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HABITAT COMMUNITY


Heather Robinson Philadelphia University INTD-487: Capstone Research & Programming for Interior Design Fall 2013


TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1: Project Objectives

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Section 2: Historiography & Contemporary Global Context

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Section 3: Case Studies

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Section 4: Topical Explorations

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Section 5: Existing Site, Context, Climate & Zoning

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Section 6: Design & Technical Criteria

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Section 7: Program Development & Documentation

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Section 8: Building Analysis, Code, Regulations & Standards 129 Section 9: Final Project Research Summary

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Section 10: Bibliography & Appendix

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Cover Image: Habitat Advertisement


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PROJECT OBJECTIVES


INTRODUCTION Eric and Audreyelaine Coleman lived in a 3 bedroom Philadelphia Housing Authority home with their three younger children and teenage son. The living conditions resembled anything but a home. Ventilation issues and mold caused their youngest son to be in the hospital on many occasions. This PHA home was overcrowded, uncomfortable and was an unsafe place to live.1 Today, the Coleman family is one of Habitat Philadelphia’s newest homeowners. Since August 2013, Eric and Audreyelaine own a home that provides the safety and stability in which their family needs. They have become part of a habitat community, one that provides support and promise in a neighborhood that once couldn’t. The Coleman’s will be able to live grow, and thrive as a family, in a place they can truly call home.1 Worldwide Habitat for Humanity has served over 3 million people.2 However, the global picture of substandard housing and homelessness is very grim. Currently, there are 876 million people living in slums, and by 2020, it is estimated the world slum population will reach almost 1 billion.3 In the United States alone, 48.5 million people are living in poverty.4 Habitat for Humanity is challenging and improving those statistics in hopes that one day; they will eradicate substandard housing all over the world.

Image 1: The Coleman Family

Image 2

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Image 3: The Coleman Family Home Dedication


The Habitat center in Kensington Philadelphia is striving to ensure that the 52% of the population that is currently living below the poverty level, will soon have a safe place to live just like the Coleman family.5 This project has a very special meaning to me. I was adopted from Peru when I was a baby. These staggering worldwide numbers of people in need, including my birth family in Peru, has motivated me to work with Habitat to help play a role in ending substandard housing and homelessness. Just as Audreyelaine and Eric explain, “With Habitat, you’re building communities within communities. Habitat home-owner’s help one another… [And] their children grow up together”1. Habitat not only provides a safe and stable home, but its broader mission is revitalizing neighborhoods. Just as Millard Fuller, the founder of Habitat for Humanity stated, “For a community to be whole and healthy, it must be based on people’s love and concern for each other”.2

Image 4

DESIGN GOALS The goal for this project is to design a successful community center, office space, and Restore. It will enhance the neighborhood by creating a safe environment to allow members of the community to flourish. This center will be a place where both the offices and community can grow and thrive together, fighting to eliminate substandard housing within this area and revitalizing the Kensington neighborhood. 7


RESEARCH GOALS My research goal is to collect information directly from Habitat Philadelphia in order to fully understand their needs as a non-profit. By gathering this directly from the client and mentor, Troy Hannigan, I can focus solely on their objectives. The research goal will be to understand how they use their space and what is necessary for a successful design. I will gather this information through interviews and surveys. I will utilize my client and interview the staff, volunteers, and families. My research goal is also to learn about the community. To do so, I must research the history of Kensington as well as gathering statistics and demographic information.

ROLE OF THE DESIGNER Designers have a responsibility to make the world a better place. Our designs impact culturally, environmentally, politically, and in some ways, spiritually. My role is to design a center that does just that. It is my responsibility to acknowledge the client and ensure my designs meet all expectations. I will utilize my knowledge of human behavior and universal design to effectively design a space in which all users can benefit from.

SUSTAINABILITY Environmentally, my objective is to design this project to be LEED Platinum. I want the Habitat Center to address all alternative energy sources. Sustainability will be a cornerstone for this design. Habitat currently designs their homes to be LEED certified to not only help improve the quality for the families but to also ensure the longevity and necessity for sustainable architecture. I want to carry those values Habitat utilizes and incorporate them within the Kensington Center.

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CLIENT

Image 5

Habitat for Humanity of Philadelphia is an affiliate of Habitat International. Each affiliate however, has distinctive needs due to the differences in the community in which they work in. Troy Hannigan, a project manager, will be my mentor and client working directly for the Habitat Philadelphia affiliate. Currently, they are located on 1829 N 19th St., approximately four miles away from Kensington. Since 1985, Habitat Philadelphia has built 168 homes creating a Habitat community surrounding their office. The main purpose of this design is for future expansion into new neighborhoods currently not served. The building proposed for this center, currently houses Habitat Philadelphia’s Restore. This center will act as second office, allowing for opportunities to expand into the Kensington community.

Philadelphia University Philadelphia University Campus Chapter Campus Chapter

Image 6

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USERS There are four main types of users. User one is the client, Habitat Philadelphia. Their overall needs will be recognized within the research that is done directly with the affiliate. I will be able to recognize their values and goals as a non-profit working in the Philadelphia community. User two is the volunteer. Volunteers donate their time to work for Habitat Philadelphia on home builds, and Restore volunteer days. User three is the staff members of Habitat Philadelphia. The full time employees play a critical role in the office and their needs are defined for each particular job they hold. User four is the visitor; such as the restore customer. Their needs are based upon the Restore layout and accessibility.

Image 7: Habitat Philadelphia Volunteers and Partner Families

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SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITIONS It is proven that Habitat has a profound positive impact on the communities in which they work and build. Crime rates drop and families are empowered to break the cycles of poverty. It gives families a sense of security and they have more options when it comes to money for education and health care.2 Most importantly, Habitat homes provide new opportunities for families and gives them a safe and comfortable place to live. This project is being designed for a nonprofit and funded by a nonprofit. Therefore, there are major factors concerning budget that will impact this design. The budget will need to be established from the very beginning phase and carefully followed. This will indefinitely impact the materials, furniture and fixtures that I specify. As the designer, it is my responsibility to be aware of the budget and find alternative ways in designing such a large and complex building. However, I do feel that the sustainable initiatives that I am proposing can exponentially impact the design. Habitat could potentially receive grants to use various sustainable systems, and therefore in the projected future, they could save money. However, during the design process it is crucial to adhere to Habitat’s requests and ensure the design meets the expectations of their organization.

Image 8: Median Household Income Map

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DEMOGRAPHICS The population in Kensington is approximately 25,0005. In 2010, it was estimated that 52% of the population was living below the poverty level5. The total housing units currently in Kensington is about 10,500 with the median household income approximately $14,586. In addition, there are over 1,500 vacant houses5. There is great potential and need for growth and revitalization within Kensington. As shown in Image 7, a majority of the homes built in the community were built in 1939 or earlier. Out of the 8,000 households, 6,000 are family households with 2,000 of them occupied with children under the age of 18. Approximately half of the population are children or young adults, creating a heightened need for better living conditions and a safer community. Out of the total population, there are about 15,000 that are Hispanic or Latino and 3,000 Black or African American. When designing the center, the wide variety of culture that exists within Kensington is an important factor that needs to be taken into consideration.

Image 9: Year House Built Graph

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Also, as shown in Image 8, a large percentage of the population have completed less than high school education. It is a community currently filled with instability and desperation. Between 2010 and 2012, there was an estimated 5,500 property crimes. It is rated two times more than the national average for crimes and five times for the murder risk national average5. These conditions and considerations will greatly impact the center. It will need to be a safe environment to work within but at the same time welcome and support the variety of culture and families within the area. It will indefinitely have to be a universal design to adhere to the values and heritages of the neighborhood. Habitat for Humanity has been proven to enhance the quality of life within a community by improving education, crime and poverty stricken families. My center will have to adapt to that objective and be designed with human behavior considerations. Within the materiality selections alone, it needs to have a safe and supportive aesthetic to allow the community and volunteers to feel welcome. This will be integrated through the color, textile, and lighting aspects of the design. It is a growing community rich in history that deserves to be revitalized in order for those within the community to flourish.

Image 10: Educational Attainment Graph

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FOOTNOTES 1

"Meet the Coleman Family, our newest homeowners!â&#x20AC;?. North Philadelphia Complete Blocks Project. Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia, 8 08 2013. Web. 16 Sep. 2013. <http://habitatphiladelphia.wordpress.com/2013/08/ 08/meet-the-colemans-our-newest-habitat-neighbors/>.

2

"Why We Build Homes, Communities and Hope: Program Milestones FY2012." Habitat for Humanity. Habitat for Humanity International, Web. 6 Sep 2013.

3

UN-Habitat, State of the World's Cities 2010/2011, March, 2010.

4

National Low Income Housing Coalition, Out of Reach 2013, March 2013

5

United States. Census Buereau. American Fact Finder: 19134. 2007-2011. Web. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/communityfacts.xhtml>.

6

"Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty in Peru."International Fund for Agricultural Development. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Sep 2013. <http://www.ifad.org/operations/projects/regions/pl/factsheet/peru.pdf>.


IMAGES C http://cargocollective.com/natesmith/Habitat-for-Humanity-Ad-Series

2 http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/9588443279/in/set72157635227785918 3 http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/9588443279/in/set72157635227785918 4 http://magazine.habitat.org/sites/default/files/cover-images/rotater-homesCommunitiesHope.jpg 5 http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/9588443279/in/set-72157635227785918 6 http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/9588443279/in/set-72157635227785918 7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/9588443279/in/set-72157635227785918 8 http://www.bing.com/ 9 http://www.areavibes.com/philadelphia-pa/kensington/housing/ 10 http://www.areavibes.com/philadelphia-pa/kensington/housing/

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

1 http://habitatphiladelphia.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/the-coleman-family.jpg


Cover Image: : World Map


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HISTO R IO GR APH Y & CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL CONTEXT


6th CENTURY 480 BC ACROPOLIS, ANCIENT GREECE

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Image 1: Athenian Agora Map


An Agora was the heart of any Ancient Greek city, and it was especially the soul of Ancient Athens. Agora translates to “the gathering place” or “assembly” and was a prominent architecture form within Ancient Greece1. Ancient Agora of Athens was the “political hub of the city”, evolving and expanding as the city of Athens grew and developed2. Image 1, clearly shows the change from an empty plot of land to a cultural center of the city. This was the place in which people of the community gathered for religious, cultural, and social purposes. It was in a way, a temple in which “progress[ed] toward a design well calculated to satisfy a given set of aesthetic feelings and human needs”1. It is relevant to the Kensington Center because it has to respond to the community and culture in which it develops within. It has to adapt, grow and expand in order to establish a successful community, just as Athens did.

Image 2: Aerial Map of Athenian Agora

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It first encompassed a plot of land that was placed in the center of the city, but it would then grow to adhere to the city’s needs; churches would be developed, sporting event halls, meeting spaces, law courts, etc. The Athenian Agora “is a fine example of the use of urban space and architecture to contain and monumentalize the social and civic rituals of the city”3. As shown in Image 2, the site was a sloping plot of land that was surrounded by a variety of roads leading to the Agora. It was constructed of packed gravel layers that were designed to be the shape of a square. The public centers were adorned with paintings and sculptures that embodied the rich Athenian history1. The materials varied from building to building, but the most common was marble and limestone. Decorated with paintings, they again captured the cultural aspects of Athens4. Athens had an important history due to the development of philosophical schools by Plato and Aristotle4. This is portrayed in The School of Athens fresco painting shown below. Completed during the Italian Renaissance by Raphael Sanzio da Urbino, this image displays the community enriched atmosphere in which existed during that time. The development of their culture would not have been possible without the Agora as the centralized community meeting center. It is linked to “the most important personalities in Athenian history who were aware of the culture and political capital that could be gained by support of urban building projects”3.

Image 3: School of Athens

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1 2

Tsoga, Kilo. "History." Odysseys. Ministry of Culture and Sports, n.d. Web. 19 Oct 2013. <http:// odysseus.culture.gr/h/3/eh351.jsp?obj_id=2485>. Thompson, Homer. "The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians." Society of Architectural Historians 13.4 (1954): 9-14. jstor. Web. 19 Oct 2013.

3

Camp, John McK. "The Athenian Agora." ASCSA (2003): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013.

4

Darling, Janina K. Darling. "Architecture of Greece."Greenwood Publishing Group (2004): n.pag. Web.19 Oct 2013.

IMAGES C

http://www.champlain.edu/assets/images/Admin/Homepage/BVT/Map.jpg

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http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Maps/Agora1.jpg

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http://www.agathe.gr/image?id=Agora:Image:2008.18.0219&w=800&h=600

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http://uploads5.wikipaintings.org/images/raphael/school-of-athens-detail-from-right-hand-sideshowingdiogenes-on-the-steps-and-euclid-1511.jpg

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

FOOTNOTES


1100 AD GREAT PUEBLO PERIOD SOUTHWEST U.S.

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Image 1: Chaco Canyon Map


Image 2: Chaco Canyon Ruins

In 1100 AD community centers were crucial to the Native American culture. Chaco Canyon was an ancient Pueblo Indian site located in Southwest United States1. It was comprised of hundreds of small settlements which collapsed in 1150-12002. These centers were known as ‘great houses’, “visually prominent buildings that no doubt symbolized social power and statues for the individuals who built the community4. They were utilized much like modern day community centers are. Meetings and activities such as: rituals, political events, economic events, and social gatherings took place in the great houses. The construction and growth was very similar to that of the Athenian Agora. It was a symbol of the cultural traditions of the Chacoan community4. The Albert Porter Great House is an example of a community center during the Chaco period. These buildings were isolated from other communities and were large in size3. Each type was constructed relatively the same. They varied in size and form according to the time in which they were built. They would consist of individual rooms with high ceilings about four to five stories high3. As seen in Image 2 and 3, the structure is comprised of blocks bound in clay mortar with rubble formed into the core of the wall. Afterwards, they would pack sandstone with mud on top of the walls to reinforce the structure3.

Image 3: Chaco Canyon Ruins

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During the early post-Chaco period, they started to resemble an Agora with clusters of buildings constructed, rather than one2. In the late-post-Chaco period, they grew to be “large aggregated villages” as the communities moved closer together4. Each great house within the Chaco Canyon was evidence of a “great social integration” for the Pueblo Indian community4. This organization allowed them to “transform with considerable social power and influence”2. It is important to the Kensington Center because it provides an additional example of how a community can gain a voice and grow together.

Image 4: Chaco Canyon Aerial View

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1

"The Sun Dagger at Chaco Canyon." PlanetQuest (2005): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013. <http://www.planetquest.org/learn/sundagger.html>.

2

Reed, Paul F. "The Puebloan Society of Chaco Canyon."Greenwood Publishing Group (2004): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013. Fagan, Brian M. "Chaco Canyon: Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society. "Oxford University Press (2005): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013. Potter, James M., and Mark Varien. "The Social Construction of Communities." Rowan Altamira (2008): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013.

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IMAGES 1 2 3 4

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ANa4kIzr_to/TwnBb083cQI/AAAAAAAAD9k/QW8X7i-YeD4/ s1600leaflet04map.jpg http://exploringculturesearchinglight.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/24-pueblo-bonitoarchitectural-lines.jpg http://m4.i.pbase.com/v3/76/20676/2/50232824.DSC04933.jpg http://classconnection.s3.amazonaws.com/984/flashcards/754984/jpg/pueblobonito 1316988146591.jpg

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

FOOTNOTES


1163 MIDDLE AGES PARIS, FRANCE

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Image 1: Map of Europe in the Middle Ages


Image 2: Notre Dame de Paris

The Christian church is a powerful precedent for the modern day community center. Throughout history, religion has been the key ingredient in which “bound[s] together disparate peoples in a shared faith and ritual and a common learned language”1. This was especially true during the Middle Ages in Europe, where the church sought extreme power and control and was a key component of the medieval culture1. Even though the control and power that the church practices is different today, the charity and support it provides its’ communities remains the same. The Cathedral Notre Dame De Paris shown in green on Image 1, was a prime example of medieval architecture that was built during the time of “demographic expansion and economic dynamism”2.

Image 3: Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII helping the poor

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Located in Paris, France, this church allowed the community to flourish. Built by Jean de Chelles, Pierre de Montreuil, Pierre de Chelles, Jean Ravy and Jean Bouteiller, Notre Dame de Paris was architecturally significant. The first stone was laid in 1163 and was continuously expanding until its completion in 12502. Due to the different class distinctions, there was a “variety of expressions of Christianity and variation in beliefs and practices”3. It practiced as both a religious and community center through the weekly masses as well as an “economic… [And] intellectual teacher center”2. The primary concern was the middleclass to lower-class peasants whom were the majority of Paris’s population3. Just as a Habitat for Humanity Center, their culture was to give charity to the poor and empower those in need1. It developed into ‘social gospel’ in which those who donated and volunteered sought the “religious expression by relieving human suffering”1. Notre Dame De Paris was also a key role of the religious pilgrimage that was a major event in the growth of Paris. The layout of the church invites people in to gather and experience the architecture. It revitalized the community and brought people from all over the world to gather within the churches of Paris.

Image 4: Notre Dame Floor Plan

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1 2 3

Logan, Donald F., and. "A History of the Church in the Middle Ages." Routledge (2012): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013. Volz, Carl, and . "The Medieval Church." Abingdon Press(2011): n.pag. Web. 19 Oct 2013. "Notre Dame Cathedral Paris." . N.p.. Web. 19 Oct 2013. <http://www.notredamecathe dralparis.com/>.

IMAGES 1

http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/arth214folder/parismaps.htm

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http://blog.best-bookings.com/en/paris-cathedral-notre-dame/

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Canossa-three.jpg

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:InteriorOfNotre-Dame de Paris

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

FOOTNOTES


19th CENTURY LONDON, ENGLAND

Image 1: Booth London Poverty Map

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Image 2: Samuel and Henrietta Barnett

In 1884, Samuel Barnett and his wife Henrietta, shown in Image 2, saw a vision in which closely reflects to the mission statement of Habitat for Humanity today1. Their goal was to provide support to the poor London community by helping to improve their homes, working conditions, and local neighborhoods within their organization Toynbee Hall. Their mission was necessary due to the recent social and economic crisis that occurred in London in the 1860’s5. Unlike the Middle Ages, where the church was a strong power and support within the communities, there was a “lack of church accommodation”3. Between 1886 and 1903, Church attendance dropped from 535,715 to 396,196; a dramatic decrease in the parish. In these urban communities, religion slowly became less of a critical power. The culture of London was slowly declining with the lower-class struggling to survive. In 1898 there were approximately 909,000 people within London; 74,000 of those were extremely poor and 100,000 were starving3. In Image 1, it maps the variety of poverty levels that existed during that time. The majority of the populations were families with children where 9 out of 10 had one room to live, sleep, and eat within3.

