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ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN PORTFOLIO HEATHER P. LUNA

2010


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Los Angeles River Masterplan

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Salvage/Conserve Monastery

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Koreatown Community Town Hall

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Ban Nam Yen School

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Interlocking Shotguns

urban planning and mapping

form, rhythm and materiality

investigation of towers and plazas

asia study abroad’s influence on formal planning

transforming typologies and low-rise housing


Los Angeles River Masterplan Los Angeles, California

F i f t h Y e a r T h esis, Professor Stefano de Martino

The Thick 2D

thick layered layers of site analysis

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Conceptual Collage

mixed media on wooden board

Los Angeles River Masterplan is a mapping

study of the immediate area circumscribing the Los Angeles River, mainly considered the industrial area of downtown Los Angeles. It proposes the insertion of new infrastructures to connect specific intensive nodes consisting of current happenings and occurences, and activate a vast public void. Analysis of the area revealed a complex order of surfaces, networks, programmatic elements, and distinct objects that make up the gestalt of the city. Information concerning geographies, ecologies, physical and virtual networks, programs, and unique instances were mapped out revealing various layers, that when superimposed, showed a matted urban landscape of emergent intensive areas or nodes with a higher number of public activities and functions alongside disconnected voids lacking public life and movement.


21 LAYERS objects elements surfaces networks

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The exploration and analysis of the site focused on the properties, functions, and activities of the site that are often invisible on the surface, as well as the very visible aspects of the adjacent communities and industrial zones, in order to show emergent moirÊs of the area surrounding the Los Angeles River. This superimposition influenced the future urban design plan to find access ways exploring the transition between distinct communities. This would emphasize the river’s already vital role as a functioning infrastructural organism within the city.

Site Analysis

superimposed layers and emergent moirĂŠs

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T h rough a delaminati o n o f t h e u r b a n l a n d s c a p e , t h e a r c h i t e c t here reinvents the map to reveal the city as a collection of disparate elements, while not losing sight of the superimpositions and intensities that collaborate as a combined whole. 9


The combination of repetitive and regular elements produces complex and irregular behaviors within an emergent figure, exposing hidden intensities and voids. MoirĂŠ effects, however, are not random and are to be examined to determine their formation and how they may be altered. A slight change in any one of their component layers will force haphazard and unexpected shape shifting.

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Intensities

analysis of the most concentrated layers

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RECREATION BI K

EP AT H

PLAYGR OUNDS PICN IC FOOD KIOSK BAS S S KET BAL L

PLAZA

POCKET PARK

BELL TOWER PICNICS FOOD KIOSKS SALES KIOSKS

METRO

ALLATIONS KIOSKS ART INST FOOD PICNICS PLAYGROUN DS

BRIDGE

DS ROUN GROVE S NIC PIC

PARK ER WATCHTOW

ART

TUNNEL BIKE PATH

BIKE PATH

PLAYG

TH BIKE PA

POCKET PARK

TH BIKE PA

PICNICS OSKS SKS SALES KI IO DK FOO

RECREATION FOOD KIOSKS SOCCER PICNICS TE PLAYGR OUNDS NNIS BA SK ET BASE BA BALL LL

Masterplan and Program Diagram

sites, paths, bridges, tunnels, and landscapes

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Master Plan 1:4000


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Preliminary Planning Sketches hand-drawings on vellum

Sites were formed into future nodes based on the existing intensity of activity found in the site analysis. Paths and lines of transportation were created to connect these sites with existing intensive nodes to increase circulation across the desolate channelized river by activating more spaces, and ultimately linking disparate demographics. The main artery of the project was the replacement of the First Street Viaduct with a more dynamic bridge allowing multiple paths to collide.

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Sectional Studies of Bridge

multiple paths converging at multiple points

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Salvage/Conserve Monastery

Site Plan

Los Angeles, California

Site Perspective

1/32� = 1’

Fourth Year, Professor Frank Clementi and Professor Jennifer Cosgrove

unifying bridge / church to chapel connection

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Site Plan

archipelago in the city

The aim of this project was to freely interpret

the idea and program of a monastery. A monastery could be any religion, sect, cult, or lifestyle that could be described as communal or “monastic”. The only requirement was that there be “monks” that lived and worked there. Salvage/Conserve Monastery is located on two small, triangular islands in downtown Los Angeles at the intersection of North Alameda Street and North Main Street. The program of the monastery is a recycle and reuse center focused on donated and used building materials to promote innovative conservation. The center is lead by monks with the help of transients and boarders. The program includes an abbey for the monks with a private chapel, a dormitory for transients and boarders with shared common space, a church, and a warehouse for recycled materials.

