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ANDY WARHOL Prints


Andy Warhol — who famously said, “In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes” — was known for his portraits of influential and powerful celebrities, business people, and socialites. He was obsessed with the rich and famous, and his depictions of them helped propel him as one of the most significant artists of the 20th century. Warhol studied design at the Carnegie Institute of Technology before moving to New York in 1949 to pursue a career as a commercial artist. He turned to painting in the early 1960s, establishing his “Factory” studio, developing his signature style. He began making silkscreen paintings in 1962, because the process was faster and felt more like an assembly line than the traditional approach. He liked the ability to create identical, mass-produced image on canvas. He removed himself as much as he could from the process, leaving “the production” of his ideas to others who could reproduce images many times, with only slight differences. To create these works, Warhol would select photographs from newspapers and magazines, send them to a printer to be enlarged on silk screens, and then direct Factory assistants to lay the screens over canvases and apply one or two colors with a squeegee. Color was significant in his portraits, and his style became as identifiable as the personalities in the pictures.


Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Letter to the World (The Kick)

Screenprint in colors on Lenox Museum Board Warhol Foundation stamps on verso Image: 36 x 36 in. Board: 38 1/2 x 38 1/2 in. Unique TP apart from edition of 100 + 25 AP 1986

Letter to the World (The Kick) from Warhol’s Martha Graham portfolio, was published in 1986 to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance in New York. The image portrays Graham’s captivating grace and movement. Warhol took interest in dance in New York City, where he found the New York City Ballet and choreographer George Balanchine. He worked for Dance Magazine and painted portraits of famous dance names, including Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, and Rudolf Nureyev.


Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Satyric Festival Song

Screenprint in colors on Lenox Museum Board Warhol Foundation stamps on verso Image: 36 x 36 in. Board: 38 1/2 x 38 1/2 in. Unique TP apart from edition of 100 + 25 AP 1986

Warhol created this double-image print of Martha Graham, the mother of modern dance, based on a Barbara Morgan photograph. Her flowing hair, depicted in shades of blue and green, imbues this image with energetic, graceful movement. Warhol’s Martha Graham portfolio was published in 1986 to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Martha Graham Center of Contemporary Dance, Inc. in New York.


Andy Warhol (1928-1987)

Giant Panda (from Endangered Species)

Screenprint in colors Signed in pencil lower left and numbered 120/150 38 x 38 in. Edition number 120/150 1983

In 1983, Warhol’s friend and publisher Ron Feldman and his wife Freyda — philanthropists and activists — commissioned the artist to create the series of rainbow silkscreens depicting 10 endangered species to help raise awareness. Warhol, an animal lover referred to this series as his “animals in makeup,” because of the bold colors he used to portray the animals as large than life. In addition to giant panda, the series included the bald eagle, black rhino, African elephant, bighorn ram, Grevy’s zebra, orangutan, Pine Barrens tree frog, Siberian tiger, and San Francisco silverspot.


Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Hammer & Sickle

Screenprint Warhol Foundation stamps on verso Image: 30 x 40 1/8 in. Board: 32 1/2 x 42 1/2 in. Unique TP apart from edition of 50 +10 AP 1977

Warhol began depicting the Hammer and Sickle in 1976 after seeing the symbol from the Soviet flag used in graffiti while visiting Italy. The icon represents the union of industrial and farm workers’ interests. To Warhol, the symbol was more Pop than politics. One of his assistants scoured books for reproductions and ultimately purchased a doubleheaded hammer and a sickle and arranged them in different positions to photograph. Warhol used the images for his series of silkscreens, which New York’s Castelli Gallery exhibited in 1977. His almost expressionist use of the hammer and sickle diffuses some of the Cold War tension that prevailed from the early 1940s through the 1980s.


Profile for Heather James Fine Art

Andy Warhol - Prints  

Andy Warhol - Prints

Andy Warhol - Prints  

Andy Warhol - Prints