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HeArt Magazine

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THE MORNING BIRDS 16 THROW THE GOAT 26 MOXY ANNE 38 THE WALDEN APPROACH 48 DONALD GIALANELLA 54 FRED SKUPENSKI 74 JD GARRETT 98 BO ROBERTS 120 JULIE ANN STICKLIN 144 INTRODUCTION 7 PROFILES 158 KIDS 168 GALLERIES 172

STUDENTS 162 EVENTS 177

HEART MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2013. Published monthly by Sabin Design Studio, P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549. ©2013 Sabin Design Studio. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. HEART MAGAZINE® is a registered trademark of Sabin Design Studio. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in articles are those of the author. All rights reserved on entire content. Advertising inquiries should be directed to: (951) 402-4200.


HeArt Magazine

The Solution? Put artists in government. Most of us work for just enough to survive and love every minute of it. We also do not create rules we ourselves do not follow. Only in a surreal world would this ever happen: when politicians elected by the people decide for themselves how things will go. What ever happened to the ‘Oath of Office? I am not into politics. My personal take is it’s all a scam. This is evident by our country’s current situation. A bunch of selfish, greedy people, who throw tantrums like little spoiled children, are defining the rules. Enough about ‘The Stupids”! Artists are the creators, the brilliant minds that can conceive things out of the reach of most people. These are the writers, painters, illustrators, sculptors, musicians, et al.: the under-paid and under- appreciated. Am I whining? NO! Because the reality is, these people make the world a better place instead of destroying it. Since when did the greedy become the needy? Every day we see people step over the homeless, look the other way, and are more concerned for an animal owned by someone who is homeless without any thought for the person themselves. This is just sick! Fundraisers for people who make a substantial paycheck doing a job with only an after-thought for those who are in dire need of help? What’s THAT all about? Really? We are a society of kiss-asses, egotistical needy and this is why the rest of the world hates us. But, is it just the rest of the world that hate us, or... do we really hate ourselves?

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Politicians and other ‘non-creatives’ see the world with its problems and they see the issues that divide communities. They see the gaps in society and the disparity between social classes. Artists see these same issues. But, where ‘The Stupids’ try to bend the will of others, artists strive to create a world they think would be better for us to live in. They see solutions by working side by side in different mediums. Artists like you and I, we plant trees, we teach children, we sing, we sew and we sketch.  We beat metal into new shapes, we build and tear down and we share our vision. We don’t go home and pout when it doesn’t work. An artist, no matter how shy, wants to share. We want to help those around us, whether by teaching or learning. An artist feels. We know when things aren’t right.  Even if we know how to fix it, we don’t strongarm those around us, for that is not the way to change. We cannot deny others when we have the power to give.  We as artists must continue to lead by example and be the change. We cannot give up our joy just because others are too short-sighted to see where we’re going. They will catch up, eventually. We must live what is in our HeArt.

R.Sabin Robert Sabin Publisher/Editor in chief HeArt Magazine


It’s Just the Beginning!


MAGAZINE


MAGAZINE

ECLECTIC

HUMBLE &

HeArt Magazine

www.heartmag.us

Southern California’s Premiere Art Magazine

October 2013

PUBLISHER - EDITOR IN CHIEF / ROBERT SABIN MANAGING EDITOR / CHRISTINE SABIN EXECUTIVE EDITOR / PETER BUHL HEART MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY: SABIN DESIGN STUDIO, P.O. BOX 3237, IDYLLWILD, CA 92549 EMAIL TO: INFO@HEARTMAG.US

The publisher would like to thank everyone who has furnished information and materials for this issue. Unless otherwise noted, artists featured in HeArt Magazine retain copyright to their work. Every effort has been made to reach copyright owners or their representatives. The publisher will be pleased to correct any mistakes or omissions in our next issue. HeArt Magazine welcomes editorial submissions; however return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts, art, drawings, and photographic materials if they are to be returned. No responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. All letters will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and subject to HeArt Magazine’s right to edit and comment editorially.

Contact Info P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549 Hours: 9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday (951) 402-4200 www.heartmag.us Email: info@heartmag.us

Send submissions to:

submissions@heartmag.us

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HeArt Magazine

So, here we sit in our beautiful little town of Idyllwild, CA: a unique and bucolic arts town nestled in the San Jacinto Mountains. From here, HeART Magazine has now published its second on-line issue. Again, it’s loaded with features highlighting artists of every persuasion. Each of them gets a generous pagecount, in glorious color, to talk about themselves and to share their work with our readers.

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submissions: artists who want their chance to be featured in HeART. We now have so much content to choose from that there will never be a lack of material. We’re delighted that this magazine has reached so far, so fast. With that said, we’re still looking to increase our local submissions. We want each and every one of you to have a chance to be featured in HeART. It costs you nothing! We do the work and YOUR WORK gets seen!

