Page 1

IRIS Issue #6

Paths for All

Colin Phillips

&

contines his Heartland History

Sustainable Colin Dmitiri takes us on a walk with poetry & pictures

Upper Tay Transport News

Heartland Media Hub

& New Web Site

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.

1


2

Welcome to Issue 6 of IRIS. There have a number of changes and exciting events since we last published and we have even more coming in the next few months and we expect by this time next year we will have travelled a great distance. In the short time since we took the decision to rebuild, restructure, relocate and to devote all our efforts into making Heartland FM the powerful community tool that it has always had the potential to be. In that time we have gone from a position where there were doubts over the very existence of the station to now becoming a Media Hub, embracing all forms of technology offered over a variety of platforms, a listen again service, podcasting and a social media reach averaging over 65,000 every month. A figure that continues to grow. The station has won a UK National award for it`s Health & Well Being programme, no mean feat in front of 75 judges and over 600 entries. We have this publication and a new interactive website encompassing all we do. Below is the new Front Door of the site, if you have not been in yet, you can enter below. Exciting times for all!

Heartland Media Hub Enter Site Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


3

Contents - with live links

Page 4 Colin Phillips continues his history with Heartland FM Page 9 The A9 upgrade—a year on

Page 15 Pitlochry Coop provides financial support to Heartland FM Page 20 Scottish Charity, Paths for All, talks about Cleaner, Better Transport. Page 23 Ready Scot gives good advice about winter resilience. Page 26 Colin Dmitri walks the walk and talks the talk of poetry. Page 31 Upper Tay Transport Group reveal a new local transport initiative. Page 34 Alistair Smith, Sation Manager of HFM looks back and forward to 2020 Page 36 Aberfeldy Community Warden, Norma Carr explains her role. Page 40 Current Schedule

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


4

A Rocky Road Colin Phillips continues his story from being the first voice on Heartland FM to his current position presenting “A Sunday Morning for Hillbillies”

Now housed in what was then The Curling Rink, Heartland FM hit the Broadcasting road running, and was received in the Highland Perthshire area with enthusiasm, with many volunteers with different ideas, eager to get involved. Like every organisation, many people would stay for a fortnight, others a few years, and others you couldn’t get rid of. I had spent my working life employed in shifts covering any of a twenty four hour period and included weekends, and the only constant was a radio blaring away in the background. I grew up in a similar situation with a mother who viewed silence with suspicion. She also remained a teenager until she was about fifty, and adopted any musical fad that came along.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


5

When we moved into the new houses at Higher Oakfield, the most vital piece of furniture was a radiogram, a combination of record player and radio, built before computer and chip and housed in a beautiful solid wood cabinet, so heavy it took four delivery men to carry it into the house. The neighbors thought it was a coffin and that someone had died. I never did master any musical instrument but in the “Great Pitlochry Flood of ’58,” I watched my Mother float out the back door sitting on the kitchen table while I accompanied her on the piano. When I left school I failed a medical for the armed services because of an irregular heart beat. My mother claimed it only occurred when Bill Haley was singing Rock around the Clock on the radio. I had a similar episode during the mid seventies, and after hearing the Bill Haley theory, the Medical Team decided it all made perfect sense. (All the above courtesy of Eddie Rose.Glasgow Empire.1951).

Sandie and I worked on the Breakfast show for a number of months before she moved on to other projects, and I worked with various co-presenters. The format changed regularly, with various topics ( cooking - always a challenge on radio, but we had Annie, Jane, and Eileen, who were talented cooks), Rangers from Atholl Estates, The Local Police, Community Council, And anyone who had a grievance. The name also changed over the years from the original Cracked and Scrambled, to The Full Heartland Breakfast, to Reveille..

