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A Heartland Multimedia Publication

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IRIS April 2021 News, views, people and places in Highland Perthshire

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Welcome. Welcome to the April edition of IRIS. Our biggest publication to date. Over 110 pages packed full of content about this amazing area we call home, Highland Perthshire. In this edition we would like to introduce you to a new idea. Our pull-out supplements. The Business2Business section, The Write Ear arts pages and the Community Council minutes are now available both in this magazine but also as handy easy to read and share, stand-alone extracts. Our range and quality of submission continues to grow and we are all very proud of what we can do together as a community, showing the world the innovation, beauty and talent that is available in our part of Perthshire. To get in touch with us email magazine@heartland.scot or visit our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Bruce

Bruce Patterson Editor & compiler

Connel Allardyce Video production

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Molly Bogle Artistic contributor

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Reaching the people you need to reach.

07975 930600 Are you ready? No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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Contents COVID History Project A project to record events during the pandemic

Breadalbane Canoe Club The club look forward to a new season

Choo Choo Thai restaurant proposal in Pitlochry.

The Scottish Crannog Events and strories from Loch Tay

Mountain Bikers Get Out A video pushing you to get out on your bike.

Perthshire Chamber of Commerce News of a new app from the Chamber

Royal School of Dunkeld Artwork and an explanation of the pupils Lockdown book

Molly Arbuthnott Local author reads one of her books to us.

Culture Perh and Kinross Images and notification of archives in Perth & Kinross

CAP Advice and help from Christians against Poverty.

Pitlochry Rotary Club Citizen of the Year

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Duke of Edinburgh Breadalbane Academy pupils write about pandemic concerns and issues

You Must Vote The runners and riders in the May election Outside the Box Online connections for older people

Dunkeld and Clan Donnachaidh The battle of Dunkeld and the Clan

Bonniest Dog The big competition reveal

Dunkeld, Cland Donnachaidh and a battle Take a historic walk around Dunkeld. IRIS Rate Card Offers and deals Perthshire Trek Pictures, video and talk on an interesting walk.

Aberfeldy Museum This month we have archive videos of events from the 1940s & 50s

Quiz Time Puzzles and questions to keep you busy

Radio Schedule What`s on the radio and when

Back Issues The last 4 issues of IRIS can be read here

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Business 2 Business Video chats with local business operators talking about a wide variety of issues affecting their ability to trade, difficulties and opportunities. We have information help and advice from Business Gateway and Growbiz. Visit the new pull-out supplement of Business2Business.


Write Ear Heartland Book Chat With Tippermuir Books A new album release from Braw Rosalie have put out a new single

Visit the new pull out supplement of Write Ear


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Pitlochry Covid19 History Project We want to gather and display material for future generations to find out what went on in the Pitlochry and surrounding area during the Covid19 pandemic 2020 / 2021. This will be stored and displayed by the Pitlochry and Moulin Heritage Centre in Moulin Kirk and curated in conjunction with them. The Pitlochry and Moulin Community Council Covid19 support group are also in support of this project. We are looking for any stories, anecdotes, personal feelings, poems, diary pages, pictures, drawings, posters and any item which relates to how the community worked together and how the country responded during these unprecedented times. We hope to get material from children, parents, the school, students studying at home, NHS staff, care home staff, care home residents, those shielding and anyone else affected by the pandemic or who was involved in making sure that our society still functioned. The Heritage Centre can retain any items on loaned or a gifted basis, based on your choice. All items loaned or donated would be recorded on the Heritage Centre gift register. If you have any material, please send to Atholl Centre, Atholl Road, Pitlochry, PH16 5BX , email to admin@athollcentre.org.uk or contact Iain Walker on 01796 473044. Alternatively pop it through our letter box at the Centre which is situated behind the Baptist Church. To help us record the items accurately, it would be great if you could include your name and address and confirm whether you would prefer for the item to be loaned or donated as part of the Heritage Centre collection.

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Club’s coming back to the water By Sam Miles Breadalbane Canoe Club is back with a splash. Firstly we would like to commend paddlers for their fantastic hard work during these challenging times. They have shown great determination in their gym sessions and running at home to keep themselves conditioned for their eager return to paddling activities.

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Seeing old and new faces enjoying great company and outdoors in our beautiful highland home can’t come soon enough. Furthermore we will be organising come and try sessions for young people to come and try out paddling following covid safe governing body guidance.

We don’t have dates yet but if you would like to keep up to date with the latest please send an email to Sam our club coach at slalom@breadalbanecanoeclub.org.uk.

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THE WEE CHOO-CHOO THAI RESTAURANT MAY BE LATE ARRIVING DUE TO OBJECTIONS ON THE TRACK

FOR THE OPTIMISTS AMONGST US PLEASE LOG ON AND DOWNLOAD A DISCOUNT VOUCHER FOR USE WHEN THE OBSTRUCTION IS CLEARED ON

WWW.THE-WEE-CHOO-CHOO.COM FOR FURTHER DETAILS PLEASE CONTACT MIA AND ISARA ON CONTACT@THE-WEE-CHOO-CHOO.COM

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Hello Everyone Welcome to part two of our Wee Choo Choo storyboard. Last month you may recall that our story began by me purchasing a train with the intentions of turning it into a Thai Restaurant in Pitlochry….ambitious I know! Part two of our tale, we are extremely sad to say, has sent us down a different track as the project has hit the buffers so to speak. We know that many local residents support us completely in bringing something quite unique to Highland Perthshire and for that we are very grateful. Unfortunately some residents do not feel the same way and the local councillors are expressing reservations about the project. We, as a family, have put forward amendments and suggested we take a short lease so that the council can undertake a parking survey. Despite this huge setback we are absolutely not giving up and still want to realise our dreams and introduce this fantastic initiative to our community and those who visit. Part three next month and we will have everything crossed in the meantime. Many Thanks The McCallums

Discount Voucher

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Scottish Crannog Centre

We are pleased to announce that the Scottish Crannog Centre will be reopening for the 2021 season on 26th April! As per government guidelines, visitor numbers will be limited to comply with social distancing so booking will be essential, and our covid safety procedures will continue to be implemented to ensure high standards of safety. We are extremely excited to welcome people back onsite, and tickets are now available to purchase from our website www.crannog.co.uk ahead of our scheduled opening date.

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As well as running our daily tours, this year we have introduced a series of workshops that visitors can attend for a half-day or full-day immersive experience, learning crafts which would have been an essential part of daily life in Prehistoric Scotland. These skills include spinning wool, weaving, basketry and smelting. Places for workshops must be booked in advance, to find out all of the details please visit our website.

Thanks to funding from the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, the Crannog Centre was able to participate in the EXARC Virtual Conference at the end of March, which involved the site becoming a virtual “hotspot” for one hour of the conferences worldwide tour. Focusing on our upcoming textile project, viewers were able to enjoy videos and a Q&A with curator Fran. To learn more, please www.exarc.net/. The textile project has also been selected as part of the new MAMUZ exhibition in Austria, focussing on experimental archaeology. To see more, visit https://www.mamuz.at/en/exhibitions/ schloss-asparn-zaya/6-experimentelle-archaeologie. To keep up with the latest Crannog Centre news, you can visit www.crannog.co.uk, follow us on all the usual social media channels, or subscribe to our monthly newsletter – details on how to subscribe can be found on our website.

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A Mountain Biker’s Favourite Time of Year Right about now has to be the best time of year for a mountain biker. After a long winter of braving the cold, rain, wind, ice, snow, (or hibernation for the not so brave riders) it’s finally spring. That means drier trails, better weather, and longer days, it’s the first feeling of summer in a long time. No longer do you have to plan your whole day around the enormous task that is cleaning every inch of you and your bike after. You might not even have to wash your bike, and if you’re lucky, you might even get to wear a t-shirt and shorts. You don’t even have to wait till the weekend anymore, you can ride after work or school. It may only be April, but it feels like July. Don’t get me wrong, it is Scotland, so you’re guaranteed more cold, wet, miserable days, but it’s still a lot better than the last few months of harsh Scottish wintertime. There is honestly no better time than now to get back out on your bike. It doesn’t have to be mountain biking, just cycling in general is more fun now than the past few months, and it’s only going to get better.

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Perthshire Chamber Test & Protect App Up And Running For Local Businesses PERTHSHIRE businesses are being reminded to sign up for an innovative contact-tracing app, as they prepare to emerge from Lockdown.

The app, which has been made available by Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, enables business owners to easily and securely check-in customers and collect the data needed to support the Scottish Government’s Test and Protect Programme The Test and Protect web app also allows them to manually check-in guests who do not have a smartphone. This app is free for all businesses in Perthshire and is supported by Scotland Loves Local.

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Perthshire Chamber Chief Executive, Vicki Unite, said: “The app gives businesses the chance to quickly and securely capture the data needed with a minimum of hassle. “It helps to give visitors and customers the confidence to safely visit Perthshire establishments knowing the necessary contact tracing information is being collected in line with GDPR requirements.” Visitors simply scan a QR code with a smartphone on entry and input their contact information to be held securely for use if required by NHS Scotland. This means that after the first sign-in, they can check-in easily and securely each time they visit a café, restaurant, hotel, visitor attraction or other business which is using the app. The information gathered, which automatically expires after 21 days, is held centrally by Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, to be provided to the NHS Scotland Test and Protect team if required. The web app can be tailored for any business which signs up, and the system creates their business’s unique QR code. It also provides a support package of posters and flyers to promote their use of the Test and Protect initiative and businesses can in addition check the number of logins on their own online dashboard. Businesses that would like to know more about the Test and Protect app, which is branded under the #ProtectPerthshire hashtag, should contact the Chamber on 01738 448325 or email

protect@perthshirechamber.co.uk For sign up and further details please go to https://protect.perthshirechamber.co.uk/

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Dunkeld author, Molly Arbuthnott is releasing a new book showcasing the artistic talents of a local school in an effort to raise funds for the Parish of Dunkeld. Together with Molly, the primary students at Dunkeld School collated stories, poems and artwork to create ‘Our Lockdown Book’. Molly said: “It took about five months to put together. The teachers were hugely supportive of the initiative and the parents too. In fact, there is a painting at the back of the book that was painted by a mother of a pupil. “The school is a wonderful primary school, thriving under Nicola William’s very capable leadership and following the motto that ‘we love to learn’.