Our first issue generated more than 189,000 unique views! WOW! Surprised us, too. Not only are the majority of viewers in Southern California, but, the stats show that people from around the world have seen HeART!

Some of the local artists featured in our first issue were referred to us by their friends or family members. That’s kind of interesting. Why wouldn’t the artists take it upon themselves to grab this opportunity? Well, that remains to be answered.

What a vehicle, what a forum for our local artists and vendors to reach out off-hill and to the world. Not to mention the off-hill artists and vendors who are taking advantage of this coverage.

In any case, the offer stands to all local artists. And, if you don’t step forward, we’ll find you anyway. We’ll just go searching for your friends and family who think you should give it a try!

Two of the local artists featured in our first issue told us that, while off-hill, both of them, at separate locations, were approached by total strangers, who commented that they had seen their work in our magazine. Now, THAT’S something! Since our first issue, we’ve been inundated by off-hill artist

See you in HeART! Peter Buhl Executive Editor


Without Heart, Art does not exist!


2013 Art Walk and Wine Tasting Sat, October 12, 2013 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM • Idyllwild, California. A portion of the proceeds go to benefit the local “in-school” art program for kids - smArts For more information, please visit the Art Alliance of Idyllwild


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The Morning Birds

The Morning Birds Musicians - Idyllwild, CA Contact Information:

www.themorningbirds.com www.facebook.com/themorningbirds

To say that Jennifer Thorington and Samuel Markus, the couple that make up ‘The Morning Birds’, have a lot on their plate, would be quite the understatement. Not only do they write, produce and direct their own music and videos, run their own PR, Licensing and Production company, called ‘Working Brilliantly’, represent numerous musicians and bands, they have also, just recently, been tapped as the official PR firm for the Idyllwild International Festival of Cinema 2014. Oh, yeah, along with all that, they find time to bring up their ‘full-of-energy’ 3-year old, Isaiah! On occasion – they sleep!! One of their music videos, ‘It’s Then You’ll Know’, just soared through the 400,000 views mark on YouTube and will surely break half a million shortly. (Click on the link to see why!) Jennifer had been a professional make-up artist for fifteen years. About a year and a half after quitting that gig to pursue music, she met Sam, a former Idyllwild Arts film student, in Los Angeles in 2008.


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Almost immediately, they worked on an album together, released it and then toured the northern East Coast and Canada. They were known as Samuel Markus and the Only Ones. But, as Jennifer put it, “when we got back, we had been performing and writing together so much that I said we need to pick a band name. After sitting around all night long trying to find one, Sam came up with The Morning Birds.” “Something kind of retro about that name,” Sam added. As they describe their music on their facebook page, (it’s) one part classic pop (and) one part emotive rock n’ roll swagger. “We were getting sick of the city,” Sam continued. “We decided we would move closer to nature. We didn’t know where that was going to be so, we started going to all these different places. (And, even though) I went to school in Idyllwild, this place never came up until a fellow musician said, ‘Why don’t you go to Idyllwild?’ So, we did. The first day we came up here, we saw a really cool house, rented it and

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we’ve been here ever since.” In regards to their son, Isaiah, Jennifer beams, “He loves to sing already. When we’re singing, he’ll be in my lap watching my mouth and then he’ll start to sing. So, I know he’s here to be creative with us, for sure!” “We eventually want him in the band,” Sam added. “He can sing harmony!” Well, for now, ‘The Morning Birds’ are a double threat. But, as soon as Isaiah grows up a little more, he’ll surely make them a triple threat! HeART Magazine is delighted that ‘The Morning Birds’ decided to set up stakes on this hill. We are sure that their talent, creativity and business savvy will be nothing short of added pluses to this community! Article by Peter Buhl Photograph by Robert Sabin


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The Morning Birds


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The Morning Birds


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Throw the Goat

Throw the Goat Musicians - Idyllwild, CA Contact Information:

www.throwthegoat.net www.facebook.com/throwthegoat

If you haven’t heard of this motley crew of hardcore thrash metal/ punk party animals yet, you will soon enough. They are destined for highvoltage, kick-butt greatness. They are known as Throw The Goat (TTG) and they are Idyllwild, CA’s premiere ‘in-your-face’, mosh-pit monsters! Well, actually, they’re Idyllwild’s only mosh-pit monsters! But, who’s counting? The little, picturesque town of Idyllwild, nestled serenely in the San Jacinto Mountains, is generally known for its jazz and folky-type acoustic musicians. Needless to say, when a group like TTG rears its brainshattering head, the hidden rock-hungry hordes converge for a night of pandemonium, as was borne out in June of 2013, when they sold out the town’s quaint, one and only movie house, The Rustic Theatre. Word has it that, not only was it a night of raucous, raunchy, headbanging sonic madness, a good time was had by all. Well, maybe not the clean-up crew! In any case, if you want to party until your eyeballs pop, TTG’s the go-to band.


