traditional view that those around him maintained at the time. They included his best friend, the artist Emile Bernard, his brother Theo as well as his doctor Paul Gachet. Suicide, in any case, was considered a sin both by French society and the Catholic Church. If those around him had felt even an inkling of foul play, they would undoubtedly have taken up matters with the relevant authorities. Van Gogh did not, as many think, die without artistic recognition. It is true that his fame was chiefly limited to the avant-garde world of Paris (and partly in Amsterdam, Brussels, and The Hague). But he nonetheless gained some recognition in his last years. The most important group exhibitions in Paris accepted some of his paintings (four of these between 1888 and 1890), and one of them in Brussels (1890). Looking through the French newspapers and journals of the time, it is interesting to see how often he was mentioned. Had he lived on, he most certainly would have earned his proper recognition.

Many considered him an outsider in the close-knit art world. Mistakenly. Vincent spent his early adulthood years discovering all on art and the art market. Six years were then passed as an assistant art dealer at the Goupil's Hague gallery. When Van Gogh set out to become an artist, he attended classes in Brussels, Antwerp, and Paris. Although he may have dropped out on each occasion, this was only due to his healthy ideas, combined with an incapacity to follow instructions. There could have been no better connection with potential buyers than through his brother Theo. The latter was employed at the Goupil's Parisian gallery and thus highly familiar with the world of art. While living with Theo in Paris between 1886 and 1888, Vincent met a multitude of Impressionist artists and their Australian follower John Russel. He also became intimately involved with the avant-garde art scene. If anything he was an insider as opposed to an outsider. Some believe that Vincent was uneducated. Indeed, he spent just over four years at school in addition to two being taught by a governess while at home. But Vincent became extremely literate and possessed a broad general knowledge much of which was selftaught. Alongside his native Dutch, he was fully conversant in French, reasonably fluent in English, and could read German. In his letters, he is extremely eloquent, articulate, and observant - he refers to numerous books and, one assumes, he had read many more. I hope this sheds new light and will enhance the appreciation of his art. Dedicate a decent fraction of your stay in Amsterdam to visiting the marvellous collection at this fabulous museum. Adam Jacot de Boinod was a researcher for the first BBC series QI and is an author of three books including The Meaning of Tingo

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Ian Fleming Right, english author, journalist and naval intelligence officer Ian Fleming, photographed for US Vogue magazine in September, 1963. Š Norman Parkinson, Iconic Images Limited. James Bond books written by Ian Fleming

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In Casino Royale, his first book written in 1952, Ian Fleming states that:

“history is moving pretty quickly these days, and the heroes and villains keep on changing parts”. How much truth is there in that, still today.

American actor Orson Welles on the set of the James Bond spoof Casino Royale smoking a cigar, 1967. © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited. Left, Ian Fleming portrait, 1963. Pagg. 16-17, Scottish actor Sean Connery as James Bond taking a bath during the filming of Diamonds Are Forever (1971). © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

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Ian Lancaster Fleming

(28 May 1908 – 12 August 1962) was a British author, journalist, and naval intelligence officer who was born in London’s Mayfair district. His father was a Member of Parliament and his grandfather the co-founder of the merchant bank Robert Fleming & Co. His education began at Eton, followed by Sandhurst, and stints at universities in Geneva and Munich. On the set of From Russia With Love (1963) with Sean Connery Right, on the set of Goldfinger (1964) with Sean Connery and Shirley Eaton

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During the Second world war, Fleming worked for Britain’s Naval Intelligence Division, first as the personal assistant to Rear Admiral John Godfrey, Director of Naval Intelligence, and full-time from August 1939, under the codename ‘17F’. Although not truly qualified, Ian excelled and quickly promoted to lieutenant-commander in just a few months. His career continued until his demobilisation in May 1945. He became Foreign Manager of the Sunday

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Times owned Kemsley newspaper group, bought a house in Jamaica that he named Goldeneye pursuant to his involvement in the planning of Operation Goldeneye during the war, and decided to write a book. Casino Royale was written within two months and published in 1953. The novel was an enormous success, with three print runs, and the beginning of 007's adventures. Left, english actor Roger Moore in his role as James Bond in Guy Hamilton's film Live and Let Die (1973). Here, with Yaphet Kotto fighting under water. Right, with co-stars Gloria Hendry (left), who plays Rosie Carver, and Jane Seymour, who plays Solitaire. Š Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

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Terry O'Neill

ICONIC

Images Gallery the world of

Irish actor Pierce Brosnan appearing as British secret service agent James Bond in Golden Eye holding a gun in one hand and Izabella Scorupco as Bond girl in the other, 1995 Left, Scottish actor Sean Connery as James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever, Las Vegas, 1971. Š Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

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English actor Roger Moore poses as superspy James Bond for Live and Let Die, directed by Guy Hamilton, 1973. Right, scottish actor Sean Connery as James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever, Las Vegas, 1971. Š Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

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“What's great about it, and I think it's the real secret to why it's been so successful for so many years, is that with each decade, each James Bond, they have kept up with the times. Sean Connery in the 60s was cool and classic; he fits that decade. Roger Moore in the 70s added more humour; very Cary Grant. In the 90s, Pierce Brosnan came aboard and added a real style. Then, Daniel Craig – he's the perfect modern Bond”. The exhibition includes portraits and on-set photography and one-of-a-kind press prints, signed by O’Neill. It also encompasses two unique images, each signed by Roger Moore (007 between 1973 and 1985) – and Honor Blackman, a.k.a Pussy Galore. The exhibit coincides with the latest James Bond film to be released later this year, with Daniel Craig as the famed secret agent.

Neill’s photographs of James Bond are iconic. No other words are necessary nor adequately descriptive. Terry captured far more (on- and off-set) than any other photographer, and his works include the protagonists; from Sean Connery and Roger Moore to Pierce Brosnan, and Daniel Craig today. His rare and, on occasion, unseen images fascinate the world's 007 fans. They are the cosmos of Goldfinger, For Your Eyes Only, and Goldeneye, Casino Royale, or Live and Let Die. From the moment that O’Neill stepped foot onto Goldfinger’s set capturing a tenacious and beguiling Sean Connery, his association with James Bond became firmly cemented. It is a legacy that continued to Daniel Craig. His images of the leading female roles are no less spectacular, portraying the indispensable representation of feminine characters played in all of the Bond movies. His is a portrayal of interaction between dynamism and beguilement, beastly and duplicitousness.

On both pages, british actor Roger Moore as James Bond and Madeline Smith as Miss Caruso during the famous closet scene on the film set of Live and Let Die, 1973. Pagg. 28-29, actress Ursula Andress posing on a roulette in the 1967 spy spoof Casino Royale in which she plays Vesper Lynd. © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited

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Ph. Jozef Wright


rich ü Z | e l l a H g a 0 | Ma 2 0 .2 8 .0 3 2 – . 7 11.0 The influence of black culture on society


BLACK ART MATTERS is a unique exhibition concept that shows - in an internationally representative way - current works by over 70 contemporary black photographers. Among them is the famous American photographer and filmmaker Kwaku Alston. Kwaku regularly photographs black personalities such as Barack Obama and has recently collaborated with Netflix for a documentary directed by Spike Lee. Black Art Matters is a unique show created on the initiative of photoSCHWEIZ in collaboration with the online platform Black Culture Movement and was co-produced with the MAAG Halle. In times of increasing politicisation of cultural identities, the BLACK ART MATTERS exhibition sees itself as a source of dialogue, an oasis of inspiration, and - ultimately - as a cultural beacon against racism. The display shows how colourful, inspiring and multi-faceted the influence of black culture and black artists is on the society in which they live. Culture of any kind can be an instrument for creating a unifying, collectivist self-image. At the same time, too narrow a cultural identity can also prevent growth. BLACK ART MATTERS invites the world to engage with all facets of black culture. It shows the beauty, influence, variety, but also the tragedy of an often misunderstood people. It is about cultural confrontation without having to explain why. PhotoSCHWEIZ states: "The aim is to bring together people with different cultures, backgrounds, and ethnicities in unity, with no other motive than to celebrate life and let pictures speak." 32