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“There are currently 136 pupils plus 20 in the nursery. “They all contributed to the initial project and created some really beautiful creative pieces. “We started on the theme of nature and it blossomed from there. “Bring surrounded by so much beautiful nature as we are in this part of the world helps a lot in producing top quality work. “They thought outside the box and made the most of nature’s playground. Their pieces are original, insightful and hugely creative. Work on the book has been a passion project for the whole family. Molly added: “My mother is an artist and was happy to contribute to the book. “She stood by the gate for a day to paint her piece – and made friends with a robin too. The book gave the pupils a chance to reflect on their experience of lockdown and put it towards a good cause. Molly explained: “The profits of the book are being donated to the Parish of Dunkeld. It was nice for the minister, Fraser Penny, to be able to contribute. “I think that we should look at every hurdle thrown our way as a great opportunity to build ties within our communities and always to look at the solutions rather than the problems. “The lockdown experience has made me feel so fortunate to live in such a beautiful part of the world, a part of the world I feel very fortunate to be able to share with all of you.” ‘Our Lockdown Book’ is available through Molly’s website www.mollyarbuthnott.co.uk and through local Dunkeld bookshops. In the following pages we have some of the pupils artwork you will see all of their work in the book. We also have a video reading from Molly of one of her own books as well as short extracts from some of her other publications.

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Forbes Owls

Angus Squirrel

Lucy Pine Cone

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Elsa Seedheads

Lilly Trees - A Poem

Squeaky & Titch

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Amelia

Harris

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For all our younger readers, here we have a video from Molly reading one of her books, Oscar, The Ferry Cat

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Introducing The Red Deer Pub and Restaurant Pitlochry We wanted to create a relaxed and casual, child friendly fun and welcoming environment for you to socialise and dine. We wanted to make sure it was open seven days a week and dog friendly. We wanted to have an exciting eclectic menu and have locally sourced food and drink to suit all tastes available every day. We wanted to offer great coffee, homebaking and be open for breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner. We wanted to make sure our decking area was comfortable, heated and covered when required to allow you to benefit from our amazing views whilst sipping on a cocktail with your pals. We wanted to continue with our famous curry nights and daily specials. We wanted to offer you Sky Sports for all major sporting events so you will not miss a thing and experience the drama all together. We wanted to do all of this and we have ! All we want now is you. The Red Deer Pub and Restaurant opens on 26th April at 9 AM Dave and the team cannot wait to welcome you and ensure you have a great experience each time you visit.

Call 01796472334 To book a table or just pop in

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The Murray Graham sketch book is one of our slightly less well known gems. It can be found in the Local and History dept. and has some distinctive sketches of the local area which we have often used in presentations and exhibitions. This unique book is a bound volume of sketches and it was given to the Sandeman library in 1944 by Gladys Graham Murray (1882-1956) who herself wrote a book on bird watching (A Bird Lovers year ) The sketch book Gladys donated is a collection of sketches which were drawn by an unknown artist between 1849 and 1852. We think the artist was probably a member of the Graham family as the sketches cover some of the houses and estates which corresponds with those owned by that family at the time of the sketches being made. The location of the drawings covers Perthshire quite extensively but also several other probable holiday locations around Scotland. Gladys’ father was Andrew Viscount Dunedin and his Oxford DNB entry does not make much mention of Gladys, her sister or their mother, Mary Clementina. His biographical information seems to be more interested in his second wife and omits any other women! I believe someone look at the sketch book from the National Museum and the quality of the drawings is thought to be quite good. For me it’s the time frame of when the artist captured places as they, obviously, look quite different now. I have chosen three sketches and added later depictions of the place or property to compare. I recall doing a walking tour of Huntingtower Castle some years ago with architectural historians who were enjoying a very heated and vigorous debate about what additions and outbuildings had been added to the castle and demolished over time as they could see evidence of this on what remains. Some time later I came across a drawing of the castle in the sketch book – I think the drawn evidence from the 1850’s might have might just have settled the historians arguments!

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Cluny Bridge on the Tummel

Moulin and Ben-y-Vrackie

Rohallie House

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You’re not alone Most of us have faced some sort of financial difficulty – whether you’ve had a knot in your stomach when a bill arrived or found yourself lying awake at night running numbers in your head. In the UK, 11.5 million people have less than £100 saved to fall back on, the Money and Pension Service found. Nine million people regularly need to borrow money for food or bills, and a third of the country say they don’t know how to plan for a comfortable retirement. Money worries are a major source of pressure on our mental health. According to the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute, more than half of people in debt suffer poor mental health. A Christians Against Poverty (CAP) client survey found that 35% of clients had considered or attempted suicide because of their money worries. In October last year, the Office for National Statistics said that 8.5 million adults were facing unmanageable debt in the UK but only 1.7 million were accessing debt advice. There is help and support available locally. CAP’s Highland Perthshire Debt Centre has been providing free advice and support for more than 7 years to those struggling with personal debt. Twenty people locally have found freedom from the chains of debt which weigh them down and 93% of CAP clients remain debt free several years later. With all that’s happened over the last year many more people are facing financial difficulty and don’t know where to turn for help. CAP Highland Perthshire currently has capacity to support new clients and can provide emotional and practical support as well as award-winning debt advice. Call free now on 0800 328 0006 to book an appointment with your local debt coach or visit capscotland.org for more information. Don’t wait until things become overwhelming.

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Sheena, Sarah, and the team at Pitlochry Hardware are here to help you. Come for a browse and if we don't have what you are looking for we will try and get it. Tools, pots and pans, bedding plants, decorating kit and even a needle and thread….. A proper Aladdin`s cave. No need for a journey to Perth if you try us first.

Call in, shop local and meet the team. Call 01796 473110 or go to our facebook page.

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CITIZENS OF THE YEAR 2020-21 LOCAL HEROES The past year has been so different from previous years that the usual criteria for choosing our Citizen of the Year are not appropriate, So many people have done so much to get us through the pandemic that the only answer is to give the award to the community of Pitlochry including: �

The couple who went out in the middle of the night to put painted stones in other gardens in their street , and make a nice surprise for the children.

The Granny who made ‘ scrubs’ out of sheets for her doctor daughter, and the seamstress who produced a pattern for her in hours.

� The Food bank topper uppers, and the local shops and individuals who donated, always with a smile. �

The Learners who taught themselves Zoom and Facetime to keep in touch.

The children who home-schooled themselves and each other, whilst Mum and Dad looked after others and delivered the mail.

The Stay at Homers – who did what they were told – Stay in the HOOSE!

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NOT TO MENTION �

The hospital takers and the take-away makers

The through-the-window talkers and the doggie walkers

The meal makers and the good neighbours

The radio carers and the facebook sharers

The phone callers , the smilers and wavers

The Festive sparklers and the Spring Flower Planters

The Ladies who made masks – and then they made more!

The friends who fed the local wildlife

The family who took up dog walking for the neighbour AND OF COURSE THE FRONTLINERS

The teachers and cleaners, the cooks and the office staff

The playground assistants , the janitors

The shop owners who stayed open , and the assistants who helped

The doctors, the nurses, the carers, the sharers

The delivery drivers, the refuse collectors

The drivers on the gritters , and the many unofficial gritters!

The emergency services personnel

AND MANY MANY MORE.

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Young People and the Coronavirus Pandemic: Reflections One Year Later In this trio of articles, S6 Breadalbane Academy pupils explore the issues that matter most to them as young people following a year of the COVID-19 pandemic and living with heavy restrictions on our freedoms. Aonghas Pringle writes about rural isolation and the fact this longstanding issue will continue to impact the lives of many once lockdown restrictions have ended. Ben Kellett takes inspiration from a favourite walk to highlight the importance of spending time outdoors in nature and of contact with other people. James Jaffray discusses how socialising has changed in the past year, including what this has meant for out mental health and the role modern technology now plays in this. The articles are linked by themes of adversity, the importance of human contact and of hope for the future.

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Rural Isolation by Aonghas Pringle Lonely. Trapped. Isolated. These are feelings almost everyone will relate to with the current state of the world, a global pandemic keeping everyone inside. However, to many, these are far from new feelings and, while plenty of us are looking forward to the light at the end of the tunnel when the vaccination program is complete, many others are only seeing a long stretch of darkness. For before this pandemic hit, there were many not isolated by disease, but by rurality and distance. Especially rural children, who find their only chance to be social and to see and make friends is school, struggle to see those that they are fond of and are denied the chance to converse with them. While they have approximately 180 days per year to go to school and play with mates, that leaves around 185 days that they are left at home, stuck with the same people for over half a year, every year. Without help or acknowledgement these children will return to the lonely and isolated life we’re escaping from now, while others frolic in the summer sun with friends.

Of course, many rural people own a car and can drive themselves or their children to see friends and play in the park, or they can afford technology for communicating on social media and playing video games with their friends remotely. However, this reveals one of the many barriers facing rural folk. Finances. There are many who cannot afford these luxuries, who struggle to pay for fuel or phone contracts, let alone support such hobbies as video gaming for their children.

In life, there are many essential needs for living. Among these are food, water, shelter and, the often forgotten about, companionship. While a family may not struggle to put food on their table, they may still find trouble in fulfilling the role of companionship in their life, through friendship or romance, as it is so bizarrely expensive in rural society, between the technology for communication and the cost of travel via a personal vehicle, to pursue. The price of travel could be negated for many with the use No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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of public transport, yet many rural, isolated areas have a lack of such transport, often being limited to a single bus every several hours, only available on certain days. Unless of course there is no bus at all, then you have little chance of travelling far to see your friends. Even if you do travel the long distances to see pals, you must account for the return journey. Your time is often cut short because of restricted bus times leaving you with little fulfilment in terms of companionship.

A rural bus stop in Highland Perthshire on a dreich winter`s day

So, while we return to as close to normality as we can at the end of this pandemic, think of those whose normal is not desirable. Those of us who, after a year of isolation by a virus, remain isolated and divided by the distance between us. Think about the ways in which we can support change for those among us, whether it be through aiding an organisation such as Breathe, a youth project that provides a space for young people, like myself, to feel safe and make friends, across much of rural Perthshire, or by supporting your neighbours who maybe could do with a ride into town and young people who just want to see their friends.