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TTG is comprised of four, shall we say, PUNK RULES!! kinda guys. You know, the kind that you just can’t wait to bring home to mom! (Just kidding). They’re actually pretty normal when they’re not bringing down the house. Michael Schnatzer (he’s the one with the funky beard – Rob Zombie eat your heart out!) duties out on the bass and lead vocals, while Brian ‘Puke’ (nice moniker) Parnell thrashes it out on lead guitar. Then there’s Johnny Trash (cool) on rhythm guitar, while Tim Olivier tries to destroy his drums. Together, these guys love to raise holy hell! When HeART Magazine went to their sanctum sanctorum, lovingly known as ‘The Goat House’, to talk and listen to them rehearse, the DIY (Do-It-Yourself) vibe was intoxicating, feral and ‘oh, so reminiscent’ of my college days when The Sex Pistols et al. exploded onto the scene way back when. Their shoebox-sized rehearsal space, wallpapered with empty beer boxes, impossibly held all their gear, amps and paraphernalia. I even tripped over a guitar bag trying to find a place to sit. Didn’t spill any of my

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beer, though! When they started to play, it was amazing that the walls didn’t explode out with the sonic assault. My internal organs were vibrating! Interview, schminterview!! Who the hell cares what kind of underwear these guys wear? Their ball-crunching, bone-grinding, head-splitting, brain-melting music is all you need. I did find one thing curious, though. In all the time we were at The Goat House, I hadn’t seen any sign of the female of the species. No groupies? Girlfriends? I thought all testosterone bands had a cadre of women hanging around. Didn’t they? So, I asked, “Hey, where are the chicks?” Puke looked at me and said, “We ate ‘em!” Nice!

Article by Peter Buhl Photo by Thanin Viwa


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Throw the Goat

Photograph by Robert Sabin Michael Schnalzer 2013


Photograph by Robert Sabin Tim Olivier 2013

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Throw the Goat

Photograph by Robert Sabin Brian ‘Puke’ Parnell 2013


Photograph by Rockwell Anderson

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Throw the Goat

Photograph by Franceska Schofield The Rustic Theatre, Idyllwild, CA 2013


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Throw the Goat

Photograph by Thanin Viwa

Photograph by Franceska Schofield The Rustic Theatre, Idyllwild, CA 2013


Photograph by Rockwell Anderson

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Moxy Anne

Moxy Anne

Musician - Orange County, CA Contact Information:

www.moxyannemusic.com www.facebook.com/MoxyAnneMusic booking@MoxyAnneMusic.com

Orange County, CA based sixteen-year-old rocker, Moxy Anne, started singing at the ripe old age of five! “For me, it was just like a thing I did and it wasn’t really that important to me until I found rock music.” About four years ago, Moxy taught herself to play keyboards. Shortly after that, ‘Sanctuary’, a rock church, sprang up again after ending in the 1980s, due to the then pastor leaving for Nashville. Serendipitously, ‘Sanctuary’, in its previous incarnation, was where Moxy’s parents first met. “When the church started up again, I automatically thought ‘oh, I can be on the worship team with my keyboard playing’. The first time I got up on stage, I was so shy. I had this big keyboard and I literally, kid you not, tried to hide behind it!” “Once I was on board, I realized that what I really wanted to do was sing. Since Sanctuary is a rock church, it gave me a lot of opportunities to just sing and play every week. I used the church as a training camp;


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getting used to being on stage and used to singing in front of people.” “Once (I felt comfortable), I started looking outside the church for more opportunities to play. About six months ago, DNT Entertainment started helping me out with artist development. They give me advice. And, they give very good advice!” “Bottom line is that I really want to be doing music. It’s what I love. It’s what I have a passion for. If there ever comes a time when music becomes something I hate because it becomes just about the money, then I won’t do it anymore!” “Right now, my fan base is mostly teenagers. But, I like the fact that adults can listen to my music as well. I have a mixed fan base at the moment.” “It’s really cool when I play to teenagers because that’s my age range, my demographic. And, that’s who I can relate to the most.” “I want to put as much of who I am into my music because I know where teens have been. I was always the outcast when I was younger.

