Issuu on Google+

HEATHER LEANNE CUSIC SELECTED WORKS


DESIGN STATEMENT WITH WELL-INTENTIONED ARCHITECTURE, ONE HAS THE POWER TO CHANGE LIVES, TO INSPIRE, TO UNITE, AND TO HEAL. ARCHITECTURE BECOMES MUCH MORE THAN SIMPLY THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, IT IS AN ART FORM WHERE CREATIVITY MEETS FUNCTIONALITY. ARCHITECTURE CHANGES THE EXPERIENCE OF PLACE, IT CREATES A LANDMARK FOR PLACE, IT DEFINES CITIES, IT SOLVES PROBLEMS. I AM AN ARCHITECTURE STUDENT WHO SEEKS TO MAKE AN IMPACT THROUGH DESIGN. I BELIEVE THAT IN ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL WE LEARN HOW TO BE PROBLEM SOLVERS, TO COLLABORATE AND PERFORM IN STRESSFUL SITUATIONS. I ASPIRE TO BE PART OF CREATING, NOT ONLY AN EXPERIENCE, BUT SOLUTIONS TO THE OBSTACLES WE FACE AS A SOCIETY.


00 contents

01. SHENANDOAH REJUVENATION 05. FOR HUMANS 10. CHRONOTORIUM: INTERREGNUM 15. ANNEX TO THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM 21. DISENTANGLE 23. EVENT PAVILION 27. LOST AND FOUND 29. TRAVEL PORTFOLIO 32. ADDITIONAL WORKS


SHENANDOAH REJUVENATION This joint Bariatric Clinic and Health and Wellness Retreat features an architecture that coincides with the undulating hills of the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. The goal of this clinic and wellness retreat is to revitalize patients in a remote, yet beautiful location, in order to start them on their way to a healthy lifestyle. The architecture addresses these goals by featuring a radial circulation where all of the adjoining rooms and classrooms expand from an inner sunken garden, where one may meditate, take a class, or have a relaxing moment. The design intent of this facility is to give patrons a space where they will not feel trapped or cornered, to give them an experience and not an institution. PROGRAM: Bariatric Clinic and Health and Wellness Retreat LOCATION: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia ARCHITECTURE STUDIO III SPRING 2016


2016 ARCH STUDIO III 02


10.

7.

8.

-

5.

6.

---

B

4.

2016

12. 14.

9.

11.

13.

15. 3.

ARCH STUDIO III

16. DN

1.

2.

2.

2.

FIRST FLOOR PLAN- HEALTH AND WELLNESS RETREAT

A

10'

03

15.

16.

16.

14.

13.

1. RECEPTION/ CHECK-IN 2. STAFF OFFICES 3. DIVIDABLE CONFERENCE ROOM 4. KITCHEN CLASSROOM 5. WORKING KITCHEN 6. INDOOR DINING AREA 7. INDOOR/OUTDOOR DINING AREA 8. TOILETS

9. SUNKEN GARDEN 10. POOL ROOM 11. LOCKER ROOMS 12. STORAGE 13. VERSATILE EXERCISE STUDIO 14. YOGA STUDIO 15. GYM 16. CARDIO STUDIO

1. WAITING ROOM 2. RECEPTION DESK 3. NURSE'S STATION 4. CLEAN SUPPLY/ MEDICATION ROOM 5. SOILED HOLDING 6. HOUSEKEEPING 7. EQUIPMENT STORAGE 8. EXAM ROOMS

9. CONSULTATION ROOM 10. DOCTOR'S OFFICES 11. STAFF ROOM 12. STAFF BATHROOM 13. IMAGING SUITE 14. PROCEDURE ROOM 15. LAB 16. PATIENT BATHROOM

12. 11.

2.

3.

7.

4.

10.

5. 6.

1.

10. 8.

40'

8.

8.

8.

9.

10.

10.

UP

GROUND FLOOR PLAN- BARIATRIC CLINIC 10'

40'

SITE PLAN 160’

320’


2016

1.

2.

3.

4.

1. POOL ROOM 2. RESTROOMS 3. INDOOR/OUTDOOR DINING AREA 4. KITCHEN

ARCH STUDIO III

SECTION B 5'

2.

20'

04

5.

4.

3.

1.

2. SECTION A 5'

20'

1. RECEPTION/ CHECK-IN 2. SUNKEN GARDEN 3. CIRCULATION 4. RESTROOM 5. DINING AREA


FOR HUMANS This design is a contemporary solution for a midrise residential building for Veterans with PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The program includes residential spaces, along with a clinic, public cafe, open-air market, and outside courtyard. The premise of this project is integration into society. The building is meant to be a sanctuary from the city, matching the urban fabric with a flat facade, followed by a comforting curve in the back. The client becomes the primary concern in this program. Many design concerns were taken into account when considering the clients’ conditions. Minimal glass in the living spaces, while allowing as much natural light as possible. Utilizing a strong building material to reinforce the idea of safety, while maintaining a non-institutional environment. It becomes a very delicate balance between what makes someone feel safe and what makes someone feel comfortable and ultimately human. PROGRAM: Midrise Residential Building for Veterans with PTSD LOCATION: St. Louis, Missouri ARCHITECTURE STUDIO IV FALL 2016




'9LHZ


III.

I. DINING AREA FOR RESIDENTS

III.

I. CAFE

VI.

V.

II. OPEN TO BELOW

II.

II. OPEN-AIR MARKET III. CIRCULATION

IV.

III. EGRESS VII.

II.

IV. RESTROOMS II.

IV. GYMNASIUM

V. SAUNA

VII.

IV. I.

IV.

I.

III.

VI. CROSSFIT AREA

III.