Image 3: Toynbee Hall

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Located on Commercial Street in Greater London, Toynbee Hall made a powerful impact on the lives of the lower class4. The concept for this group was to bring members of the upper British class into the communities in which the majority of the population was low-income. They would then utilize their resources and education to help the “urbanized English poor”5. With their upper-class status, these members would be able to put pressure on the local government to make changes that would benefit those in need. This system was able to give a different perspective to the upper-class, bringing them face to face with poverty1. Toynbee hall focused on being a “service center, research center, and a center of political action”5. Their Memorandum of Association includes their responsibility “to provide education and the means of recreation and enjoyment for the people of London and other great cities [and] to enquire into the conditions of the poor and to consider and advance plans calculated to promote their welfare”3.

Image 4: Housing in London in 1880

Toynbee Hall was constructed by architect Elijah Hoole in 1884. Within the urban setting of the London slums, this two-story building was designed with character and prominence. It is a Tudor-style facade incorporating four bays. The materials are red brick with stucco dressing4. The interior included a meeting hall, dining hall, and drawing room in which the upper-class would utilize to educate the lower-class and strategize on how to improve their community5. Image 5: Interior Sketches of Toynbee Hall

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Image 6: Toynbee Hall

Today, Toynbee Hall remains a community center in which they still address the poverty crisis that exists within London. Their values are closely related to those of Habitat, where they state “We have been a catalyst for social reform in the UK for more than 125 years, and continue to create new ways to help those who find themselves in poverty today- whatever their age or background”1. This organization was an essential part of the growth of community centers around the globe. It was slowly adapted and practiced throughout Europe and eventually North America in 1886 when National Federation of Settlements was formed. The goals of the Federation was to “support the organizational efforts of local centers”, and “to advocate for social reform at the national level”5. New immigrants greatly benefited from NFS assistance. The efforts of NFS not only advocated for improved housing for the poor and working class, but also helped develop child labor laws, and public health laws5.

Image 7: Sketches of Toynbee Hall

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FOOTNOTES Estes, Richard J. Social Work, Social Development, and Community Welfare Centers in International Perspective. Diss. University of Pennsylvania, Print.

2

"Our History." Toynbee Hall. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct 2013.

3

"Toynbee Hall." Past Scape. English Heritage, n.d. Web. 19 Oct 2013. <http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1567232>.

4

"Settlement Houses." Looking At Buildings. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct 2013. <http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/cities/london/walks-and-tours/social-provision-ineast-london/settlement-houses.html>.

5

Hansan, John E.. "National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers." The Social Welfare History Project. Social Welfare History Archives. Web. 11 Sep 2013. <http://www.socialwelfarehistory.com/organizations/national-federation-of-settlementsand-neighborhood-centers/>.

IMAGES 1

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AuZNGGa8Uq0/TbK_ MU0GTzI/AAAAAAAACj4/B4P0-77n3JA/ s1600/HB.jpg

2

http://bestelec.co.uk/admin/kcfinder/upload/images/r93mtpo13Toynbee%20Hall(1).JPG

3

http://lib-1.lse.ac.uk/archivesblog/?tag=charles-booth

4

http://fakeshakespeare.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/7.-Wych-Street-18803.jpg

5

http://www.kunstkopie.de/kunst/afterwilliamherry/interioroftoynbeehall.jpg

6

http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/typo3temp/pics/e55e497455.jpg

7

http://www.mernick.org.uk/thhol/images/toynbee.jpg

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

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Cover Image: Habitat Advertisement


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CASE STUDIES


HABITAT PHILADELPHIA OFFICES

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Philadelphia University


JUSTIFICATION Habitat for Humanity of Philadelphia is relevant to my proposed project because my client is currently utilizing this space. By studying this building, I can understand the existing conditions and learn how to improve upon it to create a more successful design. This case study shows the potential for Habitat offices and how their offices has the ability to thrive with my proposed project.

SITE & CONTEXT

Image 1: Habitat Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Exterior

Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia is located at 1829 North 19th Street Philadelphia. This building, as shown in Image 2, is located in an urban setting. Since it opened in 1985, the neighborhood has been revitalized because of Habitatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission. Currently, the location of the building is prime because there is a large amount of work to do within the area. The largest factor that effects Habitat is the socio-economic conditions of the neighborhood in which they work. Their mission is to eliminate substandard housing, therefore it is important for them to work within the areas that are in need the most. The context of the neighborhood surrounding is mostly residential. To the east of the offices however is partly commercial as well as a university. The wide variety of cultures and ages within the community speak to the necessary design of Habitat. In order to address the neighborhood, the Kensington center needs to accommodate.

Image 2: Habitat Philadelphia Context Map

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The population of the neighborhood is approximately 34,000 with a 43.3% poverty rate1. 71% of household income levels are less than $30,000. In 2010, Philadelphia had twice as much crime than Pennsylvania had as a whole, in the same year2. Habitat has truly empowered the community. The crime and poverty level statistics have transformed because of Habitatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Clearly shown with the context images, new construction is revitalizing the neighborhood. The climate in Philadelphia is in the subtropical zone. There are approximately 4 times more heating degree days than cooling degree days. The average max temperature is 63 degrees Fahrenheit and the minimum average temperature is 45 degrees3.

Image 4: Population by Race Chart

Image 3: Habitat Neighborhood Images

Image 5: Household Income Level Chart

SIZE The building is 2 floors and approximately 15,000 square feet. Shown in Image 6, It is a 2 story building on the front attached to a 1 story warehouse. It is adjacent to the building and extends beyond the entire width of the block. 40

Image 6: Habitat Office Aerial View


ARCHITECT & DESIGNER The building was constructed in the 1940’s as an auto repair shop and originally incorporated a large ramp that would allow cars to drive up to the 2nd level. The ramp was recently removed and replaced with stairs to add an additional means of egress from the second floor. The architect is unknown.

OWNER, CLIENT & USERS The owner and client is Habitat Philadelphia. As a Habitat affiliate, their offices cater towards the work location they are specifically working. Therefore the design differs from affiliate to affiliate. For Philadelphia, the building is mainly used for offices and construction storage. It also holds volunteer and community gatherings. The main users of the building are the full time employees. They are exposed directly to the functionality of the spaces and have different needs for their specific job. Their job descriptions are charted in Figure 7. Board of Directors

Organizational Chart

Henry Randolph Development Manager of Communications & Grants/ AmeriCorps HSM

Frank Monaghan Executive Director Corinne O’Connell Associate Executive Director

Megan Henry Family Services Coord. VISTA

Rebecca Saadeh Family Services Manger

Troy Hannigan Project Manager

Shonda Brinson Volunteer Coordinator

Kathy White Director of Operations

Jon Musselman Director of Project Planning

Carolyn McLaughlin Assoc. Director of Development

Zach Wilcha Development Manager of Faith Relations Martin Silverstein Resource Development VISTA

Will Lambrakos Site Supervisor

Devin Henry Bryant Burkhart Sarah Mussoline Julia Van Holt Bob Hinrichs AmeriCorps Construction Assistants

George Buckmann Construction Electrician

Rocky Font-Soloway AmeriCorps WHRP Assistant

Vicki Rosenzweig WHRP Assistant

Emily Lucas Director of WHRP

Luke Powell AmeriCorps TOC Assistant

Craig Lee Construction Supervisor

Cassie O’Connell Director of The Other Carpenter

Rick Powell Director of Construction

Tom McGlinn Volunteer Supervisor

Renia Johnson Admin. Assistant

Kristin Caldwell Development Associate

Javier Lanchang ReStore Manager

Emily Pratt Logistics Manager Greg Bradley ReStore Associate Dally Correa Warehouse Coordinator Angie Correa-Collazo ReStore Cashier Billy Tillman Contracted Truck Driver

August 2013

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Image 7: Habitat Philadelphia Position Chart


ARCHITECTURE/INTERIOR STYLE & CONCEPT ANALYSIS The design style of the Habitat office is very basic. The design is rather focused on the function and needs of the organization. Due to the reuse and the low budget, the donation based items formulate the style. The exterior and interior donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily integrate with each other, because of the lack of windows mainly in the front facade [Image 1]. The age of the building is distinctive in materiality for both the architecture and the interior design.

BUILDING PARTI ANALYSIS & DRAWINGS Due to the fact that this building is a reuse, the spaces are forced to be designed in a way that works for the interior shell. Because of this, there are minimal ways to properly organize the spaces. The office just recently went under a renovation that resolved many of the difficult circulation and spaces.

Image 8: Public vs Private Before

Image 9: Public vs Private After

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Shown in Image 8 and Image 9, are the before and after renovation. The important factor of the design to note are the public and private spaces. The public spaces are crucial to creating a welcoming volunteer and community center while the private office spaces are important to the function of the organization. Before the renovation, there was minimal public space. The conference and meeting spaces are now pushed to the front building adjacent to the entrance, to promote interaction with the community. The private spaces are pushed towards the back and sides of the building where there are more windows as well as better circulation.

CIRCULATION & WAY FINDING

Image 10: Hierarchy After

The circulation improved prior to the renovation yet still remains unclear in some spaces. The problem is the amount of program that is trying to fit in a smaller building. After the renovation, the circulation improves because of added corridors, but with no visible way finding strategies, it is difficult to understand the overall organization to both volunteers and Habitat Philadelphia staff.

Image 12: Circulation After

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Image 11: Circulation Before


SPACES, ROOMS & ADJACENCIES

The required spaces for Habitat Philadelphia include: offices, conference rooms, and construction supply storage. The 10,000 sf. of construction/ storage spaces is the largest component of the site. It provides work areas for volunteers and staff. The program also includes flex spaces to accommodate expansion within the office and room for community activity. On the first floor, the large conference space acts as both a meeting room for the employees but also has the potential to be a gathering room utilized by the community. There are also important needs that are not being met within the existing program. The office organization fails to promotes communication. Offices are split between the first and second level, creating a loss of circulation and successfulness of the space. Another issue is way finding. There is no visible design to clearly depict the spaces and functions. 44

Image 13: Rooms Diagram


CONSTRUCTION WORK & STORAGE AREA

Image 14: Entrance to Storage Area

Image 15: Storage Area Skylight

The construction work and storage rooms of Habitat Philadelphia are the largest spaces within the building. Due to the fact that the offices are located close to a majority of the construction sites, it is imperative to have ample space to both work and store construction materials. The majority of lighting is natural light. There are a number of skylights that run the entire extension of the single level storage rooms. To balance the natural, there are hanging light fixtures hung between the ceiling beams. The only furniture/equipment incorporated into the space are the tables and shelving units to organize the construction supplies. The entirety of the construction and storage rooms are unfinished. The walls are unpainted, ceiling exposed and floors are concrete. The aesthetic isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily important because the space is mainly used for storage. However, the aesthetic for the work spaces will be improved for the Kensington Center

CONFERENCE SPACE Image 16: Second Floor Conference Room

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Image 17: Community Room

The conference spaces are important to both the office employees and the community. They are used for employee lunch breaks, meetings, and community events. Each vary in size, but they have to be both flexible and efficient. The lighting only artificial light for all three of the existing conference rooms. The front room is adjacent to the entry but still does not gain any natural light. The furniture/equipment for all of the conference spaces include table, chairs and minimal storage. The materials and finishes are simple but incorporate Habitat colors and volunteer images.


OFFICE SPACE The offices on the first and second level are private and small in size. Each accommodates one to two employees. Within each office, or open office system there is a desk, chair, computer and file cabinet. Due to the layout of the floors, the offices are pushed to the exterior walls. This allows for most of the offices on the second level to receive natural light from the existing windows. The offices on the first floor however, only have artificial light. Image 20 shows the Open Office space on the second level, which promotes collaboration and communication between the private offices and volunteers. Adjacent to that space is flex space for potential expansion in office staff. The materials and finishes vary from office to office. The colors rotate between blue and tan, with minimal art and/or decoration. For the individual offices, it is up to the employee to decorate the space to their personal taste.

Image 18: Family Service Office

Image 19: Second Floor Office

Image 20: Second Floor Open Office

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SUSTAINABILITY

Image 21: Restore Recycled Doors

Habitat Philadelphia incorporates sustainable principles. The largest strategy is the reuse of the building from an auto body shop built in the 1940â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The location is of the building is also an important fact. There is ample amount of public transportation and the building is located directly within the areas of the construction sites. The interiors also have a level of sustainability. As a non-profit, the budget is extremely tight, forcing Habitat Philadelphia to use donated/reused furniture and materials.

COLOR

Image 22: Color Scheme

Due to the majority of the design being based on building reuse, and donated furniture and finishes, the color scheme is minimal. The walls, floor and ceilings are neutral tans and whites. What elevates the design are the incorporation of Habitat photos and color that help represent the organization.

EVALUATION POST OCCUPANCY SURVEY: SEE APPENDIX: 158

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The evaluation of Habitat Philadelphia is that the design doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow the organization to work to the best of their ability. The program has huge potential within a space that can successfully hold the square-footage needed. The circulation and organization of the spaces is hindered due to the small building size. The way finding can also be improved to aid the volunteers and the staff. The aesthetic of the building should also be taken into more consideration; being able to improve productivity while also creating a more welcoming and inviting experience for volunteers. The storage and work areas can be improved with more equipment to organize, as well as the offices improving with better storage and work spaces.


FOOTNOTES 1 2 3

“Data Profile.” Data Place (2005): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <1-http://www.dataplace.org/place?category=3>. “Neighborhood Information for Philadelphia, PA, 19121.” Movoto (2012): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.movoto.com/neighborhood/pa/philadelphia /19121.htm>. “Philadelphia.” Climate Zone (2013): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.climate-zone. com/climate/united-states/pennsylvania/philadelphia/>.

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IMAGES C http://cargocollective.com/natesmith/Habitat-for-Humanity-Ad-Series http://www.flickr.com/photos/habitatphiladelphia/

2

www.bing.com/maps/

3

Photo taken by: Heather Robinson

4

http://www.movoto.com/

5

http://www.movoto.com/

6

www.bing.com/maps/

7

Chart received from Habitat Philadelphia

8 14

- 13 - 21

Drawings received from Habitat Philadelphia; Diagram by: Heather Robinson Photo taken by: Heather Robinson

22 Diagram by: Heather Robinson

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

1


HABITAT PHILADELPHIA RESTORE

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Philadelphia University


JUSTIFICATION This case study is critical to understand because the Restore is an important component to the proposed project. As a retail space, run and operated by Habitat Philadelphia, it funds the construction of Habitat homes. Image 1: Site Plan Context

Image 2: Site Plan Context

SITE & CONTEXT The building is located on 2930 Jasper Street in Kensington, Philadelphia. It is on the same site that the proposed project will be located. Once a Textile Mill Factory, this building acted as a centralized business area of the neighborhood. The site is Zoned L4, an industrial district, with residential zones surrounding. The community acted as a live /work neighborhood with the residents walking to the factory to work from their nearby home. It was formally used as the commercial and industrial warehouse but is currently only housing the ReStore on the first level.

SIZE The ReStore is approximately 19,000 sf., 125ft by 250ft. It began as a 4-floor textile mill in the 1860’s and expanded to a 5-floor from an “L” to a “U” shaped building in 1910. The 5th floor is partial as well as the basement, with an attached one-story former boiler structure. The parking lot on the site is about 20,000 sf. with about 60 parking spaces. The ReStore has 2 loading docks accessible through the parking lot. Image 3: Site Plan

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OWNER, CLIENT & USERS The client is Habitat Philadelphia and they are currently renting the first floor from the owner of the building. The users are from 3 different categories. The employees are one category. They work on the floor with customers, in the storage spaces to prep the items and help volunteers. Volunteers are the second users and they play a major role. They interact the most with the items, preparing them for sale and organizing them on the main floor. The volunteers range in age and work at the store almost everyday. The third category are the customers that visit and purchase items from the store. The customers also range in age, but are mostly home owners looking for items. Their business is what allows Habitat Philadelphia to continue building homes.

Image 4: Restore Employee & Customer

ARCHITECTURE/INTERIOR STYLE & CONCEPT ANALYSIS Due to the fact this is a building reuse, the architectural style and interior concept resembles very much of the previous function. As a factory, the design and materials are unfinished and exposed. The structure is visible with limited amount of interior walls. As a “thrift shop” store, the spaces are kept open and flexible to allow the customers to circulate through the items. The only existing designated spaces are the front desk, offices, break room, and storage space. The exterior is used slightly for outdoor item display as well as the loading docks. However, the outside isn’t addressed within the spaces. There are no windows being utilized within any of the spaces.

Image 5: Restore Volunteer

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Image 6: Philadelphia Restore Interior


BUILDING PARTI ANALYSIS & DRAWINGS

Image 7: Public vs Private

The floor plan is simple in shape and layout. The form is a “U” shape . Shown in Image 7, the main showroom has the most square footage, while the private spaces hold the smallest. The axis lines shown in Image 8, derive from the structural columns and go against the beams.

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Image 8: Axis Lines


STRUCTURAL SYSTEM The structure includes exterior brick bearing walls with the interior structure of wood floors, beams and columns. The structural diagram highlights the columns and beams within the interior.

Image 9: Structural Diagram

CIRCULATION & WAY FINDING The circulation derives from one main corridor that is consistent throughout the entire building. It provides a straightforward path for both customers and volunteers to use. The displays and furniture within the showroom follow this corridor leaving about a five foot walkway throughout the main showroom. There are approximately 5 exits in the Restore.