Kwaku Alston, Mississippi walking

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PATRICK PLANTER Switzerland/Jamaica 34


VANESSA CHARLOT St. Louis, USA 35


MATTHEW JORDAN SMITH kumiko sakai

Tokyo, Japan 36


YANIIS DAVY GUIBINGA 37

araceli olmos

Libreville, Gabon


ANDRE L PERRY Brooklyn, New York, USA 38


MICHAEL IFEANYI OSHAI Lagos, Nigeria 39


JABARI JACOBS Prince George’s County, Maryland, USA 40


DENISSE ARIAN PÉREZ Copenhagen, Denmark 41


SHAMAYIM SHACARO USA 42


OBIDIGBO NZERIBE Dallas, Texas, USA 43


ISMAIL ODETOLA Lagos, Nigeria 44


SHAWN THEODORE Brooklyn, New York, USA 45


DARON BANDEIRA Zanzibar, Tanzania 46


GREGORY PRESCOTT Los Angeles, California, USA 47


&

Passion for the

beauteous 48


The exhibition will be open by appointment

until January 31, 2021 in an exclusive partnership with

Fondaco Dei Tedeschi, Venezia. Palazzo Bonvicini Calle Agnello, 2161/A Santa Croce, 30135 Venice

In a way, this says it all. It is a performance that is driven by its search of blissful aesthetics—nothing more, nothing less. The roots of art become the ultimate ambition. The exhibition is an exploration of different interpretations through various mediums, whereby the artists offer their silent dialogue to the public.

“Designing an exhibition in a 16th-century Venetian palace that connected different interpretations of universal beauty was no simple thing. A rather loose image inspired by the principle of balance began to emerge and slowly but surely became an obvious choice. The artists and works selected had only to perfect this delicate balance. Between Aristide Najean’s wild chandeliers pulled straight from the Artist’s will to reveal inner emotions, and Silvano Rubino’s immense photos with his invented and essential architecture which create suspended atmosphere, I slipped in with my humble scarred masks”.

Didier Guillon

April 2019, Munich

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Didier Guillon draws his passion for the arts, as his profound bond with Italy. DIDIER GUILLON

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ith his scenography focused around an array of white masks, Didier Guillon explores the notions of new beginnings and endings, choices and passages. Baptised Janus as a tribute to the roman God, his two-faced masks embody past and future opportunities. Didier descends from a long lineage of major art contributors: merchants such as Charles Sedelmeyer, sculptors and art historians as Stanislas Lami. He takes pride in his filiation with the emblematic sculptor and Egyptologist Alphonse Lami, whose father Franรงois was the illegitimate son of Francesco Borghese... From this phenomenal genealogy, Didier Guillon draws his passion for the arts, as his profound bond with Italy. Specifically speaking, Venice. True to his nature, he exhilarates as he relentlessly works to fine-tune his ideas. He designed multiple works in various media and several dimensions, skillfully combining a wide array of materials. He likes to think of new ways to approach, discuss and appreciate contemporary art.

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The inspiration for his chandeliers derives from both painting and glassmaking. ARISTIDE NAJEAN

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ristide’s chandeliers initiate an unedited journey across time, from Marco Polo to the current melting of glaciers... led only by poetry and aesthetics. Murano glass allows the mutation by fire from fantasy to reality, transcending his inspiration, enhancing his contradictions. Born and raised in Paris, Aristide arrived in Murano (Italy) in 1986 to study the Venetian island’s renowned, century-old glassmaking techniques. Originally a painter, he saw glassmaking as an extension, and it became his preferred material. The inspiration for his chandeliers derives from both painting and glassmaking. It is a mutual interaction that pushes both limits. Open to all inspiration, Najean observes the world around him with great curiosity. Mastering glass, he knows how far he can push his sketch and to which extent the material will retain the sculpted shape. He lives in a world of images, producing artworks that resemble none other than his inspiration – colour schemes combined with disobedient forms that either strike or seduce.

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Here a formal synthesis became the element which, combined with a poetic-conceptual characteristic. SILVANO RUBINO

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ilvano worked on a series of large-scale 3D modelled digital images called Parallel Travels. Empty decors came to life in a mysterious suspended atmosphere as he added inhabited objects, opening a dialogue between the past and present in a space filled with key references. Silvano studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice. He lives and works in Venice and Milan. His education included the study of Renaissance iconography, particularly in painting, and this was a fundamental reference for many years. Throughout the 1990s, the environmental installation became one of the most significant aspects of his work. Here a formal synthesis became the element which, combined with a poetic-conceptual characteristic, would determine the very essence of his work and its identity. In 1994 he became interested in photography. His photos are stories told through images which he constructs starting with sets created in the studio. Glass became his material of choice in 2001.

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HUIS MA 56


RSEILLE 57


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HUIS MARSEILLE VIVIANE SASSEN’S VENUS & MERCURY 01.06.2020 – 30.08.2020

E Hands: Prehendre, 2019 © Viviane Sassen Busts: V&M, 2019 © Viviane Sassen For further information please contact: Huis Marseille Museum / Viviane Sassen

ight years ago, Viviane Sassen had a highly successful and acclaimed exhibition In and Out of Fashion at Huis Marseille. Now she is returning with another monumental show: Venus & Mercury, which will occupy all fourteen galleries as well as the museum garden. It is an interwoven story with Huis Marseille themselves – an overlapping turbulent history with the court at Versailles. The exhibition was born in Versailles, where Sassen created works inspired by various accounts of the French royal court of the 17th and 18th Centuries. They are stories woven into a melancholic narrative, drenched in eroticism, power, intrigue, illness, decay, and death. For Huis Marseille, she created numerous new installations, including one based on the living history of this Amsterdam canal-side house. Venus refers to lust and love; Mercury to quicksilver. It is an assortment of fascinating stories, inspired by the lives of Marie-Antoinette and those of the royal mistresses, poisoners and soothsayers, and the erotic and medical histories that surrounded the French royal court. Venus refers to the Roman goddess of lust and love, and Mercury to quicksilver, the heavy liquid metal once used to treat venereal diseases. Each gallery tells a separate story. Together they form a linked sequence of remarkable histories, with accompanying poetic texts by Marjolijn van Heemstra, author, journalist, and playwright. Viviane was born in Amsterdam in 1972. Today she is an internationally renowned artist known for her autonomous photography and her commissioned work in the fashion world. She was awarded the Prix de Rome in 2007 and the International Center of Photography in New York Infinity Award in 2011. She has exhibited at numerous prestigious venues, including the 55th Venice Biennale, Italy (2013); The Hepworth Wakefield Museum in Yorkshire, England; Haus der Photographie in Hamburg; Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago amongst others. Her participation in the group exhibition Visible / Invisible in 2019 at the Grand Trianon in Versailles formed the first steps toward Venus & Mercury.

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Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

Summer Art 2020

Conor Mccreedy - The Er upt ion

20.02 2020

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

Selected Works, Paintings & Sculptures

In Support of

SIMONE OPDAHL AND MANUELA MOLLWITZ

Protecting African Lions

Pop-Up-Showcase

“JAY-C” Charity Auction-Dinner

Auction starts at 8:00 PM at Suvretta House, Salon Vert. Work by the following Artists will be auctioned:

“JAY-C” CONOR MCCREEDY MANUELA MOLLWITZ SIMONE OPDAHL

What’s trending

Reception & Lecture for the price of 39.-CHF per person Reception & Lecture & 4 Course Charity Dinner & Auction for the price of 215.- CHF per person

Cocktails and Lecture

Cocktail-Reception starts at 7:00 PM Simone Opdahl & Manuela Mollwitz & Mark Robinow – Short Lectures at 7:30 PM

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Please refer to: Mark Robinow when buying your ticket!