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I wasn’t bullied, but I wasn’t accepted. I didn’t have a lot of friends and I was never in a popular group.” “The point is, I understand where teens are coming from. I do the social networking, I do the crowds and I can see how much it can suck for them. And, I just want to tell them that I know where they are and that it does get better!” Rock on, girl! Keep promoting a positive message and you will surely go far! Article by Peter Buhl


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Moxy Anne


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Moxy Anne

Photographs by Greg Papaziani DiPiazza’s in Long Beach 2013


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Moxy Anne

Photographs by Greg Papaziani DiPiazza’s in Long Beach 2013


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Moxy Anne

Photograph by Greg Papaziani DiPiazza’s in Long Beach 2013


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The Walden Approach


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The Walden Approach Musicians - San Diego, CA Contact Information:

www.thewaldenapproach.com Completely devoid of any desire or need to present themselves through images of themselves, the Weston sisters, Marie (28) and Natasha (30), a.k.a. The Walden Approach, would rather have their music do the talking, so to speak. Marie puts it this way “I’ve always thought that the image of a musician is secondary to the story of a song and somewhat of a distraction.” The less stimuli you have, the more focus you have on what is being presented. There is nothing that requires us to place a focus on ourselves. “Stated in a broad perspective, in our society and in life, we have far more information than we could ever absorb. Therefore, everybody has to make a personal decision about what narrative they follow because we don’t have room for everything. We can’t eat that thousand-course meal. We can only take one bite at a time. “Some people really like their information fast and hard. They follow thousands of people on Twitter and that’s just how their brain is operating. Personally, I like quality narrative and something I can relate to personally. And, honestly, as much as information is shoved down people’s throats, I really do think that I’m not the only person who thinks this way. “I can only maintain so many high-quality relationships. So, I know if I can’t actually bond with somebody and work with them, it’s not doing the other person justice to start a relationship that you can’t follow through on. In regards to The Walden Approach beginnings, Marie explains, “We’ve basically been playing and singing with each other since I was about 14.

Just entertaining friends and family. And then, one day, about two-anda-half years ago I was sitting on my bed and I was playing a D Minor chord and a G chord. I started putting lyrics to it and it hit me that I could be one of those ‘quote/unquote’ people who know how to write a song. So, by trial and error, stumbling through different chord progressions, I wrote some songs.” Marie added, “We produce original songs and have about twenty at the moment. I write very slowly and only when there’s a clear emotional concept that I want to get across or a clear story I want to tell. “I don’t think we’ve ever played for more than fifty people. And, I don’t know if I necessarily want to play to more than that because (in a crowd that size) you can still see everybody’s face and you can follow their eyes when you say something and you can see it come back at you. Especially if you’re singing a lyric that wasn’t very comfortable to write. It’s a validation when you see somebody have an emotion. Then, you feel like ‘yes’, it was a good idea to share that.” Both sisters agree that the future of The Walden Approach is about writing more songs and keeping it personal. As Natasha puts it, “As long as I can keep it personal, then I’ll keep doing it. If it starts feeling like I’m becoming part of a machine, then… no, thank you!”

Article by Peter Buhl


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Donald Gialanella

Donald Gialanella Sculptor - Reseda, CA Contact Information:

www.donsculpture.com

Few artists can honestly say they were born to sculpt. LA artist Donald Gialanella is clearly the exception. In his hands common household objects accumulate into mind-blowing spheres. Old toys are assembled together to form huge animals and odd bits of modern technology – cell phones, computers, motherboards and disc drives become time-capsule middens that resemble the planet earth. Like the forces that hold electrons in orbit within an atom, his orbs seem to have a cosmic magnet suspending these objects in precise spheres. Now based out of Los Angeles, CA, Don always had an artistic proclivity as a child. “Where some kids have a natural talent for music or sports, it seems I was just able to draw as soon as I could pick up a pencil; much better than my peers. My parents and older sisters encouraged me and I feel I was an artist from birth. “It was just a matter of finding my way in the world of art. I started sculpting seriously in college at The Cooper Union, in New York. Then, I took a little hiatus (and worked as) a graphics producer for ABC Television for ten years. (After that), I taught for a couple of years and then finally got back to what I always wanted to do, which was be an independent artist. “I’m proficient in many mediums: illustration, painting and all types of construction techniques in wood, metal and stone. I’ve done it all over the years.” Gialanella’s art creates new thoughts for ordinary things. We don’t just see cell phones, cameras and circuit boards, but an arrangement of shapes, textures and patterns.


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Manifested in a 300 pound ball is a visual time-capsule that symbolizes how rapidly technology is changing our world. His visual reliquaries satirize our consumer-based culture and are harbingers of what consumerism means for our society and for the environment. “I’m not an art snob in the sense that would preclude any work or techniques in favor of others. I use whatever is at hand to get the idea across. And, if I can bring different skills or different ideas to a piece… I will use whatever is necessary to get my ideas across. “The orb is something that has always interested me. I wanted to get to the simplest form and I chose the orb because it’s the basic form. It’s the form of the earth, planets, molecules and the atom. So, to me, it has a sort of archetypal form. “I wanted to take all these disparate, unusual and strange objects that we have emotional connections to; pots and pans, dog bowls, drinking vessels and so forth; and put them into this perfect object. “You have this long view of it, which is a shiny orb, and then when you get closer and closer, you start to pick out objects and then it becomes something else. That was the synthesis of the idea.” Exploring the idea of change, especially the notion of ecology vs technology, Gialanella makes reference to a potential dialogue between actions and the environment. In his work, the two-way bridges communicate. “Communicating a message that I believe in is an important aspect of what I do. I’m concerned with the environment and what’s happening to