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Image 10: Way finding & Circulation


BUILDING SYSTEMS The ReStore can be divided into 3 different zones. The first, Zone A, is 3000 sf. This zone is mainly used for the storage space to store and restore items prior to going on the main floor. The second, Zone B, is approximately 7,000 sf. And is the back end of the store. It mainly houses the doors/plumbing/large furniture pieces. The third, Zone C, is 9000 sf. This area includes the main entrance, front desk, and shelving for smaller items.

Image 11: Building System Diagram

SUSTAINABILITY Habitat Philadelphia ReStore is sustainable because of the building reuse. The store itself is also promoting sustainable practices through the reuse of furniture and materials. Image 12: Building Prior to Habitat Restore

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SPACES, ROOMS & ADJACENCIES

Image 13: Spaces Diagram

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Image 14: Section A Diagram

Image 15: Section B Diagram


OUTDOOR SPACE Image 16: Restore Entrance

The outdoor retail space helps lure customers into the ReStore. By displaying items for sale with Habitat graphics, it creates an interesting and welcoming entrance.

VESTIBULE

Image 17: Restore Entrance

The vestibule is used as an information center for all of the customers as they walk into the ReStore. The posters, boards and images, educates the customers with Habitatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission. It is important that Habitat Philadelphia explains the purpose of the ReStore to both the volunteers and the customers that pass through. The color and materiality is simple, allowing the signage and bulletin to be the focus. The decorative elements are focused around the Habitat signage. The artificial lighting is minimal because the glass doors and side lights allow natural light to enter.

FRONT DESK Image 18: Restore Vestibule

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Image 19: Restore Front Desk

The front desk is located immediately between the two vestibules. It acts as display for items as well as information display about current projects and volunteers. There is a cash register, and computer at the front desk. The desks and walls are white. The lighting is all artificial but receives some natural light from the sidelights of the vestibule.


MAIN SHOWROOM The main showroom has to be functional to allow proper circulation customers. The materials and finishes are minimal to allow the items to be the main display. The majority of the showroom are comprised of large furniture. Therefore, the way finding is critical for the customer shopping and the volunteer who is restocking the floor. In other areas such as the plumbing parts and small items, there is shelving. The floor is polished concrete and the ceiling has exposed structure. The walls are white with green and blue accents. In the showroom near the entrance, Habitatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is painted onto the wall, to remind customers the importance of the ReStore. The lighting is 100% artificial. There are no windows in the space except for the vestibule door and sidelights. The combination of the black ceiling with the absence of windows, the space is extremely dark.

Image 20: Front Showroom

Image 21: Front Showroom

Image 22: Middle Showroom

Image 23: Middle Showroom

Image 24: Middle Showroom

Image 25: Back Showroom

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BUDGET The budget is relatively the same when compared to the Habitat Philadelphia Offices. Because Habitat is a non-profit, money is an issue. Most of the materials are donated or reused.

Image 26: Welcome to Restore

COLOR CONCEPT The ReStore is currently more focused on the items being displayed rather than the aesthetic of the space. Therefore, the colors consists of grays, white and black. The accents are green and blue. Image 27: Color Scheme

EVALUATION POST OCCUPANCY SURVEY: SEE APPENDIX: 162 The evaluation of Habitat Philadelphia Restore is that is has the potential to be a more welcoming and aesthetically pleasing place for the employees and the customer. With the dark colors and limited natural light, the space can become uncomfortable. However, the current organization of the main showroom allows customers to experience everything the ReStore has to offer. Wayfinding is currently successful.

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REFERENCES 1 2

“Neighborhood Information for Kensington, Philadelphia.” Movoto (2012): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. “Data Profile.” Data Place (2005): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <1-http://www.dataplace.org/place?category=3>.


IMAGES Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10

2

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson

3

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 ; www.bing.com/maps/

4

http://philadelphianeighborhoods.com/2013/05/01/kensington-habitat-for-humanity-restore-made-possible-throughdonations/

5

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2011/10/flinth_ abitat_forh_ umanity_res.html

6

Photo taken by: Heather Robinson

7

- 11

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson

12 Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 13 16

- 15 - 26

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson Photo taken by: Heather Robinson

27 Diagram by: Heather Robinson

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

1


SOS CHILDREN’S VILLAGES LAVEZZORIO COMMUNITY CENTER

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Image 1: Lavezzorio Community Center


JUSTIFICATION

Image 2: Lavezzorio Community Center

The SOS Children’s Villages Lavezzorio Community Center is an important case study because it is a building that addresses both the community and housing. The designers reached out to the neighborhood surrounding the site and researched their needs. In turn, they were able to create a “noticeable, Eco-friendly, and inviting” community center1. This project is a perfect example of the types of design strategies the Habitat Center in Kensington should embody. The budget of the Lavezzorio Community Center is extremely similar to that of Habitat, with a low budget, the design was donation based. The designers show the originality and creativity when working within a low budget, and also how to create a community wide impact with their designs.

SITE, CONTEXT & SIZE Lavezzorio Community Center is located in Chicago, Illinois. The center acts as a “gateway” for sixteen foster homes that make up the Children’s Village2. As visible within the Image 3, the boundaries form a triangle with the Community Center at the central point. The site includes a large amount of green space to promote community. Completed in 2008, Children’s Villages not only brought life to the foster parents and children, but to the existing neighborhood surrounding. Image 3: Site Plan

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The context around the Village is mostly residential. Therefore, the center was not only for the Village, but the design was able to adapt the Chicago community. The building is approximately 16,000 square feet.1

ARCHITECT & DESIGNER

Studio Gang Architects designed the Village Community Center. This Chicago-based architecture and design firm is recognized for their innovative international designs. Founded in 1997, their experience varies from large scale educational and cultural designs to small scale residential3. Their knowledge of community design created a successful project. Their design strategies will be implemented into the Habitat Center in order for it to successful revitalize Kensington. The firm also worked with CCJM Engineers Ltd. For the electrical and mechanical design1.

Image 4: Context Map

Image 5: Zhong Bang Residential Village by Studio Gang

Image 6: Reedy Square Plaza by Studio Gang

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OWNER, CLIENT & USERS

Image 7: Lavezzorio Community Center Interior

Image 8: Lavezzorio Community Center Interior

Image 9: Lavezzorio Community Center Lobby

The Client for this center is the SOS Children’s Villages of Illinois. The organization designs a neighborhood within a community. It incorporates a cluster of individual homes with foster children living under the care of a trained foster parent. Their concept strives to give the children structure within the home along with support of other foster families living nearby. This center is revitalizing both the Village neighborhood and the surrounding Chicago community by “strengthening and building families together with the community”1. Therefore, the end user is the 425 foster care children and their families. The building is used for a variety of functions for the children. It is a family education center, learning center and a gathering space that will allow families to grow together with their community.

ARCHITECTURE/INTERIOR STYLE & CONCEPT ANALYSIS For Studio Gang Architects and designers, the biggest challenge to overcome was the circulation and flow from one space to another3. The community center needed to allow the foster parents to see and maintain contact with their youth while participating in adjacent spaces. The spaces also needed to feel safe and welcoming for the both the children and members of the community. Therefore, the struggle was to keep the spaces warm yet open. 65


The aesthetic of large open spaces doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily have the feeling of community, so the solutions were further explored. With a minimal budget, particular constraints affect design. Forcing the architects to pay close attention to materiality. Another element to the concepts and styles was the Chicago community influence. They wanted an exterior that was inviting. Their innovation is clearly seen within their use of concrete for the exterior facade. By improvising with various shades of concrete, Studio Gang brought out the liquid aspects of the material3. Image 10: Concrete Concept Design & Small Scale Test

BUILDING PARTI ANALYSIS & DIAGRAMS

Image 11: Hierarchy Analysis Diagram

Studio Gang architects and designers utilized hierarchy to designate the crucial spaces within each level. The hierarchy reveals the openness and flexibility that is within many of the rooms. Also the larger rooms are placed adjacent to the lobby to promote circulation and communication between the users of the different spaces. 66


Image 12: Public and Private Diagram

Image 13: Public and Private Diagram

The private spaces are pushed to the outer edge of the building, while the public spaces engage with the main lobby entrance. This delineation provides organization within each floor. Visible in both the floor plan and elevation, the public spaces engage the outside with curtain walls or floor to ceiling glazing. The private spaces are more refined.

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CIRCULATION & WAY FINDING

Image 14: Circulation Diagram

The circulation derives from both the upper and lower lobby. It creates a corridor that runs between the private and public spaces, creating a relation between the two.

SPACES, ROOMS & ADJACENCIES

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Image 15: Rooms Diagram

The required functions for the Village Community Center, are spaces that accommodate to both the community and the families of the foster care program. The Day-Care classroom and Infant Day-Care room are both designed specifically for the children. However, the Community Room on the second level is an extremely flexible space that can be utilized for a variety of activities. The game room and storage adjacent to the community space allows for it to remain open and adaptable to the community and Villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. The offices are located both on the first and second level. All are enclosed for the exception of the Caseworkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, to provide a welcoming aesthetic and to promote communication between the Caseworker and the families.

Image 16: Center Lobby

Image 17: Community Room

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SUSTAINABILITY The Studio Gang architects and designers allowed the spaces to receive ample amount of natural light. The glazing allows for less artificial light to be used inside. During the winter, the large curtain walls allow sunlight in, heating the spaces. Because of the low budget, similar to Habitat for Humanity, there was material and furniture. This sustainable strategy benefits both the user and the environment.

LIGHTING The design of the exterior and interior allows for light to travel deep into the building. The openness promotes natural day lighting reducing the need for artificial. The lights used are small in size, and indirect. With the exposed plenum, the fixtures disappear into the ceiling creating pleasant design.

Image 18: Community Center Exterior

FIXTURES, FURNITURE, & EQUIPMENT The furniture for the community center needs to accommodate the variety of users. The flexibility in the equipment and furniture needs to be easily accessible. The ergonomics are crucial because both children and adults will be using the spaces equally. The stairs on the second level lobby is a great example of the multiple use of spaces to accommodate all users and functions. Image 19: Second Level Lobby

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MATERIALS, FINISHES & COLOR CONCEPT

Image 20: Lower Level Lobby

The prominent material used within both the interior and the exterior is concrete. The color variation within the facade is visible in the interior as well. The finish varies, within the spaces to provide diversity. The colors are successful because they help to dictate the particular organization and function of the spaces. The architecture is mainly a neutral palate, and the furniture and equipment are highlighted with bright pops in color.

BUDGET

Image 21: Color Wheel

The City of Chicago, Safe homes for kids and new homes are the funders of this project. The end cost was $3.5 million USD. The organization relied on donated items to ensure the completion of the project. To organize and set a goal, the center set up a spreadsheet to track the materials, furniture and equipment that they needed to receive through donation. Working with a tight budget can be a positive in many ways. It forces the designer to focus on the needs of the client and find inventive ways to create a comfortable aesthetic with the use of materiality.

Image 22: Construction Process

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FOOTNOTES 1

“SOS Children’s Villages Lavezzorio Community Center / Studio Gang Architects” 13 Jul 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 15 Dec 2013. http://www.archdaily.com/?p=28636

2

“About Us.” SOS Children’s Villages International (2013): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.sos-childrensvillages.org/about>. “SOS Children’s Villages Lavezzorio Community Center.” Studio Gang Architects (2008): n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://studiogang.net/work/2004/soslavezzoriocenter>.

3

REFERENCES 1

http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/tag/lavezzorio-community-center/


IMAGES 1

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3 http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gangarchitects/

www.bing.com/maps/ ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson

5

http://studiogang.net/work/2004/soslavezzoriocenter

6

http://scbiznews.s3.amazonaws.com/1319132251-Reedy-Square-Plaza-Compressed.jpg

7 8

http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gangarchitects/ http://behance.vo.llnwd.net/profiles21/1647329/projects/8064995/8c8706ce6dd9d40cbf42ba7de8f792f2.jpg

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http://www.publicinterestdesign.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/sos.jpg http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gang-

10 architects/ 11 16

http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gangarchitects/ ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gangarchitects/

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17 http://www.contemporist.com/photos/lavezzorio.cc.06.jpg

21

http://www.archdaily.com/28636/sos-children%E2%80%99s-villages-lavezzorio-community-center-studio-gangarchitects/ Diagram by: Heather Robinson

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https://www.aiachicago.org/special_features/2008dea/images/full/.jpg

18

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REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

4


NEWLANDS COMMUNITY CENTER

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Image 1: Newlands Community Center


JUSTIFICATION The Newlands Community Center is an important case study because it is designed within a residential neighborhood, forcing the architects to create a design with the community in mind. The research and design strategies utilized by CCM Architects will relate directly to the Habitat Kensington Center. The communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number one concern was to ensure their identity would be preserved within the design of both the exterior and the interior1. This concept will be crucial within my proposed design in order to have a successful community center that responds to the Kensington community.

Image 2: Newlands Community Center

SITE, CONTEXT & SIZE Newlands Community Center is located in Wellington, New Zealand. The community is the outer residential suburb of Newlands, Wellington. This site is adjacent to a tavern and shopping center. A challenge with the site was the contour and orientation. The cross fall of three meters would not be able to accommodate ADA code. One of their goals was to have a community center that had street presence because the building would be set back on the site. The building is approximately 12,000 sf. on a 14,000 sf. site1.

Image 3: Context Map

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ARCHITECT & DESIGNER

CCM Architects designed the Newlands Community Center which was completed in 2008. This award winning New Zealand design firm has experience designing residential communities, museums, airports and commercial architecture and interior design2. Their experience designing with and for communities is crucial to a community center project. They worked with landscape designer, John Powell and Engineers Spencer Holmes Structural. The project managers were the Wellington City Council to ensure the design was considering the community.

Image 4: College of Creative Arts by CCM Architects

Image 5: Dowse Art Museum Alterations by CCM Architects

OWNER, CLIENT & USERS

Image 6: Newlands Interior

The Client for this center is the Wellington City Council. The city council presented the architects with the challenge of incorporating â&#x20AC;&#x153;competing interestsâ&#x20AC;? that existed within the brief given by the community. The end user would be the town of Wellington which included all ages and socioeconomic groups. The spaces needed to be flexible and accommodating for all different types of activities that would be held.

Image 7: Newlands Interior

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ARCHITECTURE/INTERIOR STYLE & CONCEPT ANALYSIS Image 8: Newlands Interior

The Newlands Community Center was a challenge in itself because the wide range of spaces and activities that would be incorporated into one unified building. A key challenge CCM Architects had to overcome was to figure out the transition between each space2. For example, the first level was to include a stage, toy library, food bank and youth area. Each space is distinct in its own way which makes it difficult to space plan correctly to allow the circulation to be organized properly for the users. Image 9: Newlands Interior

The exterior was also an important design because it needed to be able to draw community members in from the street. The center was to promote relationships and revitalize Newlands. Clearly seen within the facade of the building, CCM Architects used lighting, color, and powerful geometry to achieve strong architectural lines.2

Image 10: Newlands Exterior

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BUILDING PARTI ANALYSIS & DIAGRAMS A prominent design of the Newlands Community Center, is the large amount of public space that is integrated in both the first and second levels. CCM Architects were able to seamlessly connect and justify these particular spaces by utilizing simple geometry. Shown within both the sections and floor plans, the public spaces have hierarchy over the private, forcing the center to promote socialization and collaboration. The private spaces are minimal yet, do not break the circulation of the public rooms; they are either pushed to the outer edge or centralized to uninterrupt the corridors.

Image 11: Public vs Private Diagram Second Floor

Image 12: Public vs Private Diagram First Floor

Image 13: Public vs Private Section Diagram

Image 14: Public vs Private Section Diagram

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Not only do the public spaces gain hierarchy over the private, but the architecture creates hierarchy within the rectangles formed. These spaces are noticeable larger in size than the others, and receive the most influential location within the plans.

Image 15: Hierarchy Diagram Second Floor

Image 16: Hierarchy Diagram First Floor

CIRCULATION & WAY FINDING The circulation and way finding are the two most crucial design concepts to be used in a community space. Within Newlands Center, the corridor remains the same on both the first and second level, reinforcing their design. The users can therefore understand the organization of the space in a clearer way.

Image 18: Circulation First Floor

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Image 17: Circulation Second Floor


SPACES, ROOMS & ADJACENCIES

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Image 19: Rooms Diagrams

Image 20: Rooms Diagrams


SUSTAINABILITY Image 21: West Elevation

Image 22: South Elevation

The Newlands Community Center is sustainable in many ways. The materiality and finishes are low VOC finishes, rapidly renewable, and reused. The budget for this center was also very small, forcing the designers to utilize donated materials and furniture. The architecture used a large amount of glazing designed in a way that would receive lots of natural light, but eliminate direct sunlight to avoid heating the interior.

LIGHTING The majority of the lighting is natural. The large curtain walls and windows paired with light interior colors help stretch the light further into the spaces. With larger community rooms on the exterior, rather than small enclosed spaces, there are less interior walls to block the sun from extending deeper into the building. The artificial light that is used, is minimal and indirect.

FIXTURES, FURNITURE, & EQUIPMENT Image 23: Interior

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Image 24: Interior

As a community center, the furniture, fixtures and equipment need to be able to accommodate the neighborhood surrounding. The furniture therefore needs to be ergonomically correct for both the elderly and the young child to be able to use. Moreover, the furniture needs to be flexible and movable to allow the community members to adjust to their specific needs.


MATERIALS, FINISHES & COLOR CONCEPT The materials and finishes used were warming and inviting yet fun and optimistic. The bright colors created an interesting contrast to the blues and dark grays that were used mainly for the walls and flooring. The aesthetic created a comfortable atmosphere that promoted socialization and activity. As shown in the images of the lobby and interior space, the colors and materials also were used for way finding purposes.

Image 26: Interior

Image 25: Color Wheel

BUDGET The budget was low due to the fact that this project was being publicly funded. This forced the CCM Architects to pay close attention to the community needs in order to ensure the necessary designs were being enforced. The materiality and furniture were used purposefully to eliminate unnecessary spending.