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


6

I was also doing a Saturday night spot called Heartbeat (appropriate), which highlighted the best of modern Scottish music. It was a good time to be interested in home grown musical output and was during one of the country’s most successful periods in the industry. It was always a myth that they were desperate to represent their country though. The majority just wanted to be in London and appear on Top of the Pops. I would cover any programme which involved music, so would stand in regularly on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. The first Sports Reports were done on a Sunday Morning during The Long Good Morning Show. I had a fairly large pool of volunteers from sports of all kinds, and phone calls, fax messages, and notes handed in, were all put together before I went on air. Thirty seconds of Stars and Stripes Forever by The United States Army Band announced my arrival to the listeners of Highland Perthshire, and then I would solemnly read out the results for the local Darts, Snooker, and Domino League, The Shooting Club at Blair Atholl, and the Perthshire Football Amateur League. (If the message came in by fax and the handwriting was a struggle you didn’t know if Vale of Atholl had a 0-0 draw or whether they had beaten Breadalbane 6-0). I always kept the best until last and had the listeners on the edges of their seats, as I read the salmon catches from the various beats on the river Tay. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


7

Heartland quickly went from weekend to weekday evening broadcasting, and then finally 24/7. We were still in the age of reel to reel tape machines (although Eddie Rose always recorded on eightsome reel to reel), cassette tape, vinyl 45s, singles and long player, DAT (digital Audio Tape), plus an amazing new innovation, the compact disc. Advertising and jingles were recorded on Cassette tapes, which were played from a bank of three machines set in front of the presenter. To cue up, you listened to the Identification. eg “ Ad for Alex Butter Garden Centre 3, 2 ,1� then you paused the machine. Presenters learning their trade would often forget and 3-2-1 was a popular greeting throughout the area. We were also still in the age of land-line telephones, with few mobile phones, but we had an amazing group of volunteers who manned the phones during the day, and dealt with much of the administration.

Bill Stephenson, Janet Hobson, Martin Hobson, Sandie Goodyear, Stuart Argo, Margaret Stephenson, Valerie Henderson Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


8

During a Full Heartland Breakfast Show we had a regular Astrology Spot from an expert who lived in Fortingall. He would walk along to the local telephone box at an arranged time, and we would phone him. All went well, until, suffering from a hangover, he slept in and arrived at the box just as the phone went. He panicked and dropped all his prepared cards but tried to continue talking, while wiping off mud and deciphering smudged writing. Taurus listeners were told to avoid china shops, Cancerians told to stop smoking, Leo told to always go for the lions’ share, Scorpio listeners told to avoid insects, Virgo told just to say no, and well, I just put the phone down. The station immediately started using recorded/repeated programmes to fill up air-time and those had to be installed manually. This meant a rota had to be introduced to announce them, and make sure everything went out on time. We didn’t use the term continuity announcer/disc jockey/presenter or programme co-ordinator, but a term straight out of the Civil Service; The Duty Officer.

BMR Your local garage servicing Highland Pertshire

Great mechanical service and great personal service 01350 72 72 76

Dunkeld & Birnam

Visit our website

Mon– Fri 08:00— 17:00

Perth Road, Birnam

and

PH8 0DN

Facebook pages

Book an MOT

Book a service now

Check your MOT Renewal date

Classes 4 & 5

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


9

Cabinet Secretary Marks Major Milestones on A9 Dualling Project One year on – Bridge Beams, Community Benefits and Barnardos…

One year on from the award of the construction contract to dual the A9 from Luncarty to Pass of Birnam, Transport Scotland looks back at what has been achieved on this section of the £3billion programme to upgrade the A9 between Perth and Inverness. Michael Matheson, Cabinet Secretary for Transport, Infrastructure and Connectivity, visited the 9.5km site north of Perth during the summer, ahead of the first major construction milestone to install beams at the Stanley & Tullybelton Junction, to highlight there is

more to this project than bridge beams and road surfacing. Mr Matheson took the opportunity to view the significant construction progress on site and met with some of the local young people who are benefitting from the employment and training being realised as a result of this £96million Scottish Government major infrastructure investment. Trainee labourers, Patrick Stewart (19) and David McPhee (22) have secured full -time work as General Operatives on the project following successful twoweek placements, arranged through a relationship between Transport Scotland’s contractor, Balfour Beatty and children’s charity Barnardos.

Over the course of the two weeks, the trainees who both live in Perthshire, experienced a variety of construction activities on site and gained valuable experience and skills that they may otherwise not have had. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


10

Meeting the new recruits, Mr Matheson, commented: “It’s so rewarding to meet young people starting out on their career working as part of the construction team dualling the A9. “This is an ambitious programme that will create and sustain construction jobs

in Scotland for many years to come, and this opportunity is arguably lifechanging for these young trainees. Providing long-term employment and training opportunities for young people is vital to equip them with the skills to build a solid foundation for their future careers.” Transport Scotland has set its contractor ambitious targets to create new job opportunities, work placements, apprentice and graduate positions, as well as educational and community engagement to be delivered during construction, ensuring the project encourages sustainable employment benefits that help to support the local economy.