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different animals and their habitats shrinking due to human encroachment and pollution. The orbs and (other pieces of mine) bring attention to these kinds of issues in a very different way, rather than hitting somebody over the head with it. “I would like to head more in the direction of large public sculptures, or large sculptures that are funded in some way, so I could explore some more ambitious types of constructions, which is hard to do on a private basis. That… and gallery shows. I’d like to do a serious gallery show in the next couple of years. Those are some of the things on my wish list. “I create what turns me on and that, in turn, turns viewers on. I’m very gratified and feel very privileged to be able to live off my work. I’ve been doing it for twenty years now and raised a family of three sons. “I’ve been very lucky, I think. I’ve always found an audience for my work and I’m very grateful for that.” Donald’s current projects include a commission to create a life-size cow sculpture covered with toys for the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto on the campus of Stanford University. He’s also working on a sixteen foot-long stainless steel Honey Badger that will be suspended from the ceiling of a restaurant in Union City, CA.

Article by Peter Buhl Photo by Natalie Levy


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Donald Gialanella

Photograph by David Meister


Napa Orb

48� diameter. Stainless steel object assemblage.

2012

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Donald Gialanella

Photograph by David Meister Model: Maria Ivanova


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Photograph by Darrin Ballman


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Donald Gialanella

Near Nirvana

39” x 47” x 8” Steel, paint, plastic.

2012


Samsara 39” x 47” x 8” Steel, glass, paint, plastic. 2012

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Donald Gialanella

Bardo - New Incarnation

39” x 47” x 8” Steel, glass, light, doll, paint, plastic.

2012


Million Proof

36 “x 48 x 3/4. Recycled steel, wood, paint, found objects.

2013

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Donald Gialanella

Midden Woman 60� tall.

2009


Cisco’s Games of Chance

41” tall. Steel, Found objects, wood, ceramic.

2009

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Donald Gialanella

Parallax Head Cor-ten steel

2007


Piano Key Chrysanthemum 46� x 46 x 24. Piano keys. 2012

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Donald Gialanella

Belgian Horse

Life size. Recycled steel.

2012


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Fred Skupenski

Fred Skupenski Photographer - Location Contact Information:

fredskupenski.see.me

Sometimes you come across an artist whose story is as interesting as their work. And sometimes, the way they tell the story is as engrossing as the story itself. Such is the case with now Los Angelesbased Fred Skupenski. With his matter-of-fact New York lilt and ‘I-justdo-what-I-do’ attitude, it’s totally refreshing to find someone who, not only does interesting work, but also doesn’t realize how fascinating they, themselves, really are. As you’ll see from this spread of photographs, Fred’s work is totally unique, different and speaks for itself. But, what struck me the most was the genesis of all this. Fred, whether he knows it or not, is a storyteller. One I could listen to for hours. Although, what follows are written words, I’ll try to capture the delightful cadence in his voice. “ I started shooting at least thirty years ago. I was in the service and that’s how I got interested in it. I was stationed in Washington, DC and they had a brand new darkroom set in for the troops and no one was using it. “The facility was run by an Art Center graduate, who worked for the government at the time. He kept pushing us. ‘Get a camera! I’ll teach ya how to use it, blah, blah, blah.’ No one did it, so, finally, I said, ‘So, what do I have to do?’ “Go to the PX’, he said, ‘and find a cheap camera. Nothing fancy. I’ll teach you how to use the darkroom. We’ve got everything the troops need.’


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“So, I bought a camera. He took me through the process. Then, I started shooting. “I was going on leave and he said, ‘I want you to enter the Military District of Washington Photo Contest’. I said, ‘I don’t know how I’m going to do that ‘cause I’m going on leave’. He said, ‘Give me your work. I’ll edit it for you’. Me, I’m going ‘this is an Art Center grad!’ “So, I gave him the work and when I came back he goes, ‘Enter this, this, this and this in these categories’. So, I entered and I won in three of them! “So, he asks me, ‘What are you going to do when you get out of the service?.’ I said, ‘Well, I don’t know’. And he goes, ‘ You have the eye for photography. If I get you a job after the military as a photographer in Washington, DC… but, you’ll starve for four years, blah, blah, blah…’ Well, I wasn’t interested. “So, I spent the next five years working in the oil fields in Texas as a geologist. I got sick of it and called the guy up. I said, ‘How do I get back into photography?’ He said, ‘For you at your age, there’s only two ways to do it. You go to New York and assist or you go to a good school. So, following his advice, I went to Brooks. “After that, I finally ended up back in Pittsburgh, where I’m originally from, and opened up my own studio. I learned real quick what cash flow meant! “So, I couldn’t make the business work because my business sense

