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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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HOOPES VISION

September 30, 2013

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september VOL. XIII № 9

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TRX: YOU’RE SUSPENDED A Navy Seal secret revealed: how it works, and how to know if it’s right for you.

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TORTURE TIME Here we explain why some people hate exercise, and what those people can do about it.

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OPEN UP! We all need nutrients, but it turns out that these needs differ by age. Educate yourself!

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A BROKEN MEAL Fewer and fewer people are eating breakfast, especially among the younger generation. Here are some good reasons to reunite with your morning meal.

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RED WHITE AND BLACK & BLUE Americans are a competitive bunch, no doubt. But is all the competition really helping us?

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FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH Obtaining and retaining youth is the quest of millions. There is a side of this journey you may be underestimating: your mind.

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CRAYONS TO CAREERS The modern way to reach adulthood is different than it was decades ago; and everyone needs to know the differences.

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CRASH & BURN BLOOM Missing one Olympics by a hair was just the beginning of her frustrations, but Arielle Martin refused to be defeated. Here she explains how even the greatest disappointments don’t determine your fate.

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“Where my child’s smile is concerned, I want the best. Any father would feel the same.” — Jason, 38

Your child. Your orthodontist. Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile – that feels great, too.

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3/19/13 8:55 AM


SEPTEMBER.

I

EDITOR'S NOTE

move forward and dig into a new routine of productiveness. I've recently been working with the students at our favorite local college in a semi-advisory role, and am amazed at the intern-talent that works in our office. The young people of today are bright, and their future is even brighter. I’m very impressed. Just this week, one young man asked me how he could pursue more promising opportunities into his life. Good question. I thought about the typical, and fundamental, answers and elements of pursuing opportunities, including persistence, preparation, and sheer tenacity. But these students are already quite diligent at working hard. They are already opportunists, seeking excellence in their future. They are definitely on the outlook. As I think about how to best direct these college students about properly pursing

advancement in life come to those who have made themselves valuable, helpful, insightful, effective, enlivening, energizing, positive, constructive, crucial—attractive. This idea of attracting, rather than pursuing opportunity is echoed by business great Jim Rohn, who said:

If you can develop your skills, keep refining all the parts of your character and yourself, your health, your relationships, etc. so that you become an attractive person to the marketplace— you’ll attract opportunity. Opportunity will seek you out. Your reputation will probably precede you and someone will want to do business with you. All of the possibilities are there by working on the philosophy that success is something you attract.

The key to attracting opportunity and achieving success in life is to continue making yourself a more attractive person by honing and enhancing the abilities you have, the disciplines you have, the personality you’ve acquired, the character and reputation you have established, the language and speech you use—all of that refinement makes you more attractive in every role in your life, personal and professional. And,

EDITOR IN CHIEF

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

accomplishment makes you a fundamentally happier person. Every day holds the possibility to improve not only yourself, but also to attract opportunities and affect others. And the month of September is a good time to start fresh and begin a new season of success in your life.

®

VOLUME XIII, № 9

the best opportunities in their lives, I reconsider my own position on prospects. Instead of seeing opportunity as something to pursue, I see it as something to attract. My belief is that opportunity comes to those who have become 'attractive' people. Sure, attractiveness pertains to beauty and appeal. But, attractiveness is, even more importantly, the art of becoming enticing and engaging, useful and necessary. I’ve noticed that the best opportunities for

JOHN A. ANDERSON,

MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 2013

like September. It’s my favorite time of year to begin anew; even more so than January. For some reason, September is when I kick it into gear and make plans and goals. Maybe it’s the back to school push, or the time when seasons start to change. Maybe it’s because all the summer plans have happened and are now memories. Maybe it’s that classic Earth, Wind and Fire song that gets stuck in my head every year. Whatever it is, September is my month to

WRIT TEN BY

Healthy

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF John A. Anderson MEDICAL DIRECTORS Steven N. Gange, M.D. Lane C. Childs, M.D. PUBLISHER Kenneth J. Shepherd MARKETING DIRECTOR Timothy Howden DESIGN EDITOR Phillip Chadwick MANAGING EDITOR Michael Richardson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Whitney Lewis ONLINE EDITOR Dallin Law DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sandy Wise CIRCULATION MANAGER Ron Fennell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Aubrey Taylor, Brooke Kittel, Darrin F. Hansen, David Joachim, Douglas H. Jones, Robert Jones, Andy Peiffer, Lisa Mathews, Stuart B. Porter, Mark Saunders

Healthy Magazine (866) 884-3258 l info@healthy-mag.com To be included in our free online directory, please e-mail your contact information to directory@healthy-mag.com PLEASE NOTE: The content in this publication is meant to increase reader awareness of developments in the health and medical field and should not be construed as medical advice or instruction on individual health matters, which should be obtained directly from a health professional. The opinions expressed by the authors and advertisers are not necessarily those of the publisher. Call for reprint permission.