Gemma Montrose, Project Sponsor for the A9 Dualling: Luncarty to Pass of Birnam project, explains: “Transport Scotland is committed to delivering more than just a road and we are working closely with Balfour Beatty to maximise the wider social benefits of this £96million investment, locally and nationally. “We are already seeing the positive outputs of these commitments, in the first 12 months of the project, we can report that we are well on the way to achieving our target of creating 30 new jobs over the anticipated two-year duration of the works. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


11

“Transport Scotland has worked hard to ensure that the majority of the opportunities created by our project are filled by workers from the local area, with a focus on ‘difficult to reach’ groups, including bringing new people to the industry, young people, disadvantaged young people, long-term unemployed and veterans. “It is important to recognise a huge amount of effort is dedicated by our contractor to work in partnership with organisations such as Remploy and Barnardos to fulfil these commitments.” Similarly, Transport Scotland places a great deal of emphasis on education to encourage the next generation of engineers. The project has already engaged with 2,271 pupils and students from nursery though to university level education, which includes supporting Transport Scotland’s Academy9 Schools Programme to promote STEM (Science

Technology Engineering and Mathematics) subjects and engineering as a career.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


12

Gemma added: “With so much going on, it’s easy to overlook the tremendous strides achieved in the last 12 months and the ripple effect these will continue to make to the benefit of the local economy and communities at grass-roots level. “The project has already been able to spend 64% of its spend on subcontracts

with small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and a huge 99.7% of spend on subcontracts is within Scotland, of this, £2.08million has been spent with local businesses within a 30 mile radius of the works. On top of this, a staggering £4,500 of benefit-in-kind has been donated in support of local charities and organisations.” This rounded approach to construction and community benefits is not new, but this project showcases a distinct step-change in Transport Scotland’s approach to the delivery of major infrastructure projects, with a resolute focus on community benefits and legacy creation.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


13

The project recently marked its first major milestone with the completion of the first beam lift to construct the new bridge at the Stanley/Tullybelton Junction, which was the culmination of months of planning and preparation by our contractor Balfour Beatty.

Fifteen precast concrete beams, ranging from 22m to 25m in length and between 49 and 57 tonnes, were lifted into place over the A9 carriageway during a series of three overnight closures to create the bridge deck of the biggest structure of the project. A 750-tonne crane was used to lift and secure the beams in place before the road could be re-opened to traffic each morning. The overnight closures also allowed the temporary formwork to be installed that allow the deck and parapets to be constructed without further closures of the A9 below. Alan Brisbane, Project Manager for Balfour Beatty, said: “The success of the beam lift operation marks a significant construction milestone as part of the A9 Dualling: Luncarty to Pass of Birnam project and is the first major piece of the new infrastructure now visible to road users. “Over the next few months, road users and the local communities will see a

distinct change in the landscape as the line of the new carriageway begins to emerge. “There is still a great deal of work to be done, both in terms of construction and in delivering more community benefits to the local area, but I am confident we will exceed expectation on both fronts.”

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


14

Speaking during his site visit, Mr Matheson added: “As Scotland’s largest infrastructure project, the A9 Dualling Programme offers a ‘once in a life-time’ opportunity to create a legacy the industry can be proud of.

“The young people I met today are a true inspiration – they have been given the opportunity to learn new skills and develop a new career, reinforcing my conviction that the A9 Dualling Programme is about so much more than building a road.” \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


15

Local Coop Supports Heartland FM Heartland FM Radio has been chosen to benefit from the next round of the Co-op Local Community Fund.

