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tobacco FACt vS. MYtH

Myth “One or two cigarettes a

day while I’m pregnant is no big deal.�—Carol

Fact A pregnant woman who

Before you change a diaper, make sure you have everything within reach (fresh diaper, baby cream, wipes, etc.)

Lie baby down on the changing table. Sing a song or give her a toy to keep her entertained.

Undress baby’s bottom. Use the front of diaper to wipe o any poo, then fold diaper into tight bundle to prevent spills.

BY BA Gently cleanse baby’s bottom using baby wipes or a damp washcloth. Wipe girls front to back to avoid vaginal infections.

To wipe the back of baby’s bottom, hold her by the legs and gently lift her so her bottom comes slightly o the table.

AM

E CR

Apply a dollop of baby cream to prevent diaper rash.

smokes one cigarette a day is exposing her baby to a total of 13 full packs of cigarettes over the course of her pregnancy. very rarely does someone keep smoking only one or two a day. Nicotine is highly addictive. Eventually the number of cigarettes you smoke is likely to increase. And a pregnant woman who smokes a 1/2 pack a day exposes her baby to the cumulative effects of 135 packs of cigarettes, which is a pretty big deal.

Once you’ve dressed baby, put her in a safe place (bouncer or crib, for example), dispose of dirty diaper and wash your hands.

Moms & Babies

BULLETIN 1213

Remember: Never leave a baby unattended on a changing table. If you have to take your eyes o baby, keep your hands on baby.

Cigarette smoke irritates the lining of the nose, throat and lungs. Children can get bronchitis, pneumonia and ear infections from second hand smoke. the best way to protect your children is to quit smoking. talk to your Healthy Start care coordinator about resources to help you stop.

We hope you’ll enjoy this issue of A Healthy Start where you’ll find information on breastfeeding, parenting, daddy time and more. This bulletin is brought to you by Central Healthy Start, which provides free services for pregnant women and infants up to age three. Be sure to ask your nurse, doctor or midwife for the Healthy Start screen to find out if you and your baby could benefit from our services. Learn more about Healthy Start at www.CentralHealthyStart.org.

breastfeeding & tHE WORKING MOM

During Pregnancy

Join a breastfeeding support group and talk with other working moms about breastfeeding. l

Citrus County (352) 726-1731

Hernando County (352) 540-6819 Lake County (352) 314-6933 Sumter County (352) 569-2959

Healthy Start Services:

Childbirth Education

Breastfeeding Education & Support Parenting Education & Support

Tobacco Free Education & Support

Women’s Health Education & Support

www.CentralHealthyStart.org

Car Seat Safety for Babies Under Two

As a parent, you want to keep your baby safe. For the best possible protection, keep your baby in a rearfacing child car seat in a back seat for as long as possible—preferably up to their second birthday. Be sure to check the height and weight limit of your particular car seat.

CENTRAL HEALTHY START

welcome

my kids get isn’t going to hurt them.�—Linda

Source: Raising Children Network’s comprehensive and quality-assured Australian parenting website http://raisingchildren.net.au.

Contact your local Healthy Start program:

Healthy Start

A

Myth “the little bit of smoke Fact

Open clean diaper. Lift baby up by ankles and slip diaper beneath bottom. Fold the front ap up, tuck it ďŹ rmly around waist and secure each tab.

Produced by WellFlorida Council

daddy time

HOW tO CHANGE A DIAPER

l talk with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss a location where you can breastfeed or pump at work. Discuss schedules, too. If possible, transition by coming back part-time at ďŹ rst, or working split shifts so you can breastfeed baby between shifts. lDevelop a breastfeeding plan for the hospital and share it with your doctor.

The First Weeks

Start a breastfeeding routine of 8-12 times daily to establish a good milk supply. Get help from a lactation consultant or contact your Healthy Start care coordinator for breastfeeding support. l

Avoid using bottles or paciďŹ ers for the ďŹ rst 3-4 weeks in order to keep up your milk supply. l

If separated from baby, pump as often as you would nurse. Refrigerate or freeze the excess. l

Your Maternity Leave

You need at least six weeks of recovery for vaginal births and eight to twelve weeks for c-sections. l

l Your Healthy Start care coordinator or local WIC oďŹƒce can oer you information about good breast pumps.

As returning to work gets close, practice pumping and “banking� milk. l

Help baby and caretaker adjust to bottle-feeding. l

Don’t let work stop you from fulfilling your goal to breastfeed

Back at Work

Find a private room with a locking door and electrical outlet where you can pump. Bathrooms are not sanitary or comfortable. l

If childcare is close by, breastfeed baby at lunch. l

l Express milk about 2-3 times a day during a typical eight-hour day.

l Label and store your milk in a cooler or in a container in the refrigerator. l When picking up baby from childcare, take a few minutes to nurse baby before leaving.