Image 27: Lobby

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Image 28: Lobby


1

“Newlands Community Centre / CCM Architects” 19 Jul 2009. ArchDaily. Accessed 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=29323>

2

“Projects: Public: Newlands Community Hall.” CCM Architects n.pag. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.ccm.co.nz/

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

FOOTNOTES


1

http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/

2

http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/

3

www.bing.com/maps/ ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson

4

http://www.ccm.co.nz/

5

http://www.ccm.co.nz/

6

- 10

http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/

11

- 20

http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/ ;Diagram by: Heather Robinson

21

- 24

http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/

25 Diagram by: Heather Robinson 26 - 28 http://www.archdaily.com/29323/newlands-community-centre-ccm-architects/

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

IMAGES


Cover Image: Wayfinding


4

TOPICAL EXPLORATIONS


HUMAN BEHAVIOR WAYFINDING The Habitat for Humanity Kensington Center has a variety of functions. Understanding how the user interacts with each space for each particular function is important. However, it is imperative that each space of the Center works together to create one unified building. Wayfinding is in essence, “the art of helping people find their way”1. It acts as support to the designs through “speech, touch, print, signs, architecture, and landscape”1. In terms of space planning, wayfinding will aid in defining the spaces and connecting the users. The process allows for a clear definition of the architecture in order to have a cohesive space2. Because there will be volunteers, office employees, Habitat partner families and community members within a single building, wayfinding is imperative to understanding the circulation. Images 1 and 2 are examples of wayfinding that can exist in a centralized corridor. The colors and materials should vary from the design surrounding so that the message can stand out to the user experiencing the space. Wayfinding can be used for finding spaces, exits, restrooms, and/or activities.

Image 1: Wayfinding

Image 2: Wayfinding

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Image 3: Signage

Wayfinding not only can define the interior of a building but it can also create a buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence in an area. The Newlands Community Center was an example where the architecture and signage successfully created a street presence on a site that was set far back from the road. In terms of Habitat for Humanity, this center has to represent the neighborhood it will be working within, to promote the Kensington community. The overarching goal is to create this Center to be the foundation of an ever-growing and changing Kensington, providing safe and comfortable spaces for the community to utilize. Therefore, the exterior signage has to properly attract the Kensington community members. Image 3 and 4 are examples of exterior signage that promotes community interaction.

Image 4: Signage

GREEN SPACE Sustainable interior design has a profound impact on the users of any space it is implemented within. The concept of bringing nature within is a challenging design but make a space successful. Within office interiors, the introduction of green spaces can change the perspective one would have on a typical workplace.

Image 5: Green Office

89


Image 6: Sustainable Commercial Interiors

90


Plants can improve the environment, the social and economic aspects of an office. Studies show that employees increase productivity which in turn, reduces capital costs, operating costs and liability/mitigation costs3. Environmentally, any type of greenery can reduce emissions, waste reduction and reduce offgassing/VOCs which is in turn, improving health of the employees. Shown in Image 8, is a chart that describes the common indoor pollution and the type of plants that can improve the air quality. Within the Kensington Center, green spaces should be incorporated in all of the various spaces; offices, community rooms, retail. It will improve the aesthetic to create a welcoming sustainable environment for all users. Image 7

91

Image 8: Green Over Grey Toxic Chemical Chart


COLOR Color is a defining element in interior design that can truly have a positive or negative impact on a space. “Color serves many purposes. It not only acts on the nerves, as a stimulant or depressant, but serves as an ornament as well as a protection…”4 The Habitat for Humanity Center also serves many purposes. It incorporates offices, retail, and community spaces in which each has a specific role to contribute to the organization. Therefore, color is crucial to ensure unique successful spaces. Habitat for Humanity’s colors are green and blue. Both colors can be positively used within the spaces throughout the Center. By using both green and blue, the design will not only promote the organization but also improve the aesthetics within the offices, retail and community spaces. In a work environment, the design should promote “creativity, information, knowledge, and close corporation…to be successful”5. The result of good office design is high productivity while encouraging creativity and individualism.

Philadelphia University Image 9: Habitat for Humanity Logo

Image 10: ReStore Logo

Campus Chapter

Image 11

92


Image 12: Psychology of Color

93


Blue, can define a workplace and express the specific goals that need to be met within an office. Using the color blue within the offices will promote productivity, calmness, and serenity. It can also lower one’s pulse rate and body temperature6. Blue not only has a calmness aesthetic but it also provides a confident and trustworthy environment which is extremely beneficial in a work place. It is crucial that the color schemes “aim to avoid visual disturbances, concentration difficulties, and fatigue from glare, reflections, low contrast, harsh dark-light contrasts, intensive color stimuli and irritating patterns in a direct line of vision”5. Rather subtle color paired with positive lighting design can create a powerful yet pleasing environment.

Image 13

Image 14

Image 15

The color green expresses health, tranquility, nature, balance, harmony and growth. By using green within the community spaces, it will provide a comfortable and nurturing space to help welcome the volunteers and Habitat partner families. Green is also associated with revitalization and energy which translates comparably to Habitat’s mission of revitalizing the neighborhood. Image 16

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COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT URBAN PLANNING

Image 17

Image 18

Image 19

Urban planning is a “long-standing sense of common concern for environment and the setting it provides for individual life chances and community satisfactions”7. An important focus within the Habitat Center should be its’ impact on the urban setting of the Kensington neighborhood. Additions such as the community center can drastically impact the function of any neighborhood, therefore it is important to focus on the building site and overall surroundings. The goal is to implement not only the building into Kensington, but introduce other factors that can improve the community and neighborhood. A focus would be to use the community center as a type of “node” that exists within the community. This “node” is the base point for sharing ideas and resources. An example would be a community garden. This would “help improve their daily lives through cultivation and enjoyment of plants” where “gardeners works collectively…to grow food or flowers, or curate art or natural features”8. This will create an active community and in hopes, a movement that take aspects of the community garden and apply them to all parts of the community. 95


FOOTNOTES 1

Berger, Craig M. Wayfinding. Switzerland: RotoVision SA, 2009. eBook.

2

“Interior Wayfinding Cognition.” Harvard. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/ Sosnowchik, Katie, and Penny Bonda. Sustainable Commercial Interiors. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2007. Print.

3 4 5 6 7 8

Grumbine, Jesse Charles Fremont. Psychology of Color. Cleveland, Ohio: The Order of the White Rose, 1921. 22. eBook. Meerwein, Gerhard, Bettina Rodeck, and Frank H. Mahnke. Color: Communication in Architectural Space. Berlin: Birkhauser Verlag AG, 2007. 101-105. eBook. Paulina, . “How Colors Affect Your Mood.” Pixers Blog. WordPress, 09 27 2012. Web. 15 Dec. 2013. <http://pixersize.com/blog/en/6630/jak-kolor-scian- wplywa-na-samopoczucie>. Freestone, Robert. Urban Planning in a Changing World: The Twentieth Century Experience. New York: Routledge, 2000. eBook. Kirby, Ellen, and Elizabeth Peters. Community Gardening. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Inc., 2008. eBook.


IMAGES https://www.fontfont.com/staticcontent/inuseimages/original/shopping center

1

http://graphics.asisignage.com/blog/wayfinding.jpg

2

http://www.meldrenachapin.com/blog/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/ColorWayfinding1.jpg

3

http://www.dudleyvision.org/?p=1728

4

http://www.smashlab.com/files/7813/4378/4575/6-cn-centre-banners.jpg?max-width=598

5

http://inthralld.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/San-Francisco-LEED-Certified-Office-With-A-Vertical-Garden-1. jpeg

6

http://books.google.com/

7

http://www.biawow.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/green-plants-color-for-wall-decor-unique-interior-decor.jpg

8

http://greenovergrey.com/green-wall-benefits/overview.php

9

Received from Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia

10 http://fabnfrugal.net/wp/?p=180 11

http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/multimedia/goodies/green-guide/green-lifestyle/

12 http://pixersize.com/blog/en/6630/jak-kolor-scian-wplywa-na-samopoczucie 13 http://pixersize.com/blog/en/6630/jak-kolor-scian-wplywa-na-samopoczucie 14 http://cdn.architectism.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/BLUE-Communications-offices-02.jpg 15 http://images.ais-inc.com/Homepage/Divi-green-station.jpg 16 http://www.houzz.com/green-bedroom 17 http://www.archdaily.com/369852/ 18 http://www.designbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/120692332.jpg 19 http://www.archdaily.com/369852/

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

C


44

EXTERIOR PANORAMA VIEW FROM PARKING LOT

Cover Image: ReStore Facade


5

EXISTING SITE, CONTEXT, CLIMATE & ZONING & BUILDING ANALYSIS


100

Image 1: ReStore Facade


7

1862 1862

1895 1895

1910 1910

2008 2005

XT

Street grid established.

Residential neighborhood develops.

1910 1910

2008 2005

moves to northeast Philly, leavingStreet, The site is locatedLOMAX oncarpets2930 Jasper mill building vacant. Kensington, Philadelphia. It is a residential urban neighborhood that historically started as a live/ work community. The proposed site was previously a Textile Mill Factory. Contextually, it is surrounded by residential units where the employees and workers of the factory would live. It was built in the 1860’s and renovated from a 4-story “L” shape to a partial 5-story “U” shape in 19101. Currently, the feature is the existing Restore that is located on the first floor of the old factory building. The estimated population of Kensington is 50,0002. CONTEXT The cultural diversity that exists within the village is comprised of different races; Hispanic, African American, Caucasian, and Asian. Kensington has a growing arts community and development initiatives currently being practiced. There is a newly constructed school directly adjacent to the site, as well as a number of arts centers located to the East of the site. It also contains a Free Library of Philadelphia as well as secondary schools.

Textile mill built with L-shaped plan. By 1919, an addition to the south end forms a U-shaped plan.

SITE

SITE ANATOMY

PARKING

GATE

6

Image 2: Site Timeline

ALLEGHENY

MECH

FRONT

WESTMORELAND

KENSINGTON

ALLEGHENY

SITE ANATOMY

CONTEXT ARTS COMMUNITY + DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES

ONE-WAY STREETS TWO-WAY STREETS

FRANKLIN PLAYGROUND (NEW SCHOOL)

6 MINUTE WALK TO EL

KENSINGTON AVE. COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR

RICHMOND MILLS + THE CERAMIC SHOP

LOMAX

KENSINGTON/ SOMERSET

CL

DOCKS

ON

GT

IN

NS

KE

HUNTINGDON

BIRCH ST. (ELM STREET PROGRAM) MECH HUNTINGDON

KF

AN

FR

Image 3: Community Development Map

KENSINGTON

CLEARFIELD

SOMERSET

ARAMINGO

LEHIGH

FRANKFORD

CONTEXT

ET

TYLER SCHOOL OF ART (2 MILES)

NEW KENSINGTON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

RS

VIKING MILLS

500’

ME

YORK DAUPHIN

FRANKFORD AVE. ARTS CORRIDOR

CORAL ST. ARTS HOUSE

SO

OR

D

4-FLOOR TEXTILE MILL (1890s)

YORK DAUPHIN

LD

IE

RF

EA

1-FL BOILER HOUSE

LEHIGH

KENSINGTON/ SOMERSETLOADING

ARAMINGO

FRONT

MAJOR STREETS

PARKING

5-FLOOR EXTENSION (1910s)

4-FLOOR TEXTILE MILL (1890s)

TRAFFIC TRAFFIC

MCPHERSON LIBRARY (CLOSED)

GATE

1-FL BOILER HOUSE

WESTMORELAND

250’

LOADING DOCKS

5-FLOOR EXTENSION (1910s)

LOMAX carpets moves to northeast Philly, leaving mill building vacant.

KENSINGTON

125’

Textile mill built with L-shaped plan. By 1919, an addition to the south end forms a U-shaped plan.

N. 2N D

od develops.

CITY/TOWN/VILLAGE

7

CONTEXT

Image 5: Viking Mill

101

Image 4: Little Baby’s Ice Cream Shop


The average dry bulb temperature varies from 26 degrees in January to 78 degrees in August3. The average wind speed yearly is 7mph3. Based on ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, the psychrometric chart reveals the design strategies followed in Philadelphia. As shown, heating and cooling is designed with the comfort level between 65 and 85 wet-bulb temperature3. More heating is done than cooling. The average yearly rainfall for Philadelphia is approximately, 3.46 inches4. Currently since October 2013, Philadelphia has already been equal to last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s average rainfall.

Image 6: Philadelphia Psychrometric Climate Chart

NEIGHBORHOOD The neighborhood is in need of revitalization. Kensington has a high crime rate with a low socioeconomic community; causing an unsafe place for residents to live. In 2011, it was estimated that approximately 49% of the population was living below the poverty level, with 26% living below 50% of the poverty level. The household income is below the state average with the median income of $20,0001. Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s median household income is $50,000.

Image 7: Kensington Neighborhood

102

Image 8: Kensington Neighborhood


Image 9: Kensington Neighborhood

The number of college students and unemployment rates of residents are also factors that fall significantly below the Pennsylvania state average1. The age range is relatively equal within the community1. The cultural and economic makeup of Kensington is 50% Hispanic, falling significantly over the state average for Hispanic residents. The other half is made up of Black, Asian, and White. The variety contributes to Kensington having a high percentage of foreign-born residents1. 16,500 homes currently in Kensington have been built in 1939 or earlier. Only about 100 homes have been built in 2005 or later.

STREET The site is located on Jasper Street which ends west of the site onto the recently built school. To the East, it continues approximately 600 feet before hitting a main road, East Lehigh Avenue. The majority of the buildings on the street are older in age and architectural style. They are individual row homes built side by side. Each varies in design and size. Most of the homes are two story single family homes. However, there are some that are larger and multi-family residents. The buildings on the street are all residential units for the exception of the light industrial at the end of Jasper Street. Due to the large residential zones, there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any outstanding features to be noted. Image 10: Number of Floors Map

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SITE ZONING The site is currently zoned L4 [Industrial District]. The permitted uses for this zoning includes retail sales, offices, libraries, theaters, schools, studios, and other public building uses. Therefore, the proposed project fits within the limits of the permit. Zoning Map Legend Industrial Commercial Mixed-Use Medium Industrial Residential Single-Family Active Parks and Open Space Residential Multi-Family Neighborhood Commercial Mixed-Use Community Commercial Mixed-Use Heavy Industrial 6

Image 11: Zoning Map

SITE ANALYSIS WESTMORELAND

KENSINGTON

FRONT

ALLEGHENY

The development of the form can be contributed to the accessibility of the site. Within the negative space of the “U” shape, loading docks and a parking lot exists. The lot allowed parking for workers who commuted to work for the Textile Factory. The loading spaces were also used for factory purposes and still used currently for the Restore. TRAFFIC TRAFFIC MAJOR STREETS ONE-WAY STREETS TWO-WAY STREETS 6 MINUTE WALK TO EL

MOND MILLS + CERAMIC SHOP

KENSINGTON/ SOMERSET

LD

IE

RF

EA

CL

ON

GT

IN

NS

KE

500’

ME RS ET

FR AN

SO

KF OR D

HUNTINGDON

104 NGO

IGH

TON

Image 12: Traffic Map

Image 13: Site Diagram


FLOOR 4 FLOOR 4

FLOORS 3 4 5

8

UPPER FLOORS FLOORS UPPER

UPPER FLOORS FLOOR 4

EXTERIOR ACCESS

ENTRANCE ENTRANCE PARKING/LOADING PARKING/LOADING EGRESS EGRESS SECTION SHIFT SECTION SHIFT FIRE STAIRS FIRE STAIRS ELEVATOR SHAFT ELEVATOR SHAFT

GROUND FLOOR FLOOR GROUND

RANCE

KING/LOADING

ESS

TION SHIFT

E STAIRS

VATOR SHAFT

GROUND FLOOR

Image 14: Exterior Access Diagram bUILDING

Image 15: Site and School

105

Image 16: Site and Residential

For the proposed project, the Kensington Center should address the community surrounding. It should be more accessible from both sides. Currently the focus is on the west, within the “U” form. With the new school to the west show in Image 15, the center should allow opportunity for the school and center to relate, promoting community participation. The entrances should be more easily accessible to the neighborhood, but also allow for a safe building. The parking lots are lined with the back sides of multiple row homes. This attribute is both positive and negative. The design should both welcome but respect the privacy of those homes. This issue is described through the Site and Residential Diagram.


12

Currently, there aren’t any positive potential views that are available for the building to focus. However, the proposed project will present opportunities to create a green space in a portion of the parking lot area. The issue with sound is simply the general noise that would come for an urban residential area. The site is flat so there is no grade or slope change that would affect accessibility. Currently there is no surrounding landscape. The site has some trees but they are located around the perimeter of the parking lot.