The funding round will open on 27 October 2019 and close on 24 October 2020. During this funding phase, Co-op Members will be able to choose HFM as their local cause. Every time a member buys selected own-brand products and services, 1% of the money they spend goes to local causes in their community, so it’s important that you nominate HFM as your favoured cause. To become a member and benefit from all the Coop offers you can join online. HFM has adopted a multi-media approach to broadcasting incorporating an online magazine, a listen again feature, podcasting and have upgraded the global listen live options. Our training programme now encompasses honours students from PUHI, a Foundation Apprentice and we are working closely with local schools This funding will go a long way to consolidating these initiatives and help the station achieve its aims. Heartland is a not for profit organization and is supported through a mixed funding process of grants, sponsorships and advertising.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


16

Listen Again. There is a new feature available on the Heartland site, you can now catch up with a variety of our programming. If your favourite programme is on at the wrong time or you have missed something visit our Listen Again feature and you can listen to almost all of our evening and weekend programmes. Visit our new web site www.heartland.scot and press the Listen Again button. Here you will find a book showing you where you can easily find everything we have archived. Just click away to your hearts content and visit regularly as the list will be updated weekly.

No reason to miss anything now!

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


17

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// New Website Alert! We have brought everything into one place; the radio station, the magazine and all our social media now sits under the one web address

WWW.HEARTLAND.SCOT There are a number of new features and items available here all easy to find in the one place. This is another step towards a fully integrated media hub, pulling together as many different platforms and technologies as are practicable to make our output more accessible and available to as many people as possible. We still have our radio station, magazine and social media as separate entities but all work together complementing each other under the Heartland Media Hub. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


18

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Show us your Photies!! On our new site www.heartland.scot there is a new Front Door. This page will feature a picture of Highland Perthshire and will change regularly, if you are out and about snapping away but have nowhere to show your amazing pictures send them to us and we will consider them for our Front Door. This is open to all amateur or keen photographers and we will give you full credit for anything we use. So go on search through your photos and send us your favourite seasonal favourites and let everyone see your skills. You never know it may lead to bigger things. magazine@heartlandfm.co.uk with Front Door in the subject line.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


19

Opportunities We have many different skills and disciplines on offer within the Heartland Media Hub. Being the voice on air is the part that most people think of, and we are always looking for help there but there is a lot of work to be done before and after a programme has been aired. Social media plays a big part and is ever changing. There is a constant need for new and fresh designs of posts and presentations. If you would like to build up a CV, portfolio or simply find an outlet for your creative talents we can help you. This is Issue 6 of IRIS and the way it is put together, delivered and promoted is already evolving into a more reactive ever changing publication. We are looking for people to help us take it forward to be at the heart of Highland Perthshire. Journalism, commentary, lay-out and design plus all the admin that goes with this are some of the areas where we can offer help to improve your employability or just provide another place for your creativity giving something to your community. ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


20

Cleaner, Better Transport. Paths for All and Heartland are combing to produce a series of radio programmes to highlight the issue of sustainable transport across Highland Perthshire. Through its Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme, Scottish charity Paths for All supports public and third sector organisations adopt sustainable travel solutions. The programme runs because, in Scotland, transport is the biggest contributor to the gases that cause climate change. Walking and cycling, including getting to and from the bus stop or train station, has positive health impacts. There is growing evidence that car pollution increases the likelihood of some cancers, heart disease and dementia. In some parts of Scotland, GPs are recognising the value of exercise in improving health by prescribing walking and cycling rather than medication. People often underestimate the true cost of running a car. When you add up the cost of fuel, insurance, road tax, breakdown recovery, repairs, servicing and depreciation, owning a car never mind being dependent on one can severely impact your wallet.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


21

Some rural communities have met these challenges head on. South Ayrshire Community Transport is establishing a car club that uses electric cars. Joining the club means you can access a car without having to pay all the costs of owning your own, but still have the advantages of getting about easily from A to B. Electric bikes, or e-bikes as they are known, make sustainable travel much more feasible for many people. Hills and headwinds are no longer an issue when you are on an electric bike and you can travel much further without needing to stop for a rest. Huntly Development Trust has some as part of their transport hub. Loch Lomond and Trossachs Countryside Trust run the TRED project which is promoting e-bikes in the rural towns and villages in the National Park.