VII. CIRCULATION

FLOOR TWO

FLOOR ONE

I. CLINICAL AREA

I. GROUP THERAPY

V. VI.

II. RESTROOMS

IV. VIII.

II. CIRCULATION

VIII. VII.

I.

VII.

III. CONFERENCE ROOM

III. RESTROOMS III.

II.

IV. EGRESS

IV. CIRCULATION II.

II.

V. WAITING ROOM

V. EGRESS

IV. III. IV.

VI. STAFF OFFICE

III.

VI.

I. V.

VII. ACTIVITY ROOM

I.

II.

V.

VI. COURTYARD VII. STAFF LOUNGE

IV.

VIII. STAFF OFFICES

FLOOR THREE

FLOOR FOUR

I. RESIDENTIAL 2. CIRCULATION

V.

3. EGRESS 4. COMMUNAL SPACE II. II.

I.

I.

IV.

FLOOR SEVEN

III.

5. COURTYARD/ GREEN ROOF


ELEVATION 1/16”=1’

SECTION I 1/16”=1’

SECTION II 1/16”=1’


CHRONOTORIUM: INTERREGNUM THE INBETWEEN

“Is today nothing? Is the beginningless past nothing? If the future is nothing, they are just as surely nothing....” -Walt Whitman The chronotorium is a unique building program, in that it is used as a method for measuring time. This design in a space for meditation and social contemplation, designed based on the way that a human’s senses allow them to perceive reality and time. By removing a large amount of sensory experience in some spaces and overwhelming the senses in others, a stimulating journey is created. By exploring the three different environments of Skidaway: marsh, forest and lagoon, and allowing the outside to intervene, this project creates a sound relationship with nature, creating a variety of experiences in the same structure. This chronotorium allows a person to escape time and focus on the experience or rather become lost in the inbetween. PROGRAM: Meditation Space LOCATION: Skidaway Island, Georgia ARCHITECTURE STUDIO II WINTER 2016


5’

20’


POLYSEMIC IMAGERY A polysemic image occurs when there are multiple meanings in one image. It is able to createan environment where one cannot be sure what is happening. In architecture, polysemic imagery can be used to manifest a concept or a theory.


ANNEX TO THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM This project arrives from the cultural significance of the piĂąata, a common party object derived from Mexican culture. This idea of flipping the piĂąata inside out, plays on the principle order of things; thereby creating defamiliarization. This project emphasizes a common entity and focuses on showing the viewer what is not meant to be seen until the very last moment. The primary idea relates largely back to lust or wanting what you cannot have. The tense postures of the stone Laocoon and David and the antagonistic posture of a rearing horse signifies impatience. The form juxtaposes the availability and convenience of the candy on the outside. There were many faces and sides of Andy Warhol including the explicitness of the 1970s, which many people gloss over in regards to his life. Developing from this is the concept of taking something childlike and innocent and converting it into something intriguing and corrupted, something which makes people uneasy upon discussing; for example the peeled banana. Something very common, turned into something crude; therein lies a mystery of what is on the inside, after it is revealed the excitement is no longer there. PROGRAM: Gallery spaces as an annex to The Andy Warhol Museum LOCATION: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ARCHITECTURE FUNDAMENTALS II WINTER 2015


5

20 10


5

20 10

10

20


5

20 10

5


DISENTANGLE This design deals with the concept of unfolding and unraveling. It takes the enigma that is the Abbaye Sainte Hilaire and displays it in a clear way through structures that unfold from the natural landscape. The focus of this project is site and client. The original abbaye was built in 1254 and since has been added on to and constantly changing programs, at one point it was a refuge for Carmelite nuns, at another, a home for monks and then a mere storage for farming equipment. It is currently privately owned and in need of a guard’s house. As part of the studio requirement, we were also challenged to design a visitor’s center to attract patrons to this historical beauty. Hand rendering became the main method of presentation in order to articulate the antiquity of Provence and the rural natural landscape. PROGRAM: Abbaye Sainte Hilaire visitor center, cafe, and guard’s house LOCATION: Lacoste, France ARCHITECTURE STUDIO I FALL 2015


EVENT PAVILION The purpose of this initial studio was to create a structure according to form, space and order. Hierarchy of spaces, circulation, and structure were important considerations when designing this model. The intention behind the design itself was to create a seamless route through the space where the transition from the inside to the outside was unrecognizable. The triangle becomes a strong shape when considering truss design. Every design decision taken in this model focuses on the triangle and discerns the large cantilevered spa ce above. PROGRAM: Inside/ Outside Event Pavilion LOCATION: No specific site ARCHITECTURE FUNDAMENTALS I FALL 2014


LOST AND FOUND The premise of this collaborative project was to uncover the past of historic Savannah’s first four squares. With the help of The Georgia Historical Society, the Bull Street Library and the Municipal Archives, we were able to delve deep into Savannah’s past from the perspective of the buildings that were once there or still standing. We designed an exhibition to display our research and model and chose the Cluskey vaults for the site for two reasons. First, the City of Savannah sponsored an archaeological study of these spaces, which had been previously used for parking, in order to highlight the importance of their heritage. Secondly, we chose to place our exhibition at a site, which has lived to see all of Savannah’s changes throughout the years. LOCATION: Savannah, Georgia DOCUMENTING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT SPRING 2016


TRAVEL SKETCHING In the field of architecture, traveling is just as essential as the classroom. Being able to translate ideas by hand into a sketchbook becomes a great learning tool. By sketching architecture, one truly examines the details, which are intended by the architect. Sketching becomes much more impactful than simply taking a photograph.


(301) 904-3396

hcusic20@student.scad.edu

https://www.linkedin.com/in/heatherleannecusic HEATHER CUSIC

B.F.A ARCHITECTURE


Undergraduate portfolio