Hosting Committee

Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and Andrea Rinderknecht

Thank you! We look forward to your attendance on Thursday 20.02.2020

Magazine and Gallery

TERRY O'NEILL IRENE KUNG DYLAN DON ANKE SCHAFFELHUBER SEBASTIAN COPELAND ANDRÉ DE PLESSEL MATTHEW BRANDT MEGHANN RIEPENHOFF KYLE MEYER ALLISON ROSSITER JAMES CASEBERE CANDIDA HÖFER ALEC SOTH POPEL COUMOU ELLEN KOII EDDY POSTHUMA EVE ARNOLD IAN BERRY BURT GLINN DAVID ALLAN HARVEY DENNIS STOCK DAVID SEYMOUR RENÉ BURRI NIKOS ECONOPOULOS NADIA ATTURA DASHA PEARS ADAM FIRMAN


TERRY O'NEILL

CKTAILS – ART EXHIBITION CHARITY GALA DINNER Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter

T

Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

- The Er upt ion

erry O'Neill (1928-2019) was the 60s. Omnipresent. Everywhere. He knew everyone, was invited to everything, and always in the loop. Because he had that certain je ne sais quoi that made him a friend of the musicians, movie stars, or politicians he photographed. He became one of them, and with that, one of the world's most celebrated photographers. His works are a part of some of the most important art collections globally, even at the National Portrait Gallery in London. No other photographer has ever managed to In Support of seize as many images Tickets are jet-set availableas forTerry. of the & Lecture for candidly the price and unconventionally. In Protecting African Lions His photographs Reception capture his subjects of Bardot 39.-CHFunsuspectingly, per person 1971 he caught Brigitte with a cigar between her teeth. And in 1975, Bruce Springsteen before his days of Reception & Lecture & 4 Coursefame; he was standing under a billboard promoting his either I make it or for don't Charity Dinner & Auction theBorn to Run album. Terry was born Terence Patrick in 1938 in Romford, East Lonprice of 215.CHF O'Neill per person don. His career began while working for a photographic unit at London's Auctioneer Complimentary Goody Bags for Heathrow airport, where, by chance, he photographed Rab Butler (Home To be announced Dinner Attendants secretary at the time). He then secured a job on Fleet Street where he worked Please Purchase Tickets directlywas Laurence Olivier. There with The Daily Sketch in 1959. His first subject Your Host ARTOLOGY followed the likes ofover: Judyinfo@suvrettahouse.ch Garland, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones not Gallery & Magazine forgetting striking images of the British royal family. And the rest, as they Please refer to: Mark Robinow & say, is simply history.when buying your ticket! Mark Robinow

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

ings & Sculptures

HL AND LLWITZ

n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

r

:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 62

Hosting Committee English actress Honor Blackman on a beach for a publicity shot for the 1964 James Bond Goldfinge r. Spelt out in the sand is the name of her character, Pussy Galore. Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Thank you! contemplative Audrey Hepburn with a dove perched on her shoulder, 1966. Bella Haas, Right, Fabiana Herdieckerlook forward towith yourhis minders and his stand in (who Pagg. 64-65, singer and actor Frank Sinatra, hoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra We is wearing an identical to him), arriving at Miami beach while filming, The Lady in attendance on Thursday Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and outfit Cement (1968). Andrea Rinderknecht 20.02.2020 © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited


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TERRY O'NEILL

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TERRY O'NEILL Elton John became one of his favoured subjects, about whom he also published a book in 2008 - Eltonography. He spent more than 30 years taking photos of Frank Sinatra as his private photographer. And there are images of Brigitte Bardot, Audrey Hepburn, Nelson Mandela, Muhammed Ali, ... to name a few. His book Terry O’Neill’s Rock’ n’ Roll Album is a force to be reckoned with. It's a compelling account of a life led among the stars, and his images of Faye Dunaway (who later on became his wife) are amongst his most iconic. He photographed her lounging at the Beverly Hills Hotel swimming pool the morning after she won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the movie Network. His works have graced the covers of Life, Rolling Stone, and Vogue, amongst others and his intimate snap-shot-like style has become synonymous with the 60s and 70s. In 2019 he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to photography. “I’m a reportage photographer, and I just like fading into the background. The more discrete you are, the better off you are”. Terry O’Neill.

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English singer songwriter Elton John performing at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, October 1975. Trinidadian actor Geoffrey Holder plays the mysterious Baron Samedi in the James Bond film Live and Let Die (1973). Portrait of Terry O'Neill taken by his assistant Richard Pereira, mid 1990's. Sean Connery plays golf on a deserted film set in Pinewood Studios in London during the filming of Diamonds Are Forever (1971). American actress Faye Dunaway takes breakfast by the pool at the Beverley Hills Hotel, 1977. The previous night she won the 1976 Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role for Network. Pagg. 68-69, comic actor Peter Sellers taking a photograph with a Linhof camera, Rome, 1965. © Terry O'Neill, Iconic Images Limited


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TERRY O'NEILL

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IRENE KUNG

T

he first time I became aware of Irene Kung and her work was through a series she had produced for the Porsche Automobile company. It was featured in a magazine I grabbed by chance on a flight. I was deeply impressed with the Zen-like-energy that her work radiated. Clean, light, and still with an incredible eye for every visible detail. Her name anchored itself in my mind, and I began following her through the usual social media outlets that merely served to increase my interest. Her extremely calming and beautiful photographs presented a novice style of handwriting in my mind. After only a short time, I gathered the courage to contact her about an art-car project that I was in the process of preparing for Monaco in 2021. As once in a while may be the case, one thing led to another. Today I find myself writing about a unique artist who by a phone interview on June 7th answered a few of my questions.

CKTAILS – ART EXHIBITION CHARITY GALA DINNER Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter

Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

When did you start taking pictures, and what motivated you to pursue this? I was a painter for many years and some time ago decided to add a camera to my tools. I used it with a painter's mind, listening to my intuition and emotion. As soon as I started taking photographs, I realised how wonderful it was. I brought my subjects back to the studio instead of always being there alone. To me, working with a camera is a more extravert way of creating images, and this corresponds more to my character. - The Er upt ion

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n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

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:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 70

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Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Thank you! Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra We look forward to your Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and attendance on Thursday Palma. Right, Genesis Bejing Andrea Rinderknecht 20.02.2020


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Taj Mahal, Agra

IRENE KUNG Were you influenced by other fine art photographers or painters? Painters like Caravaggio mostly influenced me. His way of using light is very contemporary; Piero della Francesca is an inspiration - for his painting style whereby his subjects appear realistically. Still, at a second glance, you discover that he converts everything into an abstract shape, and Paul Klee is the master of colour! Photographers such as Sugimoto also inspire me by expressing silence and peace that I am also searching for. I could mention so many other artists that I admire and who influence me... especially the up and coming young photographers who create amazingly surprising works. What are your favourite subjects for your shootings? My first subjects were monuments, undoubtedly because I was living in Rome. I find joy in photographing buildings that are significant symbols across history. I brush out the unnecessary and replace it with endless shades of grey, hoping to transform these poignant buildings into magical images. I wish to give them immortality, and myself a little bit of peace. My second Project were trees. They constitute a break with the rigid lines of architecture. Then, of course, there is a more in-depth explanation: trees are the symbol of nature, a sacred icon. I try to express the power of life without distortion or distraction and noise. Here is our plant, nothing else. A 'portrait of the tree' is exact and faithful, yet it is oneiric – that is what I imagine.

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What is your next big Project? I am working on the Project of photos I took three years ago during trekking in Yunnan and – mainly – Tibet: the earth's highest ecosystem. An exciting project for me.