There are schemes across Scotland that can help people rediscover the joys of traditional cycling. Some projects like the Angus Cycle Hub recycle old bikes, keeping them out of landfill and giving them a new life. Cycle hubs can also offer all sorts of support include bike maintenance classes, cycle confidence training, led rides and access to maps and route information.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


22

Buses are another great way to travel sustainably. Bus journeys account for 75% of all public transport journeys in Scotland. HITRANS has recently been promoting a new electric bus service in Moray, Fife Council has been investing in new routes and new integrated bus ticketing is helping increase bus usage from rural communities to Dundee city. Often people simply don’t know when buses run, or if they run at all. Apps and websites such as Traveline Scotland are useful to plan your journey. Changing behaviour is a challenge, but there are some tools that can motivate you to travel more sustainably. Paths for All’s Step Count Challenge runs in Spring and Autumn very year.

Get together with a group of five workmates and enter a team into the challenge and log your steps, or cycle miles, every day. Past participants say they not only enjoyed the fresh air and escaping their desk, they went on to think more about walking further in future.

Don’t forget the most sustainable transport method there is, just walk. Everywhere. Everyday. It makes you happy, it combats diabetes, cancer, heart disease and dementia. It is cheap and easy to do and saves the planet at the same time. What more could you want? Find out more about the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places Programme or give call the team on 01786 641851.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


23

Be Prepared for Winter Advice from Ready Scotland Don’t let winter catch you unprepared. Heartland Media Hub has teamed up with Ready Scotland to help you prepare for the coming winter months. Keep an eye on our schedule and our Listen Again feature to hear our radio broadcast with advice specific to Highland Perthshire

Scotland might be no stranger to bad weather but with a little planning and action now you can be ready for winter disruption. Our winters often bring snow and ice, thunder, lightning and heavy rain, all of which can cause frozen or burst pipes, blocked drains, localised flooding, treacherous conditions out and about, risks of hypothermia and isolation. And that’s on top of Christmas chaos! But don’t worry, there's plenty you can now do to prepare for and deal with wild winter weather. The first thing you can do is be informed. Sign up to alerting services and be aware of the risks in your area. You can do this by checking forecasts and keep up to date with weather warnings through the MetOffice; sign up to the Floodline alerting service and follow ReadyScotland on Facebook or Twitter Another great way to be ready is to make a plan. By making a simple household plan and creating an emergency kit you and your family will feel much more in control if the winter affects you. It’s important that you make a plan and a kit that works for you and your family – this could include key phone numbers, local radio station frequency, agreed meeting places and essentials like spare medicine, copies of important documents and emergency food. Don’t forget the car either! Having winter essentials like a snow shovel, ice scraper, and blankets will make a huge different if you find yourself stuck. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


24

And finally, think of others. Look out for neighbours who might need a hand in an emergency. If you have you the time and ability then volunteering for groups like neighbourhood watch or forming a local community resilience group, allows you to help others in your community, while learning new skills and building friendships. Whether it's providing practical, medical or emotional support, or assisting with search and rescue or transport services, our voluntary organisations make a huge contribution during emergencies. Find out more at ReadyScotland.org and stay safe this winter. SOCIAL MEDIA MESSAGES FOR WINTER: Severe weather You can subscribe to @readyscotland’s new "severe weather" list for an easy way to keep track of developments whenever poor weather strikes check the Ready Scotland twitter feed Have you signed up to the @metoffice’s weather warnings service? Pipes new and old don’t like the cold - check out helpful winter advice to heat, insulate and protect your home Sign up to @ScottishEPA's free Floodline service to receive flood warnings direct to your phone If you experience a power cut, call 105 to be put through to your local operator, who can give you help and advice. Find out more here. Making a flood kit can help you reduce the impact of flooding on you and your family Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


25

Business Resilience If you run a small business, make sure you’re ready for whatever winter might throw at you, find advice here.

Is your business ready for any disruption this winter? Check out our advice and self-assessment checklists for making sure you can keep trading Small and medium business owners – why not take 10 minutes today to fill out this plan from @BITC and get ready for any winter disruption Community Spare a thought for your neighbours who might need help when bad weather strikes – a little help can go a long way Every community has skills and knowledge that make a big difference when emergencies like sever weather or power failures hit. Don’t wait for a disaster to think about how your community will cope When emergencies occur volunteers make an incredibly positive contribution. Whether it’s helping your community or volunteering with a charity in your area think about what you can do to help