LIGHT LIGHT

UNLIMITED LIGHT

NO LIGHT (variance unlikely)WINDOW

BAY SIZES

SEMI-LIMITED LIGHT (variance possible)

52

ALLOWABLE WINDOW OPENINGS

LIGHT UNLIMITED

47

XL 400-500 SF

S 150-200 SF

LIMITED LIGHT (variance possible) XXL - 500+ SF

M 200-300 SF L 300-400 SF

DARK

UNLIMITED

SECTIONAL SHIFT (FL. 3-5)

LIMITED (25% WINDOWS)

NONE

S 150-200 SF

XL 400-500 SF

M 200-300 SF

XXL - 500+ SF

L 300-400 SF

DARK

11

Image 17: Light Penetration Diagram

EXIT EXIT 300’

EXIT

EXIT 300’

97’ 97’

EXIT

155’

155’75’ 75’

225’

300’ 300’

95’ 95’ 97’ 97’

195’

75’ 75’

EXIT

95’ 95’

195’ EXIT

95’ 95’

195’

225’ 300’

300’

155’

EXIT

95’ 95’

195’

155’ 300’

80’ 80’

LIGHT LIMITED

EXIT

300’

115’

S 150-200 SF M 200-300 SF

EGRESS - REQUIRED

EXIT

50’ 50’

BAY SIZES

47

L 300-400 SF

BAY SIZES

EXIT

115’

DARK

EGRESS - REQUIRED

EXIT

80’ 80’

XXL - 500+ SF

L 300-400 SF

POTENTIALS

EGRESS - EXISTING

115’

XL 400-500 SF

M 200-300 SF

LIMITED (15% WINDOWS)

EGRESS

65’ 115’ 65’

LIGHT UNLIMITED

S 150-200 SF

11 BAY SIZES

EGRESS

65’ 65’

BAYS

52

EGRESS - EXISTING

EGRESS

LIGHT PENETRATION

WINDOW BAYS

100’100’

127’127’

195’

100’100’

225’

195’

50’ 50’

EXIT

100’100’

127’127’

195’

100’100’

225’

EXIT

195’

Image 18: Existing Egress Diagram

CORRIDOR

CIRCULATION

CIRCULATION

EXIT CORRIDOR

CIRCULATION

EXIT

CIRCULATION

EXIT

CIRCULATION EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

CIRCULATION

USE SW PUSH USE SW WINDOWS CORRIDOR WINDOWS TO DARK FACADE PUSH CORRIDOR TO DARK FACADE

PUSH EXIT EXIT CORRIDOR TO DARK EXIT FACADE PUSH EXIT EXIT EXIT CORRIDOR TO DARK FACADE

EXIT EXIT

USE SW USE SW WINDOWS WINDOWS

EXIT

EXIT FILL DARK SPACE

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

EXIT

SPACE Image 19: Potential Egress Diagram

FILL DARK

EXIT LIGHT UNLIMITED

UNLIMITED LIGHT

NW LIGHT LIMITED UNLIMITEDNW LIGHT LIGHT LIMITED

106

UNLIMITED LIGHT UNLIMITED LIGHT

NW LIGHT LIMITED UNLIMITEDNW LIGHT LIGHT LIMITED

NW LIGH NW LIGHT NW LIGHT LIMITED LIMITED

POTENTIALS

NW LIGHT NW LIGHT LIMITED LIMITED

POTENTIALS

NW


HIERARCHY The hierarchy within the floor plan is clearly defined by the form of the building. The central axis acts as the main space which has the most square footage to hold program. It acts as the axis and central corridor/ circulation and it remains the same within Floors 1-4.

Image 20: Hierarchy Diagrams

The sections reveal the solidarity of the building form. Each floor has the same ceiling height, square footage, construction and structure. Because it was a Textile Factory, the machinery would fill the space, creating the circulation and the design rather than the architecture defining it. Therefore, there are no interior walls existing.

Image 21: Hierarchy Diagrams

107


SOLID/VOID The solid and void is defined between usable program space versus the existing dead space. Clearly shown in the diagrams below, the void available for program is blue, and the grey represents the existing mechanical, stair case, ect. Therefore, the diagrams reveal the openness and opportunity available within the proposed building.

Image 22: Solid/Void Diagrams

The sections are difficult to convey solid versus void because of there similarity. There is minimal difference between each level. The section shown below that is cut through the main corridor, shows the existing stair shaft that extends to the top level. However, on either side of this void there is open space for the program. Within the smaller section, there is no solid interrupting the voided space.

Image 23: Solid/Void Diagrams

108


1

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10

2

“19134 Zip Code Detailed Profile.” (2013): n.pag. City-Data. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://www.city-data.com/zips/19134.html>. Climate Consultant Program

3 4

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

FOOTNOTES

“Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Average Rainfall.” (2013): n.pag. Weather Database. Web. 15 Dec 2013. <http://average-rainfall.weatherdb.com/l/218/Philadelphia-Pennsylvania>.


IMAGES C Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 1 Photo taken by: Heather Robinson 2 Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10

4 http://www.visitphilly.com/philadelphia-neighborhoods/fishtown/view-all/ 5 http://hiddencityphila.org/daily/sections/news/ 6 Climate Consultant Program 7 Photo taken by: Heather Robinson 8 Photo taken by: Heather Robinson 9 www.bing.com/maps/ 10 Interface Studio Architects ; Diagram by Heather Robinson 11 http://www.phila.gov/Map#id=757bbd2d07704a9bb684a1e88ca681c9 12 Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 13 Interface Studio Architects ; Diagram by Heather 14 Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 15 www.bing.com/maps/ ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson 16 www.bing.com/maps/ ; Diagram by: Heather Robinson

- 19 20 - 23

17

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10 Interface Studio Architects ; Diagram by Heather

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

3 Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10


Cover Image: Living Building Challenge


6

DESIGN & TECHNICAL CRITERIA


FURNITURE, FINISHES, AND EQUIPMENT As a community center, the user group varies within each space and activity. The furniture, finishes and equipment are not necessarily specialized but all need to accommodate all user groups. Therefore, universal design is a prominent design aspect for the Habitat Center. Durability, stability and clean-ability are crucial because of the amount of use the center will have. Through the furniture and equipment, the neighborhood should be able to establish a safe place to connect and participate in revitalizing their community. Flexibility of the furniture will also promote collaboration. By seamlessly incorporating universal design, the design will be able to create an equal experience for all members of Kensington.

Image 1: Ergonomic Adjustable Office Desk

ERGONOMICS Because of the wide variety of user groups within the Center, ergonomics is important. It has to accommodate a wide range of people types at different age range and body types. For the office, the office system furniture has to correctly support and adjust for different users. The difference between a child, an adult, an elderly, and a disabled is a broad wide range forcing all furniture within a community center to be seamlessly accessible to all.

Image 2: Ergonomic Office Desk

114


MATERIALS

Image 3: Sustainable Strategy Diagram

The community rooms within the center will need to have materials in which is durable and cleanable. The level of quality is not necessarily achievable through the tight budget however, it will reduce the future cost of replacing items.

LIGHTING Natural light promotes a healthy aesthetically pleasing environment. The light should promote natural light to successfully create a space that is comfortable for the users to experience. Daylight will be most appropriate within all of the parts; retail, office, and community center. Direct light will be avoided. Image 4: Sustainable Strategy Diagram

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN Within any design, it is important to understand how the building systems work together. It is critical for sustainable design because on has to understand the effects of each systems to correctly design an efficient building. Renewable energy, daylight, shading, solar collection and rain water collection will be just some of the parts that will be working together to achieve a complete sustainable system.

115

Image 5: Living Building Challenge Diagram


Image 6: Sustainability Diagram

Image 7: Sustainability Diagram

116

Image 8: Sustainability Diagram

Image 9: Sustainability Diagram


ACOUSTIC CONTROL Acoustic Privacy within a community center is vital. Due to the large variety in user groups and spaces, it is important to allow privacy for the offices, retail and community spaces. Habitat prefers individual private offices due to the privacy of the families and clients in which they work with.

Image 10: Acoustic Control Diagram

117


THERMAL COMFORT

Image 11: Thermal Comfort Diagram

Image 12: Thermal Systems Diagram

INTERIOR CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING SYSTEMS

The construction and building systems will be based off of the existing building. Minor improvements would be made structurally however insulation will be improved to properly insulate for a community center. Sustainability will play a major role in ensuring the R-Values will improve the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efficiency. Image 13: Wall Section Diagram

118


UNIVERSAL DESIGN, ADA AND CODE

Image 14: ADA Corridor Diagram

Image 16: ADA Corridor Diagram

Image 17: ADA Doorway Diagram

Image 19: ADA Parking Diagram

119

Image 18: ADA Braille Sign

Image 15: ADA Water Fountain Diagram


floor. However, the 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards limit the operable portions of dispensers in toilet 39-41 compartments to no lower than 18ICC/ANSI inches (455mm). When determining the mounting location 990-1040 12 max of restroom accessories, make sure to account for side and forward approaches. 34-36 C: 305 865-915

18

min Fig. 1 Mounting Heights for 54 Restroom Accessories.

PLANNING AN 42 min ACCESSIBLE RESTROOM 33-36

445

may be located under fixtures, lavatories, or accessories as long as the required knee and toe clearance is provided.

ICC/ANSI

1370

rily for c children’s age ding on age.

AGES ough 12

es (1120mm)

es (405mm)

HROUGH 12

AGES hrough 12

1065

840-915

48 max 17-19

430-485

1220

39-41

990-1040 ICC/ANSI

11-17 note21-30 BEGIN WITH RESTROOM ENTRANCE AND EXIT For all restroomC:entries, the 18-27 280-430 C: C:

15 min

535-760

44-48 455-685 importance of approach direction (indicated in the figures by arrows) andToilet the presence seat height of 1120-1220 closers or latches in determining minimum clearances. The accessibility standards should be 36-44 C: 915-1120 studied carefully because they offer numerous dimensional options to consider. Meeting or Depending on age exceeding the minimum maneuvering clearances at doorways is an important aspect in design to ensure proper access. Fig. 12a Seat Height and Grab Bar Locations.

380 If mounted over counter or lavatory, 40 inches max (1015mm) to bottom of reflective surface 35 inches max (890mm) if not mounted over counter or lavatory 7-9

hes to 17 inches 0 to 430mm)

hes to 27 inches 5 to 685mm)

Depending on age

Fig. 12b Outlet Location for Toilet Paper Dispenser (2010 ADA Standards). Fig. 1b Mirror and Toilet Grab Bar Mounting Heights.

SINGLE-DOOR ENTRIES (Fig. 3a), the door swingsforintoRestroom the restroom, are Fig. 1a Upper Range of where Mounting Heights Accessories with Operable Parts. common. A level and clear corridor or passageway leading to the door is recommended to 36 max be 48 inches (1220mm) minimum wide. The doorway must have a clear opening 32 inches 915 Protruding dispenser 2 Wheelchair Turning Spaces. (815mm)Fig. minimum width when the door is open 90 degrees. A minimum access aisle 48 24 min outlet above grab bar 610 inches (1220mm) wide is also recommended inside the restroom to allow people using 60 min Recessed dispenser, wheelchairs to maneuver around obstructions, such as sight-barriers, to accommodate 1525 and entire L-shaped area simultaneous in and out traffic. Protruding dispenser outlet to lower child is between them, is another popular configuration. In this instance, makemounted sure no hazard grab bar) created in the alcove by the simultaneous60entry and exit of two people. The width of the min 1525 alcove must be a minimum of 48 inches (1220mm) plus the width of the door. It is difficult for 48 max a person using a wheelchair or crutches to back up and pull open a door, so it is recommended 1220 18 min that opposing doors swing in the same direction. This opposing door layout455provides doors that always open in the direction of travel, for restroom entrance and exit. C: 14-19

455-685

180-230

12 min

12 min

305

36 min

305

915

36 max

A

24 min

A

915

610

mounted below grab bar OPPOSING DOORS (Fig. 3b), one for entrance and the other for exit with an alcove (also for child outlets,

hes to 18 inches 0 to 455mm)

33-36 C: 18-27

840-915

B

C

B

C

24 min 610

G

60 min E 1525

48 max

D

1220

18 min

F

36 min

7-9

915

180-230

2010 ADA

455

To top of outlet

C: 14-19

355-485

355-485

OPEN VESTIBULES (Fig. 3c),Fig. free2a of doors, are (1525mm) by far the most universally because BottomTurning of usableSpace. 60 inch Diameter

hes to 19 inches 0 to 485mm)

outlet they don’t require manipulating door hardware or maneuvering arounddispenser door clearances. It is recommended that the entire passageway be 48 inches (1220mm) minimum width to NOTES FOR ALLinFIGURES IN THIS PLANNING GUIDE max accommodate simultaneous and out42traffic.

that follow

1. This edition of the Planning Guide1070 for Accessible Restrooms has adopted the simple measurement notation for figures that is found in the current standards. This notation eliminates the use of IfEnglish RAISED THRESHOLDS at doorways should be avoided wherever possible. it is and metric notation, inch and millimeter dimensions with the inch appearing over the millimeter (Figs. in 1 always Fig. 12c Outlet Location for Toilet Paperhigh Dispenser 2 inch ⁄ (13mm) maximum necessary to substituting include them, then they should be beveled, this manner: 48 (ICC/ANSI).

erous minimum well, with e of this, or more usable g designs, niversal design options in all greatest extent duce improved if a particular examples, t exceed

1220 thresholds can be beveled and up to 3 ⁄4 inch (19mm) high, provided 21a, b). Existing or altered 2. In certain figures with whole restrooms, overall room dimensions are given in feet and inches with the metric they conformdimension to the change of level requirements for accessible routes. Note that thresholds listed in centimeters (cm). higher than 1⁄4 inches (6.4mm) will need to incorporate a bevel no steeper than 1:2. ROLL TOILET TISSUE DISPENSERS that do not control delivery or do not allow continuous paper flow are required in all accessible toilet compartments. The 2010 ADA Fig. 3 Restroom Entrance Exittoilet Maneuvering Clearances. Standards requireand that roll tissue dispensers must be installed with the dispenser centerline 7 inches (180mm) minimum and 9 inches (230mm) maximum in front of the leading edge of the toilet (Figs. 12b, 12d). The 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards establish a different measurement procedure, locating the dispensers between 24 inches (610mm) For exit—front approach minimum and 42 inches (1070mm) maximum from the rear wall of the toilet compartment (Figs. 12c, 12e). The 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards locate the outlet of the dispenser no lower 48 min Recommended than 18 inches (455mm) above the finish floor (Figs. 12c, 12e). The 2010 ADA Standards 1220 allow the outlet on the roll toilet tissue dispenser to be mounted as low as 15 inches (380mm) 50 min above the finish floor (Fig. 12b). 1270

60 min Recommended

SANITARY NAPKIN DISPOSALS are recommended in all women’s toilet compartments. 60 min 1575

ng the same by modifying es by replacing l approach and the stigma

120

essories if they lity of toilet . Both the ded facilities restrooms eatest extent

Fig. 2b T-Shaped Turning Space. Fig. 12d Surface Mounted Dispensers.

Fig. 12e Recessed Dispensers (ICC/ANSI).

LEGEND 3. Bobrick product fixtures. Not all figures and standards’Dispenser E B-221 Surface-Mounted Toilet-Seat-Cover A B-5806 x 18 references Vertical GrabareBarprovided for many restroom layout (mounts below grab bar) Breferences B-5806 have x 36 Horizontal Grab BarBobrick product. a corresponding F B-2888 Surface-Mounted Multi-Roll Toilet Tissue Dispenser C B-5806 x 42 Horizontal Grab Bar 4. Neither standard requires thatToilet grabSeat barsDispenser, be located with reference(mounts to the below centergrab of the bar)escutcheon. This Planning D 819839 Partition-Mounted Sanitary Guide shows centerline lines where forGlocating grab bars. Both Sanitary standardsNapkin locateDisposal horizontal B-270 Surface-Mounted Napkin Disposal, Toiletdimension Tissue Dispenser on rightappropriate when grabfacing bars unit fromwith finish floor to topSpindle of gripping surface. (mounts below grab bar) Theft-Resistant (serves two compartments)

3

12 min 305

1 1/2 min 38

Fig. 12f Protruding Objects Mounted Near Grab Bars.

Fig. 12g Recessed Objects Mounted Near Grab Bars.

1525 be within reach from a sitting position, and it is recommended that they be They should mounted below grab bars (Figs. 12d, e). 18 min 455

TOILET SEAT COVER DISPENSERS are an optional hygienic amenity that can easily be provided in all toilet compartments. The opening for toilet seat covers needs to be mounted between 15 inches and 48 inches (380 and 1220mm) above the floor, in an accessible location in the accessible compartment, typically away from the vicinity of the toilet itself (Figs.12c, d, e). 48 min 1220

24

610

For entry—latch approach

COMBINATION UNITS can organize and unify installations by incorporating several accessories at one convenient location, such as toilet tissue dispensers, toilet-seat-cover dispensers, and sanitary napkin disposals. Recessed units should be installed in side walls or partitions with grab bars (Fig. 12e). Note that recessed units are allowed to project only ¼ inch.

32 min clear 815

Image 20: ADA Diagrams 9


SPECIAL C FOR LAVA 48 min Recommended 1220

24 Recommended

48 min

CHILDREN’S REACH RANGES Refer to these tables to find the dimensions when designing restrooms primarily for children’s use. Select the dimensions that are most appropriate for the specific children’s age group for which you are designing. Mounting heights for children vary depending on age. The age groups are 3 and 4, 5 through 8 and 9 through 12 years.

CHILDREN’S REACH RANGES FORWARD OR SIDE REACH HIGH (maximum) LOW (minimum)

AGES 3 and 4

AGES 5 through 8

AGES 9 through 12

36 inches (915mm)

40 inches (1015mm)

44 inches (1120mm)

20 inches (510mm)

18 inches (455mm)

16 inches (405mm)

DIMENSIONS AT WATER CLOSETS SERVING CHILDREN AGES 3 THROUGH 12 AGES 3 and 4

AGES 5 through 8

AGES 9 through 12

12 inches (305mm)

12 inches to 15 inches (305 to 380mm)

15 inches to 18 inches (380 to 455mm)

11 inches to 12 inches (280 to 305mm)

12 inches to 15 inches (305 to 380mm)

15 inches to 17 inches (380 to 430mm)

GRAB BAR HEIGHT

18 inches to 20 inches (455 to 510mm)

20 inches to 25 inches (510 to 635mm)

25 inches to 27 inches (635 to 685mm)

TOILET TISSUE DISPENSER HEIGHT

14 inches (355mm)

14 inches to 17 inches (355 to 430mm)

17 inches to 19 inches (430 to 485mm)

WATER CLOSET CENTERLINE TOILET SEAT HEIGHT

The blue notations beginning with “C:” in many of the figures that follow in this Planning Guide refer to children’s measurements.