Irene Kung was born in Switzerland and studied graphic design before becoming a painter. She has always been interested in photography which is now her main form of expression. Her works have exhibited in London, New York, Beijing, Moscow, Milan, and Rome. International magazines and newspapers such as The New York Times, The Sunday Times, AD, The Economist and Il Sole 24 Ore have published them. Her book The Invisible City won the PDN Photobook 2013 award. In 2015 the EXPO Committee commissioned a series of photographs of fruit trees for the Fruits and Legumes Cluster. In 2018, working for Porsche, she immortalised the new Porsche 911 in the Timeless Machine project. Irene Kung continues to live and work in Switzerland.

IRENE KUNG Battersea Power Station

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DYLAN DON

CKTAILS – ART EXHIBITION CHARITY GALA DINNER Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter

Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

- The Er upt ion

I

t is indeed an immense pleasure when one sees how children of friends grow up and step into their fathers’ footsteps. Surely this is the case with Dylan Don. I have known him since he was a young teenager who was inspired by the film and photography success of his father Movie Producer Karel Dirka. Dylan is a top tier fashion and advertising photograTickets are available for pher who has worked successfully around the globe. All noteworthy Reception & Lecture for the price fashion cities such as Milan, Paris, London, of 39.-CHF per person New York, and Los Angeles etc. on his list. His works contain an incredible eye and phantasy, surprising his subReception & Lecture &jects 4 Course and viewers alike. Charity Dinner & Auction for the He price of 215.- CHF per personimmersed himself in international campaigns for fashion houses such as Dolce & Gabbana, Joop, Vionnet, Complimentary Goody Bags for Trussardi, and Tom Ford. He created global advertising Dinner Attendants campaigns for clients such as Mercedes-Benz, Sony, Nike, Adidas and Jimmy Choo. Dylan then decided to use his Please Purchase Tickets directly incredibly sun-inspired colourful reverie to start producover: info@suvrettahouse.ch ing portraits and fine artwork with his camera. Please refer to: Mark Robinow Born in the fairy-tale-like landscapes of Bavarian when buying your ticket! palaces and castles, the lush tones and bright colours of Los Angeles naturally seduced him, providing a basis for many an iconic work to be produced. Thank you! We look forward to your attendance on Thursday 20.02.2020

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

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n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

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Ron Beals, Harlem Globetrotter

r

:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 74

Hosting Committee

Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and Andrea Rinderknecht


Genesis Bejing

Batsisters

The city’s incredible architecture and typical Americana landmarks, as well as the towns plush and funky design hotels complete with infinity pools and Alice in wonderland style decors, are the subjects of his magnificent photographs. Often Dylan’s work is inspired by some of his visual heroes such as the incredibly creative American film director Wes Anderson with his funny, weird, bold, and phantasy-like film sets. This influence is visible in many of the celebrity portraits that he had the pleasure photographing. Stars like Giorgio Moroder shot in a chauffeur-driven Bentley, or Cara and Poppy Delvigne depicted in deck chairs on a hotel rooftop in L.A. As one of his fans once said: “His images have the rare intimacy of selfies, except that they are curated by an opera like phantasy”. A perfect description! His works published in: Vogue IT, Vogue UK, L’Uomo Vogue, Vanity Fair, W, GQ UK, GQ Style UK, Interview Magazine, L’Officiel Hommes France, L’Officiel France, Style.com, ID Magazine, Variety, Flaunt and Blackbook.

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ANKE SCHAFFELHUBER

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nke Schaffelhuber was born on July 30th 1968 in Iserlohn, Germany, and grew up in Deggendorf, a town situated in the middle of Bavaria. From an early age, she felt the strong desire to explore the world and to revel in its diversity. In her early twenties, enthused with youthful curiosity, she was drawn to what, at the time, seemed to be the most exciting metropolis in the world. New York City. Anke was astounded by the ‘Big Apple’ and the opportunity to channel her creative interest at the Art Students League. After a time of academic pursuits, the ignition of her curiosity and travel lust followed an invitation to join a two-month photographic journey across the USA. Inspired by her experiences on this adventure and equipped with a diversity of images and impressions, she returned to Germany. Here she furthered her education by attending the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich to study economic administration. Upon completion of her business studies – unwilling to put aside her art – Anke enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich. Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter She spent her time fueling her passion. During a visit to Africa in 2003, she once again combined her two great loves by experimenting with digital photography. Little did she know what this visit would have as an impact on her future. It combined a vast array of photographs that captured the unique African beauty, its landscapes, animals, and people with an overpowering love for the ‘Dark Continent’.

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- The Er upt ion

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

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n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

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:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 76

In Support of

Protecting African Lions

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Reception & Lecture for the price of 39.-CHF per person Reception & Lecture & 4 Course Charity Dinner & Auction for the price of 215.- CHF per person

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ARTOLOGY Gallery & Magazine & Mark Robinow Hosting Committee

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Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Thank you! Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra We look forward to your Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and attendance on Thursday Built on sand. Right, Last visit; Port of Call Andrea Rinderknecht 20.02.2020


Genesis Bejing

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ANKE SCHAFFELHUBER By 2011 she had travelled to Africa a staggering 22 times and to the present day carries on exploring the beauties of Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, South Africa, and Kenya. While Africa may have captured her heart, the western capitals of Paris, London, and New York continue to thrill and excite her with every visit. Her drive of discovery ever-present. Then there is the uniqueness of Buenos Aires, Bangkok, Berlin, and Stockholm. Or St. Tropez, the Mediterranean coast, the Maldives, Seychelles, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Marrakech, Bhutan, Mauritius, Turkey, and Sicily. All serve as a vital source of inspiration for her as an artist. Her art conveys elemental polar differences, creating a striking contrast between two incoherent but recognisable perspectives. Her work tells tales of the first and third world, the past and the future, the calmness and frantic bustle by throwing together the beauty of nature with the stark reality of urban industrialisation. Images that are instantly familiar emerge from the translucent foggy skyline of New York City towers above the timeless sandy desert of Botswana. And yet, they

Victory Temple of Art

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ANKE SCHAFFELHUBER are images that create a struggle and inner discomfort of stark contrast. Turn around, and the four giant feet of the Eiffel Tower straddles the silent beauty of a Patagonian glacier. Another 360, and you find yourself drawn down a beautiful avenue. A path that leads out of a 21st Century city rushing through the bustling people, their lives, and material possessions flooding out into the remote and barren landscape of a Namibian desert. The end of the line, a life, a dream? Through Anke’s photo art, you gather perspectives of our world which on the one hand are part of our day-to-day life, yet on the other so unfamiliar that they appear surreal. It is the combination that in the end, reminds us of how alien we risk becoming in our world. The art of Anke Schaffelhuber creates bridges between the gap of what is known to the human eye and what the mind is capable of imagining. The prerequisite of craftsmanship is interpretation, and this attribute, combined with its belief structure, transforms her photography to art. Today Anke is based in Munich, Germany and Geneva, Switzerland.

Mindsetting Why not Quo Vadis?

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SEBASTIAN COPELAND

CKTAILS – ART EXHIBITION CHARITY GALA DINNER Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter

Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

- The Er upt ion

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

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HL AND LLWITZ

n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

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:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 80

In Support of

Protecting African Lions

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Reception & Lecture for the price of 39.-CHF per person Reception & Lecture & 4 Course Charity Dinner & Auction for the price of 215.- CHF per person

Auctioneer

To be announced

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Your Host

Please Purchase Tickets directly over: info@suvrettahouse.ch

ARTOLOGY Gallery & Magazine & Mark Robinow

Please refer to: Mark Robinow when buying your ticket!