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


26

RISK A VERSE? Colin Dmitri visited the Corbenic Poetry Path. Strolling through Dunkeld one day, as I frequently do, I noticed a couple of wide -eyed faces peering at me through a shop window. Each was smiling pleasantly. I had to smile back, it was impossible to do anything else. They were simple line drawings on a vase in the Corbenic Shop. I bought the vase immediately. In the shop I saw a leaflet about the Corbenic Poetry Path. I had seen the leaflet in various places in Dunkeld and Birnam and I had driven past the Path’s signpost on the A822 Old Military Road while taking the scenic route from Birnam to Aberfeldy and beyond without it really registering with me. This time I decided to investigate.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


27

I drove to the Poetry Path on a crisp November morning. The Sun was low, strong and bright and very warm when it hit you.

This is a circular path about 3 kilometres long circumnavigating the Corbenic Camphill Community. You are asked to respect the privacy of the members of the Community but you can’t help noticing the activity within as you wend your way round. The Path is punctuated with poetry and artworks and is blessed with some glorious views. I look forward to visiting again in the different seasons to witness the changes that will inevitably take place.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


28

Starting from the car park you ascend through woodland until you are directed across a road where the path takes you to another wood. Just off the path at the entrance to this wood are some benches facing South where you can enjoy the view. The benches are decorated with ceramic ware which appears to have been created in the Community. Emerging from this wood you come across boggy ground and a beautiful pond with lily pads. Again, a bench is provided to rest a while. This brings you to the Northern boundary of the Path and as you move Eastwards on the edge of more woodland the views change as you can now see North.

Travelling further into the wood you start your descent, twisting and turning past poems, weird structures, sculptures and other artworks until you find yourself down by the River Braan and you finally see the rapids that you have been able to hear for quite some time. The river leads you back towards the car park and it’s all over till next time..

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


29

This is a beautiful walk with many interesting talking points along the way. The presentation of the poems is, at times quite creative and adds something to the words making the poem one you experience rather than merely read. Some are etched into stone, one appears to have been sandblasted into a piece of glass, held in place by two wooden stakes with the sunlight shining through allowing the contrast between clear and etched glass to show the form of the poem. Others are typed and under perspex. Some poems reflect on life, nature and the countryside in general. Others have been written for the trees or the view before which they are displayed. There are more poems that have been written for the Path that, as yet, haven’t been installed so it is still evolving. Another reason to come back again and again. My favourite poem from the Path is a short, witty one entitled Lost in Translation (For Daniel Merki) by Jon Plunkett, who happens to be the Care and Support Manager at the Corbenic Camphill Community. If you want to read it, you’ll have to go on the walk. I hope my amateurish pieces to camera and snapshots help give you an idea of what to expect on a visit here. I shall be re-visiting regularly. It should be noted that the Path covers mixed terrain from boggy ground to tightly twisting and sloping woodland paths so it is not wheelchair accessible.

Insert Video here

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


30

Santa Day The Cross, Dunkeld. December 14th Join in all the festive fun and experience all the festive fun and warmth at the 30th annual Santa Day.

Heartland FM will be there broadcasting live from the event, come along and say hello, we will be in the Drill Hall—beside Santa himself. Just next door to the real live reindeer. See the full programme here.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


31

BETTER TRANSPORT FOR OUR COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENT A new initiative is evolving in the Upper Tay valley to improve transport options and improve people’s ability to access them. Supported by the Tay Valley Timebank, Upper Tay Transport aims to benefit everyone in the community, although particularly older and more vulnerable people, and benefit our environment.

How will transport options be improved? We have several different projects being developed and promoted. Community Lifts Community Lifts is a volunteer driver scheme that offers transport to members of the community who might struggle to move around otherwise. In order to request a lift you have to join the scheme and pay ÂŁ5 and then you can request any lift you need. We are currently recruiting volunteer drivers and if you can help please get in touch. Lift Share This scheme enables people who travel to offer lifts to people who might be interested in going the same way. Organised through a simple website and app. Go to www.liftshare.com to sign up. Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


32

Community car rental Need to hire a car in our community? This scheme enabled people to rent their own car out to members of the community. Its simple and effective. More information soon. Community minibuses There are a number of minibuses in our community available for hire by groups. Save fuel by sharing transport. More information soon. Buses Travelling by bus can be a great way to get around whether to work or for social purposes. The number 91 bus serves Abereldy and out to the west offering a vital link to some great places.