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wasn’t there, yet. So, I went to Los Angeles and I’ve been working in and out of the business for the last 15 to 20 years. “I play around with digital, but, for someone who is old-school trained like I am, I like the touch and feel of film. To me it’s just basically more magical.” In regards to Fred’s ‘discarded object’ work, he recalls, “ So, one day, I’m walking on these railroad tracks in North Hollywood and I look at some of this rusty stuff and I figured ‘ok’, let’s document some of this junk. Then, I noticed that if I do it a certain way and light it a certain way, I can make the stuff have human qualities and, in a sense, change the identity of the subject. I just kept building and building until, now, I have over seventy pieces in that style. “I’ll look at something now, like an old tea bag sitting on a saucer next to a cup and I’ll go, ‘You know what?, if I get 6 old tea bags and line them up and put something on top, I can make them look like human beings! And THAT’S what I do. And THAT’s where I’m at!” You know what, Fred? I like the way your brain works. Keep it up! Until next time… I want to hear more! Article by Peter Buhl Photograph by Regina Shelton


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Fred Skupenski

50th Anniversary


Achilles Heel

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Fred Skupenski

Acid Rain


American Spirit

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Fred Skupenski

Benched


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Fred Skupenski

Fish Bowl


Fish Out of Water

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Fred Skupenski

Child at Play


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Fred Skupenski

Guru


Kids

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Fred Skupenski

Staggering Home


Box of Chocolates

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Fred Skupenski

Wasted Moments


Whisper

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Fred Skupenski

No Love


No Soap

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Fred Skupenski

Victory

Overpopulation


Doughboys

Garage Band

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JD Garrett

JD Garrett

Photographer - San Diego, CA Contact Information:

www.jdgarrett.com @jdgarrettdotcom

There are still those purists out there who think that digital photography is some bastard child of ‘real’ photography. In their eyes, if you’re shooting digital and then photoshopping, you’re cheating in some way! What they fail to acknowledge is that, first, they rarely take a perfect picture themselves and, second, to make a ‘perfect’ picture, they use darkroom techniques to enhance what they shoot. That is no different than taking a digital image and then using the computer to enhance what was shot. Digital just happens to be faster, cheaper and, sometimes, smarter! Originally from Connecticut, J. D. Garrett, who can and does shoot both ways, describes it like this, “I think digital gets a bad rap. Digital saves you a ton of time and money in regards to things you would do in analog. “The idea that a digital image that has been photoshopped is not a worthy piece of art is (just wrong). I treat every piece as a stand-alone piece. I mean, if it’s cool, it’s cool! What do you care how I made it? If


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you can make something cool any which way, then, go for it. “Occasionally, I’ll shoot film, but, if I’m going to do it, it’s more just for the love of the process. But, I can achieve the same thing, or much more, with digital. If I’m out shooting, I can snap thousands more pictures than I can with film. “I do a lot of graphic design, as well. And, it’s cool experimenting with some of the pictures and seeing what I can do with them. It’s great to have all the options. Most of my shots aren’t manipulated and some still don’t look real! With other images, I can do a lot to make them better. The finished product is what counts. “Photography, for me, is full time, but I do have other business interests. I’m a left-brain, right-brain kind of guy. I’ve got a couple of companies I’m starting up and I have a couple of patents that I’m applying for. I’m always in the middle of trade-marking brands that I’ve created. Always got ideas flowing. “But, photography is what I spend a lot of time on. It’s really what

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makes me the happiest: when I can sit down and spend a few hours at the computer and go through pictures, shaping them up and creating what I want (to see). It’s really satisfying!” In the not-too-distant future, J. D. has his mind set on going to Myanmar/Burma. “I want to spend 3 months there and go from top to bottom, east and west and photograph that country and, probably, some of Cambodia and Viet Nam. I’m going to shoot in super-large format, donate images to their local archives, and have large projection screen and print exhibitions both there and back here in the states. “Myanmar is just coming out of this super-oppressive time. It hasn’t at all been westernized. I want to tell a story of the last few years and all the changes that have happened over there and to its people. It’s just an interesting place and a place people really don’t understand.” Article by Peter Buhl