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Walking Up Birnam Hill By Ben Kellett

After being swamped with online classes, assignments and overdue deadlines, exercise and fresh air quickly took second priority. When COVID-19 first dealt the UK a lethal blow and the entire country spiralled into lockdown, everyone felt as if they were being kept prisoner in their own homes. Despite having an abundance of free time, finding any motivation at all to complete schoolwork became near impossible. I often found myself slumping back into bed with the goal of sleeping through lockdown! For school kids especially, loneliness began to creep in. Socialising daily was normal. Yet, in a very short space of time, it was cut off completely; it was made abundantly clear that social gatherings were point blank illegal. To say that circumstances such as this take a toll on the mental health of not just teenagers, but everyone, is a drastic understatement. More than ever, it’s important to be outside as often as possible. Personally, I often found myself walking up Birnam Hill. Walking there on a regular basis helped me by altering the dull and repetitive lifestyle that I became accustomed to during lockdown. In addition to this, hiking at different times of the day meant that the walk was never the same. In the morning mist often covered most of the hill meaning that the visibility was reduced, creating a surreal and luminous atmosphere. On a slightly cooler day, a blanket of cloud sometimes encased the surrounding area. Not to mention the varied wildlife that I would catch a glimpse of throughout the walk. In the evening, the sunset would cast beautiful shades of yellow and orange over every part of the hill, producing majestic silhouettes out of the pine trees and setting the vegetation on fire. Regardlesss of the time of day, the view from the summit never disappointed as it was always truly spectacular. Truthfully, another sidelining motivation that got me out the door was the hope of ‘accidentally’ bumping into someone I knew. After months of being trapped indoors, everyone can relate to the longing to socialise with someone who isn’t a household/family member. A distinct encounter that I remember was when I met a former work

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colleague. Despite not knowing him all that well, we chatted to each other for over an hour, which I’m sure helped to keep my sanity intact. During lockdown, things like this have helped to keep people going. Things such as a spontaneous call from a friend or a letter in the post from family. Though lockdown has been undoubtedly hard, with the new vaccine, the light at the end of the tunnel now begins to look ever so slightly brighter.

Sunset on Birnam Hill

Wildlife on Birnam Hill All Photographs by Ben Kellet

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How Socialising Has Been Impacted During the Pandemic By James Jaffray Health is more than just disease prevention. For many people, being healthy requires social interactions with friends and family, spending time outdoors, exercise, and other pleasures of life. When making decisions about social contact during the coronavirus pandemic, you need to weigh the risk of the interaction against the potential benefits to your overall health. For most people socialising was a day-to- day part of life before COVID-19 struck, now it has become much more of a challenge due to the restrictions put in place by the government. This has had a knock-on effect for the majority of the public as, although time to yourself is needed, you also need some time with others and for some people the social distancing rules have had negative effects on their mental well being. More than two-thirds of adults in the UK (69%) report feeling somewhat or very worried about the effect COVID-19 is having on their life. The most common issues affecting well being are worrying about the future (63%), feeling stressed or anxious (56%) and feeling bored (49%). While some degree of worry is understandably widespread, more severe mental ill health is being experienced by some groups. Institute of Fiscal Studies analysis of longitudinal data from the Understanding Society study found that, taking account of pre-pandemic trajectories, mental health has worsened substantially (by 8.1% on average) as a result of the pandemic. Groups have not been equally impacted; young adults and women – groups with worse mental health pre-pandemic – have been hit hardest. The University College London COVID-19 social study of 90,000 UK adults has monitored mental health symptoms throughout lockdown, finding that levels of anxiety and depression fell in early June 2020 as lockdown measures began to lift. But these remained highest among young people, those with lower household income, people with a diagnosed mental illness, people living with children, and people living in urban areas, and now, due to the restrictions, some are having to face these problems alone. This highlights the true importance of trying to keep in contact with loved ones as

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regular contact lets them know that you are thinking about them and this can aid in boosting their morale. However, it’s not all bad. Many people have found ways to socialise without breaching COVID-19 restrictions, such as Zoom calls, socially distanced walks in the park, online gaming and many more methods. This shows how much modern-day technology has impacted our lives during the pandemic for the better as it has allowed many people, who would have been in isolation, to communicate with family and friends.

Zoom social calendar during Lockdown

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Introduce your business to the Highland Perthshire community, with Heartland Multimedia.    With a population of over 25,000 people​1​, there’s plenty of potential customers to say hello to! O ​ ur 

Welcome Pack s​ howcases who we are. Let our multimedia platforms showcase who you are.

Listening Figures Heartland FM has an estimated listenership of ​over 5,000 people per week​.  We have recorded that, in 2020, Heartland FM received on average 1,260 unique online listeners  per week, for an average of 2,986 hours per week.  In that time, our total listening hours reached 155,000 - an increase of 75% year on year.  RAJAR​ (Q1 2020) reports that 25% of listening is done online, suggesting that on average, 3,780  listeners tuned in to our FM frequency per week.   

Digital Figures In February, 4,176 unique users visited our website, ​heartland.scot​, with 10,090 total page views.  Our social media platforms, cumulatively, connect with over 10,000 unique followers. At the end  of February, we had 6,117 ​Facebook​ likes, 2,944 ​Twitter​ followers, and 1,042 ​Instagram​ followers.  In February, we reached a total of 25,797 users on ​Facebook​, and our social content on Twitter  received a total of 68,800 impressions.  Our digital magazine, I​ RIS​, receives an average of 32,000 page views per month.   

Getting Started To find out more about Heartland Multimedia, or to discuss a bespoke package that suits your  budget, contact our Sales and Marketing Manager, ​Chris Stanton​, on 07975 930 600. Or e-mail us  at ​sales@heartland.scot​. 

1

Scotland’s Census 2011 - National Records of Scotland.

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By Charles Fletcher AND they’re off! The racers, the riders, the runners, the outsiders. The Scottish Election 2021 has passed starter’s orders and the only predictable thing is the unpredictability of the Campaign Trail. For journalists, like me, who cover politics, this is the equivalent of the World Cup, Wimbledon and the Olympics all rolled into one. It is the moment we have been waiting for. We are fired up for six weeks of tumult and expect only to get a real night’s sleep once the final declaration is made and we know who will form the next government. Our families are very understanding, although we know they do, at times, shake their heads and tut. The pandemic has changed this campaign. No street stalls and smaller numbers of canvassers will arrive on your doorstep. The Scottish Parliament has not dissolved. That won’t happen until the 5th of May and we will vote the next day. Instead, it has Risen and we are in Pre-Election Recess. MSPs remain MSPs, again unusually during a campaign, but they can’t do MSP things or use their office at Holyrood, or their parliament email, or MSP mobile. Everything they do switches to party mode. All parties have their campaign plans. Wednesday is a visit to a farm; Thursday sees politicians in a factory; and Friday, getting a takeaway. No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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Then something happens to knock your plans off the rails. Even today, this is perhaps best defined by former Prime Minister Harold Macmillan as “events, dear boy, events”. That can hit the reporters as much as the politicians. I had produced and presented the latest edition of The Week in Holyrood (hear it on Heartland FM at 10am on Saturdays and later on Replay). It had gone off to the Network and had started its playout across Scotland from that evening.

Then, suddenly, the next day, rumours we’d heard of and talked of in the Media Tower at the Scottish Parliament for weeks suddenly burst into life. The former first minister was about to burst into the election campaign. The tumbleweed gathered speed, the dust arose, the horses sounded and the saloon bar doors swung open. Against the high noon sun beating down around the Are You OK Corral, we saw the outline of a familiar figure, a defined large pear shape, as we placed down our glasses in awe, for we knew who it was. “Well, hallo! I said you’d not seen the last of my bonnets and me,” smirked Alex Salmond, pushing back those swing doors and shimmying over the sawdust-laden floor. “Now, believe me, I’m only here to be helpful. “My gang is here to deliver a Super Majority for independence. “With me and my team, we can get around 90 seats for indie. “No, now don’t expect me to go into a coalition or take a Cabinet seat, but thanks for asking. “I’m doing this for Scotland. And Scotland belongs to me.”

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Barely 48-hours into the Campaign and the meat and drink for the journalists has been laid on the table across five sensational courses. Until this moment, many of us in the Media Tower believed the Story Of The Election had to be Anas Sarwar taking Labour into second place, kicking the Tories into third spot at Holyrood. It may yet be. Nicola Sturgeon is expected to lead the SNP to victory on the 6th of May. Her future may depend on leading them to a majority victory. IndyRef2 will feature hugely in the coming weeks. There will be a second referendum on Scottish independence, but its timing at this moment is uncertain. Brussels will readily welcome an independent Scotland back into the EU. Forget what you hear about “having to join the Euro”. That is simply an aspiration set for all Members. An independent Scotland may choose to do so. Or not. The Unionists are not working together on this Campaign but they do have a common goal: economic recovery. The SNP and the Greens also seek recovery. They have an alternative vision: recovering and reshaping as an independent country. As ever in Scottish political reporting, the definitive line is the Constitution. It is, of course, unwritten as a document, but is set in statute over a series of parts. However you may vote, I ask you to please vote. It is a democratic freedom secured for you and me. We approach the most important election of the Devolution Years. As a journalist, covering it is a privilege. I hope we serve you well over the coming weeks.

Charles Fletcher presents The Week in Holyrood on Heartland FM at 10am on Saturdays

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Advertising Rates Radio Advertising Rates

Standard Rates - Set Price plus One-off Production Fee and 20% VAT 20 Second Advert

£2.50 (per play)

30 Second Advert

£3.50 (per play)

40 Second Advert

£4.50 (per play)

50 Second Advert

£5.50 (per play)

60 Second Advert

£6.50 (per play)

Single voiced commercial, including scripting and professional voice-over, from £60.00, plus VAT. Additional voice at £30.00, and one use of Library Music at £30.00.

Radio Sponsorship Packages Prices starting from £90.00 per month plus VAT. All in-house production fees included.