FACEBOOK.COM/HEALTHYMAG T WIT TER: HEALTHYMAGAZINE Healthy Magazine is dedicated to using recyclable materials.

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Copyright © 2013 Stardocs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Modern Childhood / in the news

SNACK ON THIS

In the late 1970s, American children consumed an average of only one snack a day. Today, they are consuming nearly three snacks per day. As a result, daily calories from children's snacks have increased by almost 200 calories over the period. Source: USDA

Getting Fat for Kids Is Different

New research from the National Institutes of Health compares how both adults and children gain weight, and the data shows that, compared to adults, children may be eating many more calories for each extra pound gained. Children under the age of ten, for example, have to eat two times the amount of calories to gain a pound of extra weight compared to an adult.

= Lower

BMI

Sleep Matters

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania recently published research showing that for people age 14 to 18, fewer hours of sleep at night is associated with an increased body mass index (BMI). Getting enough sleep at night could reduce the prevalence of obesity. Source: Pediatrics

High Anxiety “The average high school kid today has the same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950s.”

Source: National Institutes of Health

teen appetite

Source: Prof. Robert Leahy, American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York City

A surge in appetite around the age of ten in girls and twelve in boys foreshadows the growth spurt of puberty. How much of a surge? Let’s just say that Mom and Dad might want to oil the hinges on the refrigerator door and start stockpiling a small cache of their own favorite snacks underneath the bed. “Adolescents seem like they’re hungry all the time,” says dietitian Mary Story, “especially boys.” Kids who are big and tall or who participate in physical activity will still need increased amounts of energy into late adolescence.

MORNING MATTERS

Eating a healthy breakfast is associated with improved cognitive function (especially memory), reduced absenteeism, and improved mood.

healthychildren.org

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Source: National Institutes of Health

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Spinal Cord Stimulation: Tiny electrical impulses are sent to the nerves through small, flexible medical wires. Those impulses mask the pain signals going to the brain Discography: Investigates and establishes the role of intervertebral discs in the production of low back pain. Radio frequency (RF) Nerve Ablation: A therapeutic procedure designed to decrease or eliminate pain symptoms within spinal facets by temporarily deactivating minor nerves around the spine. Rehabilitation Therapy: Land and aquatic based therapies administered by certified physical therapists, athletic trainers and sports kinesiologists.

SMART F.I.T. (Functional Innovative Training) is a dynamic fitness program created by our physicians, physical therapists, and personal trainers. It is a multifaceted approach to fitness and wellness. The innovative cardiostrengthening program is based on exercise science and is individualized for your specific goals. It is designed to burn fat and strengthen muscles, as it synergistically improves your cardiovascular system. Since there is no set way of training, the body must be constantly challenged in different ways in order for the muscles to adapt and respond to functional activities. The program incorporates plyo-metrics, kickboxing, stability training, cardiovascular training, functional movements, suspension training, balance awareness, and strength training. Group sessions are available (2-5 at a time). Visit www.thesmartclinic.com to get started today.

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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.

>> Advisor FITNESS

THE PRESSURES OF BEING A TEEN TODAY

›› Slowed heart rate ›› Low blood pressure ›› Loss of bone and muscle mass ›› Cessation of a menstrual cycle in females ›› Dehydration ›› Electrolyte and chemical imbalances resulting from frequent vomiting. Such imbalances can lead to irregular heartbeat, a decline in cardiac function, and death ›› Chronic gastrointestinal irregularity and distress due to abnormal eating and elimination habits or the abuse of substances such as laxatives and diuretics ›› Damage to the esophagus caused by regular, self-induced vomiting ›› Fainting or lightheadedness

95%

OF THOSE WITH EATING DISORDERS ARE BETWEEN THE AGES OF 12 AND 25

O

nce upon a time, teenage life was infinitely simpler than it is today. In my day, there were no smartphones or social media websites. Processed “convenience” foods and fast food outlets were much less prevalent. “Super-sizing” was an unknown term. Fast-forward to 2013. According to the Pew Research Center, 95 percent of teens use the internet and 47 percent own smartphones. A lot of screen time means less time being active. 84 percent of parents report taking their teen to fast food at least once a week. Teens between 13 and 18 years old consume an average of 800-1100 calories during one of these fast food visits. This represents roughly one-half of a teen’s total daily calorie requirement in one meal! It’s no wonder that 1 in 3 American teens are overweight or obese, triple the rate seen in 1963.