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

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A monastic archipelago, self-contained and set apart from downtown Los Angeles. Monasteries are inherently islands embeded in the land with both topographical as well as imagined and mental boundaries that mark a clear divide between the non-monastic and the monastic world.

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Model Study

exploration of islands, bridge, physical and non-physical boundaries and form.

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Section through Warehouse and Church

Section through Boarder Space and Bridge

Section through Monastic and Shared Spaces

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The final design focused on the gradation between private to public or sacred to profane space. Marked by strong formal qualities, the monastery’s multiple parts are united by a lengthy bridge spanning the entire site and anchored by a sacred space on either end. The church and the chapel are considered the most sacred spaces and are directly proportional. The bridge that connects them is both private and sacred. It is only accessible to the monks to circulate across all boundaries and all islands. The monks reside on the most private of the islands in rigid concrete sleeping cells that create rhythm and order across the site. These cells imitate the sacred spaces of the chapel and church through a language of louvers and skylights. Concrete louvers were used in the monk’s cells while wood louverswere used in the church and chapel. Moving north the islands and buildings gradually become less bound and more secular. The dormitories and the warehouse become more translucent signifying their public and profane nature. They both consist of wood framing clad with polycarbonate panels. Insulation is added only to the boarders dormitories revealing their limited accessibility. 20


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Roof Detail

Drainage mat

Shared Space and Roof Gardens Planted Roof with Parapet

Vapor Barrior Screed Topsoil Thermal Insulation

Topsoil Drainage/Protection Mat Calendered Polymeric Roofing (2 Layers) Thermal Insulation Vapor Barrior Screed laid to falls Concrete Slab Plaster

Exterior Wall Detail Monastic Cells Louvered Concrete

East Elevation

open bridge / sacred space

Concrete

Plaster

Precast Concrete Louvers Steel Mullions Glass

Wall

Precast Concrete Louvers Steel Mullions Glass

Floor

Concrete floor covering Screed Separating Layer Impact Sound Insulation Reinforced Concrete topping Metal Decking Steel primary/secondary beams

Concrete Floor Screed Separating Layer Sound Insulation Metal Decking

Concrete Steel Beams

West Elevation

floating monastic cells / profane space

Foundation Detail

Monastic Cells Steel with concrete encasement Steel Column Concrete Fixed based columns

Steel Column Concrete Fixed Based Columns

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Koreatown Community Town Hall Los Angeles, California

T h i r d Y e a r , P rofessor Mark Bittoni

South-Facing Facade

perforated metal cladding

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K oreatown Community Town Hall is a neighborhood council building located in the Koreatown district in Los Angeles. Sited on the corner of Wilshire Boulevard where Irolo Street turns into Normandie Avenue, its program includes a council chamber, social hall, planning counter, and classrooms. Wilshire Boulevard is an active business corridor lined by tall office buildings and surrounded by dense residential neighborhoods. This makes its position heavily populated by both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. Further activating the site is the adjacent entry to the Metro Purple Line.

Parti

initial form, rotated, sunken

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Vignettes

movie night, upper balcony, plaza, council chamber

The design focused on creating a prominent addition to Wilshire Boulevard with a direct pedestrian pathway from street to subway, while architecturally emphasizing the council chamber’s importance within the community. The buildings footprint was minimized to allowing the program to rise vertically. Siting the building to the northern edge along Wilshire ensured its place among the other skyscrapers. The social hall was pushed underground to maximize open space for a pedestrian plaza and passageway. In order to emphasize the council chamber, the floors gradually cantilever, reaching full extension at the council chamber floor, and retract again beyond it creating a triangular protuberance on the south side. The roof of the social hall imitates this angled shape, lifting the ceiling to allow more light to enter as well as forming a sloped plane for people to sit on above. Skylights were added to the social hall to bring in more natural light. These apertures reflect the larger openings of the perforated metal cladding on the south facade. 26


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Model and Sectional Model perforated metal cladding and section cut marked in orange

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Floor Plans

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plaza and council chamber


Elevations and Axon

Program elements like service spaces and circulation are stacked vertically and grouped by materiality creating slender towers to accentuate the overall height and add clarity to the total composition. The circulation is defined by channel glass for its structural and airy qualities. The Wilshire facade is a glass curtain wall system, while the south cantilevered facade is clad with perforated metal to act as a shading device and direct light.

eleven-story slender tower

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Ban Nam Yen School Loei, Thailand

Fourth Year, Professor James Steele

West Elevation

entrance to campus

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B an Nam Yen School is located in the remote Ban Nam Yen village within Loei Province in the northeastern region of Thailand. It serves as the sole educational facility for children in three neighboring villages as well as a community meeting center. The school enrolls students from preschool thru eighth grade and currently has 214 students however, it can no longer provide a safe, productive learning environment for them. Presently, the school lacks plumbing, secure outdoor circulation, and adequate classroom space for a growing village. It has seven existing buildings, four of which are used for classrooms. These buildings are all in need of repair, while one is completely dilapidated. The school is also in need of a more effecient system to collect and store clean water to last them a longer period of time. Their proposal called for a substantial addition, to be completed over three phases, including a new library, a main office, a new dining hall, more classrooms, and a revised landscape plan that accommodates their playing field and garden.