Watch a short video about The 91 and enjoy the amazing scenery and plan your future trips and days out. Cycling We will be developing a range of cycling projects in the spring. Bus Buddies A scheme to support people who need or want to get the bus but lack the confidence to do so. Coming in the spring.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


33

Who is organising this? Tay Valley Timebank set up this transport project in response to many requests for lifts. The project is managed by a group of volunteers with a paid coordinator. When will it all start happening? Projects are still being developed and we hope to launch in early Spring. Keep your eye out here or in Quair or other local media for up to date information. Or check out our website or our Facebook page

How can you get involved? For more information or to volunteer or to join a scheme go to our website or contact our coordinator Emma Burtles on uttg2019@gmail.com or phone 07881 991176.

You can hear an interview with Emma here

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


34

A word from Alistair, Heartland FM Station Manager It’s been a busy few weeks at Heartland FM and as we move to the Festive Season it’s often a time to both look to the future and celebrate. So let’s celebrate. Heartland FM recently won a National Award in the Community Radio Awards. We were delighted to be nominated in the Community Show of the Year category. Bruce Patterson and myself attended the Community Radio Awards in Barry, South Wales. 450 entries were received from radio stations throughout the UK. With over 70 judges from all spheres of UK radio judging our entry we were delighted to be awarded the Silver Award for The Health and Wellbeing Hour. This is a programme we started broadcasting only this year, and to win an award in its first year of production is amazing. Putting together a programme which is heavily speech based takes a lot of time and effort from the whole team. From research to recording, editing, podcasting and social media it takes a lot of commitment from the dedicated team at Heartland FM, as well as the input from local health organisations and agencies. We are delighted to have won and be recognised at a National Level, the only Scottish radio station to come home with an award.

Advent Calendar Prize Giveaway Every day until December 23rd Heartland will be giving away a daily prize. To find out how to win the prize visit our facebook page each day and follow the instructions. You can eneter as many times as you like and each day you enter gives you chance of winning the Super Draw package. This is worth a massive £1500 which will be won by one lucky listener and will be delivered to you before Christmas. Terms and conditions apply and you must have a valid Highland Perthshire postcode to enter. Best of luck to you. See our Social Media here

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


35

Looking forward to the future, we have just produced a new three year business plan and prospectus. We are taking a multimedia approach to our services, created a new website, and an already popular listen again service. We are looking Small Scale DAB, broadcast licences will be advertised in 2020 and have launched our own You Tube Channel, along with our existing Facebook, Twitter and Instagram services. As we come to the end of the year we will be producing our popular Christmas Song Celebration with Primary Schools across Highland Perthshire, we will be broadcasting from the 30th Anniversary Santa Day in Dunkeld and launching our Christmas Advent Competition. In addition we will be live at Pitlochry Church of Scotland for the Watch Night Service on Christmas Eve, and will have the best Scottish Entertainment with Eddie Rose’s Hogmanay Special from 11pm to 1am. As we say goodbye to 2019 and welcome in the new decade. It just leaves me to say thank you for your support during 2019, have a great Christmas and all the best for 2020 - Alistair Smith Station Manager. ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Flur—Highland Perthshire`s newest flower shop, 54 Atholl Road Pitlochry. Tel. 01796 473964.

Insert flur video

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


36

Aberfeldy Community Warden Norma Carr is the Community Warden in Aberfeldy, recently we spoke to her and Matt McCauley Station Commander with Scottish Fire and Rescue. You can listen to that interview here. The role of a Community Warden is wide and varied, Norma is at the call of the community when they raise issues or need advice. These can be anything from broken glass to litter problems, or more basic help for older members of our community. She is based at the Fire Station in Aberfeldy where everyone can drop in to have a chat and talk about local issues, raise concerns or find out more about her role.