IRIS Magazine Advertising Rates Prices offered as a one-off, or as an ongoing direct debit campaign with the opportunity to update your advert. Full Page Interactive Advert

£75

Two Page Interactive Advertorial

£125

Assistance in creating advertorials also offered by our team for a fee. Contact us for more details. All adverts and advertorials will include a direct, clickable link to your website or social media page.

Bespoke and Tailor-Made Options Over to you! You have the product, and we have the platform. Let us know exactly how you want to market your business to Highland Perthshire, and we’ll make it happen… your way.

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We have been awarded devices from Connecting Scotland as part of our Digital Buddies project to help older people get online in Highland Perthshire! Being online is an essential lifeline. The internet is a great way to keep us connected to friends and family, informed and entertained and access public services. If you are an older person (over 60), in Highland Perthshire and don’t have the confidence, kit and connectivity at home we can help. The project can provide a free tablet, mifi and support to set it up and use it.

To find out more get in touch with Ruth at ruth.w@otbds.org or tel: 07925635591. Digital Buddies is a project run by the community development charity Outside the Box.

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Whisky for the Masses from The Mob by David McNicol

The Distillery and the Godfather With thousands of visitors annually, the picture-postcard Edradour Distillery, established in 1837 is one of the most frequently visited in Scotland; and rightly so. Beautifully set among the rolling barley fields above the town of Pitlochry in the southern Highlands. But beneath the rustic vibe, crystalline streams and the smell of aging spirit there lies an extraordinary tale which transports us from the quiet, timeless hills of Perthshire to the blood-soaked streets of 1930s Manhattan. For Edradour was once owned by the New York Mafia. In 1914 wine merchant, William Whitely secured the purchase of Leith based, JG Turney & Son. Turney had been established in 1891 as ‘distillers, blenders and exporters of Scotch Whisky and other spirits.’ But by 1914 however it was to all intents and purposes defunct, and he bought it for peanuts. It was registered, then immediately shelved as a holding company, while the same time listing ‘William Whiteley Co. Ltd.’ as the principal trading name going forward. Following the War, and during the lucrative hey-days of prohibition, he had seen an opportunity to make serious money selling his blends under the counter into a very thirsty United States, introducing his House of Lords brand in 1922 and the even more successful King’s Ransom in 1928, with Edradour Single Malt beating at the heart of No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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both. To this end, he got involved with New York’s notorious mobsters who provided him with the market and distribution capacity. Prohibition would prove a cash-cow for all concerned. With the passage of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1919, the making, selling and buying of commercial alcohol for domestic and personal use was outlawed. The philosophy and morality behind ‘Prohibition’ was essentially sound, as it was genuinely believed that by the removal of alcohol from the equation then other societal evils, like crime would crumble. But the reality was very different, and there was no hiding the obvious fact that organized crime, usually prosecuted from the business end of a Tommy gun, prospered and developed into a multi-billiondollar enterprise. By the late 1920s, having streamlined the city’s criminal underworld into a structured business model, the king of New York was Charles ‘Lucky’ Luciano. His reorganizing created the modern Mob, constituted in the fashion of the old Sicilian Cosa Nostra, and one of his top lieutenants or consiglieri was the intelligent and ruthless operator, Frank Costello, supposedly the inspiration behind Mario Puzo’s character, Vito Corleone from The Godfather. Although money from slot-machines was his main income source, but with so much to be made from illegal alcohol sales, he was also by the late twenties dabbling in booze-running. In 1930 he began working with a mid-level bootlegger from Philadelphia called Irving Haim. The pair had gotten to know each other well during prohibition, and they established a very slick operation along the east coast, and formed a very natural partnership. Haim was born in Romania in 1905, and had become a naturalized US Citizen in 1912, and had climbed the ranks of the local syndicates, and investing himself into the world of rum-running, but he was also involved in bribery, corruption and federal agent pay-offs, work that resulted in an attempt on his life. All the while he ran a successful and wholly legitimate tobacco industry, where he funneled all the drink money and washed it into clean bills. Money laundering and a spotless public persona had seen him dodge more bullets than the ones fired at him from a gun. Haim would never be arrested for any crime, a fact not lost on Costello who used this seemingly untouchable quality to their business strategy. In 1933 following the repeal of the 18th amendment, Haim and Costello, whose network of speakeasies had been a major part of the success story, formed ‘Alliance Distributors’, who became the

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exclusive legal importers and distributors for all of Whiteley’s products in the United States. By 1932 Edradour itself was facing closure and so the company bought the place to ensure supply. By this point his portfolio included over 50 labels, but he wasn’t getting any younger, and with no children of his own the clock was counting down towards inevitable retirement, and so in 1937 he sold his stock Alliance. A year earlier Luciano was jailed for running a prostitution racket and so Frank Costello became the de facto boss of the organization, head man in the world of American organized crime. It gave him freedom to flex his economic muscle. In order for Alliance Distributors to buy Whitely out, Haim needed money and although he tried to distance himself at a later Senate hearing, in 1938 Costello endorsed a note to the tune of $325,000 to use against a bank draft to purchase the business. Initially, the Englishman got cold feet when he heard of Costello’s direct involvement in the scheme, and so the gangster ‘officially withdrew’, instead using an ‘associate’, millionaire sportsman, and future friend of President Truman, William Helis, as the front man. Reassured, although probably unconvinced, he was happy to take the man’s money and retired.

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So, with suitcases stuffed with money, Irving Haim became the legal owner of Edradour Distillery and would remain so until his death forty years later. Alliance would continue, with Haim at the helm, and fellow crook, Phil Kastel would play the role of Brand Ambassador for the Scotch labels in America. He personally received a commission on every single cask sold. How much the big boss got is anyone’s guess, but you can bet Costello wasn’t in it for the good of his health. He later insisted that he’d signed the note to Haim out of longstanding friendship with all parties concerned, and that after the sale went through had no further part to play. However, in 1943 he was opening bragging about owning a Scotch distillery, and claiming House of Lords and King’s Ransom, still enormously popular through the forties and fifties in America, as “his whiskies”. But the net was closing in. In 1950 he was hauled in front of a Senate investigative committee to answer for illegal involvement in the drinks industry going all the way back to prohibition. It would spend a good amount of time delving into the dealings with Whiteley, both as a distributor and in the eventual takeover. It noted: “Though Costello probably makes most of his money in gambling, one source of revenue is his partnership with Kastel, Helis and Irving Haim, as sales agents for House of Lords and King’s Ransom whiskies. . . [and in] 1938 an agreement was executed between Irving Haim and William Helis, giving the latter an interest in William Whiteley & Co.” It was further concluded that Costello provided the money and remained an interested party, and that his denials to other hearings including that of New York State Liquor Authority, was tantamount to perjury. From this point the Feds began a systematic attack on the organization with the US Government looking to bring him down, like Capone, with charges of tax evasion. He would be imprisoned for contempt of the Senate and political corruption. In and out of jail his position weakened, and he lost control of the mob. He died of a heart attack at his Manhattan home in February 1973, aged 82. Haim died in 1977, and his spirits holdings split up. William Whiteley & Co. was sold and dissolved, and Edradour purchased first by an Australian consortium and then in 1982 by the House of Campbell, a subsidiary of the French drinks giants, Pernod. In 1986 they would release the first ‘Edradour’ as a single malt under its own name, and this charming, little distillery with a colourful, and now rarely mentioned history, emerged into the light. The tour buses turned up and it has never looked back. The now very respectable Edradour distillery is a strong supporter of local events and community groups in Highland Perthshire and is the sponsor of a studio at Heartland FM. No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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Bonniest Dog in Highland Perthshire. Thank you very much for getting involved and supporting a fun idea to crown a local dog Highland Perthshire’s Bonniest. We know only too well how much we all love our cuddly canines but as in every competition there has to be some finalists and ultimately, of course, a winner !! As you can imagine our judging panel had the terrifying task of whittling all the contestants you will see on previous pages to the six you see on this page. Our head judge, who shall remain nameless, spent hours pawing (sorry) through the photos based on all the submissions from the panel. After a ruff (sorry again) sleepless night the Head Judge had this to say. ‘I love dogs, all dogs and this has been the most difficult task I have ever had. I looked for funny ones, ones that had a commanding presence, ones that looked liked loyal companions and everything else in between. I fell in love about thirty times and had lots of fun imagining how their character behaved and who might have been their proud owner. If your dog did not make the final six please don’t hate me, I have already beat myself up a hundred times as I have put in and taken out and put back in again just about every single dog I have looked at. Thankfully, the final vote is not down to me but to you, the listeners, readers and followers of Heartland Multimedia. Please vote on our website by following this link.and good luck to all.’

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Borderpoodle

Harley

Lexie

Nelson

Glen

Bella

Bonnie


Leo

Brodie

Cooper

Reilly

Lola

Hunter

Ginny


Mac

Kirsty

Dougal

Pippa

Tilly

Milo

Kaiser


Bolfur

Kenzie

Kobi

Zizi

Asher

Dougie

Lola


Lucy

Mishkal

Pippa

Annie

Rolo

Salene

Archie


Slioch

Charlie

Levi

Struan

Poppy

Hendrix

Ludo


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Voting Time Now it is your turn. You get to pick the winner, we found it far too hard to make a decision. Simply chose which dog you feel is the one most suited to the title of Highland Perthshire`s Bonniest Dog You have until April 16th to cast you vote and you do that by clicking on the link below.

Vote Here

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Over leaf you will find the final six dogs. The decision as to which dog gets to wear a crown is now entirely down to you.

Simply go to VOTE HERE and cast your vote. The winning dog will be announced in the May edition and will appear on the front page. No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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The Final Six

Kobi

Brodie

Slioch


It`s Up To You Now

Hendrix

Milo


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Dunkeld, Clan Donnachaidh and a Battle. by David McNicol

On the 28th of July 1689 Alexander Robertson of Struan, 13th chief of the Clan Donnachaidh marched his men into the grounds of Blair Castle deep in the hills of Highland Perthshire. He was there to join his clan from the wilds of Rannoch to the rebelling Jacobite army; an army that had just won a spectacular victory against the government the day before at the nearby Battle of Killiecrankie. It was however an afternoon of mixed emotions for the supporters of the exiled king, James VII: for at the very moment of victory their inspirational leader, John Graham of Claverhouse was killed. The Robertsons arrived in time to attend his funeral. After the service the Jacobite high command weighed up their options, Struan among them. The momentum was with them, but with Claverhouse gone, what was the next logical step? What would the great warrior have done? Either emboldened or punch drunk, the Jacobites decided to prosecute the advantage and press on with their revolution against King William of Orange. The next target was to cross the wide and fast River Tay, and the most logical place to do this was Dunkeld, sitting on the very edge of the Highlands and the road to Perth and beyond.