UNIVERSAL DESIGN

IN

610

1220

PLANNING AN ACCESSIBLE RESTROOM BEGIN WITH RESTROOM ENTRANCE AND EXIT For all restroom entries, note the importance of approach direction (indicated in the figures by arrows) and the presence of closers or latches in determining minimum clearances. The accessibility standards should be studied carefully because they offer numerous dimensional options to consider. Meeting or exceeding the minimum maneuvering clearances at doorways is an important aspect in design OUT 22 to ensure proper access. 560 42 min

24

1065 SINGLE-DOOR ENTRIES (Fig. 3a), where610theRecommended door swings into the restroom, are

Recommended common.48 Aminlevel and clear corridor or passageway leading to the door is recommended to 1220

be 48 inches (1220mm) minimum wide. The doorway must have a clear opening 32 inches (815mm) minimum width when the door is open 90 degrees. A minimum access aisle 48 inches (1220mm) wide is also recommended inside the restroom to allow people using wheelchairs to maneuver around obstructions, such as sight-barriers, and to accommodate 3b out Opposing simultaneousFig. in and traffic. Doors. (Door has closer and no latch)

OPPOSING DOORS (Fig. 3b), one for entrance and the other for exit with an alcove between them, is another popular configuration. In this instance, make sure no hazard is 32 min The width of the created in the alcove by the simultaneous entry and exit of two people. 815 alcove must be a minimum of 48 inches (1220mm) plus the width the door. It is difficult for 48 min ofRecommended 1220 a person using a wheelchair or crutches to back up and pull open a door, so it is recommended that opposing doors swing in the same direction. This opposing door layout provides doors that always open in the direction of travel, for restroom entrance and exit.

OPEN VESTIBULES (Fig. 3c), free of doors, are by far the most universally usable because they don’t require manipulating door hardware or maneuvering around door clearances. It is recommended that the entire passageway be 48 inches (1220mm) minimum width to 42 min accommodate 1065 simultaneous in and out traffic.

LAVATORIES are impo

facilities for all people. A Standards for accessible close as possible to the fr with the front of the high maximum above the finis minimum from the botto extend at least 8 inches ( of the overflow (in the St determining knee and toe space in front and under t minimum. Except in resid overhang the clear floor s required amount of toe cl (635mm) maximum. To provided for the full dept and reach requirements.

WATER SUPPLY, DR

be insulated or otherwise or abrasive surfaces. Thi people who have may ha (Fig. 4). A recommende lavatory (Fig. 5).

Fig. 4 Lavatory Clear

C: Kneespace not required for ages 5 and under if 30 x 48 inches (760 x 1220mm) clear floor space for parallel approach available

8 min

48 min Recommended RAISED THRESHOLDS at doorways should be avoided wherever possible. If it is 1220

205

necessary to include them, then they should be beveled, 1⁄2 inch (13mm) high maximum (Figs. 21a, b). Existing or altered thresholds can be beveled and up to 3 ⁄4 inch (19mm) high, provided they conform to the change of level requirements for accessible routes. Note that thresholds higher than 1⁄4 inches (6.4mm) will need to incorporate a bevel no steeper than 1:2.

121

The accessibility standards are often described as minimums and contain numerous minimum requirements. These minimum requirements are often usability minimums as well, with 32 min requirements below which many cannot operate easily, safely or at all. In spite of this, 48 min 815 1220 48 min Recommended Fig. 5 Protective Pane nationwide accessibility mandates have created the widespread expectation for more usable Fig. 3 Restroom Entrance and Exit 1220 Maneuvering Clearances. environments. In the interests of an even wider reach for more accommodating designs, and to extend those designs beyond accessibility minimums, the concept of universal design arose. A universal approach includes improved usability characteristics and/or options in all Fig. 3c Open Vestibule. 27 m 34 max products, building elements, and spaces to ensure that they are usable to the greatest extent For exit—front approach 68 865 possible by people of all ages and abilities. A universal approach will also produce improved C: When 31 Image 21: ADA Diagrams 7 usability features that are integrated with the overall design of a facility, even if a particular 48 min Recommended 1220 element or feature clearly has a more limited target group. To provide diverse examples, DOORS for interior use must push or pull open with a maximum of 5 pounds of force (lbf) 50 min this Planning Guide displays designs that conform to minimums and those that exceed (22.2 N). Door handles, pulls, latches, locks,1270 and other operable parts must have a shape that Place l minimums, achieving more universal results. 60 min Recommended far forwa is easy to operate with one hand, and not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the 1575 cut out pip 60 min


Fig. 7a Reverse Diagonal Approach.

Fig. 7b Side Approach.

Fig. 7c Perpendicular Transfer.

Fig. 8 Wheelchair Accessible Toilet Compartment. Where wall space does not permit a grab bar 36 inches (915mm) minimum in length, a rear grab bar shall be permitted to be 24 inches (610mm) minimum in length, centered on the water closet.

32 min

4 max

815

100

Alternate door location

With a 36 inch (915mm) grab bar, maintain exact 12 inch (305mm) x 24 inch (610mm) split over center line of the water closet.

4 max 100

Fig. 9 Large Wheelchair Accessible Toilet Compartment.

36 min

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

60 min

915

Self-closing door

32 min clear 815

Grab bar may be split or shifted when it conflicts with water valve.

1525

60 min 24

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

610

36 min

1525

915

Clear floor space

ACCESSIBLE TOILET 12 16-18 COMPARTMENTS ARE REQUIRED 42 min 12 max C: 12-18 IN ALL PUBLIC RESTROOMS 405-455

1065

Wheelchair turning space

305

305

305-455

48 min (1220)that Recommended There are two basic toilet compartment designs are named and shown in the standards: 54 min the Wheelchair Accessible Toilet Compartment (Fig. 8) and the Ambulatory Accessible Toilet 1370 Compartment (Fig. 10). A third variant is described in this Planning Guide, labeled Large 42 min 56 min Wall-mtd. toilet Wheelchair Accessible 9). The wheelchair accessible compartments 1065 Toilet Compartment (Fig.1420 Latch approach only who use wheelchairs and who transfer onto a toilet using a should accommodate people 59 min Floor-mtd. toilet variety of positions and procedures. Three common 1500 transfer positions are diagonal, side and (Also compartment perpendicular (Fig. 7 a, b, c). length for children's use)

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TOILET

16-18

405-455

60 min 1525

C: 12-18 COMPARTMENT (Fig. 8) the depth must be 56 305-455

inches (1420mm) minimum for wall-hung toilets and 59 inches (1500mm) minimum depth for floor-mounted toilets. The minimum width measured at right angle from the side wall is 60 inches (1525mm). The minimum space required in toilet compartments is provided so that a person using a wheelchair can maneuver56into at the toilet. TheWall-mtd. toilet must be offset on minposition C: 59 min toilet 1500 the back wall with the toilet centerline 161420 inches (405mm) minimum to 18 inches (455mm) maximum from the side wall or partition. Grab bars must be mounted on the rear wall and 59 min Floor-mtd. toilet 1500Install coat hooks and shelves maximum 48 on the closest side wall or partition to the toilet. inches (1220mm) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; projecting no more than 4 inches (100mm) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to complete the design.

LARGE WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TOILET COMPARTMENT (Fig. 9) is one of many types of larger wheelchair accessible toilet compartments that are possible. Note that in-swinging doors must not overlap the required toilet clearances. 7

Fig. 7 Transfers to Toilet from Wheelchair. Vertical grab bars 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

Fig. 7a Reverse Diagonal Approach.

Fig. 7b Side Approach.

122

Fig. 8 Wheelchair Accessible Toilet Compartment. 4 max 100

32 min 815

Where wall space does not permit a grab bar 36 inches (915mm) minimum in length, a rear grab bar shall be permitted to be 24 inches (610mm) minimum in length, centered on the water closet.

Fig. 7c Perpendicular Transfer.

Image 22: ADA Diagrams


g. 18 Accessible Restroom with Additional Entry Clearance Space. 16 feet 66

489cm

shelves to complete the design.

accessible co

TOE CLEARANCE (Figs. 11a, 11b) of 9 inches (230mm) minimum above the finish floor is required under the front partition and one side partition of all accessible compartments. The toe clearance must extend 6 inches (150mm) deep minimum beyond the compartment-side face of the partition. Toe clearance at the front partition is not required if the depth of the compartment is greater than 62 inches (1575mm) deep with a wall-hung toilet or 65 inches (1650mm) deep with a floor-mounted toilet. Toe clearance at the side partition is not required in a compartment greater than 66 inches (1675mm) wide.

TOILETS (

Fig. 10 Ambulatory Accessible Toilet Compartment.

60 Fig. 18 Accessible Restroom with Additional Entry 1525Clearance Space. G

GRA IN A COM

1680

Q

V

66 P

30 x 48

489cmB

1680

760 x 1220

760 x 1220

30 x 48

760 x 1220

ar floor space

S

Clear floor space at lavatory

BB

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

1220

EE 30 x 48

760 x 1220

1500

FF

48

AA

Clear floor space

Baby changing station 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) in down position

48

1220

EE

G

B

C: 8 feet - 9 inches

FF

267cm

BB

1065

35-37

12 max 305

36

890-940

915 ICC/ANSI

60 dia

AA1525 Wheelchair turning space

1070

17-19

54 min 1370

60

1065

1525

(32mm) mi and rounded mounting he centerline. T inches (106 installation c and extendin the 36 inch toilet is now requirement are now the individual to The 20 inches (990 Refer

430-485

Fig. 18b Larger Size Compartment 42 min with Alternate Door Opening.

60 dia

Baby changing station

19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) Fig. 18a Accessible Restroom with Additional Entry Clearance Space.

GRAB BAR

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

42

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

1525

approach only Size Compartment Fig.Latch 18b Larger with Alternate Door Opening.

Wheelchair turning space

in down position

42 min

Door must swing-out and be self-closing

By positioning the partition layout, additional space DD can be added to the 8 feet - 6 inches F toilet compartment, 56 x259cm 60 min E 1420 x 1525 more Vertical grab bars 18 inches 32providing min clear 1500 8 feet 9 inches Wheelchair accessible maneuvering space(455mm) long (ICC/ANSI) 815 A toilet C: 267cmwith compartment DD Vertical grab bar 18 inches without adding 8 feet 6 inches C 42 wall-mounted toilet additional square (455mm) 259cm long (ICC/ANSI) footage to the room 1070

C: 59

1420 x 1525

V Q Wheelchair accessible A toilet compartment P with C wall-mounted toilet Y

30 x 48

1525

1425

56 x 60 min

E

60

56

F

Y

S

ear floor space at lavatory

By positioning the partition layout, additional space can be added to the toilet compartment, providing more maneuvering space 56without adding 1425additional square C: 59footage to the room

16 feet

Fig. 11 Toe Clearance Under Partitions.

Fig. 18a Accessible Restroom with Additional Entry Clearance Space.

g. 19 Small Public Restroom Provides Accessible Toilet Compartment and Ambulatory Accessible Compartment. 15 feet - 6 inches Fig. 19 Small Public Restroom Provides Accessible Toilet Compartment and Ambulatory Accessible Compartment. Ambulatory accessible 472cm 35-37 compartment not required, 56 x 60 min 890-940 60 84 provided to create a more 1420 x 1525 15 feet - 6 inches 36 1525 2135 Ambulatory accessible universally usable restroom

915 compartment not required, ICC/ANSI provided to create a more universally usable restroom

35-37

890-940

1525

915

B

60

1500

60

A

A

C

C

C: 59

1500

462cm

66

1675

Conventional toilet compartments

M

A

A

CA

C

C

HH

15 feet -Vertical 2 inchesgrab bars 462cm 18 inches (455mm) long 66 AA (ICC/ANSI) 1675

DD L

ConventionalK toilet compartments

HH

62

Vertical grab bars 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

1525

Wheelchair turning space

30 x 48

P

P P

T

T

Q T

150

12 min

9 min

30 x 48

305

230

Clear floor space

X

P

6 min

150

760 x 1220

Countertop lavatories with knee space and P P protective panel below

Partition

6 min

Z

Clear floor space

X X

DD

K

L

Baby changing station 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) in down position

Z

HH

760 x 1220

DD

Fig. 11a Horizontal Toe Clearance. Partition

Baby changing station EE 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) in down position

X

DD

150

EE 60 min

Wheelchair turning space

6 min

1575

C 1525HH

AA

24 610

Recommended

A

60 min BB

460

1575

S

DD

A number of must be loca accessible co universal us Regar the wall or p grab bars. I than 12 inch bar and proj (Fig. 12f). located 18 i floor, except mounted no grab bar are Standards al

18 min

62

L

6 min 150

24 610

Recommended

S

DD 1525

BB

15 feet - 2 inches

B

L M

1420 x 1525

Wheelchair accessible toilet compartment

18 min 460

ACC SPEC COM

56 x 60 min

2135

ICC/ANSI

1525

C: 59

60

36

Vertical grab bar 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

Wheelchair accessible toilet 84 compartment

472cm

Elevation

Q

Countertop lavatories adult with knee space and protective panel belowFig. 11b

Elevation children

Vertical Toe Clearance.

T

8

g. 20 Individual Toilet Room with Baby Changing Station.

Fig. 20 Individual Toilet Room with Baby Changing Station. 7 feet - 6 inches 30 x 48

Clear floor space

204cm

Clear floor space

N R

U

Image 23: ADA Diagrams

7 feet - 6 inches

204cm

760 x 1220

EE

N R

Baby changing station Baby changing station 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) U in down position EE in down position

123

30 x 48

760 x 1220

must meet 2 Flush contro compartmen people have be 17 inches seat. Toilet reference req


Fig. 12 Toilets, Grab Bars and Accessory Locations.

39-41 ICC/ANSI

12 max 305

990-1040

C: 34-36

865-915

18

54 min

445

ICC/ANSI

1370

48 max

42 min

33-36

1065

840-915

280-430

455-685

39-41

990-1040 ICC/ANSI

430-485

C: 11-17

C: 18-27

1220

17-19

C: 21-30

Toilet seat height

15 min

535-760

380

7-9

180-230

Fig. 12b Outlet Location for Toilet Paper Dispenser (2010 ADA Standards).

Fig. 12a Seat Height and Grab Bar Locations.

36 max 915

24 min 610

Protruding dispenser outlet above grab bar Recessed dispenser, entire L-shaped area

36 max

A

24 min

Protruding dispenser outlet mounted below grab bar (also for child outlets, mounted to lower child grab bar)

610

B

C G

E 1220

455

C: 14-19

B

C 48 max

D

1220

18 min

F

48 max 18 min

A

915

455

7-9

To top of outlet

C: 14-19

180-230

355-485

2010 ADA

355-485

Bottom of dispenser outlet

42 max 1070

Fig. 12c Outlet Location for Toilet Paper Dispenser (ICC/ANSI).

124

ROLL TOILET TISSUE DISPENSERS that do not control delivery or do not allow continuous paper flow are required in all accessible toilet compartments. The 2010 ADA Standards require that roll toilet tissue dispensers must be installed with the dispenser centerline 7 inches (180mm) minimum and 9 inches (230mm) maximum in front of the leading edge of the toilet (Figs. 12b, 12d). The 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards establish a different measurement procedure, locating the dispensers between 24 inches (610mm) minimum and 42 inches (1070mm) maximum from the rear wall of the toilet compartment (Figs. 12c, 12e). The 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards locate the outlet of the dispenser no lower than 18 inches (455mm) above the finish floor (Figs. 12c, 12e). The 2010 ADA Standards allow the outlet on the roll toilet tissue dispenser to be mounted as low as 15 inches (380mm)

Fig. 12d Surface Mounted Dispensers. LEGEND A B-5806 x 18 Vertical Grab Bar B B-5806 x 36 Horizontal Grab Bar C B-5806 x 42 Horizontal Grab Bar D 819839 Partition-Mounted Toilet Seat Dispenser, Sanitary Napkin Disposal, Toilet Tissue Dispenser on right when facing unit with Theft-Resistant Spindle (serves two compartments)

12 min 305

1 1/2 min 38

Fig. 12e Recessed Dispensers (ICC/ANSI). E B-221 Surface-Mounted Toilet-Seat-Cover Dispenser (mounts below grab bar) F B-2888 Surface-Mounted Multi-Roll Toilet Tissue Dispenser (mounts below grab bar) G B-270 Surface-Mounted Sanitary Napkin Disposal (mounts below grab bar)

Image 24: ADA Diagrams


that meet 2010 ADA and 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards. Entry doors should swing into vestibules, not directly into corridors, access aisles, or clear floor spaces required at lavatories and other restroom accessories.

As in all accessible facilities, small public restrooms and individual toilet rooms should meet or exceed the 2010 ADA and the 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards for entrance and exit, lavatories, toilets, grab bars, restroom accessories, controls, and operating mechanisms. Refer to previous sections, Accommodating Diverse Users, Space Requirements and Reach Ranges, and Planning an Accessible Restroom, for information on specific 2010 ADA and 2009 ICC/ANSI Standards as well as universal design considerations.