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among teens. In fact, 95 percent of those with eating disorders are between the ages of 12 and 25. The two most common eating disorders, anorexia nervosa (self-starvation) and bulimia nervosa (bingeing and purging), can often lead to health risks such as:

HOW CAN PARENTS HELP THEIR TEEN DEVELOP POSITIVE WEIGHT CONTROL HABITS?

The combination of technology and super-sized convenience foods has not only led to expanding teen waistlines, but also to a marked increase in unhealthy teen dieting and eating disorders. Over one-half of teenage girls and nearly onethird of teenage boys use unhealthy weight control behaviors such as skipping meals, fasting, smoking cigarettes, vomiting and taking laxatives. The depiction of “ideal” celebrity body types on the internet further pressures teens to diet and lose weight. In fact, the more time teen girls spend on social media sites, the more likely they are to develop an eating disorder according to the National Eating Disorders Association. While many of these teen dieters don’t have an eating disorder per se, diagnosed eating disorders are the third most common chronic illness

›› Educate yourself regarding exercise and nutrition so you can model healthy lifestyle habits. ›› Stress the importance of staying active for health and longevity. ›› Discuss unrealistic portrayals of body types in media. ›› Eat as a family at home as much as possible so you can control ingredients and portions. ›› Pack school lunches with your teen. This will provide you with an opportunity to discuss nutrition. ›› Watch for warning signs of eating disorders such as sudden weight loss, excessive exercise, frequent vomiting and laxative/diuretic usage.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Brooke Kittel

Treehouse Athletic Club 801-553-0123 TacFitness.com

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3:07 AM

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EXERCISE

TRX YOU’RE SUSPENDED

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H

ave you ever wondered how Navy SEALs stay in shape during their covert operations, while they stay in safe houses, and generally when they live a life that doesn’t include 24-hour gyms, accessible free weights, and personal trainers? It turns out that they have to get creative to find out ways to stay fighting fit in situations decidedly not convenient nor easy. One SEAL, sick of trying to make weights out of logs and milk jugs, took some parachute cord, tied it to a pole and creatively developed an exercise regimen using only his own body weight and

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WRITTEN BY HEALTHY MAGAZINE STAFF

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The concept is fairly simple: the TRX system is a long, sturdy strap with a carabiner in the middle to attach it to an anchor point and handles and loops at either end from which you can suspend your feet or your hands. The length of the strap is very easily adjusted which allows for many different positions for your body. Depending on the length of the strap you can get into positions leaning forward or backward, lunges, push up positions, and many more. Depending on the position, the suspension focuses your body weight on your arms, legs, abs, etc. and works out nearly any group of muscles. On the TRX website they feature over 300 exercises that can be done focusing on different muscles and developing strength in different movements.

WHAT MAKES IT GREAT?

As the inventor found out, carrying around just a strap with a carabiner and handles is much more convenient that trying to find weights or a gym when traveling. Suspension training is ideal for people who want to exercise while on the road or who have a small amount of room in their house or apartment. There is an inherent element of instability while hanging from straps which requires your body to balance itself using the supportive core muscles near the spine during nearly every exercise. For this reason, this system promotes so-called functional strength training, which doesn’t isolate individual muscles, but instead is more synergistic in recruiting larger groups of muscles for each movement. The core muscles are constantly engaged, which is essential to back health and everyday, functional strength. Furthermore, the intensity of the workout is also adjustable depending on the angle of your body to the anchor point and obviously the tempo of workouts. Workouts vary from a light warmup, stretching exercise to a high-intensity interval training to a powerful strength training regimen.

IS IT RIGHT FOR ME?