BAN NAM YEN

Thailand Map

loei province, dan sai district kok sathon subdistrict

Ban Nam Yen School

phi ta khon dance and a typical school day

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The parti and master plan were based on the traditional textiles of northeastern Thailand, and produced in partnership with Wei Hong Lee, an architecture student at the University of Malaya.

Northeastern Thai Textiles

striations and patterns reflect on the parti diagrams weaving of building and landscape

Textiles play a crucial role in Thai culture and an individual’s identity because they represent a person’s age, social status, and gender. Though it is customary for the all women to hand-weave textiles for all the family, it is also common for all children to learn and take part in the weaving process at a young age. 34


Diagonal paths outline diamond and triangular shaped spaces that serve as gathering areas and gardens filled with striae of native flowers and plants.

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B

A

Ground Floor Plan

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Warp

Both the patterns and the process of weaving, particularly the basic concept of warp and weft, influenced the planning of buildings, circulation and landscape. The buildings, striated across the site, act as the warp rigidly structuring the remaining program elements of path, recreation, gathering, landscape, and garden. The covered walkways designate the primary circulation and act as the weft drawing students through each building and space. An overlay of diagonal lines act as paths and landscape to create direct movement through the site, unifying the final composition.

Weft

Woven Circulation

the warp and the weft

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Section A

Section B

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Brick, bamboo, and concrete were the primary building materials used because they are traditional and easily obtainable. Brick walls separate classrooms and act as a structural component. Woven bamboo panels shield classrooms from the rainy season and collapse to increase air flow during most of the year. Exterior screens made of cut bamboo cross sections are woven together to line the halls of each building. The covered walkways protect students from rain and act as a water collection system using gravity to move the water to the lower south side of the site to be stored.

Materiality

bamboo screens, bamboo, brick, concrete

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First Floor Plan

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The diagonal patterned landscape becomes a learning garden with native flowers and vegetables filling in each striae and adding color. The angled paths, consisting of both hardscapes and softscapes, move students from the lower entrance to the top of the site where the garden sits.

Vignettes

entrance, landscape, assembly, and classroom

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In Ban Nam Yen School, textile is created through the weaving of building, circulation, path, landscape and garden, uniting the campus and its students.

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Interlocking Shotguns South Pasadena, California

T h i r d Y e a r , P rofessor Liz Falletta

Site Model

three unit apartment complex

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Front Elevation

symmetrical composition

Interlocking shotguns is a low-rise three unit housing compex located in South Pasadena, California in a suburban neighboorhood of mainly single family homes. The parti, a jigsaw puzzle of interlocking pieces, emerged through the transformation of the shotgun house typology. Like a shotgun house, each unit has one axis of circulation from front to back upon which rooms are adjoined, but unlike the shotgun house, whose rooms stay a thin constant width and strictly border one side of the axis, these units have rooms with fluctuating borders and, in the case of the studio, shift from either side of the main path. Each unit acquires necessary space by pushing into the boundaries of an adjacent unit. Where one unit gains space the other losses space, yet they each maintain adequate square footage.

Parti

interlocking shotgun houses

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The ground floor is occupied by all three units consisting of a studio, a two-bedroom and a three-bedroom apartment. The front elevation shows that all three units have entrances with identical screened in front lawns. The studio apartment in the center is entered through a narrow skylit hallway leading into the main living space containing a double height atrium and two open air courtyards. The two remaining apartments have larger living spaces along with individual backyard gardens on the ground floor.

Back Elevation

each unit has a one car drive way

The second floor is almost wholly taken over by the two outer units. The two-bedroom apartment has the advantage of an additional outdoor space, while the three-bedroom apartment benefits from the middle studio’s courtyards that bring light in through clerestories into two upper bedrooms. 52


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Final Model

The facades are lined with ribbon windows allowing light to enter along the entire length of the building. The front facade is symmetrical and appears to be split into two distinct units by the slit in its upper half, but the three entrances along the sidewalk show that there are three units within.

basswood jigsaw model disassembled

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Architecture and Design Portfolio: Heather P. Luna