Hosting Committee

Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and Andrea Rinderknecht

Thank you! We look forward to your attendance on Thursday 20.02.2020


Genesis Bejing Last visit

Seasasgtain. Left, Greenland

H

e is a British-French born world Traveler, award-winning Movie-Director, Fine Art Photographer, environmental advocate and Ted-Talk-Speaker. The feathers of various prizes this multi-talented artist has received would burst any hat. Sebastian Copeland's photographic oeuvre is not only mind-blowing in its beauty and uniqueness but also communicates messages of urgent global significance. Copeland was twice named Photographer of the Year: in 2007 (IPA) for his first book Antarctica: The Global Warning (Earth Aware 2007), and in 2016 (TIFA) for his latest Arctica. Copeland has led expeditions across the Arctic sea, Greenland, and Antarctica, and has reached both poles on foot—North and South. With over 8,000 kilometres travelled under his skis, Copeland holds various records and polar 'firsts' across the polar region. In 2017, Copeland was named one of the world's top 25 adventurers of the last twenty-five years. Sebastian has addressed audiences at the UN, The World Affairs Council, and the Green Cross International's General Assembly on climate in New Orleans (President Gorbachev in attendance). He presented at the George Eastman House, the Google and Apple headquarters, and was interviewed by Larry King live on CNN. His internationally held speeches on the climate change crisis are renowned for over a decade. He has warned many fortune 500 companies of the systemic transformations taking place in the polar regions from 81


SEBASTIAN COPELAND

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SEBASTIAN COPELAND

anthropogenic activities, and their geopolitical consequences. From September 15, 2018, to January 13, 2019, an estimated four million people visited the exhibit From Pole to Pole – A Vanishing World on the Gates of the Luxembourg gardens in Paris. The 82 large panels displayed Sebastian's stunning polar images with an urgent message of warning: from the North Pole to Greenland and Antarctica, the ice is melting at an accelerated rate. We will be re-drawing the maps of our world within this century. Involved in his book projects, are celebrities such as Leonardo Di Caprio, Richard Branson, David De Rothschild, Orlando Bloom, and Mikhail Gorbatchev. They are also close friends as well as avid collectors of his incredible images. Sebastian offers us a unique vantage point from which to appreciate the loneliness of this location. Admittedly, this is the last true wilderness on the planet - and its demise should ring the alarm for lower latitudes. Copeland's authority on the subject is unparalleled and, in his books and global exhibits, his passion for this place truly shines. Copeland's awe-inspiring images of the frozen continent capture the beauty of the glaciers, biodiversity, and wide, wild seas of the Drake. Although the vision presented in these pages may be poetic and beautiful, the book's aims are pragmatic - to seduce and inspire the world to help foster a market transformation towards a sustainable future. This alone is a more than worthy goal. Sebastian lives in Munich, Germany with his wife and two children.

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SEBASTIAN COPELAND

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SEBASTIAN COPELAND

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ANDRÉ DE PLESSEL

"W

omen are angels” - the credo omnipresent in André de Plessel's life and works. He sees women, his photography's main subject, as 'strong angels' and he calls them his most important companions. The special relationship that André de Plessel establishes through his lens with his 'angels' is a very personal yet respectful and provocative one. His photographs are seductive and intimate and have significant aesthetic power filled with sensuality and in many cases a unique glamour of the past. With immense pleasure, we have worked with André for almost two decades. His works exhibited and sold in London, New York, Milan, Munich, Frankfurt, and in Cap d'Antibes, South of France. Prestigious galleries display his black and white fine art photographs.

CKTAILS – ART EXHIBITION CHARITY GALA DINNER Ma nuela Mol lw it z – Red Ha lter

Jay- C – A horse w it h no na me

- The Er upt ion

PLEASE JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL EVENING OF EXQUISITE ART

ings & Sculptures

HL AND LLWITZ

n starts at 7:00 PM Manuela Mollwitz – Short Lectures at

r

:00 PM at Suvretta Work by the followauctioned:

EEDY LLWITZ HL 86

In Support of

Protecting African Lions

Tickets are available for

Reception & Lecture for the price of 39.-CHF per person Reception & Lecture & 4 Course Charity Dinner & Auction for the price of 215.- CHF per person

Auctioneer

To be announced

Complimentary Goody Bags for Dinner Attendants

Your Host

Please Purchase Tickets directly over: info@suvrettahouse.ch

ARTOLOGY Gallery & Magazine & Mark Robinow

Please refer to: Mark Robinow when buying your ticket!

Hosting Committee

Luca De Ambrosis, Jay C Foster, Bella Haas, Fabian Herdieckerhoff, Christian Reinhardt, Yantra Lewis, Sabine Rauhenbusch and Andrea Rinderknecht

Thank you! We look forward to your attendance on Thursday 20.02.2020

Loving Angel. Right, Taste top model. Pagg. 88-89, Peggy Weiss, Playboy


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ANDRÉ DE PLESSEL

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ANDRÉ DE PLESSEL André provides his viewers with feelings of voyeurism, a look through the keyhole, introducing them to the tremendous explosive power only a fantastic picture exposes. In de Plessel’s art photos women are powerful, proud, and erotic beings. He has worked together with Helmut Newton and photographed beauties like Laetitia Casta and Naomi Campbell. He was born in Frankfurt Airport to an Italian mother, French father, and Russian grandmother – anything else but an international career not even taken into consideration by André de Plessel. After studying art and photography, he lived in Frankfurt and Barcelona, in Milan, London, Paris, Los Angeles, Miami, and New York. The passion for photography is his life-drive and remains to-date, after more than 30 years in this business. Frankfurt has never felt like home to him. It is in his eyes, too narrow and dreary. Instead, his photography settings around the world have become his home. But how is it that a young man brought up near Frankfurt would decide to dedicate his entire life to photography? The answer is simple; photography enabled him to invent and develop an international language that he made his own. He shows the unadulterated dignity of female eroticism, bows to their beauty. He inspires them to reveal their deepest secrets to us and to unleash women's powers. In the process, we are magically taken by him, and his erotic angels, often like a voyeur to a world that without him, would have stayed hidden forever. It is the captivating world of his extraordinary and artistic eye. Miami (the ‘Magic City’) has become his home – or rather the base for his travels for over 30 years now. It may be an on- and off-premise that is a constant subject to creative change, but it is, at least, a stomping ground.

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Cherry mouth. Right, Cuba story For further information please contact:Artology Gallery


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MATTHEW BRANDT

From the series Silver: AgXB481A

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atthew’s work revives traditional photographic techniques and finds common ground between the medium and the subject, sometimes creating prints that use physical elements from the topic itself. Brandt’s Silver series features images of trees at night produced as large-scale gelatin silver prints. Then treated with liquid silver and mounted on aluminium frames, recreating in a series of unique works his own personal experience of rapture at the natural world. For his Wai’anae series, Brandt photographed the landscape of Oahu, Hawaii, took the printed photographs of Oahu and then rolled them in a mixture of soil and leaves from the island. He combined this with burlap, a material used in traditional Hawaiian burial, and lace, commonly used in Hawaiian festivals. He proceeded to bury the assemblage on a family farm in Wai'anae for a period of one to three months. As a result, the materials stripped the cyan emulsion to create vibrant hues of reds, oranges, and yellows layered against the soft cool colours of the landscape.

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From the series Wai'anae: Wai'anae 603625

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MATTHEW BRANDT

Brandt’s artwork was recently the subject of a solo exhibition, Rocks and Eagles, presented at Newark Museum from March 2019-February 2020, and was featured in prominent group exhibitions including Look Again: Collecting 45 Years of Photography, High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Ansel Adams in Our Time, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and New Territory: Landscape Photography Today, Denver Art Museum, Denver. His work is held in the permanent collections of Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Art Gallery of South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Royal Danish Library, among others. He received a BFA from The Cooper Union, New York and an MFA from UCLA. Brandt was born in 1982 in Los Angeles, CA, where he currently lives and works.