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Bo Roberts

Bo Roberts

Photographer - Los Angeles, CA Contact Information:

www.borobertstalent.com @Mrboroberts BoRobertstalent@gmail.com

Homelessness is a sad and tragic reality all over the world. It is estimated that there are over 600,000 homeless people in the United States alone. You can see these lost Americans on almost every street corner, whether they are in a city, a town, or, even in rural areas. Former law enforcement officer turned print model, Bo Roberts, has, in the last few years, added photography to his repertoire. Although selftaught and fairly new to this field, his special gift is undeniable. While living in New York City before settling here in Southern California, Bo was moved by the plight of the homeless and, as he puts it, “I couldn’t see anybody touching this subject and it seemed, to me, like a powerful and obvious thing (to document).” His images are, at once, poignant, sad and dynamic. “Although, I do other kinds of photography, I would say, as far as an ongoing project goes, this (subject) is my primary focus. “When I came to Los Angeles, I met this girl I befriended. I found out she was connected with a group and they do a lot of charity work and ‘good cause’ type of things. And, for me, I’m not really sure why, it’s just


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instilled in me. I enjoy trying to help people. “So, I try to go down with them to Skid Row in L.A., at least once every three weeks. I haven’t quit my day job, yet. Taking these photos helps to get the message out and the charity group can take them and use them to promote their cause and try and raise money. “Being in the fashion world, it’s very much about your image, what you have and how you present yourself. But I will say that, the people I have met who have been really successful and that I have been fortunate enough to hang out with, most of them do some kind of volunteer or charity work. They just feel grateful and when they see these people, they have a level of empathy. It’s pretty amazing. “Photography started out as just being a hobby. But, now, people are paying me to do events, head-shots and such, and it has expanded into randomly making money. Print modeling is still my primary job. I’ve also been studying acting for about a year and I’ve done a few projects. “Probably, in this upcoming year, I plan on making a ‘splash’! “On a final note, though, there is one story I want to tell you. When I

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was in law enforcement, this guy was brought in for breaking in and trying to rob a store. It turns out that he was homeless. It was the middle of winter with snow all over the ground. “He had nowhere to stay, so he walked up to a police car and asked the officers if they could give him a lift to jail, so he could have a place to sleep and food to eat. They said ‘No, we can’t arrest people that don’t commit a crime’. So, the guy said ‘Alright’ and then threw a brick through a storefront and tried to rob it in front of the officers so he could simply get a warm place to go!” Bo may be a print model who hobnobs with some of the privileged, but it is obvious that he has what it takes – heart.

Article by Peter Buhl


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Julie Ann Stricklin

Julie Ann Stricklin Painter - San Diego, CA Contact Information:

www.facebook.com/pages/Julie-Ann-Stricklin

At once exuberant, witty, business savvy, creative and just downright delightful, this San Diego-based commercial artist epitomizes what we, at Heart Magazine, love about a creative who has their feet firmly planted on the ground, while their head is somewhere else in that shiny, sparkly place that more of us need to visit from time to time. And, although Julie Ann Stricklin’s illustrations, graphic designs and fine art are client-pleasers (to be touched on in a future article), it was her little ‘Rock Project’ that immediately caught our fancy. More on that in a minute! “I still have this first friend who, when we were in cribs together, we were already doing art! Then, in the 70s, they had all these cool television shows that began with cartoons, like ‘Carol Burnett’ and ‘The Partridge Family’. I’d sit there with my crayons, watching those animated graphics because they were so inspiring to me. “From the very first, I wanted to put what was in my head on paper. Then, I wanted to be able to put what was in my friends’ heads on paper, too. Then, I’d give it to them.”


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This idea of ‘giving’ and sharing some of her art has carried through to today. And, therein lies the genesis of ‘The Rocks’. “I started doing the rocks about two years ago. With my commercial art deadlines, I never really have time to paint. So, I needed to find something I could do as free-form, so I could just let my brain relax. You know, no one’s there, there’s no right or wrong… and, I needed it to be on a cheap canvas. “So, I would paint on the rocks and then put the rocks back, put them in my friends’ mailboxes, on their yoga mats or in their shoes. Sometimes, I would walk down the beach and put them on towels and when the people came back they’d say, ‘Oh, what’s this?’. I just thought this was really cool, like when you’re walking along and you find a treasure. It could be a shell, a bone or anything. (When you find a treasure) everything that was in your mind goes away. It wipes everything clean and you have a clean slate. That is the point of the rocks. “The rocks are not an ego-driven art thing. The coolest thing is when I give people a bunch of rocks to give away, they don’t really realize that I’m

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about to give them something to share. There’s such a great vibe you get when you’re giving away good energy. “I gave a rock to a little boy once and he eventually put it on the curb. A little girl came by and found it and she went out of her mind. It was like she had found a diamond ring. Just the joy on her face was my gift. That’s what it’s all about! “I didn’t realize that painting on rocks was such a big deal. Some people even hoard some of them. ‘They’re selling, too. But, that’s not the point. I just want people to love them!” Well, Julie, good on you. Keep spreading the joy!

Article by Peter Buhl Photo by Dr. Michael O’Leary


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Support local businesses, only if they support you!