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On the 21st of August, the Jacobites streamed across the flanks of the rocky hill, Craig-a-Barnes, and looked down upon the sleeping cathedral city, a town that would be unregonisable today: both in style of buildings, but more importantly in layout. The modern observer would also be struck by the lack of trees in the surrounding countryside. Apart from a few patches of woodland along the river and on the upper hillsides, small crofts, cattle and barley rigs would have dominated the scene.

The Dunkeld of 1689 was essentially the inheritor of the medieval market town that grew up around the cathedral church. Little would have changed since 1350, and the place was dominated by two key buildings: the Cathedral itself, which until the Reformation was the centre of a powerful Catholic bishopric; and Dunkeld House, seat of the powerful nobleman, the Earl of Atholl. Until 1560 the lives of everyone in Highland Perthshire revolved around these two men.

The Cathedral was built in the mid-14th century, and not long after a ‘Bishop’s Palace’ was erected just to the south and west, between the clocktower and the Tay. It was said to be in the ‘Highland Style’ – two floors and roofed with thatch. Today, most of the site is planted with trees along a fence-line. The town of Dunkeld would grow up around the church and these two important residencies.

All this sat within the tiny parish of ‘The Church of St Columba of Dunkeld’, which was surrounded on all sides by the huge Parish of Little Dunkeld. The eastern boundary of the city was the small Ketlochy Burn,

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which is now entirely underground, and flows a little to the left of Bridge St - Atholl St as you travel north. Around 1500, with plague ravaging the countryside, Bishop George Brown, concerned that the dead had to be transported through the town from the north to get to the parish church on the south side of the river (the medieval church lay close to the modern building, built in 1757), spilt Little Dunkeld in three. To the north and east he erected the parish of Caputh for English speakers; to the north and west, Dowally for the Gaelic speakers; and, south of the River – Little Dunkeld as is. In Gaelic, Little Dunkeld is Baile a’ Mhuillin, meaning ‘settlement of the Mill’. Where that mill sat is anyone’s guess, but it was known that back in 1500 there was a sizeable village on the southern bank of the Tay, linked by a wooden bridge to Dunkeld itself (the bridge would be washed away in a flood, not to be replaced until 1809). Indeed until Telford’s bridge was completed the principal axis of the town was east to west, rather than north to south, and centred on the High Street, Cross and Cathedral Street. From here small lanes, known as wynds, led down to the river. But, this is to all intents and purposes a re-modeled town – one rebuilt after catastrophic destruction. As the Jabobites shouted their famous slogans and swarmed down to into this most ancient of towns, the defenders – the Earl of Angus’ 26th Regiment of Foot, who were heavily outnumbered, braced themselves. The regiment were known as the ‘Cameronians’, in honour of the martyred Covenant field preacher Richard Cameron, and they saw themselves literally as the soldiers of God. The Jacobite rising came less than 30 years since the ‘Killing Times’ when king and the staunch Presbyterian Covenanters went to war, and much animosity still existed on both sides. Trapped with the river behind them, and a circle of small hills to the north, the Cameronians had no option but to dig trenches, build dykes and stand their ground. Around 800 would have to defend the crossing against a force of fierce clansmen nearly five times the size. But, there was one advantage. Highland armies are most effective when charging down hillsides, and certainly not in house to house combat; indeed, urban combat was rare in 17th and 18th century Scotland. Although the Cameronians lost their leader William Clelland early on, they trusted in their faith and despite moments when it seemed they’d be overwhelmed they stood firm. After No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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a sixteen hour fight amid street and house, the Jacobites had failed to take the town or cross the river, and so, dejected headed back up to Blair to lick their wounds. As they marched away, they heard the Cameronians singing hymns: their version of God had won – Dunkeld on the other hand had not. The town was ablaze, and in the aftermath only the cathedral, Atholl House and a couple of other buildings were left standing – the rest was smouldering rubble.

The length of time since the battle, and the totality of the destruction makes it difficult today to redraw the map of pre-1689 Dunkeld: but not entirely. Today, the cathedral, the Dean’s House and the Rectory House are the only surviving buildings in Dunkeld dating from before the battle in 1689. The inferno didn’t completely destroy the layout, with buildings continuing to line the south side of the cathedral at least into the mid to late 18th century. But, the bulk of the town which lay to the west of the church and around Dunkeld House was never re-built: only Cathedral Street and the Little Houses would preserve the past. For all that, it has left us with a picturesque cathedral-town amid peaceful parkland, wooded hills; and then as now as always: the Tay flows quietly past.

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Clan Donnachaidh, whose principal names are Robertson, Duncan, and Reid, is Heartland's neighbour, with its headquarters and its own museum just up the road at Bruar. The Clan lays claim to be Scotland's oldest. It fought for Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn, its Chiefs were for centuries the Scottish monarchy's most loyal supporters, and its clansmen were seen as the finest swordsmen in the Highlands. Nowadays its Clan Society boasts a global membership and enjoys Gatherings and Games at home and across the world. Recently its achievements included helping to buy and preserve for posterity the kirk at Struan where a thousand years of its ancestors lie buried; giving a permanent home at Bruar to the 51st Highland Division's splendid memorial statue of a piper; and launching its Youth Award for local youngsters who have shown exceptional courage in adversity.

Clan Donnachaidh, whose principal names are Robertson, Duncan, and Reid, is Heartland's neighbour, with its headquarters and its own museum just up the road at Bruar. The Clan lays claim to be Scotland's oldest. It fought for Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn, its Chiefs were for centuries the Scottish monarchy's most loyal supporters, and its clansmen were seen as the finest swordsmen in the Highlands. Nowadays its Clan Society boasts a global membership and enjoys Gatherings and Games at home and across the world. Recently its achievements included helping to buy and preserve for posterity the kirk at Struan where a thousand years of its ancestors lie buried; giving a permanent home at Bruar to the 51st Highland Division's splendid memorial statue of a piper; and launching its Youth Award for local youngsters who have shown exceptional courage in adversity.

To learn more; email chair@donnachaidh.com, call 07931 217681, or visit www.donnachaidh.com

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Handam Refill Station CIC Hi, my name is Kaja Ekiert and I am the owner of Handam Refill Station. I invite you to check us out online by clicking the link on this page. You can see our product lists there and up to date details on our pop up shops and upcoming markets. We want to reduce packaging waste on a local level, to help the planet on a global level. We provide a plastic-free and environmentally friendly option to shop in Aberfeldy and Pitlochry! You can refill your containers with a wide range of products from loose food items to cleaning supplies and much more! We continue to listen to our customers' requests and expand our range accordingly to help reduce or eliminate the waste and plastic in our community and the local environment. We are so grateful for everyone's support, you have helped our Refill Station become what it is today, and we are now looking forward to building our Eco Hub with you! Find us at Aberfeldy: 11 The Square PH15 2DD Pitlochry: 2 Burnside Road PH16 2BP (behind Coffee Break and Chemist) My team and I hope to see you in either of our shops and online too. Thanks, Kaja

If you want to learn more please click this link www.handam.co.uk www.facebook.com/Handamrefillstation

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Rate Card

Advertise your Business in IRIS

Advertising both your business and product in our digital magazine is a fantastic, cost effective way to communicate with your customers. IRIS has some fantastic statistics, and our readership grows month-on-month.

IRIS Magazine Advertising Rates Full Page Interactive Advert

£75

Ensuring readers and browsers see your message.

Two Page Advertorial Approx. 250 words and two or three pictures to tell your story.

£125

Assistance in creating advertorials also offered by our team for a fee. Contact us for more details.

Remember: All adverts and advertorials are interactive, and will include a clickable, direct link to your website or social media page. All prices subject to 20% VAT.

We aim to produce a diverse and interesting read that helps showcase the best of Highland Perthshire. Our contributors are many, and our content varied. If you or someone you know has a passion for something in particular get in touch with us and your story could be included. Please share on social media, and tell your friend all about us. We are the very best monthly magazine available.

Check us out on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and leave a comment.

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If you have an idea or suggestion beyond what we offer, get in touch for a bespoke product that can be tailored to suit your needs.

Examples of a Sponsorship All of our regular features can be sponsored by you. The article will have your interactive logo leading customers directly to your website.

Sponsor “Business 2 Business” for just £50 per month, plus VAT.

Magazine Sponsorship If you’re looking for a high-impact campaign, why not sponsor IRIS Magazine itself? Our front cover will say “IRIS Magazine - Brought to you by [your company]”, and your sponsorship includes a full page interactive advert on page 3.

Your sponsorship will also include social media presence, your logo on our website, and 120 radio promos on Heartland FM per month. Truly unique!

Promo to include 10 second tag

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

5 plays

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This is a fantastic opportunity to sponsor one of our multimedia platforms. Be IRIS Magazine’s headline sponsor for

only £250 per month (plus VAT) A full magazine sponsor is taken for a minimum three months. T&Cs may apply.

To start talking, contact Bruce at magazine@heartland.scot Or Chris at chris.stanton@heartland.scot


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Business 2 Business The business world has an ever changing terrain. How is it affecting Highland Perthshire. See and hear views, thoughts and ideas from local operators inside. Visit our new B2B pull-out supplement


Are You Ready?, We Are. by Chris Stanton, sales & marketing.

