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AGRICULTURE

In The Heartland By: Audra Clemons

Mrs. Rodeo Okeechobee

Meet

Michelle Harper began her involvement with the Miss Rodeo Okeechobee pageants in 2010 when her youngest daughter Danielle, took up an interest. From there, Michelle watched her daughter win the title, which, like any parent, furthered her participation and interest. In 2013, Michelle eventually found herself running the contests and numerous clinics associated with pageantry, all the while battling a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma.

Harper credits the resuscitation of the Miss Rodeo program to Audrey Driggers, who handed it over to Michelle after a 25-year hiatus. Miss Rodeo Okeechobee is a labor of love for her. Harpers states, that the girls draw attention to the Okeechobee community and its unique rodeo and agricultural heritage; that they learn to work together as a team; and how to be poised and socially outgoing, which are all skills that will help them progress in life. Harper puts educational information up on her website and Facebook pages for the girls to download and learn. This information helps them prepare for the tests they have on rodeo and horsemanship. “What the girls need to learn depends on the age brackets. For the younger girls, I don’t expect them to know much more than the rodeo basics, which is how long the timed events are, and the difference between tie-down roping and team roping for instance. But, the older girls, they need to know the PRCA rules; the difference between animal welfare and animal {L-R): Miss Rodeo Okeechobee Princess, Nicole Boulton, Miss Teen Rodeo Okeechobee , Katie Brummett, Miss Rodeo Okeechobee Sweetheart, Lexi Todd and Michelle Harper-Kmotch.

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Heartland Living February-March 2015  
Heartland Living February-March 2015  

Heartland Living Magazine is published bi-monthly by Heartland Publications & Marketing. Serving the Heartland of Florida - Sebring, FL - w...

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