From the series Silver: AgXB581A

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From the series Silver: AgXB752B

From the series Wai'anae: Wai'anae 923624

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MEGHANN RIEPENHOFF

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orking cameraless, Meghann places paper coated with homemade cyanotype emulsion. It will interact with ocean waves, rain, snow, or ice in the landscape. UV light and water activate the photochemistry, allowing nature to create an abstract image in tones of blue, sometimes leaving its trace on the paper which textures the surface with sand and other debris. In the end, each print is an imprint of nature, rather than an image of it. Riepenhoff’s work has been exhibited and is held in the collections at the High Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts (Houston), the Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago), and the Worcester Art Museum. Riepenhoff is the recipient of a Fleishhacker Foundation grant, residencies at the Banff Centre, Rayko, and the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, and an affiliate studio award at the Headlands Center for the Arts. She is a 2018-19 Guggenheim Fellow. Riepenhoff is based in Bainbridge Island, WA and San Francisco, CA.

Littoral Drift Nearshore #209; Littoral Drift Nearshore #765. Right, Littoral Drift Nearshore #502; Littoral Drift #189; Littoral Drift #844 96


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KYLE MEYER

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or his Interwoven series, Meyer addresses Eswatini’s hyper-masculine culture by photographing its LGBTQ community. For each male model, the artist creates an elaborate headwrap from fabrics chosen by each subject from textiles traditionally worn as headdresses by the Swazi women. After taking the subject’s portrait and creating a large-scale print, Meyer then hand-shreds the large-scale photograph and the head wrap. Strips are then together to create a textured, three-dimensional work. The resulting colourful images both conceal and reveal the men’s identities, whose sexual orientation is illegal in their country. Meyer’s works are held in the permanent collections of Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain Paris, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, Microsoft Art Collection, Washington, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, amongst others. He has held solo exhibitions in New York and London and participated in group shows throughout the world.

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Unidentified 146

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Jaren. Left, Haarlemmerpl.; Kinkerstraat


KYLE MEYER

Unidentified 156

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Unidentified 130a

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ALISON ROSSITER

Compendium 1916, 1917

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ince 2007, Alison has collected expired photographic papers from the 19th and early 20th Centuries, creating an archive of over 1,800 individual packages that represent the rise and transformation of the photography industry over time. Even in dark storage, each box of paper reacted to conditions – moisture, humidity, physical damage, attacks by mould spores – that manifested in tonal changes when developed. These resulting tones are evidence of the papers’ experience and are taken by the artist to be the subject matter. Rossiter’s abstract, minimalist assemblages are composed of rare, expired photographic papers. The artist processes them using photographic chemicals, and they are now on view in Substance of Density 19181948, the artist’s third exhibition at the gallery, in New York City, through September 26, 2020. Alison Rossiter’s photographs are in the collections of major public institutions such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Minneapolis Institute of Arts; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson; and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

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Compendium 1919 (publicity)

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Density 1932-1938

For further information please contact: Yossi Milo Gallery


JAMES CASEBERE

J

ames Casebere was born in 1953, in East Lansing, Michigan. He attended Michigan State University and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, from which he graduated in 1976 with a BFA. In the fall of 1977, he attended the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York and received an MFA from Cal Arts in 1979. Casebere's pioneering work has established him at the forefront of artists working with constructed photography. For the last thirty years, Casebere has devised increasingly complex models that are subsequently photographed in his studio. Based on architectural, art historical and cinematic sources, his table-sized constructions are made of simple materials, pared down to essential forms. Casebere's abandoned spaces are hauntingly evocative and oftentimes suggestive of prior events, encouraging the viewer to reconstitute a narrative or symbolic reading of his work. While earlier bodies of work focused on American mythologies such as the genre of the western and suburban home, in the early 1990s, Casebere turned his attention to institutional buildings. In more recent years, his subject matter focused on various institutional spaces and the relationship between social control, social structure and the mythologies that surround particular institutions, as well as the broader implications of dominant systems such as commerce, labour, religion and law.

Red/Orange Solo Pavilion. Right, Flooded Street 104


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JAMES CASEBERE In 2001, Sean Kelly gallery presented an exhibition that included works inspired by the indigenous architecture of the Caribbean Island of Nevis, traditional Japanese architecture and an imagined gallery space. This exhibition also featured a now well-known body of work inspired by Thomas Jefferson's utopian Monticello. In the following years, he has continued to investigate a wide range of iconic architectural spaces, resulting in increasingly sophisticated layers of interpretation. Two photographs from his recent series, Landscape with Houses (Dutchess County, NY), were featured in the 2010 Whitney Biennial. In May of 2013, The New York Times Magazine commissioned Casebere to create a new work for their cover. Casebere has been the recipient of numerous fellowships, including three from the National Endowment for the Arts, three from the New York Foundation for the Arts and one from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. His work is collected by museums worldwide, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art; the Los Angeles County Museum; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England, among many others. In 2016, Casebere was a New York Foundation for the Arts Hall of Fame Honoree and the subject of important survey exhibitions: Fugitive at the Haus der Kunst in Munich, curated by Okwui Enwezor; Immersion at Espace Images Vevey in Switzerland; and After Scale Model: Dwelling in the Work of James Casebere, at the BOZAR/ Centre for Fine Arts in Brussels, Belgium. James Casebere lives and works in New York.

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Bright Yellow House on Water. Right, Flooded Courtyard with Tree


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CANDIDA HÖFER

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orn in Eberswalde, Germany in 1944, Candida Höfer attended the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf from 1973 to 1982. Whilst there she studied film with the Danish filmmaker Ole John and photography under the influential photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher, who also taught noted Düsseldorf School photographers Andreas Gursky, Thomas Struth, Axel Hütte, and Thomas Ruff. Known for her meticulously composed, large-scale colour images of architectural interiors, Höfer’s oeuvre explores the structure, presentation, and influence of space. Interested in the psychological impact of design and the contrast between a room’s intended and actual use, Höfer has focused her lens on cultural and institutional buildings such as libraries, hotels, museums, concert halls, and palaces. Whilst devoid of people, the images allow us to consider the role of their missing inhabitants. The large-scale nature of the work invites the viewer to linger over the architectural details and contemplate the subtle shifts in light that make up the character of the space.

Teatro Degollado Guadalajara III. Right, Passage I

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CANDIDA HÖFER

On her decision to exclude people from her photographs, Höfer has said, “…it became apparent to me that what people do in these spaces – and what these spaces do to them – is clearer when no one is present, just as an absent guest is often the subject of a conversation.” Höfer's internationally recognized work has been shown in solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle in Basel and Berne; the Museum Folkwang in Essen; the Louvre in Paris; the North Carolina Museum of Art; the Museo Amparo, Mexico; the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; and the Kunstmuseum Luzerne, Switzerland. Her work has also appeared in group exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Power Plant, Toronto; Kunsthaus Bregenz; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; the Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao; and Documenta XI, Kassel. Höfer represented Germany at the 2003 Venice Biennale. In 2018, the Sony World Photography Awards recognized Candida Höfer for her outstanding contribution to photography. Her photographs are in major public and private collections worldwide. Candida Höfer lives and works in Cologne, Germany. Edificio Basurto Ciudad de México I. Right, Museo Nacional de Arte Ciudad de México II; Hospicio Cabañas Capilla Tolsá from Daniel Buren work in situ Guadalajara V

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ALEC SOTH

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lec Soth was born in 1969 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He studied at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York. Soth received international acclaim when his photographs were featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including the 2004 Whitney and São Paulo Biennials. Soth's photographic style has continued to develop in subsequent series beginning with his iconic Sleeping by the Mississippi, and including Niagara, The Last Days of W, and Broken Manual. Soth uses his large-format camera to photograph the people and landscapes of suburban and rural communities, often during road trips throughout the Midwest and the South. Soth’s photographs have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions. In 2016, Soth’s Gathered Leaves, an exhibition bringing together his four-signature series – Sleeping by the Mississippi, Niagara, Broken Manual, and Songbook, travelled to numerous institutions, including The Finnish Museum of Photography in Helsinki. In 2008, a large survey exhibition of Soth's work was exhibited at the Jeu de Paume in Paris, France and Fotomuseum Winterthur in Switzerland. In 2010, the Walker Art Center mounted a comprehensive exhibition with an accompanying catalogue entitled From Here To There, Alec Soth’s America.