Suspension training has been criticized for its reliance on core strength for the majority of its exercises. Some physiologists and exercise scientists have expressed concern that first time adopters without a good core fitness base could injure themselves. However, suspension fitness supporters point out that by simply adjusting the angle exercises can be made harder or easier depending on individual fitness level which should limit muscle strain to people just starting out. But to be safe, if you do have back or joint problems, consult your doctor before trying out suspension training.

gravity that kept him flexible, healthy and, most importantly, functionally strong. This former SEAL began marketing his homespun invention as the TRX suspension trainer and many gyms, and even some military groups, have adopted the system as an effective and flexible whole-body workout. Now a new, interesting phenomenon is occurring in many gyms, homes, and even hotel rooms around the country. Men and women are tying straps to poles, trees, even attaching them to a door jam to partially suspend themselves in air before they start acrobat-like workouts that some claim is a mix between mid-air yoga and weight lifting.

HOW DO I GET IT?

Many gyms offer the equipment and sometimes have classes built around suspension training. Some are more like meditative yoga mixed with slow, controlled weight lifting while others are an extremely intense high-intensity interval training. You can opt to buy the TRX system and instructional programs to keep you on track or even make one out of climbing materials for under twenty dollars if you feel crafty. Sources: nytimes.com, militarytimes.com

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EXERCISE

Torture Time WHY SOME PEOPLE HATE EXERCISE & WHAT THEY CAN DO ABOUT IT

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

SOME PEOPLE LIKE DOING MATH, WHILE OTHERS LOATHE IT. Some people like a trip to the mall, while others would rather eat tree bark. Exercise is the same way: there are haters and lovers. But the hard part about this is that while we don’t all need to do calculus, we’re all supposed to exercise. Researchers keep saying that if we don’t become more active, we are going to die of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or some other horrible problem. UNDERSTAND YOUR BODY All human bodies are built a little differently. Some are built with a natural athleticism and capacity for physical exertion. Some people have a great lung capacity, or a great ability to transport oxygen through the body, even if they don’t exercise regularly. Those not endowed with these physical gifts might step onto the treadmill as if it were some kind of horrendous torture device. It may more painful than when a gifted person does a workout, causing the ungifted to hate exercise.

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

Genes may be a factor in determining one’s inclination to exercise, but researchers don’t agree on just how big of a factor genetics are. Some say it may carry a weight of about 10 percent, others say 50 percent, when people are deciding to hit the gym. But there are plenty of other factors that can make you hate exercise, or even the prospect of exercising: ›› PAST EXPERIENCES: Memories of being forced to try a pull-up in gym class is enough to make anyone shy away from the gym in the future. ›› LOOKING STUPID: There will always be that ripped guy and cut girl in the gym who make everyone else look bad. There will always be someone with an effortless running stride, which makes your own stride look like a chicken’s strut. ›› PRESSURE: The media, peers, your doctor and yourself provide a mountain of pressure to maintain a healthy weight. This can steal the enjoyment out of exercise, making it drab and painful.

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3.5

%

An absurdly low percentage of people get the recommended amount of exercise in America

TIPS FOR

CHANGING YOUR MIND ABOUT HATING EXERCISE The pain will fade.

Research from the University of Heidelberg in Germany found that athletes have a higher pain tolerance than non-athletes, and that physical activity can change how we perceive pain, for pretty much anyone. So fight through that first wall of pain, because the next wall will probably be smaller.

Avoid comparison.

If you are faster and stronger, you might get complacent. If you are slower and weaker, you might want to give up. So exercise for yourself. If you can’t avoid comparisons, find another place besides the gym to exercise.

Don’t commit exercise suicide.

Take small steps towards fitness. Progression is the key, not killing yourself on the track the first time you run.

Find motivation besides “because I should.”

This type of motivation usually leads to puttering out. Establish goals, and establish the why’s, and exercise will become less hated.

Find something you enjoy. BABY STEPS Researchers from Iowa State University and Washington State University say that baby steps may be required to begin the journey to loving exercise. Sometimes, even walking is too much to begin with for sedentary people, their research suggests. A person’s ventilator threshold is the point when the amount of oxygen coming in versus the amount of CO2 leaving becomes skewed. The CO2 begins to exceed the body’s intake of oxygen, a sign that the muscles are more acidic, which the body finds stressful. Most people reach this threshold at about 50 to 60 percent of their maximum capacity. But for sedentary people, the threshold comes much sooner. Researchers say some people can reach it by washing dishes. So when they say baby steps, they mean baby steps. Getting off the couch to cook dinner could the baby step. Then progress towards more strenuous exercise.