INDIVIDUAL TOILET ROOMS (also known as unisex or family toilet rooms) provide privacy for all persons who need the help of an assistant or caregiver (for example a child who needs the help of a parent), especially when they are of the opposite gender (Fig. 20). Fig. 17 Small Accessible Public Restroom. 10 feet - 7 inches 323cm

60

S

1525

S 60 min

60

1525

1525

Wheelchair turning space

60 min 1525

Q

Wheelchair turning space

P

P

P

P

Q

48

20 feet

1220

620cm

EE

W

30 x 48

W

760 x 1220

Clear floor space

14 feet - 8 inches 446cm

AA

Baby changing station 19 x 33 inches (485 x 840mm) in down position

60

DD

K

760 x 1220

Clear floor space at lavatory

BB FF

1525

30 x 48

EE

FF

Vertical grab bars 18 inches (455mm) long (ICC/ANSI)

C A H J D

56 x 60 min

30 x 48

1420 x 1525

Wheelchair accessible toilet compartment with wall-mounted toilet

760 x 1220

Clear floor space at urinal

GG

Urinal with elongated bowl

C A H J

DD

J B-4288 Surface-Mounted Multi Roll Toilet Tissue Dispenser (mounts below grab bar) K B-357 Partition-Mounted Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser, Sanitary Napkin Disposal, Toilet Tissue Dispenser with Theft-Resistant Spindle (serves two compartments) L B-3574 Recessed Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser, Sanitary Napkin Disposal, Toilet Tissue Dispenser on right when facing unit with Theft-Resistant Spindle M 819843 Recessed Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser, Sanitary Napkin Disposal, Toilet Tissue Dispenser on left when facing unit with Theft-Resistant Spindle N B-822 Lavatory-Mounted Soap Dispenser P B-824 Automatic, Universal Countertop-Mounted Soap Dispenser

Q B-165 Series Wall-to-Wall Mirror R B-165 Series Mirror, 18" W x 36" H (455 x 915mm) S B-165 Series Full-Length Mirror, 24" W x 60" H (610 x1525mm) T B-318 Recessed Paper Towel Dispenser U B-369 Recessed Paper Towel Dispenser and Waste Receptacle V B-526 Paper Towel Dispenser W B-43944 Recessed Paper Towel Dispenser and Waste Receptacle X B-3644 Recessed Waste Receptacle Y B-529 Circular Waste Chute Z B-7128 Surface-Mounted Hand Dryer AA B-4706 Recessed Sanitary Napkin/Tampon Vendor

56 x 60 min 1420 x 1525

Wheelchair accessible toilet compartment with wall-mounted toilet

B

B

LEGEND A B-5806 x 18 Vertical Grab Bar B B-5806 x 36 Horizontal Grab Bar C B-5806 x 42 Horizontal Grab Bar D B-270 Surface-Mounted Sanitary Napkin Disposal (mounts below grab bar) E B-2740 Surface-Mounted Double-Roll Toilet Tissue Dispenser, no controlled delivery (mounts below grab bar) F B-301 Recessed Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser (mounts below grab bar) G B-353 Recessed Sanitary Napkin Disposal (mounts below grab bar) H B-4221 Surface Mounted Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser (mounts below grab bar)

BB

DD

BB CC DD EE

B-687 Door Bumper B-76727 Double Robe/Clothes Hook KB102-00 Wall-Mounted Child Protection Seat KB110-SSWM Horizontal, Wall-Mounted Baby Changing Station FF 1031 Series Floor-Anchored Laminated Plastic Toilet Compartments GG 1035 Series Wall-Hung Urinal Screen HH 1542 Series Overhead-Braced Laminated Plastic Toilet Compartments

12

Image 25: ADA Diagrams

125


Image 26: ADA Diagrams

126


IMAGES C http://buildipedia.com/images/masterformat/Channels 1 https://www.pinterest.com/ewayea/computer-workstation-focal-upright-furniture/ 2 https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/computerworkstations/ 3 http://pourparlerprofession.oeeo.ca/decembre007/design.asp 4 http://hubnews.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/completing-the-hamilton-streets-hamilton-as-asteel-city-a-background-on-the-suggested-need-for-one-way-traffic/

5 http://ecovillagecommonhouse.wordpress.com/

7 http://media.except.nl/media/cache/ 8 http://sustainability.universityofcalifornia.edu/documents/Berkeley_12_13.pdf 9 http://www.archworlds.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Sustainability_diagramP_age_1.jpg 10 http://www.screensolutions.co.uk/downloads/Acoustic/acoustic/index.html 11 http://sustainabilityworkshop.autodesk.com/buildings/zones-air-distribution-equipment 12 http://www.enn.com/energy/article/40375 http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/information-sheets/high-r-value-wall-assemblies/ high-r-wall-12-exterior-insulation-finish-systems-eifs-wall-construction 14 http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/08/86/ bb/0886bb94866db94d2717f8a70f0e6e20.jpg

13

15 http://www.hot2cold.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/ada-lav-diagram.jpg 16 http://abadiaccess.com/2011/08/09/protruding-object-lesson-learned/ 17 http://www.schuham.com/washroom-accessories/images/ada-door-compliance-diagram.gif 18 http://signcollection.com/blog/The-Different-Components-of-ADA-Braille-Signs/ 19 http://www.ada.gov/images/vanpark.gif 20

- 26

Bobrick Planning Guide for Accessible Restrooms 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

6 http://www.aiatopten.org/sites/default/files/styles/popup/public/FIX%20-%20Diagram.jpg


Cover Image: Habitat Advertisement


7

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT & DOCUMENTATION


PROGRAM NAME QTY. S.F. TOTAL S.F ADJACENCIES PRIVACY

V(VISUAL) A(ACOUSTIC)

LIGHTING

3

150

450

A

NATURAL

1

150

150

A

ARTIFICIAL

SHOWER/ LOCKERS BIKE STORAGE

2

300

1800

A

NATURAL/ARTIFICIAL

1

225

225

A

ARTIFICIAL

JANITOR ROOM

1

100

100

A

ARTIFICIAL

A

NATURAL

VESTIBULE MECHANICAL ROOM

30%

CIRCULATION RESTROOMS

RESTROOMS

TBA

TBA

TBA

JANITOR ROOM

A

ARTIFICIAL

OFFICE

4

144

576

CASH WRAP

A

NATURAL

MAIN SHOWROOM

1

18000

18000

CASH WRAP

V

NATURAL/ARTIFICIAL

CASH WRAP

1

650

650

MAIN SHOWROOM, OFFICE

V

NATURAL/ARTIFICIAL

VOLUNTEER BREAK RM

1

1000

1000

OFFICE, MAIN SHOWROOM, STORAGE

A

NATURAL

DONATION STORAGE

1

3000

3000

MAIN SHOWROOM, VOLUNTEER BREAK ROOM

V

ARTIFICIAL

CONSTRUCT. WRKSHP

2

500

5000

CONSTRUCTION STORAGE

V

NATURAL/ARTIFICIAL

CONSTRUCT. STORAGE

1

7000

7000

CONSTRUCTION WORKSHOP

V

ARTIFICIAL

KITCHEN

1

300

300

A

NATURAL

1

100

100

A

ARTIFICIAL

RESTORE

130

FILE ROOM


EQUIPMENT/ FURNITURE

FINISHES

PERCEPTION EXPENSE REMARKS

TBA

DURABLE

INVITING

TBA

DURABLE

TBA

LOCKERS, SHOWER STALLS, RESTROOMS

CLEANABLE/DURABLE

COMFORTABLE

MEDIUM LOW

COM MUNIT Y BOARD TBA

MEDIUM

AVAILABLE TO ALL USERS

BIKE RACK

DURABLE

TBA

LOW

AVAILABLE TO ALL USERS

TBA

DURABLE

TBA

LOW

TBA

HIGH TOILETS, SINKS, URINALS, CHANGING STATIONS

STORAGE, TASK CHAIR, GUEST CHAIR, DESK

CLEANABLE/DURABLE

FLEXIBLE/DURABLE/NATURAL

TBA

MEDIUM

INVITING, COMFORTABLE

LOW SEPARATE SECTIONS

SHELVING DISPLAY

MINIMAL/DURABLE

INVITING

HIGH

COUNTER, CASH REGISTER, STORAGE

MINIMAL

INVITING

HIGH

TABLE, CHAIR, LOCKERS

DURABLE

INVITING/SAFE

HIGH

STORAGE OF BELONGINGS

TBA

DURABLE

TBA

LOW

DROP OFF & REFURBISH

MINIMAL/DURABLE

TBA

LOW

TBA

SHELVING

MINIMAL/DURABLE

TBA

LOW

TBA

MEDIUM

TBA

LOW

TBA

APPLIANCES, COUNTER, TABLE, CHAIRS FILE CABINETS

CLEANABLE/DURABLE MINIMAL

INVITING TBA

131

TABLE, CHAIRS


1800

NAME QTY. S.F. TOTAL S.F ADJACENCIES PRIVACY

V(VISUAL) A(ACOUSTIC)

LIGHTING

COMMUNITY CENTER COMMUNITY ROOM

2

1500

3000

STORAGE, KITCHEN/LUNCH ROOM

A

NATURAL

FLEX GYM SPACE

1

2000

2000

STORAGE

V

NATURAL

CLASSROOM

4

400

1600

COMPUTER/STUDY ROOM

A

NATURAL/ARTIFICIAL

COMPUTER/ STUDY RM

1

1000

1000

CLASSROOMS

A

NATURAL

ORIENTATION

1

2500

2500

KITCHEN/LUNCH ROOM

A

NATURAL

KITCHEN/ LUNCH RM

1

600

600

COMMUNITY ROOM/ ORIENTATION ROOM

V

NATURAL

STORAGE

2

100

200

FLEX GYM SPACE, COMMUNITY ROOM

A

NATURAL

INDIV. OFFICE

12

144

1728

CONF, COPY RM, FILE ROOM

A

NATURAL

CONF. ROOM

3

300

300

INDIVIDUAL OFFICE, COLLAB. ROOM

A

NATURAL

OPEN OFFICE SPACE

1

450

450

INDIVIDUAL OFFICE, FILE ROOM

V

NATURAL

KITCHEN/ BREAK RM

1

600

600

COLLABORATIVE RM, CONF. ROOM

V

NATURAL

COLLAB. ROOM

2

700

1400

CONF, KITCHEN/BREAK ROOM

V

ARTIFICIAL

COPY ROOM

1

250

250

OPEN OFFICE, INDIVIDUAL OFFICE, CONF. ROOM

A

NATURAL

STUDIO

1

300

600

INDIVIDUAL OFFICE, COLLAB. ROOM, CONF.

A

ARTIFICIAL

FILE/STORAGE

5

100

500

OPEN OFFICE, INDIVIDUAL OFFICE, CONF. ROOM

A

ARTIFICIAL

300

1800 TOTAL: 80,000

OFFICE

AVAILABLE: 83,463

A


EQUIPMENT/ FURNITURE

FINISHES

STORAGE, TABLE, CHAIRS

CLEANABLE/DURABLE/FLEXIBLE

INVITING, SAFE

HIGH

MEETINGS, ACTIVITIES

SPORTING EQUIPMENT, SEATING

CLEANABLE/DURABLE/FLEXIBLE

INVITING, SAFE

HIGH

SPORTS GYM

DESKS, CHAIRS

DURABLE

COMFORTABLE, INVITING

HIGH

FOR INSTRUCTIONAL CLASS

COMPUTERS, DESKS, CHAIRS

DURABLE

INVITING, SAFE, COMFORTABLE

HIGH

COMPUTERS, BOOKS

TABLES, CHAIRS

DURABLE/FLEXIBLE

INVITING

HIGH

SMALL THEATER

APPLIANCES, COUNTER, TABLE, CHAIRS

CLEANABLE/DURABLE

INVITING

MEDIUM

TBA

SHELVING

DURABLE

TBA

LOW

TBA

PERCEPTION EXPENSE REMARKS

STORAGE, TASK CHAIR, GUEST CHAIR, DESK

CARPET

INVITING, COMFORTABLE

HIGH

TBA

CONFERENCE TABLE, PROJECTOR, CHAIRS

CARPET

INVITING

HIGH

TBA

WORKSTATIONS, TASK CHAIRS, STORAGE

NATURAL/DURABLE

TBA

HIGH

FLEX SPACE

APPLIANCES, COUNTER, TABLE, CHAIR

CLEANABLE/DURABLE

INVITING

MEDIUM

TBA

DURABLE/FLEXIBLE

INVITING, COMFORTABLE

HIGH

TBA

PRINTERS, CABINETS, TABLE, CHAIR STUDIO DESKS, CHAIRS, FLAT STORAGE

DURABLE/CLEANABLE

TBA

LOW

TBA

NATURAL/FLEXIBLE

INVITING

HIGH

PROJECT TEAM

SHELVING

MINIMAL

TBA

LOW

TBA

TABLES, CHAIRS


PU BL C IC on SP M stru AC ai c ES n t O Sh ion rie o W w C n ta r o o r k o m ti o s h o m o p Fle pu n R o t xi e o C ble r/St m om G u d C mu ym y R ol la nit Spa oom Ki bo y R c tc r e he at oo m i n/ v e Br R ea oo k m Ro om

ADJACENCY MATRIX

PUBLIC SPACES Kitchen/Break Room Collaborative Room Community Room Flexible Gym Space Computer/Study Room Orientation Room Main Showroom Construction Workshop

PR IV C ATE la s S St sro PAC o r om E a S Fil ge s e R St oo ud m C io op C yR on o o O fere m ffi c e nc e

Direct Close Convenient

134

PRIVATE SPACES Office Conference Copy Room Studio File Room Storage Classrooms

Direct Close Convenient


TEST FIT 1

COMMUNITY SPACES

COMMUNITY SPACES STORAGE

RESTORE STORAGE FLOOR PLAN 1

COMMUNITY SPACES

RESTORE FLOOR PLAN 2

COMMUNITY SPACES

OFFICES

FLOOR PLAN 3

FLOOR PLAN 4

STORAGE FLOOR PLAN 5

Test Fit 1 explores a design that relocates the current ReStore. Currently, it makes up the entire first floor. However, the community spaces would be beneficial to have on the first level to invite the community into the building. The storage and the ReStore would then be split between the first and second levels. This option may allow for 2 atrium spaces. The offices would then be located on the fourth floor. This is a positive in that it can be separated from the community activities but also a negative to be so far from the ReStore. 135


TEST FIT 2

ENTRY

ENTRY

ENTRY

COMMUNITY SPACES

COMMUNITY SPACES

RESTORE ENTRY FLOOR PLAN 1

RESTORE

FLOOR PLAN 2

COMMUNITY SPACES

OFFICES OFFICES

OFFICES FLOOR PLAN 3

FLOOR PLAN 4

STORAGE FLOOR PLAN 5

Test Fit 2 is similar to Test Fit 1 in that the ReStore and community spaces are split between level 1 and 2. Rather than the third floor being all community spaces, there would be a mix between offices and community rooms. This will allow the staff communication between both the volunteers and members of the community. The offices would then continue onto the fourth floor. 136


TEST FIT 3

ENTRY

ENTRY

ENTRY

COMMUNITY SPACES

RESTORE ENTRY FLOOR PLAN 1

COMMUNITY SPACES

FLOOR PLAN 2

STORAGE

OFFICES

FLOOR PLAN 3

FLOOR PLAN 4

STORAGE FLOOR PLAN 5

Test Fit 3 keeps the existing ReStore on the first floor and all the community spaces on the second floor. With the loading docks and storage already designed on the first floor, it may be beneficial to leave the existing and just add more entrances. The entrances would allow access to the second level which would hold the majority of the community spaces. The offices are then placed on the fourth floor similar to Test Fit 1. 137


C http://cargocollective.com/natesmith/Habitat-for-Humanity-Ad-Series

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

IMAGES


Cover Image: Building Codes


8

CODE, REGULATIONS & STANDARDS


CODES Project Data: Project Name: Habitat for Humanity Kensington Center Address: 2930 Jasper Street Kensington, Philadelphia 19134 Owner: Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia Architect: Michael B. Kimmey AIA Date of Completion: March 31, 2014 Number of Stories: 4-Floor Total Gross SQFT: 83,463 SF Applicable Building Code Information Zoning Ordinance: Philadelphia Zoning Code Fire Code: 2009 International Fire Code Building/Dwelling Code: 2009 IBC Structural Code: IBC 2009 Plumbing Code: Philadelphia Plumbing Code Mechanical Code: IMC 2009 Elevator Code: N/A Energy Code: IECC 2009 Use Group Classification A-3: Assembly B: Business F-1: Factory Industrial Moderate-Hazard Occupancy M: Mercantile S-1, S-2: Storage Construction Classification TYPE III (exterior walls non-combustible; interior walls any material) TYPE IIIB: w/o sprinkler or w/ sprinkler used for area or height modifications (Sec.s 506.3, 504.2) [Note: Building can be classified as TYPE IIIA if it is sprinklered and if the sprinkler is not otherwise required (i.e. if the use is not R or F-1) or used for area or height modifications

142


Fire-Resistance Rating Requirements for Bldg. Elements (Hours) (Table 601) BUILDING ELEMENT TYPE IIIA* TYPE IIIB STRUCTURAL FRAME 1 0 BEARING WALLS EXTERIOR 2 2 INTERIOR 1 0 NONBEARING WALLS + PARTITIONS EXTERIOR TABLE 602 TABLE 602 INTERIOR 0 0 FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 1 0 ROOF CONSTRUCTION 1** 0 * Sprinkler can be substituted for 1-hour fire-resistance rated construction, if sprinkler is not otherwise req’d or used for area or height modifications (Sections 506.3, 504.2) ** Except in groups F-1, H, M, S-1, fire protection of structural members not req’d, including roof framing and decking where roof is 20 feet above any floor immediately below. Fire-retardant-treated wood is allowed for unprotected members. Means of Egress/Sanitation Sprinklered: PLUMBING SYSTEM Plumbing Fixture count is per IBC 2009 not Phila. Plumbing Code [Confirm count] Urinals per Phila. Plumb. Code All Work (B or F: 19,775 SF) Group B: WC Male WC Female Lav Male Lav Female Fountain Sink 1 / 25 (first 50) 1 / 25 (first 50) 1 / 40 (first 80) 1 / 40 (first 80) 1 / 100 1 1 / 50 (50+) 1 / 50 (50+) 1 / 80 (80+) 1 / 80 (80+) 5 5 4 4 2 / floor 1 / floor Group F: WC Male WC Female Lav Male Lav Female Fountain Sink 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 400 1 2 2 2 2 1 / floor 1 / floor 143


Mixed Use (B or F: 9,545 SF; A-3: 5,330 SF; R-2: 10,230 SF) Group B: WC Male WC Female Lav Male Lav Female Fountain Sink 1 / 25 (first 50) 1 / 25 (first 50) 1 / 40 (first 80) 1 / 40 (first 80) 1 / 100 1 1 / 50 (50+) 1 / 50 (50+) 1 / 80 (80+) 1 / 80 (80+) 3 3 2 2 1 / floor 1 / floor Group F: WC Male WC Female Lav Male Lav Female Fountain Sink 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 100 1 / 400 1 1 1 1 1 1 / floor 1 / floor Group A-3 (standing / chairs / tables + chairs): WC Male WC Female Lav Male Lav Female Fountain Sink 1 / 125 1 / 65 1 / 200 1 / 200 1 / 500 1 9 / 7 / 3 6/4/2 6/4/2 3 / 2 / 1 1 / floor INTERNATIONAL EXISTING BUILDING CODE Alteration Level: Level 2 – Reconfiguration of space, new doors & windows, extension of systems or Installation of additional equipment Level 3 – Work area exceeds 50 percent of the aggregate area of the building Egress Ceiling Height: Minimum of 7’-6” (1003.2) Max Floor Area Allowances per Occupant (Table 1004.1.1) SPACE FUNCTION GROSS FLOOR AREA (SF) / OCCUPANT Business, Industrial 100 Residential 200 Assembly (standing) 5 Assembly (chairs) 7 Assembly (tables/chairs) 15