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Profiles

Profiles

Each and every month we will be featuring additional artists and their work. If you are an artist and would like to be featured in the ‘Profiles’ section of HeART, feel free to send five (5) photographs of your best work. Each photo should be of print quality, with a minimum resolution of 8.5x11 at 300 dpi for portrait and 11x17 at 300 dpi for landscape. Also, include your contact information. HeART assumes that what you send is free to publish and has no copyright restrictions. Also, if you wish to have your submission returned, please include a self-addressed, stamped, appropriately-sized envelope. Send submissions to P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549 or by email to submissions@heartmag.us


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“The urge to draw must be quite deep within us, because children love to do it� David Hockney


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Students

Students

Each and every month we will be featuring students and their work. This is for the High School to College Level who have a strong interest in art. and/or currently enrolled in an art program. If you would like to be featured in the ‘Students’ section of HeART, feel free to send five (5) photographs of your best work. Each photo should be of print quality, with a minimum resolution of 8.5x11 at 300 dpi for portrait and 11x17 at 300 dpi for landscape. Also, include your contact information. HeART assumes that what you send is free to publish and has no copyright restrictions. Also, if you wish to have your submission returned, please include a self-addressed, stamped, appropriately-sized envelope. Send submissions to P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549 or by email to submissions@heartmag.us


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Molly Connor Ballet - Arlington, Texas Age: 15 Contact Information:

www.facebook.com/MOLLYlovesPIKACHU

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“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up� Pablo Picasso


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Kids

Kids

Each and every month we will be featuring kids and their work. This is for the Elementary to Middle School Level who have a strong interest in art. We have been amazed at the work we have encountered from these little guys. If you would like to be featured in the ‘Kids’ section of HeART, feel free to send five (5) photographs of your best work. Each photo should be of print quality, with a minimum resolution of 8.5x11 at 300 dpi for portrait and 11x17 at 300 dpi for landscape. Also, include your contact information. HeART assumes that what you send is free to publish and has no copyright restrictions. Also, if you wish to have your submission returned, please include a self-addressed, stamped, appropriately-sized envelope. Send submissions to P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549 or by email to submissions@heartmag.us


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“Art is not what you see, but what you make others see” Degas


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Galleries

GALLERIES

Each and every month we will be featuring additional art galleries. If you have a gallery and would like to be featured in the ‘Galleries’ section of HeART, feel free to send five (5) photographs of your facility. Each photo should be of print quality, with a minimum resolution of 8.5x11 at 300 dpi for portrait and 11x17 at 300 dpi for landscape. Also, include your contact information. HeART assumes that what you send is free to publish and has no copyright restrictions. Also, if you wish to have your submission returned, please include a self-addressed, stamped, appropriately-sized envelope. Send submissions to P.O. Box 3237, Idyllwild, CA 92549 or by email to submissions@heartmag.us


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“If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint’, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced” Vincent van Gogh


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EVENT CALENDAR

HeART Magazine is now accepting your event listings for the November and December 2013 issue. Everyone who has an upcoming event, or events, will get free listings in our Calendar Section. It’s FREE!! So, send us your info by October 23rd and we’ll make sure it gets into our next issue. Hey, c’mon, who else is going to give you free publicity!!?? Please send your listing(s) to:: events@heartmag.us

October:

November:

Oct. 12th, 2pm to 5pm - Idyllwild, CA.

Nov. 1st, 10pm - Idyllwild, CA.

Art Walk & Wine Tasting $25 ticket includes commemorative wine glass! Visit artinidyllwild.org for more information.

First Friday Funnies Idyllwild’s Local Improv Group The Rustic Theatre

Oct. 12th, 3pm - Idyllwild, CA.

Nov. 8th, 10pm - Idyllwild, CA.

Halloween Treat Cooking Class $25pp (Kids under 12 free) - 20 spots available Mountain Center Cafe RSVP: Pamperedbysam@yahoo.com or (951)357-7308

Veteran’s Day Comedy Show A Benefit Performance for the Idyllwild Volunteer Firefighters The Rustic Theatre

Oct. 19th, 5pm - Idyllwild, CA. Idyllwild Zombie Run Can you survive a run through Idyllwild on the streets and through the woods with zombies on your heels? Visit idyllwildghosttown.com for more information.

Oct. 26th - Idyllwild, CA. Slenderman and the 8 pages Visit idyllwildghosttown.com for more information.

Oct. 31st, 10pm - Idyllwild, CA. Throw the Goat, with special guest, Interim Diving The Rustic Theatre

Oct. 31st, 9pm - Idyllwild, CA. Café Aroma Late Night presents “IT’S A DEAD MAN’S PARTY” w/ live music by: Pentagrams&Daisies Live on HALLOWEEN night, Catch the parade, the carnival, the haunted ghost town, then P&D live @ Aroma. “Who Could Ask For More”...

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ECLECTIC www.heartmag.us

Southern California’s Premiere Art Magazine

October 2013


HeArt Magazine - October 2013