Easter has arrived…..And we think we’ve cracked it Nothing stands still for very long at Heartland Multimedia. Our team meets regularly to ensure we are all moving in the right direction and are being as creative and innovative as we can be. Ultimately, everything we do revolves around a clear ambition of being here for our community in every respect. We want to be a stand alone business that generates a certain level of revenue to meet our monthly obligations. It really is as straightforward as that. We all believe that now, more than ever before, we have the right products to offer the businesses of Highland Perthshire and it is what we are calling the multimedia way. Remember, we are not for profit and the whole pricing structure has been put in place to ensure we remain in place and provide superb value to any business. We want to support you and we want you to support us. We have no plans to let our meetings go global like the Handforth Parish Council meeting did, however, if you could eavesdrop on one of our meetings you would find a committed and passionate group of people doing their level best to ensure Heartland Multimedia works. Our Chairman, Board of Trustees, Management Team and Volunteers are all part of what makes Heartland Multimedia tick. You, the listener or viewer or follower or advertiser are why we do it. We are now launching fresh new products and services. Let's look at an example of a new product. Previously we had full sponsorships available for entire shows across


our prime time-day time shows. Now, we have broken those full products down into affordable ‘part sponsorships’ that allow businesses to share the prime time-day time slots that might have been out of their reach beforehand. We want to include as many businesses as we can and offer the best value we can to ensure that we have a full complement across our multimedia offering. We really do see this as the new way forward for ourselves the businesses in Highland Perthshire. Please click this link that will take you to our ‘Advertise With Us’ page and have a look at the different brand new products we have available. One example is the Time Check Sponsorship which will consistently promote your business throughout the day and certainly help raise your profile. Another is sharing our prime time Breakfast Show Sponsorship that can consistently showcase your business every single week day. Of course, these are part of the multimedia way and include your profile on our Website, social media and our digital magazine Iris.

Why take the plunge? These days there are lots of ways to promote your business and we cover, in one transaction, an entire complement. More people are tuning in to our broadcasting, more people are reading our magazine and more people are engaging with us on our website and social media. We have a fantastic team full of energy and ideas on how to work for you and help you create your message in a dynamic way. Our skill sets cover all bases and between us we can offer support that no other organisation in Highland Perthshire can. Are you Ready? Like everyone we were delighted to learn of the new and extremely positive roadmap back to normality that was announced on 16th March. Are you ready to reopen your doors to potential customers ? If you are then we can help bring your business back to the minds of your previous customers and introduce you to many many more potential new ones.


Business 2 Business Our new Business 2 Business programme has been designed to introduce you to the people who run businesses in our area and hear what they have to say. We have had, and continue to attract, some fantastic guests who really have their fingers on the pulse of what is going on. Tune in on a Saturday at 12 noon for the latest programme then on a Monday between 6 pm and 7pm for a repeat. It’s a great listen and please get in touch should you wish to feature. We want a cross section of individuals to contribute to what is quickly becoming a must listen to broadcast. All the very best and here's to a positive few months ahead. Chris Stanton Sales and Marketing

You can watch the Business 2 Business videos below or go to our YouTube Channel to view all the videos in the series so far.

Ross Dempster from Beyond Adventure, and Tracie Hall from Cafe Calluna, join Chris and Alistair to speak about tourism in Highland Perthshire, accessing business funding, and looking after your mental health on this week's Business 2 Business.


Vicki Unite of Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, and Kevin Milne of Saleshire, join Chris and Alistair to chat about the importance of keeping up in a digital age, and how the right technology can help customers feel safe when shopping.

Fiona McLellan, of Elevator, and Patrick Birkbeck of House of Bruar, join Chris and Alistair to discuss entrepreneurship, running a retail business, and the business opportunities beyond COVID restrictions.

Chris and Alistair are joined this week by Fergus McCallum, of the Thistle and Orchid Beauty Salon, Pitlochry, and William Stormont, of Scone Palace on this week's Business 2 Business.


Business Gateway Tayside: Friendly, local support for YOUR business! This month, we’re introducing to you to Elaine Donnachie, Business Adviser for Perth & Kinross…. Tell us about your role… I’m a Business Advisor working within the Start-Up team which means I work with anyone from pre-start up to 1 year of trading. In short, I help get businesses up and running and support with their initial growth period! What made you want to join Business Gateway? Hearing about the difference Business Gateway made to their clients’ lives was the biggest influence – it sounded like such a rewarding job! I joined in November and can already confirm it definitely is the most rewarding job I’ve ever had. Being able to help people make their dreams and goals a reality, and not having to charge them a penny for it gives me amazing job satisfaction. What areas do you focus on? I work with businesses in rural Perthshire which suits me perfectly – it’s where I live, and I know how much the area has to offer. What’s your experience of the local area? I come from a farm just outside a small village on the Perthshire/ Angus border. My parents are both from agricultural backgrounds, and my brother and fiancé are now also in that industry. I love the rural lifestyle and enjoy spending the summer months socialising at agricultural shows across the country – catching up with friends from near and far.


What’s the most enjoyable part of your job? Getting that email from a client thanking you for your help, letting you know they’ve managed to successfully start their business and are doing well… it’s just great! That’s what makes it all worthwhile at the end of the day. What are the most common enquiries you get from businesses looking for support? Most people are initially looking for legal structure support – when you google “how to set up a business” it can throw out a lot of terminology and look quite complicated and scary on first glance; so a lot of people come to us just to talk it over with someone to better their understanding (and scrap all the business lingo!) Are there any misconceptions about Business Gateway? Some people think we only deal with businesses in towns and cities – because that’s where our offices are based. But that’s not the case at all – we’re always available to help, wherever your business is based. We work with everybody from the person part-time selling fudge made in their kitchen to the multi-million-pound entrepreneur and everything else in between! There really is no business too big or too small. The past year has been an incredibly tough time for businesses. How to you feel about the road ahead from here as we move out of lockdown? One thing I’ve noticed since starting this job is how resilient and adaptable most people are. We’ve seen some really innovative ideas coming out – all due to the restrictions put on us by this pandemic. I’m looking forward to watching local businesses rebuild the local economy. Finally, what’s the best piece of business advice you’ve ever heard? You’ve never failed; you’ve just found various ways that don’t work. Everything is a learning curve, and don’t let that put you off. Learn from it, and always move forwards with that lesson.


Who Cares? Discover local, flexible and professional care and wellbeing services across Perthshire The Care and Wellbeing CIC (community interest company) is an inclusive community of care and wellbeing practitioners and businesses based in Perthshire that supports both their members and their clients. It believes in local, compassionate, professional, flexible, and personalised services, where the focus is on individuals and what’s important to them.

Social care, particularly in rural areas, has long faced challenges around isolation, increased distance between people and community, poor connectivity and reduced access to resources. The Care and Wellbeing CIC is an innovative solution to some of these issues, providing services tailored to individual client needs. Clients seeking care have a whole menu of different options to choose from, including


befriending services, various forms of therapy, transport, respite support, independent living solutions and much more. As well as covering basic needs, the Care and Wellbeing CIC recognises the importance of quality of life, with a holistic approach that prioritises mental wellness. This means that choices such as creativity for wellbeing services, yoga, self-help, stress management, relaxation, and even biodynamic gardening are offered. See the full range of services available at www.thecareandwellbeing.coop

This support also stretches beyond the clients to caring for the carers. The members are self-employed, so being part of the community means they can both give and receive support. “The CIC is unique as a member organisation and for its inclusivity — anyone who’s approached for advice or assistance will give it gladly, which is especially helpful because practitioners in rural Perthshire are so spread out; as a member you can pick up the phone (or Zoom) and help is there,” explains Olivia Robertson, Chair of the Board.

Olivia Robertson, Chair of the Board.


The practitioners in the Care and Wellbeing CIC regularly come together and support each other in events facilitated by GrowBiz. “What’s unique about GrowBiz being involved is that enterprise and business support is included as well,” says Development Facilitator Lorna McCurrach. GrowBiz can help with 1-1 advice on starting up, becoming self-employed, and the challenges around the running or growing of an existing business. Other benefits of membership include a listing on the website, opportunities for promotion and funding, free membership to the GrowBiz-powered REDS initiative, access to useful resources, mentoring and monthly newsletters.

Lorna McCurrach, Development Facilitator.

The Care and Wellbeing CIC could be for you if you’re a carer or personal assistant, care and wellbeing practitioner, a business with an interest in care and wellbeing (e.g. artists offering classes that promote creativity and mindfulness), a business that offers tourism opportunities related to wellbeing, a business that may be interested in collaborating to create wellbeing packages, or a young person considering a rewarding and satisfying career as a self-employed health and wellbeing practitioner. Find out how to become a member at https://thecareandwellbeing.coop/ our-services/for-members/becoming-a-member/ More about GrowBiz enterprise support services can be found at www.growbiz.co.uk


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Highland Perthshire Community Councils Minutes 2021 - 2022 Open Here www.heartland.scot/iris-magazine

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Great walking adventures in Highland Perthshire By Richard Davison & Brenda Clough Getting outdoors and enjoying Scotland’s fantastic nature and landscapes is good for all of us – it helps us to relax and reduce stress, it helps us get fitter, and it provides a chance to connect with nature and learn something about our countryside. Helping more people to get outdoors has been a constant theme of our careers, from leading work to introduce Scotland’s world-class outdoor access rights to writing the Scottish Outdoor Access Code to developing ranger services and local path networks throughout Perth & Kinross. Over the last 30 years or more, we’ve climbed the Munro’s and explored many parts of the Scottish Highlands. We gained Summer Mountain Leader qualifications and emergency outdoor first aid certificates. When we retired, we decided to continue this life-long interest by setting up our own walk guiding business called Perthshire Treks, which is based just outside Pitlochry. In setting up Perthshire Treks, we wanted to encourage more people to get outdoors and to attract more people to stay for a few nights in Highland Perthshire. Rather than simply taking people to hills and areas that are already popular, we wanted to focus more on places and routes that are off the beaten track. We also wanted to focus on smaller groups so that we had a bit more time to pass on some of our knowledge and experience to others. That’s the theory….our first full season was in 2019 and the Covid-19 pandemic then stopped us in our tracks! For 2021, we thought we’d try something a bit different so we’re running a number of full-day and half-day guided walks in Highland Perthshire. You can explore the full list on our website

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One of the things that really interests us is searching out attractive walks that might appeal to visitors. This involves checking out the walks and doing some research into things on the walk that people might find interesting. One of our new guided walks is a half-day walk that takes in Craig Fonvuick and the Pass of Killiecrankie. The walk starts at the Garry Bridge car park just north of Pitlochry. Our first stop is at Tenandry Kirk, which started life in 1836 as a “Chapel of Ease” – built to ease the lot of parishioners who had previously needed to walk long distances to worship each day. The walk then follows a path up past some ruined homesteads at Corhulichan to reach the summit of Craig Fonvuick at 413m. This is a great viewpoint, taking in Schiehallion, Ben Vrackie, Beinn a’ Ghlo and Loch Faskally. If the weather is good, it’s a great place to have a rest and a bite to eat.