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Yuko. Berlin. Left, Leyla and Sabine. New Orleans

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ALEC SOTH

His first monograph, Sleeping by the Mississippi, was published by Steidl in 2004 to critical acclaim. In 2008, Soth started his own publishing company, Little Brown Mushroom. Since then Soth has published Niagara (2006), Fashion Magazine (2007), Dog Days, Bogotå (2007), The Last Days of W (2008), Broken Manual (2010), Songbook (2015) and Gathered Leaves (2015), which brings together an essay by Aaron Schuman spread across 29 large format postcards, with mini facsimile versions of 4 of Soth’s previous books (3 of which are now out-of-print), all housed together in a luxurious printed and embossed clamshell box. His work is in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, to name a few. Soth is also a member of Magnum Photos. Soth lives and works in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Adelyn, Ash Wednesday, New Orleans. Right, Nick, Los Angeles; Bil. Sandusky, Ohio

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For further information please contact: Sean Kelly Gallery


POPEL COUMOU

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77_Untitled. Right, 112_Untitled

orn 1978 in Velsen, The Netherlands, Popel Coumou’s work is inspired by naturally occurring everyday lines. Popel finds her focus on those that furniture, architecture, and shadows replicate. She tries to reproduce these lifeless but highly evocative sights, by composing her own constructed spaces. To do this, she uses a wide variety of techniques; the most prominent among them collage. She layers her images, beginning with the construction of illusion of space which she then lights to add the suggestion of a third dimension. Hers is an accentuation of lucent effects – the light outside versus the shadows inside. Through this, she furthers both the sense of a flattened representation and the illusion of depth. The result is an image that seems to hold the mid-ground between painterly abstraction and geometric photography. Popel uses an old analogue camera to carefully capture the romantic notions in the most abstract artistic gestures. She mixes and matches with the resulting compositions appearing to the viewer like graphic interpretations of daydreams. It is an abstract language that is uniquely her own. Her works have found homes around the world, exhibited and collected by both individuals and institutions.

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POPEL COUMOU

2_Untitled. Right, 109_Untitled

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ELLEN KOOI

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Abbekerk-tweeling

llen Kooi was born in 1962 in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. Today she lives and works in the Dutch city of Haarlem. In 1987 Ellen graduated from the Academie Minerva in Groningen. She went on to complete her post-graduate studies at the Rijksacademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam in 1994. Kooi is known for her oeuvre of largescale panoramic photographs. She challenges her viewers to see the world as a dramatic narrative; to seek the border between fantasy and reality. At first glance, the people that inhabit these images of (mostly Dutch) landscapes seem to be at the mercy of their surroundings. But if we look at these pictures more carefully, we see a far more complex relationship, as the landscape almost responds to its inhabitants. The displays of nature we see are a symbolic reflection of the inner turmoils, or indeed the happiness of these people. In a way comparable to 19th Century psychological portraits, Kooi tries to tell us about myths, chance encounters, and our relationship with the outside world. Keeping this in mind, it is imperative to remember that her works are as much concerned with landscape as they are with the person. By forming close connections between themes set in our visual memory of history but never choosing a primary focus, Kooi’s works are suspenseful and hard to identify. Ellen’s works have been exhibited globally and acquired by Museums, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as the Collection Hermès in Luxembourg, and the Borusan Contemporary in Turkey, among others. Numerous private collections around the world have purchased her works of art.

Right, Schier EngelsGras; Velsen-slootmist; Zwammerdam-kas

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EDDY POSTHUMA

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Haarlemmerpl.; Kinkerstraat. Right, Jaren

or over fifty years, photographer Eddy Posthuma de Boer has restlessly roamed the earth, capturing human life in over 85 countries. No corner of this world has been left untouched by Posthuma de Boer who “searches for the world as it really is”. From the moment seventy years ago that he picked up his first camera, photography remained his obsession. He witnessed historical events and came face to face with world leaders. His is a life lived through and with his camera. The social-documentary movement that emerged just after the second world war – humanist photography – was a significant influence on his work. It is characterised by representing the human condition as such, documenting how humans connect through traditions and customs. During his career, he worked for numerous Dutch and international newspapers and magazines, all while always letting his vision and insights prevail over the direct message of the assignment. Combining this with his ability to capture every degree of drama and humour naturally, has led to the publication of a large number of photo books and many remarkable exhibitions. Posthuma de Boer was born and raised in Amsterdam, where he still lives today. He made his decision to become a free-lance photographer in the early 50s. In 1961 he married the singer and musicologist Henriette Klautz, and they have two daughters, Tessa and Eva. His works have shown throughout the world. For further information please contact: Torch Gallery


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This London, New York, and Paris based Gallery has an incredible archive. As a novelty they have now added a new collection of timeless photographs

for the first time.

The images are available in an 8x10� format as a limited edition of 100 prints. Magnum Photos is a co-operative owned and run by its member photographers, who undergo a rigorous process of self-selection.

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EVE ARNOLD

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ve Arnold began photographing Marilyn Monroe after the actress saw her work of Marlene Dietrich in Esquire magazine. They met at a party and Monroe asked: “If you could do that well with Marlene, can you imagine what you can do with me?� So it was that their professional relationship began, which, over the years, turned into a friendship. Arnold photographed Monroe six times over the decade they knew each other, the longest of these sessions lasted two months during the filming of The Misfits.

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IAN BERRY

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n 1970 Ian Berry returned from a gruelling trip across three continents. He found himself in the small Paris flat of French singer and pop-culture icon Serge Gainsbourg, who shared the premises with his partner English singer and actress Jane Birken. The pair's relationship often played out in the public eye, through photographs, but also, music - evidenced not least by the duet Je t’aime... moi non plus (although banned in some countries due to its lyrical content). This image is something of an anomaly for Ian, as he rarely worked with the famous.

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BURT GLINN

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urt Glinn's work on the set of Suddenly Last Summer, a 1959 movie adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ one-act play of the same name – offers a window onto a production that was fraught with tension. Twenty-five-year-old Elizabeth Taylor starred alongside Katharine Hepburn and Montgomery Clift. Glinn followed the cast and crew from Shepperton Studios in London to S’Agaro in Spain, photographing Taylor at work and behind the scenes. Despite the tumultuous production, and mixed reviews, Taylor was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for the film.

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DAVID ALLAN HARVEY

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his photograph was taken in Chile in 1987, just after Harvey had left his staff photographer job at National Geographic. He was experiencing a renewed sense of freedom at the time and said of this image: “On my right wrist is a small tattoo: a red balloon. Why? It's in honour of the 50s French classic short film The Red Balloon. Saw it when I was a kid […] When I saw this boy in Santiago, Chile, that image of ultimate freedom popped into my head. There are all kinds of freedom. Creative freedom is one of the most rewarding”.

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DENNIS STOCK

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n the late 60s, Dennis Stock took to the road to create a portrait of California during the peak of America's countercultural heyday. In this image, photographed at Venice Beach Rock Festival, Stock captures just one of the attempts of California's non-conformists to reshape society according to the ideals of love and peace. He described his voyage as nothing less than extraordinary: “A recent trip blew my mind across this state of being, as I collected images along the way to remember the transient quality of the Big Trip�.

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DAVID SEYMOUR

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avid Seymour worked on numerous commercial commissions for significant publications, including shooting portraits of some of the most iconic cultural figures of the 20th Century, including Sophia Loren, Pablo Picasso, and Richard Avedon. He took this photograph of Audrey Hepburn in Paris in 1956, three years after her breakout starring role in Roman Holiday, for which she won the BAFTA for Best Actress. Seymour's biographer, Carole Naggar, wrote of his portraiture work: “His unobtrusive manner and sense of humour, his ability to listen, helped in the creation of portraits that went beyond the usual 'glamour shots', conveying an air of relaxed intimacy�.