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An absurdly low percentage of people get the recommended amount of exercise in America (about 3.5). This may be in part because we have such a narrow minded view of what constitutes exercise. Dumbbells and treadmills are good tools, yes, but the list of physical activities that humans are capable of is miles long.

Recognize that some pain is good. Halfway through a workout, exercise begins to feel like an illness, in many respects: aching, soreness, lack of breath and maybe a headache. But exertion is healthy. Source: npr.org/blogs

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The results are in

Teens Becoming Adults / by the numbers

Average SAT score, class of 2012:1498 Critical reading: 496 Mathematics: 514 Writing: 488

$26,600

Average ACT Scores, 2012: 21.1

The average amount of debt an American student has when graduating college.

English: 20.5 Math:21.1 Reading: 21.3

Source: The Institute for College Access and Success, Project on Student Debt

UTAH’S COMPOSITE: 20.7

I’m a Graduate, Now What?

Source: Collegeboard.com

You Live With… Your Parents? 2011:

33.5%

20.7 million

of Americans ages 25 to 29 had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2012. That’s a big jump from decades past.

people aged 18 to 30 live with their parents, up dramatically from just four years earlier.

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

Source: University of Minnesota Population Center

How Parents Feel About Their Young Adult Kids

THE BAD NEWS

58%

Of parents who have kids aged 18-29:

of college graduates took six years to

38% have kids living at home. 64% say their children aren’t

get a four-year degree.

a source of stress.

Source: collegecompletion. chronicle.com

42% say money is a source of parent-child conflict.

52% say they consider their kids adults (shocker)

Source: Clark University

Unemployed, or Unemployable?

Unemployment, June 2013: 16+: 7.6 16-19:

24 %

For the latest

20-24: 13.5

in news and

25-34: 7.6

research go to healthy-utah.com

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

%

%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

My Life Will Be Better

Gallup asked more than 1,200 children and teens, in grades 5-12, if they thought they would have a better life, better home and better education than their parents.

42% Very likely 52% Somewhat likely Source: gallup.com

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NUTR

ITION

OPEN UP! N U T R I E N T N E E D S BY AG E WRITTEN BY HEALTHY MAGAZINE STAFF

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THE TRUTH IS, THE FOOD PYRAMID (OR PLATE

THESE DAYS, WITH MYPLATE.GOV) PROVIDES A GOOD GUIDELINE, BUT AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF LIFE YOUR BODY NEEDS DIFFERENT THINGS. SO BEFORE YOU GO PUTTING YOUR BABY ON A SKIM MILK DIET OR GET FED UP WITH YOUR TEENAGE SON’S REQUESTS FOR MORE MEAT, LOOK AT WHAT EACH STAGE OF LIFE CALLS FOR. I N FA N T S Omega 3 fatty acids are needed for your infant’s brain development.

Water may seem obvious but it is especially important for toddlers because, “children have larger body surface area per unit of body weight and a reduced capacity for sweating when compared with adults” according to NutritionMD.

whole milk (dairy products should only be consumed after first year of life) flax seed cheeses olive oil Liquids (but avoid soda which weakens bones and contains a high concentration of sugar)

CHILDREN Vitamin A promotes normal growth and development; tissue and bone repair; and healthy skin, eyes, and immune responses.

milk eggs yellow-to-orange vegetables like carrots, yams, and squash.

Vitamin Bs (The family of B vitamins: B2, B3, B6, and B12) aid metabolism, energy production, and healthy circulatory and nervous systems.

chicken fish nuts eggs milk beans soy beans.

Vitamin C promotes healthy muscles, connective tissue, and skin.

citrus fruit strawberries kiwi tomatoes broccoli

Vitamin D promotes bone and tooth formation and helps the body absorb calcium.

milk fortified dairy products egg yolks fish oil sunlight ( The best source of vitamin D doesn't come from the diet —it's sunlight!)

SUPPLEMENTALICIOUS Wouldn’t a vitamin supplement just be easier than worrying about all the different foods and their vitamins? Easier, yes, but a pill won’t give you the health you’re looking for. Even the supplement industry and doctors agree that in an ideal world, we'd all—kids, teens, and adults—get our nutrients from food. "A pill will never replace the goodness that a wellbalanced diet brings," says Shaikh. Experts say there is definitely a place for vitamin or mineral supplements in our diets, but their primary function is to fill in small nutrient gaps. They are "supplements" intended to add to your diet, not take the place of real food or a healthy meal plan says Kathleen Zelman, Registered Dietician. There are thousands of phytochemicals, fiber, and other nutrients in food which all work together to promote good health. These natural combinations cannot be duplicated by a pill or a cocktail of supplements. And large doses of vitamins aren’t good for kids. They can even be toxic at times. If you’re set on dietary supplements, think healthy food choices first, then add vitamins and minerals as needed to fill in the gaps, and do so in combination with healthy food choices.