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The path then heads downhill to reach Balrobbie Farm and on to Killiecrankie. From there, the route drops down to the Soldier’s Leap. After the Battle of Killiecrankie in 1689, a fleeing government soldier called Donald McBean managed to leap 18ft across the raging torrent of the River Garry……It seems quite a feat!

Killiecrankie itself is a very scenic place. Its name in Gaelic is thought to derive from “aspen wood” or “trembling wood”, it is particularly impressive when the autumn colours are out. The wood is a remnant of a post-Ice Age woodland and has been here for about 8,000 years! These days, the main native wood is sessile oak. Beech trees have become established and the National Trust for Scotland are doing work to reduce the number of these as they discourage the growth of other trees.

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The walk then follows a lovely path alongside the river, passing a hidden and impressive curved viaduct carrying the main railway line between Perth and Inverness. The viaduct was completed in 1863 and cost a total of £5,730! After crossing a bridge over the gorge, we arrive back at the Garry Bridge car park.

The walk is 8.5km (5 miles) long and involves 400m (about 1,300ft) of ascent. With various stops along the way, it takes about 4 hours to complete the walk. To hear more about our walking adventures and what we get up to, you can follow or like us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Richard Davison & Brenda Clough Perthshire Treks

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All Inclusive Marketing Support Limited Time Offer 

Our All Inclusive marketing support package has been created to create an affordable way to shout out your messages during this time of increasing optimism about our futures in 2021. This offer is for any  individual month, or consecutive three month period during the year, for full use of our multimedia  platforms. It is, without question, the b ​ est value deal we have ever done.   

IRIS Magazine Advertorial You  provide  us  with  one  image  and  approximately  100  words  that  helps  promote  you  and  your  business.  We  will write up the advertorial, including instant click-through to your website, for IRIS, our  Digital Magazine. IRIS currently averages 4 ​ 0,000 page reads per month. 

Radio Advertising We will help you script a 15 second advert for your sales message. Your message will go out in a  non-conflicting group of three ads, with a clear “Buy Local, Support Highland Perthshire” tagline.  Heartland FM has an estimated listenership of ​nearly 5000 people per week​.   

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

15 second advert between 7am and 6pm 

3 plays

2 plays

2 plays

2 plays

2 plays

2 plays

2 plays

Website Advertising We will put a sidebar advert for your business on our website, appearing on all pages, with an instant  click-through to your website. Our website currently averages​ 11,000 page views per month. 

Facebook Promotion We  will  post  social  content  twice  per  month,  which  will  include  a  tag  to  your  business  page  and/or  link to your website. Our Facebook page had ​6,375 followers​ at the end of November.   

Normal Price

Limited Time Offer

£299 plus VAT per month £799 plus VAT for three months 

£149 plus VAT per month £399 plus VAT for three months 

Towards the end of your campaign, you will be offered a ​10% discount  to take on a sponsorship deal, to  continue marketing your business  with Heartland Multimedia. 

   

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Write Ear Our accessible and vibrant arts section contains a selection from across the arts world of what is going on, being produced, written or performed in and around Highland Perthshire. See it all inside.

Visit our new Write Ear pull-out supplement.


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A Heartland Book Chat A Heartland Book Chat Tippermuir Books is a Perth-based ‘not-for-profit’ publishing company founded in 2011. For a decade, Tippermuir’s team of three, Rob Hands, Matthew Mackie and myself, have published books covering many genres, in both English and Scots, most with a Scotland-theme. Two of our books have been shortlisted as ‘Children’s Book of the Year’ by the Scots Language Awards, and one of our authors, the poet Stuart Paterson, was named ‘Scots Language Writer of the Year’ in 2020. As a member of Tippermuir Books, it is a great pleasure to be asked to contribute a monthly piece to IRIS, the Heartland magazine. Every month, ‘A Heartland Book Chat’ will feature two titles, each chosen to be of interest to the magazine’s readers. One will be a new or forthcoming title, the other a Tippermuir title. In the main, the books selected will have a Perthshire or Scotland nexus, and will cover fiction, non-fiction and poetry; children’s books will also feature.

Mary Symon: Collected Poems

(Ian Spring and Fred Freeman (editors)) was published in 2020 as a ‘second impression’ by Perth-based Rymour Books. I was drawn to the book as much for its content as to the publisher. Rymour is the new kid on the Perthshire publishing block - there are a few out there (‘We are not alone’) and I was intrigued to take a peep at one of their books: Who do they use for a printer? How do they package their books for direct sales? What font do they use for poetry? Just plain nosey really. The question of the best font for poetry, however, is one I have pondered long and hard – I guess I need to get out more. Rymour takes its name, according to their website, from Thomas the Rymour, ‘a legendary Scottish poet and prophet’ who had spent seven years of his life in Fairyland after being ‘carried off by the Queen of the Elves’. More importantly, it is linked to the Rymour Club whose remit was

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the preservation of Scottish songs, folklore and traditions. In publishing the collected poems of Mary Symon, a Scots language poet whose work has been neglected and unavailable for some time, Rymour Books have stayed true to the Rymour Club remit. The book begins with a preface by Fred Freeman, a Scottish traditional music scholar known for his work on the Complete Songs of Robert Burns. Here, I immediately found a resonance with my own research on William Soutar and the Scots language publications of Tippermuir Books. Alongside the current increase in interest in Scots, and thankfully book sales, especially those for children, there are several debates that echo around social media and old-fashioned media, i.e. newspapers, as to whether Scots is a language or a dialect, and as to the literary status of poetry and prose written in Scots. Freeman exposes in his preface that this is an old debate, offers a refutation of the claims made by advocates of the ‘Scots is a dialect and poor cousin of English’ by drawing on some heavy hitters including Hamish Henderson, another Perthshire poet (and so much more). Henderson suggested that Scots included English, in other words English is a mere sub-set of the Scots language! Freeman also exposes parallels in this argument with the historical debate between the literary merits of Hebrew and Yiddish writing and poetry. As someone brought up in a home where my grandmother and mother conversed in Yiddish, the book had hit a second resonance. The debate as to Scots’ literary value is one that poets and writers employing Scots and its variants, in Mary Symon’s case, a vernacular Scots from the Northeast of the country, continue to engage with and why books such as this are important. Hats off to Rymour for taking up the charge. In his introduction, Ian Spring tells us something of the life and artistic output of Mary Symon. Born in 1863 in Dufftown, Mary Symon had the opportunity to study in Edinburgh under James Logie Robertson, a poet, writer and literary scholar (born in Milnathort, by Kinross)

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who is better known under his pseudonym, Hugh Haliburton. It was Robertson and later the poet Charles Murray who provided Symon with inspiration and encouragement. Symon went on to study at the universities of Edinburgh University and St Andrews. Hugh MacDiarmid, who offered Symon initial encouragement by publishing her work, later, as he developed his ideas around Scots as ‘a modern literary language’, was critical of Symon and other vernacular poets for what he perceived as sentimentality, insularity and parochialism. William Soutar too suffered under MacDiarmid’s ire being described by his former champion, in the posthumous Collected Works, as ‘a minor poet’, a description that took Soutar’s cultural legacy decades to overcome. The similarities between Symon and Soutar are arresting. That is not to say they were similar poets but rather they are overlaps in their work, reception and poetry. Both Symon and Soutar wrote in both English and Scots, for example. Soutar preferring the English tongue when dealing with matters of politics, state and war; Symon’s Great War poetry, which includes much of her best work, employing both Scots and English. In their war poetry, both poets present the themes of loss, carnage and sadness. Here are lines from Symon’s ‘The Soldiers’ Cairn’ written before the Battle of the Somme (and much later performed as a

‘The Soldiers’ Cairn’ Lads in your plaidies lyin’ still, In lands we’ll never see, This lanely cairn on a hameland hill Is a’ that oor love can dee; An’ fine an’ braw we’ll mak’ it a’, But oh, my Bairn, my Bairn, It’s a cradle’s croon that’ll aye blaw doon To me fae the Soldiers’ Cairn.

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‘The Permanence of the Young Men’ No man outlives the grief of war Though he outlive its wreck: Upon the memory a scar Through all his years will ache. ... Upon his world shall hang a sign Which summer cannot hide: The permanence of the young men Who are not by his side.

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song by Jim Reid) and Soutar’s ‘The Permanence of the Young Men’ written in 1940. Symon’s poetry was eventually published in 1933 as Deveron Days and was well received. Symon died in 1938, her obituary describing her as ‘a woman of extraordinary wide culture’. Symon’s legacy is well preserved in this collection of her poems and although as the editors admit her poetry and prose was of ‘various quality’, there are many in the book that readers will find enjoyable, poignant, effective and noteworthy. Mary Symon: Collected Poems is published by Rymour Press priced at £9.99 (paperback) - https://www.rymour.co.uk.

Ice Cold Blood (David W Millar) s the second novel from David Millar, A Chocolate Soldier published in 2016 being his first foray into fiction. In his new book, published as an eBook, Millar moves into ‘tartan noir’ to produce a clever and absorbing whodunit crime novel with enough twists and turns to keep afficionados of the genre guessing. Here’s the book blurb: ‘A woman’s body is found in the remnants of a snow-hole dug on Ben Nevis. Naked, with an ice axe embedded in her skull, the cause of Ellie Saunder’s death is clear, only the murderer remains to be found. But inconsistences remain, and recently-appointed Detective Chief Inspector William Tosh is keen to solve the case. Three men had been a major part

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of Ellie Saunder’s life: a structural engineer, a professional climber, and a third mysterious figure, John Serafini, a psychosexual counsellor. Serafini, it transpires, had a strong motive to see Ellie dead. His reluctance to come forward adds to the case against him. Throughout the investigation DCI Tosh feels the rawness of his own failed relationship resurface as the life history of a woman climber who struggled with mental illness is laid bare. Can DCI Tosh solve the murder and find new love while wrestling with his and Ellie’s demons?’ Dr Paul S Philippou is Honorary Research Fellow in History and a member of the Centre for Scottish Culture at the University of Dundee, and a director of Tippermuir Books. He is currently project manager and joint director (alongside Professor Kirsteen McCue of the University of Glasgow) of ‘The Soutar Project’, a Scottish Government supported endeavour to see to the publication of the complete poetry of William Soutar both published and unpublished alongside a modern and critical appraisal of the Scots Renaissance poet. With Jim Macintosh, he is currently editing a collection of poetry to mark the centenary of the birth of the great Orcadian poet George Mackay Brown; Beyond the Swelkie will be published in May/June this year.