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RENÉ BURRI

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ené Burri photographed many modernist icons: Le Corbusier at work, Picasso in his home, and the construction and inauguration of Brasilia-Oscar Niemeyer's purpose-built capital city, to name a few. This image depicts the work of another modernist, the influential Mexican architect Luis Barragán. Commissioned by a Swedish equestrian family, and designed in collaboration with his protegé Andrés Casillas, it was built in 1968 in Cuadra San Cristóbal (Mexico City). Pictured is the family's horse exercising area.

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NIKOS ECONOPOULOS

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ikos Economopoulos' major early projects saw him photographing his native Greece and its neighbours, as well as the Balkan peninsula following the fall of Yugoslavia. Initially, his works were mainly black and white, and only later on did he become focused on producing colour work. He revelled in the opportunities this created. “Black and white transcend reality by removing a very significant part of it: the colour. Its simplicity and deductive character allow for abstraction... Colour is more realistic. To get the same outcome, the same contrasts and tensions, the same scope of intensity is more complicated... You need to engage other tools, like the quality of light and a sense of balance between colours�.

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For further information please contact: Magnum Photos


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he art world is an interesting one. There are the challenges the artists face, like lack of time or money and the actual successful creation of something wonderful. There is the subject of constraint – for some too many, for others, too few. And then there is the fact that these beautiful artistic creations need to find acceptance. Firstly, by the artist themselves, and secondly, by the potential galleries and art collectors. Factor in the unforeseeable, such as the current Covid-19 pandemic, and the world looks different yet again, creating new and unsuspected predicaments. Today the online art market is soaring, as the focus is shifting around the world—both on the part of artists as collectors. Sotheby’s is seeing a 131% increase in the number of lots it sold online so far this year. Anders Petterson of Art Tactic and author of the Hiscox Report, said: “I believe we have seen a significant change in ‘perception and attitude’ in the art market towards the potential and importance of online – and I believe this will continue to drive future growth.” Robert Read, Head of Art at Hiscox, predicted that online sales could account for half of the art market within the next six years. He said, “social distancing is here to stay for long enough that it will change how we buy art as well as many other things. No longer will we have the joy and pain of crowded art fairs and gallery openings. Dealers will have to find new

I believe we have seen a significant change in ‘perception and attitude’ in the art market towards the potential and importance of online - and I believe this will continue to drive future growth. (Anders Petterson)

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ways to create the buzz that makes us have to buy now, lest we dwell and lose yet another treasure that we can’t live without.” The company Artfinder, launched in 2013, does just this and has closed its best sales quarter ever. Artfinder is a VC funded startup, backed by the investors behind Spotify and Zoopla. Investors include Wellington Partners, Oxford Capital, Cambridge Angels, plus private investors in the UK, the US, and Switzerland. In August 2019, Artfinder became the art world’s first B Corp, solidifying its mission to make art affordable, accessible and a viable career for artists. It offers close to 6,000 artists throughout the world the chance to show and thus sell their work to approximately 500,000 subscribers. Their bespoke technology additionally allows collectors and artists alike to find each other through an online ‘match’ facilitation. CEO Michal Szczesny comments: “It’s been a truly remarkable quarter for Artfinder and I think for the art world as a whole. The art world has been slow to embrace online, but for many these last few months it has been a matter of adapting to survive. We prepared, as I’m sure almost every business everywhere did, for a drop in our sales, what that would do to our cash flow, what measures we may need to take and when. What we did not prepare for was 100%+ growth of orders. We’re lucky as a marketplace business that our artists handle shipping and deal directly with customers. However, we’ve still seen a 136% increase in tickets to our customer care team, which has meant that we’ve had to scale that team, and other teams quickly. We’ve also launched a crowdfunding round to accelerate this period of growth even faster”. Artfinder has raised £500,000 to date through its first crowdfunding campaign with Crowdcube, which has 17 days left to run. Investors in the crowdfunding round will receive equity in the business, at a valuation of £10 million.

It’s been a truly remarkable quarter for Artfinder and I think for the art world as a whole. The art world has been slow to embrace online, but for many these last few months it has been a matter of adapting to survive. (Michael Szczensny)

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NADIA ATTURA

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adia graduated from The London College of Printing with a Postgraduate degree in Photojournalism. Today she lives and works in London. Nadia's artwork has been selected and exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition in 2016 and 2019, respectively. She was one of the five finalists of the VAO and her work features in prominent residential and public projects throughout the world.

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DASHA PEARS

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asha is an award-winning Russian conceptual photographer, currently based in Helsinki, Finland. Dasha uses the instruments of surrealism, colour, and photography to speak about the most profound psychological matters, including emotions, states of mind, and mind shifts. She started her photographic path in 2011, after reaching burnout in a marketing communications career. Having tried many types of photography, Dasha found herself in the conceptual and fine art sphere. Since then her images have been exhibited in Russia, France, Poland, Austria, Italy, and Finland. Her photographs grace the covers of books published in Europe, the United States, and South America. In 2016 Dasha started sharing her experience of organising conceptual photography shoots and producing surrealist artworks in the form of creative photography workshops. Since then she has held over 15 events in Finland and abroad.

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ADAM FIRMAN

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riginally from the English seaside town of Eastbourne, natural light has always been Adam's principal source of inspiration. So stimulated by a love of nature, Adam began his career by mastering a distinct style of landscape photography. His passion and skill in the creation of beautiful photographs transcend into his work with interior and architectural design. His concept of how light plays into the role of aesthetics, coupled with his meticulous eye for detail, has cultivated a unique and unforgettable style of imagery. He moved to London in 2014 and continued to further develop his career in photography. Adam's repertoire includes commissions from some of the world's most dynamic and innovative brands, including Sotheby’s, Soho House Group, Red Deer Architects, and the restaurants of Great British chef, Robin Gill, to name a few.

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Artfinder www.artfinder.com customers@artfinder.com Telephone: +44 (20) 7713 0023 PO Box 77102 London SW18 9 RD United Kingdom

MAAG Halle www.bymaag.ch info@bymaag.ch Telephone: +41 (44) 444 2626 Hardstrasse 219 8005 Zurich Switzerland

Artology Gallery www.artology-mag.com m.robinow@artology-mag.com Telephone: +49 (152) 0612 6910 Pienzenauerstrasse 16 81679 Munich Germany

Magnum Photos www.magnumphotos.com londond@magnumphotos.com Telephone: +44 (20) 7490 1771 63 Gee Street London EC1V 3RS United Kingdom

Fondation Valmont www.fondationvalmont.com info@fondationvalmont.com Telephone: +39 328 12 13 801 Palazzo Bonvincini Calle Agnello, 2161/A Santa Croce, 30135 Venice Italy

Sean Kelly Gallery www.skny.com info@skny.com Telephone: +1 (212) 239 1181 475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018 United States

Huis Marseille Museum www.huismarseille.nl info@huismarseille.nl Telephone: +31 (0) 20 531 8989 Keizergracht 401 1016 EK Amsterdam The Netherlands

Torch Gallery www.torchgallery.com info@torchgallery.com Telephone: +31 (0) 20 626 0284 Lauriergracht 94 1016 RN Amsterdam The Netherlands

Iconic Images Gallery www.iconicimagesgallery.net sales@iconicimages.net Telephone: +44 (20) 7349 9332 13a Park Walk London SW10 OAJ United Kingdom

Yossi Milo Gallery www.yossimilo.com info@yossimilo.com Telephone: +1 (212) 414 0370 245 Tenth Avenue New York, N.Y. 10001 United States


I DON'T WANT A BLACK

HISTORY MONTH.

BLACK HISTORY IS AMERICAN HISTORY;

THERE IS NO WHITE HISTORY MONTH. THE ONLY WAY TO END RACISM

IS TO STOP TALKING ABOUT IT.

Morgan Freeman


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WINTER ART 2020

Profile for H Fusion Media Group Limited

H Edition / Summer Art 2020  

H Edition / Summer Art 2020  

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