FOR CHILDREN

Advice from the doctors at WebMD: “Spread the variety of foods into several small meals and snacks throughout the day. If your child won't eat a particular food for a few days—like vegetables— don't fret. But reintroduce those foods again a day or two later, perhaps prepared in a different way. Kids' 'food strikes' usually end by themselves.”

TEENS

T E E N AG E R S Iron builds muscle and is essential for healthy red blood cells. Iron deficiency is a risk in adolescence, especially for girls once they begin to menstruate.

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beef turkey pork spinach beans prunes

Teens are at particular risk of dietary shortfalls, since they often skip breakfast, consume much of their food outside the home, and are more likely to have sodas, snack foods, and fast foods rather than low-fat milk, fruits, and vegetables, says Ulfat Shaikh, a pediatrician at the University of California-Davis School of Medicine and supplement scholar, so these recommendations are especially important for them.

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NUTR

ITION

l a e M n e k o r B A WRIT

TEN

EA BY H

M AG LT H Y

AZIN

F E S TA

F

SO WHAT’S IN A TYPICAL AMERICAN BREAKFAST?

›› Occurs within two hou rs of waking, before 10 am.

WHY YO UNG PEOPLE D BREAKF ON’T EAT A WHY EV ST AND ERY SHOULDONE

A

recent report from the Food Research and Action Center found that in 2012 more than 175,000 Utah low-income students got lunch at school, but only about 60,000 got breakfast. This puts Utah last in a nation where, on average, more than 50 percent of low income kids who get school lunch get school breakfast. This news is a two-fold tragedy. First, thousands of local children may be starting the day hungry, and second, missing breakfast may be making them fatter. Research shows that eating in the morning is a key component to obesity and diabetes prevention.

YOUNG PEOPLE AND BREAKFAST

More and more, American breakfast is characterized by an empty table, especially among young people. Almost a third of adolescents skip breakfast on a daily basis, and most skip breakfast multiple times per week, studies show. Girls and overweight and obese people are more likely to skip breakfast than others. People who skip breakfast are more likely to participate in unsuccessful and unhealthy weight loss practices, researchers say. A recent article published in the American

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

›› Energy content provides 20-35 percent of daily neeabout ds. ›› Breakfast food has change significantly over the years,d bacon, eggs and toast to Reafrom to-Eat Cereals and breads dymeans Americans switched. This high fat, high protein breakf from to high fat, high carbohydr asts ate breakfasts.

Journal of Lifestyle Medicine found “evidence documenting the strong protective effect of breakfast consumption to prevent and/or treat obesity/type 2 diabetes and promote overall health in young people.” That said, research also warns that breakfast is good only if you make it good. Don’t feel too proud of yourself if you walk out the door having scarfed Pop-Tarts and a glass of chocolate milk.

that you will be eating on the run. That usually translates to packaged foods with preservatives, fast food and other dietary disasters that make losing weight more difficult.

fueled up with calories by eating consistenly helps you control your weight better. Roller coaster eating habits, such as skipping meals, can make weight harder to control.

EAT TO LOSE WEIGHT

Some skip breakfast because they don’t have a choice. Others make the skip part of their diet, or just don’t feel like eating in the morning. Some just don’t feel like time permits. For dieters, it isn’t often that our weight loss plan revolves around eating when we don’t feel like it, but in the case of breakfast, it may be just what you need to do. For those seeking a drop in weight, foregoing breakfast isn’t the way to go. Here’s why:

Breakfast eaters avoid snacking so frequently: When you don’t eat

breakfast, hunger is bound to strike at an inconvenient time, which means

Eating breakfast makes body-weight management easier: Keeping your body

Eating breakfast causes physiological changes in satiety (how full you feel): In studies comparing breakfast skippers and breakfast eaters, breakfast skippers were shown to actually have a greater daily energy intake, even though they missed out on calories in the morning.