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Perth Band Rosalie Release a New Single

Lost is Rosalie.’s second release after releasing their debut EP Sunshine in the Dark in September. It is the lead single for their upcoming album, of which the release date is yet to be confirmed. Rosalie. is the product of Nina Bossicart, singer-songwriter originally from Belgium and Stewart Landsburgh, guitarist from Fife. Their new release is a soulful and melodic approach to the indie rock scene, featuring strong vocals and layers of guitars. The band have said about the single that: “… it is an exploration into the feeling of helplessness … and allows us to see that not always having all the answers isn’t such a bad thing… although writing music is a way of connecting with people and allows for great collaborations, this song is the feeling of being alone on a drizzly day, watching the waves come in and out on the beach in a kind of blissful loneliness” . Although Rosalie. is yet to make its on stage debut due to the current climate. Nina and Stu have great plans for releases to come and are eager to get performing together.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ music.rosalie.official Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ rosalie.officialmusic/ Soundcloud: https://tinyurl.com/RosalieLost info@rosaliemusic.co.uk

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Glasgow Folk-Pop Brother Duo "Braw" Release Debut Album Braw are made up of Scottish brothers Iain and Andrew Mundy. Originally born in Edinburgh but now based in the southside of Glasgow, they specialise in close harmony vocals, much like Proclaimers brothers Craig and Charlie Reid! Their unique vocal blend allows them to create innovative and original blood harmonies, while offering fresh takes on classic songs. Formed in 2019, Iain and Andrew Mundy have been performing across the Glasgow music scene. During that year, they self-released their debut single, Swing Door, which was followed by Piece by Piece, Home from Home and finally, Whisky in Hand. All of these feature on their 2021 debut album, A Few Miles More. Whisky in Hand reached number 65 in the Official Scottish Singles Chart, and peaked at 50 in the Official iTunes Chart. It received substantial radio airplay including on BBC Radio Scotland's The Afternoon Show. The duo are no strangers to Perthshire with their Auntie and Uncle residing in the village of Kirkmichael. The beautiful album artwork and album design was done by Callander based Scottish artist Orla Stevens, and manufactured by Dunkeld based Birnam CD Ltd.

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Reflecting on the album Iain says: “A Few Miles More is a collection of songs that showcase the journey; via Melville Driving Range, Lamlash and St Andrews, that has led us to start performing together. We know this is just the beginning, and that we still have a fair way to go as a musical duo, but we’re going to enjoy every moment!” Andrew adds: “The album artwork by Orla showcases the regular return journeys I would take from his work in St Andrews to Glasgow to play at mid-week open mics - to sing with Iain was always worth the drive. It's been a tough year not being able to play together since last March, but it gave us a bit of time to finish off writing and recording the album when restrictions allowed. We're dead excited to get it out there, and when live gigs to return we'll certainly be putting on an album launch show and everyone will be invited! Keep an eye on our Facebook and Instagram for details on this. "

Album "A Few Miles More" was released on 19.03.21 on all digital platforms. You can pre-order now on the iTunes store, or pre-order physical CDs on brawofficial.com BRAW ARE... Iain Mundy - 07450281689 Andrew Mundy - 07809605906 brawofficial@outlook.com https://www.brawofficial.com/

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Aberfeldy Museum Group has been created to campaign and works for the establishment of a museum in Aberfeldy, dedicated to preserving and displaying the town's history.

Aberfeldy Museum These 8 mm films were taken between the 1930's and 1950's by Mr John George Douglas, Inventor of Dirgarve, Aberfeldy, one of a few who could afford a cine camera at this time. They were given to one of their staff, Joyce Cameron, who with her family kept these safe for many years, before donating them to Aberfeldy Museum. The films have been digitised and more will become available soon.

Here we have the Coronation Gala and Games from 1953 and Curling on Loch Tay from around the same time.

Next month we will bring you Sheep Dog Trials at Victoria Park in the 1940s and The Aberfeldy Show from the 1950s.

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Coronation Gala and Games from 1953, in colour with sound.

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Quiz Time Heartland FM Grey Matter Quiz Heartland FM share a brain teaser every day on their Facebook page. They had agreed to let us share some of our favourites. 1. I help you from your head to your toe. The more I work, the smaller I grow. What am I? 2. I am a protector.I sit on a bridge. One person can see right through me, while others wonder what I hide. 3. Four sisters, Jane, Freda, Mary and Alice were each born in four different months: January, February, March and April. "This is terrible," said Alice one day. "None of us have an initial that matches the initial of her birth month." "I don't mind at all," replied the girl who was born in March. "That's easy for you to say," said Jane "It would at least be cool if the initial of my birth month was a vowel, but no." In which month was each girl born?

General Knowledge 1.

Roughly, how many golf courses does Scotland have?

2.

Where did actor Ewan McGregor

3. What Scottish title was given to Prince William and Kate Middleton once they married? 4.

Where in Scotland does Europe's oldest tree grow?

5.

Who won the Scottish League Cup in February for the first time ?

6.

Who was Scotland’s first female Member of Parliament ?

7. Glasgow's subway is the third oldest in the wold. Which two underground systems are the oldest?

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8.

How many years does a Scottish Parliament term last?

9.

Which Scottish phrase was the title of a number one song in 1958?

10.

What is the most northerly point of mainland Scotland?

Anagram Round The following are anagrams of famous rabbits - can you identify which famous rabbits they are ? 1. 2. 3.

Nubby Guns Bribe Patter Teeny Sunbather

Out and About Evening all ! Where can you see this ?

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Local Anagrams Can you unscramble the letters to find these local places which are all connected with water. 1. 2. 3.

Hot Clay Monument Fill Furs for a Ball

What’s in a Name? This bird arrives in the spring iasgair-còirneach. A partner generally followed and great interest shown in any eggs that are laid and hatched. Which birds are they and where might you see them ?

Thanks to Sandra Cairncross for providing the questions.

Check how you well you did here.

Quiz Answers

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We reach over 120,000 people every month. Your potential customers

07975 930600 No ink, no print, no road miles. Helping the environment

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Heartland FM Schedule Monday

Tuesday

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

05:00 Sunrise

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

10:00 Alistair Smith Work Day Hits

10:00 Alistair Smith Work Day Hits

13:00 Afternoon Show with Chris Beattie

13:00 Afternoon Show with Chris Beattie

16:00 Drive Time with Updates from Sam Ross

16:00 Drive Time with updates from Sam Ross

18:00 Business 2 Business

19:00 Sounds Inspirational

19:00 Country in the Country with Clive Bridges

20:00 Eddie`s Archives

21:00 Bill Black`s Country Classics

22:00 Spinning the 60s wit Willie McIntyre 23:00 Heartland Hits

Saturday Friday

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

05:00 Sunrise

06:00 Sunrise with Howard

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

07:00 Softly into Saturday

10:00 Alistair Smith Work Day Hits

08:00 Weekend Hits

13:00 Rock `n` Roll Recipes with Chris Stanton

09:00 Back to the 70s with Willie McIntyre

16:00 Drive Time with updates from Sam Ross

10:00 The week in Holyrood

18:00 Spinning the 60s with Willie McIntyre

11:00 From Me To You with Bruce Patterson

19:00 Country in the Country with Clive Bridges

12:00 Business 2 Business

21:00 Bill Black`s Country Classics

12:00 Weekend Hits

23:00 Heartland Hits

17:00 Motown, Disco & Soul 18:00 Rock n Roll Saturday with Mike Marwick 20:00 Double Scotch with Ian Lees 22:00 Under The Radar with Shauny Shaun


Thursday

Wednesday

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

00:00 Ballads after Midnight

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes

05:00 Sunrise

0500 Sunrise

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

06:00 Graham Howie at Breakfast

10:00 Alistair Smith Work Day Hits

10:00 Alastair Smith Workday Hits

13:00 Afternoon Sow with Sam Ross

13:00 Afternoon Show with Sam Ross 15:00 From Me To You with Bruce Patterson 16:00 Drive Time with updates from Sam Ross

16:00 Drive Time with updates from Sam Ross 19:00 Back to the 70s with Willie McIntyre 20:00 Celtic Celebration with Katherine Liley

19:00 Vinyl Frontier with Ian Moyes 21:00 Under the Radar with Shauny Shaun

21:00 Moonlight Drive with Chris Stanton 22:00 Sounds Inspirational

23:00 Heartland Hits

23:00 Heartland Hits

Sunday 00:00 Ballads after Midnight

13;00 Sunday Service from Pitlochry Baptist Church

02:00 Cool & Groovy Tunes 13:30 Heartland Hits 05:00 Sunrise 14:00 Ann-Marie`s Afternoon 06:00 Softly into Sunday 17:00 On The Weekend with Mike Marwick 07:00 Sunrise with Howard 19:00 The Vinyl Frontier with Ian Moyes 08:00 Heart and Soul with Howard Simpson 21:00 Moonlight Drive with Chris Stanton & David Wilkie 22:00 Melodies for You with Ian Lees 09:00 Eddies Archives 11:00 Sunday Morning for Hillbillies with Colin Phillips

Listen Live Here Anytime


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Back Issues March 2021

February 2021

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A Heartland Multimedia Publication

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January 2021

December 2020

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IRIS

Your free, community owned magazine. Written for our community, by our community, about our community.

@irisperthshire

@irisperthshire

@irisperthshire

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Profile for Heartland Multimedia

IRIS April 2021