17 / 7 / 3

144


Occupant Load (Single Use: Live or Work) FLOOR GROSS AREA B, F-1, F-2 R-2 FIRST 19,945 SF 200 100 SECOND 19,775 SF 198 84 THIRD 19,775 SF 198 84 FOURTH 19,775 SF 198 84 FIFTH 3,043 SF 31 16 TOTAL 82,313 SF 825 Floor Area (Mixed Use Scheme 3. Live + Work b) 368 FLOOR B, F-1, F-2 R-2 A-3 FIRST 14,615 SF 0 5,330 SF SECOND 9,545 SF 10,230 SF 0 THIRD 9,545 SF 10,230 SF 0 FOURTH 9,545 SF 10,230 SF 0 FIFTH 0 3,043 SF TOTAL GROSS 43,250 SF 33,733 SF 5,330 SF [TOTAL NET 30,000 SF 25,000 SF 5,000 SF] 0 Occupant Load (Mixed Use Scheme 3. Live + Work b) FLOOR B, F-1, F-2 R-2 A-3 (standing) A-3 (chairs) A-3 (ta/ch) TOTAL FIRST 147 0 1,066 762 356 1,213 SECOND 96 52 0 0 0 148 THIRD 96 52 0 0 0 148 FOURTH 96 52 0 0 0 148 FIFTH 0 16 0 0 0 16 TOTAL 435 172

145

Egress Width (1005) 1,066 762 356 1,673 STAIRWAYS OTHER EGRESS Inches per Occupant .3 .2 Single Use (floors 1-4) .3 × 200 = 60” .2 × 200 = 40” Mixed Use (floors 2-4) .3 × 148 = 45” .2 × 148 = 30” Mixed Use (floor 1) .3 × 1,213 = 364” .2 × 1,213 = 243” (equiv. to 7 3’ doors)


Egress Illumination (1006): 1 foot candle @ walking surface (1006.2); Aisles, stairways, corridors, exterior egress components and exterior landing required to have emergency power for illumination Accessible Means of Egress (1007): [See Existing Building Notes Below] Doors (1008) Width: Clear width not less than 32” Swing: Side-hinged swing in the direction of egress where serving occupant load of 50 or more persons. Interior doors without closers shall not exceed 5-pound force. Other doors shall release When subjected to 15-lb force Thresholds: ½” Door Arrangement: Space b/w doors to be 48” Hardware: Levers Hardware Height: 34” minimum and 48” max A.F.F. Panic Hardware: Required on doors for Group A with occupant loads of 50 or more Stairways (1009) Width: See Egress Width (1005) but minimum is 44” (Except occupant loads of less than 50) Existing Widths: 42” (SE corner), 44” (NW corner), 46” (center), 48”(SW corner) Headroom: 80” measured vertically from a line connecting the edge of the nosing Treads: 11” Risers: 7” maximum and 4” minimum Landing: Min. dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway Construction: Materials must be consistent with type of construction (Type IIIB allows for combustible, interior material such as wood) Walking surface: Not steeper than 2%; treads and landings must be solid surface Outdoor: Water is not to accumulate on surface Vertical Rise: Not greater than 12 feet Handrails: On each side Stairway to Roof: 4 or more stories, 1 stairway to extend to roof unless pitch is greater than 4:12.

146

Ramps (1010) Slope: Means of Egress – 1 in 12; Other – 1 in 8 Cross Slope: Not greater than 2% Vertical Rise: 30” Max


Width: See Section 1017.2, 36” minimum Headroom: 80” Restrictions: Ramp shall not reduce in width in path of egress Landing Slope: 2% max Landing Length: 60 inches Change in Direction: 60 inches by 60 inches Doorways opening onto Landings: See A117.1 Outdoor: Water is not to accumulate on surface Handrails: Ramps with rise greater than 6”, handrails on each side Edge Protection: (Not required where handrails not required); 4” or extend ramp surface 12” beyond handrails Guards: Required if ramp is 30” A.F.F. Exit Signs (1011) [See Existing Building Notes Below] Not required for rooms with one exit Internally or Externally Illuminated Tactile Sign stating EXIT and complying with A117.1 Graphics: Letters to be min. 6” tall Handrails (1012) [See Existing Building Notes Below] Height: 34” min., 38” max. Measured above stair tread nosing Graspability: Outside Diameter: Min. 1.25”, Max. 2” Extensions: Extend horizontally @ least 12” beyond top riser and continue to slope for the depth of one tread beyond the bottom riser. Clearance: Min. 1.5” Guards (1013) [See Existing Building Notes Below] Required along open-sided walking surfaces, mezzanines, industrial platforms, stairways, Ramps, and landings located 30” A.F.F. except @ Loading Docks Height: 42” Opening Limitations: 4” Diameter sphere shall not pass to a height of 34”, 8” sphere to 42”, 6” sphere at riser/tread/railing Roof access: Provide guards where hatch opening is located within 10 feet of roof edge

147

Exit Access (1014) Egress cannot occur from one room through another No egress through kitchen, storage rooms or closets Multiple Tenants: One tenant cannot pass through another tenant space to egress Common Path of Egress:


75 feet (Where a tenant space in B, S & U occupancies has an occupant load of not more than 30, the common path of egress shall not be more than 100 feet) [Common path defined as the distance from the most remote point in a space to the point in the exit path where the occupant has access to two required exits in separate directions.] Aisles in B: See 1005.1, 36” min. Exit Access Doorways (1015) Exit or Exit Access: Two exits from any space where: 1. Occupant load exceed values of Table 1015.1 [B = 49, S = 29) 2. Common path of egress exceeds distance stated above (75 or 100) Three or more Exits: 501-1000 occupants; 4 exits = 1,000+ Two exits: Exit doors to be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one-half of the length of the max. Overall diagonal dimension of area served. Boiler/ Furnace: Two exits required if over 500 S.F. or equipment exceeds 400,000 BTU’s Exit Access Travel Distance (1016) DISTANCE W/0 SPRINKLER DISTANCE W/ SPRINKLER A, B, R, F-1 200’ 250’ F-2 300’ 400’ Corridors (1018) Corridor Fire-Resistance Rating: Group A, B, F: 0 with a sprinkler system 1 without a sprinkler system for a corridor with greater than 30 occupants. (Occupant loads on each floor except the Penthouse have 50 occupants, see 1004) Group R: .5 with a sprinkler system for a corridor with greater than 10 occupants. (See 1004 for occupant loads) Width: Comply with 1005.1, 44” min. Exceptions: Occupant Load is less than 50 = 36” Dead Ends: 20 feet; 35 feet in Existing Buildings (see below); 50 feet if sprinklered in B, F, R-2 Number of Exits (1019) Occupant Load (persons per story) 1– 500 501 – 1,000 3 More than 1,000

2

Min. Number of Exits (per story)

4

148

Vertical Exit Enclosures (1020) [See Existing Building Notes Below] Interior Exit Stairways: Enclosed with Fire Barrier complying with 706 (B: 2 hrs.)


Openings and Penetrations: See Section 715 (Wired Glass) Penetrations: Prohibited except for req’d exit doors, sprinklers and fire dept. communication eqpt. Approved Barrier required if staircase continues below level of discharge Signage required @ each floor, state story and direction of exit discharge, locate sign 5 feet A.F.F. Exit Passageway (1021) [Lobby] Width: See Section 1005.1, min 44” unless occupant load is less than 50, than 36” Construction: Not less than 1-hr rated, also See Section 706 Horizontal Exits (1022) Exterior Ramps and Stairways (1023) Shall be open on at least one side No windows within 10’ of door opening and exterior stair (See Figure 1023.6 for example) Emergency Escape and Rescue (1026) Not applicable, [Applies to R and I-1 occupancies] ACCESSIBILITY (Section 3408) Change of Occupancy: If occupancy changes, the existing building needs to have: 1. At least one accessible building entrance 2. At least one accessible route from an accessible building entrance to primary function areas 3. Signage per 1110 4. Accessible parking 5. At least one accessible passenger loading zone, when loading zones are provided6. At least one accessible route connecting accessible parking and accessible passenger loading zones to an accessible entrance. Exception for Technical Infeasibility (3409.6) Route to the Primary Function must be accessible including toilet facilities and drinking fountains except if cost of providing the accessible route are not required to exceed 20% of the costs of the alterations affecting the area of primary function.

149

Fire Protection Requirements Exterior Walls Load Bearing: Fire Exit Enclosures: 2 hrs. Shafts and Elevator Hoistways: 2 hrs.


Exit Access Corridors: Tenant Space Separations: 2 hrs. Smoke Barriers: 30 min. Incidental Use Areas or Occupancy Separations: GENERAL BUILDING HEIGHTS AND AREAS EXISTING STORIES: 4-5 EXISTING HEIGHT: 64’ – 71’ PROPOSED: NO CHANGE TO EXISTING STORIES OR HEIGHT LEVEL GROSS FLOOR AREA (TO INSIDE FACE OF EXTERIOR WALLS) BASEMENT 1,150 SF FIRST 19,945 SF SECOND 19,775 SF THIRD 19,775 SF FOURTH 19,775 SF FIFTH 3,043 SF TOTAL 83,463 SF

150


C http://living-future.org/sites/default/files/ArchBlueprints_iStock_000016523977Medium.jpg

REFERENCES 1

Interface Studio Architects 1/22/10

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

IMAGES


Cover Image: Habitat Advertisement


9

FINAL PROJECT RESEARCH SUMMARY


Habitat for Humanity Kensington Center will not only improve the Kensington community, but it will have the ability to instill inspiration and success into the residents, partner families, volunteers, customers, and staff. The research comprised within this book has allowed me to fully explore and understand the variety of designs possible for the proposed project as well as the necessity for the Kensington Center. This design has the potential to change many people’s lives and ensure that the 52% of the population that is currently below the poverty line, can soon have a Center in which they can improve and grow as a community1. Within the historical precedents discussed in Section 2, it is clear that architecture and design have the ability to represent a culture. It gives a community a voice whether that community be in Athenian Agora of Ancient Greece in the 6th Century or in Chaco Canyon of the Southwest US in 1100 AD. Therefore, the Kensington Center has great potential to improve Kensington and revitalize the city to something extraordinary. The case studies each provide crucial information that will aid in the design of the Kensington Center. Different aspects from each analysis contributed to the Center’s vision allowing it to develop throughout my research. The existing site has great potential within both the surrounding residential zones and within the building’s form. Sustainable strategies implemented within the site and the building will help improve the site’s aesthetic but also promote sustainable education to the community. A major goal would be to have the Center designed with a foundation of sustainability in order to ensure a LEED Platinum design. As a community center, universal design is a major component that needs to be addressed in each space. Most importantly, Habitat for Humanity’s values and goals need to be instilled within the Center. Throughout the design process, it will be essential to keep in mind the needs of both Habitat for Humanity and the Kensington community to ensure a successful design. It is my responsibility to create a voice for this community. Just as Millard Fuller, the founder of Habitat stated . . . .

154


“we have the know-how in the world to house everyone. we have the resources in the world to house everyone. all that’s missing is the will to do it.”2

155


156


C http://cargocollective.com/natesmith/Habitat-for-Humanity-Ad-Series

FOOTNOTES 1 United States. Census Buereau. American Fact Finder: 19134. 2007-2011. Web. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/communityfacts.xhtml>.

2 "Why We Build Homes, Communities and Hope: Program Milestones FY2012."

Habitat for Humanity. Habitat for Humanity International, Web. 6 Sep 2013.

REFERENCES + FOOTNOTES + IMAGES

IMAGES


1


10

APPENDIX


SECTION 3: CASE STUDY 1 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY INTERIOR DESIGN PROGRAM

_________________________________________________________________ INTD-487: Capstone Research & Programming for Interior Design - Fall 2013 Questions for Case Study Surveys: These questions should be answered by the appropriate individuals and may include the owners, users, architects/interior designers, and/or you. Be sure to interview individuals who are intimately connected with the building and not new to the facility. You will need to expand on these questions (See Section #3 Case Studies for more topics of inquiry). •

Who designed the building and when? o

Originally designed as an auto repair shop

What was the concept in the design of the building? o

Designed for a two story auto shop

o

Redesigned to be a more flexible office space with a community gathering room

o

For Habitat it was used for office space and construction/building storage

Does the building fit within a particular architectural style or period?

What is the main use of the building? Does it have additional or ancillary uses also? o

Offices for Habitat Philadelphia

o

Workshop

o o o

Community Gatherings Volunteer organization

▪ Lunches/Info Session/Trainings

Who is the owner of this building? Is it publicly or privately owned? o

Office is owned by Habitat for Humanity

Who are the main users of this building (demographics – age group, socio-economic class, gender, etc)? o o

160

Building construction storage

Youth-Middle Age people working in the office Both low-high socio-economic class (Employees and Volunteers)

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About how many people work in this facility? How many people visit this facility from the outside? Daily, weekly, or yearly?

How is this building used on a daily, weekly, monthly, yearly basis? What do people do here? Describe use patterns. o

Were any additions/renovations made? What and when? How did it change the character or functions? o o

Used year round for office, community, and volunteer purposes

Recently an addition to make more office space/flex space/and community gathering Made it more open and welcome to the community and more work friendly

What works best about the building? What does not work? Why? o

Best

▪ The location

▪ The individual offices o

▪ Community Space

Worst

▪ Small offices

▪ Not enough community space

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What do you consider the buildings best characteristics or features? Why? o o

The location The side garage with green space

What is the culture, mood, or atmosphere that the space is trying to express? Does it work?

Would you change anything about the building? If so, what and why? o

Is the natural and artificial lighting appropriate for the building? How is it achieved? o

No, there are not a sufficient amount of windows for each office.

o

Artificial lighting is not correctly designed for the appropriate office

o

The skylights are placed incorrectly compared to the office and gathering spaces.

Are the materials and color selections appropriate? Are any wearing poorly, hard to clean, exceptionally good for their use, etc? o

Everything except location

Things need to be durable yet more characteristically relevant to Habitat

What makes the facility unique - why would someone choose this over another? o

The reuse and the fact it used to be an auto repair shop

Are the sq. footages appropriate for each space? What are they? Are the assigned functions appropriate? Page

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162


â&#x20AC;˘

Is there a sense of place and orientation within the building? How easy is it to navigate and find ones way? What are the visual cues? o

Very difficult to find oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way. Things are not space planned correctly

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SECTION 3: CASE STUDY 2 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY INTERIOR DESIGN PROGRAM

_________________________________________________________________ INTD-487: Capstone Research & Programming for Interior Design - Fall 2013 Questions for Case Study Surveys: These questions should be answered by the appropriate individuals and may include the owners, users, architects/interior designers, and/or you. Be sure to interview individuals who are intimately connected with the building and not new to the facility. You will need to expand on these questions (See Section #3 Case Studies for more topics of inquiry). •

Who designed the building and when?

What was the concept in the design of the building?

o The building was designed in 1860’s as a 4-floor textile mill and renovated in 1910 to a 5-floor “L” shaped to “U” shaped building. The designer is unknown.

o o

Designed as a Textile Mill Factory with an attached boiler structure The neighborhood was a live/work community with the Textile Mill as the central industrial plot.

Does the building fit within a particular architectural style or period? o

The building is an extremely old factory structure.

What is the main use of the building? Does it have additional or ancillary uses also? o

The main use is the Restore. It is basically a furniture thrift shop for customers to come and purchase items. There is minimal office space for the restore employees. There is also a big space in the back of the store where the items are stored when donated to clean and restore them before putting them up for sale. The small volunteer break room is important for the volunteers to store their belongings in lockers and eat lunch there.

Who is the owner of this building? Is it publicly or privately owned? o

Office is privately owned. Habitat for Humanity is renting the space from the owner.

Who are the main users of this building (demographics – age group, socio-economic class, gender, etc.)? o The main users are the customers of Habitat for Humanity. They are of all ages and mostly homeowners looking for supplies/materials for homes.

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About how many people work in this facility? How many people visit this facility from the outside? Daily, weekly, or yearly? o

How is this building used on a daily, weekly, monthly, yearly basis? What do people do here? Describe use patterns. o o

The main activity is shopping in the restore and storing donated items

There weren’t any recent additions made for the Restore specifically.

What works best about the building? What does not work? Why? o

Best

o

Worst

▪ Simple architecture, large open space, high ceilings ▪ No windows, no natural light

What do you consider the buildings best characteristics or features? Why? o

The parking lot size and potential to expand

What is the culture, mood, or atmosphere that the space is trying to express? Does it work? o

The building is used all year round on a daily basis.

Were any additions/renovations made? What and when? How did it change the character or functions? o

Only about 3-4 full time staff at the Restore. The main workers are the volunteers that come in each day to help with the items and run the store.

It should be welcoming the community and being open to what it offers however the limited windows, the direction of the building and the location of the entrance seems to shield away the neighborhood

Would you change anything about the building? If so, what and why? o

Windows and open it up to the neighborhood around

Is the natural and artificial lighting appropriate for the building? How is it achieved?

Are the materials and color selections appropriate? Are any wearing poorly, hard to clean, exceptionally good for their use, etc?

o Artificial lighting is incorrectly place allowing for dark shadows and corners. The natural light is non-existent

o The materials and finishes are minimal and appropriate but not necessarily aesthetically pleasing

What makes the facility unique - why would someone choose this over another? o

For Habitat for Humanity it is in a location that they should be expanding to in the near future. It will allow them to revitalize this space. Page

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o â&#x20AC;˘

Are the sq. footages appropriate for each space? What are they? Are the assigned functions appropriate? o

â&#x20AC;˘

There is also lots of potential for expansion for Habitat to do anytime in the near future.

The sq. footages are large but the space isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily appropriately organized.

Is there a sense of place and orientation within the building? How easy is it to navigate and find ones way? What are the visual cues?

o Not necessarily. The tall ceilings and minimal materiality and lighting makes it a confusing space to circulate through.

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Habitat Community_Senior Capstone  

Capstone Research & Programming Book - Fall 2013

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