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THE

HEAR TODAY, HEAR TOMORROW?

ING

CRC

The ability to speak and listen to others is fundamental to our participation in work, education, social activities and the community at large. Yet every day, thousands of Australians risk hearing loss and tinnitus through choices we make about exposure to loud sounds in the work-place, at sporting or leisure activities and in the home. Damaged hearing cells

Normal hearing cells

Like sunburn, damage to hearing cells results from the intensity of the sound, duration of exposure and how often you are exposed. This figure shows normal hearing cells and hearing cells damaged by noise exposure (E) in a human cochlea.

creating sound value

TM

t: (03) 9035 5347

e: enquiry@hearingcrc.org

w: www.hearingcrc.org


LISTEN HEAR! ESTIMATED THAT HEARING LOSS COSTS AUSTRALIA $11.75BN ANNUALLY IN LOST PRODUCTIVITY AND OTHER IMPACTS. EXPOSURE TO EXCESSIVE NOISE COSTS BUSINESS $1,880 PER EMPLOYEE EACH YEAR. (From Listen HEAR! 2006, a report by Access Economics and CRC HEAR).

Contributors to financial impact and 2% Education support services

57%

health 6% Direct care costs tax losses 8% Deadweight

Productivity & direct employment

of 27% Cost informal carers

Estimated annual costs of exposing an employee to excessive noise

SOURCE OF FINANCIAL LOSS

ESTIMATED ANNUAL COST OF NOISE-EXPOSED EMPLOYEE

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) workers’ compensation insurance Personal protection program

$130 $90

Employee quality

$330

Productivity

$660

Absenteeism

$570

Staff turnover

$100

TOTAL Source: Occupational Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Australia, Safe Work Australia, 2010.

$1880


UP TO 10% OF YOUNG AUSTRALIANS ARE REGULARLY EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF LEISURE NOISE FROM THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF NIGHTCLUBS, PUBS, LIVE MUSIC VENUES AND PERSONAL STEREOS (MP3). (From Binge Listening 2010, a report by. The HEARing CRC member, Australian Hearing).

Average noise levels (in decibels) of common leisure activities Nightclub, dance music, raves, disco Motor cross, car races, ute shows Sporting events

Common leisure activities

Concert, live music venue Other music, parties at home, etc. Machinery, power tools, lawn mowers, whipper snipper Computer games Fitness class, gym Pub, registered club, eg. RSL (no live music) Play sports Busy places Children and children's activities Other performance Traffic, trains, bus, car, motorbikes, planes Walking - surrounding noise TV, movies Construction, roadworks

70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100

Average noise levels is average LAeq

SOUNDS LOUDER THAN 85dB CAN CAUSE DAMAGE The LAeq takes into account all the varying sound levels experienced at an event and produces a single figure (in decibels).


The HEARing CRC’s mission is to reduce the economic and health impact of hearing loss through more effective prevention and improved remediation of hearing loss. Developed with Intrinsically Safe design and low cost of ownership and replacement in mind, The HEARing CRC’s Safears™ incorporates smart digital sound processing to enable wearers to hear sound and speech at normal loudness while remaining protected in high noise environments.

The HEARing CRC’s research is aimed at developing more effective public awareness of the risks to hearing associated with both work and leisure activities. Hearing loss from noise damage adds up over our lifetime. In just one year, leisure noise exposure for a young Australian can be almost 3.5 times of the allowable workplace noise exposure. Source: Binge Listening 2010

The cumulative effect of noise exposure from work, clubbing and a combination of both

Cumulative exposure (AYE)

70 Cumulative

60 50 40

Work

30 20

Clubbing

10 0 10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

Age (years) AYE - Allowable yearly exposure, based on acceptable levels of workplace noise.

Are You Protected? We can all protect our hearing by using personal hearing protection (earplugs, headphones) and by managing our daily noise exposure – reducing the volume, limiting our listening time and taking breaks from noise. The HEARing CRC 550 Swanston Street Audiology, Hearing and Speech Sciences The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 t: (03) 9035 5347 e: enquiry@hearingcrc.org w: www.hearingcrc.org


HEAR TODAY, HEAR TOMORROW