Eating breakfast generally gives you a higher quality diet: Starting the day with toast, eggs and orange juice gives you the vitamins, minerals and energy you need to successfully tackle your morning’s endeavors. Sources: Medscape.com, Food Research and Action Center

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5

Five Ways to Activate Your Teens

O

besity, stress and internet safety are high on the list of health issues for teens today. It’s hard to tell which comes first, but they are all related. The antidote to these health hazards is good, oldfashioned physical activity. Knowing that exercise is important is one thing. Getting out there and doing it is another. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offer many tips and ideas to get your children moving, including the following five ways to activate your teens:

1. Show them. Be active yourself. If you

sit around watching television or spend your spare time glued to your cell

AC T IV IT Y

2.

3.

phone or computer, chances are your kids will do that too. Be a good example by getting a move on yourself. Not only will you benefit your family, you will benefit yourself with more energy and better health. Make it a team effort. Your family can be a team. You can walk together, ride bikes, play tennis, go for a swim. Enter a 5k as a family. Even a brisk walk can be a perfect way for you to burn some calories while catching up on the latest news in your child’s life. The opportunities are endless. Active time together is quality time together. Be a joiner. Join a gym. Sign your kids up for sports activities. If you make

exercise a priority by investing in it, your kids are more likely to be motivated.

4. Praise and encouragement work wonders. Be sure to reinforce

5.

positive behavior. A “way to go!” goes much further than all the lecturing and nagging in the world. Provide safety equipment. Your child isn’t going to stay active if she or he is injured. Helmets, pads, shoes and other appropriate gear protect your precious athlete.

The table below shows the three types of activities needed with amounts and examples.

A MOUNT NEEDED

EX AMPLES

Aerobic Activity

60 minutes at least three times each week

Walking, running, biking, jumping rope, basketball, tennis, soccer, in-line skating

Muscle strengthening

Three times each week

Sit-ups, push-ups, weight-lifting, working out with bands, gymnastics, football, basketball, tennis

Bone strengthening

Three times each week

Jumping rope, running, soccer, tennis, gymnastics, skateboarding, dancing, volleyball

Make the teen years a lot easier to survive by helping your child get the activity he or she needs. You’ll all benefit from those extra endorphins. To learn more about healthy living, visit www.ahplans.com.

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This important information brought to you by:

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THE TEEN AG E

ME

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We’re leaving our world in whose hands?

WRITTEN BY WHITNEY LEWIS

The Truth About “Generation Me” GUEST: “My self-esteem is through the roof because no one has ever been honest with me about how mediocre I am.”

it off, Twenge suggests that this me-based generation isn’t happy, even though they’re cocky.

INTERVIEWER: “What would you do if someone were to be honest with you?”

So are we doomed, leaving the world to Generation Me-ers?

GUEST: “I would immediately cry.”

Breathe easy. It turns out that not all is lost in a sea of student debt or the abyss of a video game-ridden basement. This group differs greatly from their parent generation of Baby Boomers, but contrary to common belief, Generation Me is surprisingly more of a generation WE.

Funny lines from a Saturday Night Live skit may capture a bit of truth or at least typify a trend may notice in America. More and more people complain of confident yet incompetent "adults" who can't handle the real world and instead are more interested in starting bands, playing video games, and balking at evaluation. Did the Baby Boomers just raise a bunch of big babies? Criticism of the rising generation runs rampant: kids live with their parents into their thirties; they don’t have real jobs, even after college; and many of these jobless, single, ungrateful “adults” think the latest smartphone is a necessity, not a luxury. In her intensely researched and widely read book, Generation Me, Jean M. Twenge wrote: Generation Me [those born 1970-2000] has never known a world that put duty before self, and believes that the needs of the individual should come first. This is not the same thing as being selfish – it is captured, instead, in the phrases we so often hear: "Be yourself," "Believe in yourself," "You must love yourself before you can love someone else." These are some of our culture's most deeply entrenched beliefs, and Generation Me has grown up hearing them whispered in our ears like the subliminally conditioned children in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.” Many people worry that these teenagers and young adults are so self-absorbed that they will not innovate, improve, serve, and save the world we live in. And to top

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FOUR GENERATIONAL DIFFERENCES 1. Tech Savvy

You don’t have to spend time in a retirement home to know that older generations and computers don’t mix. Recently this point was proven and I couldn’t help but chuckle the other day when I overheard a sweet 62 year old call a BlackBerry phone a blueberry. Technology is evolving not quite at light speed, but at Google Fiber speed—and this current generation is keeping right up.