Labor

mom& baby exercises MAKE tIME FOR

COMMON SIGNS OF

Finding time to work out with a new baby can be hard. These exercises won’t take much time out of your day and can be a fun bonding time for you and your little one.

CONtRACtIONS tHAt MAKE YOuR BELLY tIGHtEN uP LIKE A FISt EvERY 10 MINutES OR MORE OFtEN CHANGE IN vAGINAL DISCHARGE (LEAKING FLuID OR BLEEDING FROM tHE vAGINA) t HE FEELING tHAt YOuR BABY IS PuSHING DOWN LOW, DuLL BACKACHE CRAMPS tHAt FEEL LIKE YOuR PERIOD BELLY CRAMPS WItH OR WItHOut DIARRHEA

BABY LIFT

Lie on your back and have your baby sit on your tummy. Push through your heels and lift your hips up while squeezing your glutes through the motion. Lower down and lift again!

WHAt tO DO: CALL YOuR HEALtHCARE PROvIDER OR GO tO tHE HOSPItAL RIGHt AWAY IF YOu tHINK YOu ARE GOING INtO PREtERM (tOO-EARLY) LABOR.

What to pack for the hospital or birth center q Birth plan q Slippers or socks with grips q Comfortable underwear q Breast pump—ask nurses for advice on how to use it q Snacks q Camera—don’t forget fresh batteries and a memory card q Open-front pajamas for ease in breastfeeding

q Heavy menstrual pads q Toiletries—toothbrush, toothpaste, hairbrush, deodorant, shampoo, soap q Phone chargers q Going home outfits for you and baby q Glasses q Car seat— many hospitals will check car seats for proper installation before you head home

WHEN I WAS IN LABOR... “I was surprised how much the breathing techniques helped. My partner breathed along with me to help me stay focused and keep my breath steady. I think it helped him stay calm and relaxed through it all too.” “The contractions were intense, but luckily the delivery was quick. I remember this wonderful feeling when finally it was over. I had done it! My first memory of my daughter is of her exhilarating cry and her tiny body being gently placed on my chest.”

COOING CRUNCH

Lie on your back and hold your baby with arms extended in front of you. Sit halfway up, keeping abs engaged, and come down. Repeat.

What to expect...

How your child plays, learns, speaks and acts offers important clues about your child’s development. Developmental milestones are things most children can do by a certain age. Talk with your child’s doctor at every visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect.

Your Baby at Six Months

• Likes to play with others, especially parents • Responds to other people’s emotions • Likes to look at self in a mirror • Strings vowels together when babbling (“ah,” “eh,” “oh”) and likes taking turns with parents while making sounds • Shows curiosity and tries to get things that are out of reach • Begins to pass things from one hand to the other • Rolls over in both directions (front to back, back to front) • Begins to sit without support

Your Baby at One Year

• Is shy or nervous with strangers • Cries when mom or dad leaves • Repeats sounds or actions to get attention • Plays games such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake” • tries to say words you say • Explores things in different ways, like shaking, banging, throwing • Looks at the right picture or thing when it’s named • Puts things in a container, takes things out of a container • Gets to a sitting position without help • Pulls up to stand, walks holding on to furniture • May take a few steps without holding on Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov

KISS PUSH UP

Arrange yourself in the push up position (either with legs straight or bent) with your baby flat on his back near your head. Raise and lower your body doing traditional push ups, and be sure to smooch your baby on the way down.

Always check with your doctor before starting any exercise routine and take extra care to keep your baby safe while exercising. Sources: Disney’s Baby Zone and The Daily Green

Recipe

BEAN SALAD

Start to finish: 20 minutes Servings: 4

SALAD: 1 can (15-16 ounces) garbanzo beans, black beans OR black-eyed peas 1 ⁄4 cup green pepper and/or celery, finely chopped 1 tablespoon onion, finely chopped

DRESSING: 1 ⁄2 cup mayonnaise 1 ⁄2 cup sour cream OR plain yogurt 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar 1 ⁄2 teaspoon herbs (dill, oregano or basil) Salt and pepper to taste

In a medium bowl, mix beans, green pepper, celery and onion. In a small bowl, mix dressing ingredients. Pour dressing over salad mixture. Stir gently to blend well. Serve as a side dish or as a main dish over washed and torn lettuce leaves. the salad can also be used as a filling for lettuce wraps—take large lettuce leaves, fill with bean salad and roll up like a burrito.

Central Healthy Start - bulletin dec 2013  

http://www.centralhealthystart.org