You can hear an interview with Norma and Matt here

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


37

Heartland Media Hub Heartland FM has been part of the Highland Perthshire community for 27 years. It began in 1992 as an innovative tool for the community to communicate, support business and to showcase the best that is around in our area. Over the years the station has had many ups and downs with the last two years being a fast climb again through innovation, the adoption of new technology and working practices. Heartland Media Hub is the next step. By adopting as many differing online platforms, embracing new outlets and giving the listener as many avenues as possible to access our productions. Our new web site features all the radio outlets, all our social media platforms and access to IRIS. There are news stories, magazine features, articles, blogs, videos, social media commentary and a new listen again option ensuring you can catch up with any missed programmes. We recognize that the way we access our news and entertainment is changing rapidly Heartland Media Hub will allow us to bring everything to you in one place.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


38

Training, Schools and University Heartland has always had a commitment to bringing new skills and education to the community of Highland Perthshire, it is written into the constitution as one of the main objectives. It has now taken on a new and exciting direction. Since the beginning of the last academic year we have had a Foundation Apprentice with us, studying IT and Creative Design. This course is accredited by Perth UHI and the school which the pupils attends for the rest of their subject choices. The pupils is with us one day a week working and learning as part of the team, at the end of placement they will have the equivalent of a Higher subject qualification and a wealth of material for a CV & portfolio. This will give them leverage over many others when applying for jobs. We also now have two Honours students from Perth UHI with us. They are gaining vital experience in relevant work skills, experience that is very hard to gain in their chosen field of Sound Engineering. Heartland Media Hub (HMH) is able to provide a wide range of training and credible experience that is invaluable for these students entering into the job market.

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


39

We are also working very closely with both Breadalbane and Pitlochry secondary schools again providing work experience opportunities and new skills. This aids the pupils in future course choices, improves self-confidence and prepares them for life and work outside the school. This is a two-way street. Not only are the participants gaining immeasurable benefits but HFH has a steady stream of new bodies to lighten the load of the existing personnel but allows it to expand projects, widen the breadth of topics and provide a better service, everyone wins. It has already proven to be such a success that Perth UHI are asking for more placement spaces for 2020/21. Our training is of course not limited to those in education but is open to all, if you would like to find out more contact us here. //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

6-8 Bonnethill Rd Pitlochry PH15 5BS 01796 472047

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


40

Monday

Schedule

Tuesday

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

05:00 Sunrise

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

10:00 Alistair Work Day Hits

10:00 Alistair Work Day Hits

13:00 Afternoon show

13:00 Afternoon show

16:00 Drive Time

16:00 Drive Time

19:00 Country in the Country

19:00 Sounds Inspirational

21:00 Bill Black`s Country Classics

20:00 Eddie`s Archives 22:00 Spinning the 60s 23:00 Heartland Hits

Wednesday

Thursday

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

05:00 Sunrise

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

10:00 Alistair Work Day Hits

10:00 Alistair Work Day Hits

12:00 Health & Well Being

13:00 Afternoon show

13:00 Afternoon show

16:00 Drive Time

16:00 Drive Time

19:00 Back to the 70s

19:00 Vinyl Frontier

20:00 Celtic Celebration

21:00 Under the Radar

21:00 Moonlight Drive

23:00 Heartland Hits

22:00 Sounds Inspirational 23:00 Heartland Hits

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


41

Saturday

Friday 00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

05:00 Sunrise

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

06:00 Sunrise with Howard 07:00 Softly into Saturday

10:00 Alistair Work Day Hits

08:00 Weekend Hits

13:00 Afternoon show

09:00 Health & Well Being

16:00 Drive Time

10:00 This Week in Holyrood

18:00 Spinning the 60s 19:00 Country in the Country

Sunday 00:00 Ballads after Midnight

11:00 Sunday Morning for Hillbillies

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

13:00 Number1s at One

05:00 Sunrise

14:00 Ann-Marie`s Afternoon

06:00 Softly into Sunday

17:00 On The Weekend

07:00 Sunrise with Howard

19:00 The Vinyl Frontier

08:00 Heart and Soul

21:00 Moonlight Drive

09:00 Eddies Archives

22:00 Melodies for You

Missed anything? Listen Again Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.


42

Heartland Media Hub Visit Site

New web site address www.heartland.scot Contacts; stationmanager@heartlandfm.co.uk magazine@heartlandfm.co.uk

sales@heartlandfm.co.uk Social Media details

Heartland Media Hub Publication. No ink, no print, no road miles, helping the environment.

Profile for heartlandfm

IRIS Heartland Media Hub Magazine Issue 6