2. Open Book Life

Personal technology such as smart phones, tablets, blogs and Facebook have paradoxically made it possible to connect to millions of people while sitting alone in front of a glowing screen. While this trend has made staying in touch easier than ever, overwhelmingly numbers of useless, minute-by-minute updates from oversharing acquaintances flood the internet, reducing privacy and commodifying personal lives. From marriage and birth announcements to break-ups, dance parties and cupcakes successes, there's a growing impulse to document and share with a largely uncaring world.

3. Postponed Marriage & Parenting

Unlike prior generations though, this generation’s major life milestones do not mark the entryway to adulthood. In the 70s young adults around age 21, were probably married, or about to be. They were probably parents, or about to be. They were probably

done with school, or about to be. Not anymore, much to the dismay of some baby boomers longing for grandkids and much to the dismay of many who only connect maturity with marriage and graduation. Nowadays, families start much later. The average age of marriage in the United States has been rising since 1970 when the median age was 22. Now the average age of couples entering a first marriage is 26 according to the U.S Bureau of the Census. Of course, whether or not the increased age is good is left up to debate. Tom Brokaw wrote a New York Times bestseller titled The Greatest Generation, referring to the men and women who fought in the world wars and shaped modern America. Their lives were in many ways and for many years, sacrificed for their country and families. He describes them as generally an unselfish, loyal group. In contrast, living with parents longer and postponing marriage are often seen as selfish decisions.

4. Egocentric

To Twenge and others, it appears that this generation just wants to be happy! Is that too much to ask for? Twenge cited an Ellen episode where Ellen Degeneres said the most important thing is, "how you feel and being happy." But when I [Twenge] asked my mother (born in 1943) about this, she said, "In the early 1960s, most people would have said the most important things were being honest, hardworking, industrious, loyal, and caring about others. I can't even remember thinking about whether I was 'happy.' That's not to say we weren't happy—we just didn't focus on it. We do now. And in many ways it’s not working. People focusing on their own happiness are not shown to be any happier than those focused

>>>>>>>> continued HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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on others or on developing character traits or talents. As a matter of fact, Twenge’s study shows that they are actually unhappier. Fortunately, not all Generation Me-ers agree with Ellen and Dan.

DOWNFALLS REFUTED…MOSTLY

The host of 13-33 year olds in the country compose the era Twenge named Generation Me. It is interesting to note that the focus on self—self-esteem, self-worth, selfrespect, self-acceptance, self-talk, etc.— has not produced more happiness. But luckily, having fun and living according to the adage "you only live once" are not the sole focuses of this chunk of the population.

SERVICE-CENTERED

Contrary to accusations of selfishness, a study performed by the National Service Organization found that service is at a thirty-year high. Even in an economic downturn, the Me Generation is showing that they are not always self-absorbed. Many Americans who are hunting for jobs use some of their free time to volunteer with local charities, schools and church in such noble causes like saving libraries from closing, helping clean up parks, and helping children learn to read. The capitalists are involved too. “Companies such as Timberland and PricewaterhouseCoopers allow employees time off for public service. Others, like Target, are going into partnership with non-profit groups to provide pro bono marketing and financial advice,” reports The Economist. These companies are mostly staffed by Gen Me-ers who are advocates for the public good and taking advantage of opportunities to help. When new service opportunities recently opened up with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, thousands of young adults applied to volunteer 18-24 months to do service. Applications to serve a mission increased 470% in the first month the opportunity was presented. In less than a year the number of serving missionaries surged from about 50,000 to 70,274.

Lost Boys in Neverland, however, never wanting to grow up, these young people are just trying to get some breathing room. Many university students and recent grads would prefer to move out and are trying to, surveys show. However, with housing and tuition costs going up and the economy going down, some are forced back to the nest for a while. In this year’s survey, more teenagers said they planned to be financially independent— around the time they turn 26 reported Robby Soave in The Daily News Caller. Fewer teenagers said they would be able to support themselves between the ages of 18 and 24, so many have no choice but to live at home. Living at home isn’t all that bad, even for the state of the union. “In most countries young people are increasingly sober and well behaved,” reports The Economist. “They are more likely to live with their parents and to be in higher education— across the European Union 28% of adults aged 25-34 still live at home. In Britain, the current generation of 18- to 24-yearolds is a lot less likely to have tried an illegal drug or to drink than those ten years older were at their age, and the same is true in most European countries.” Living at home seems to have decreased crime. The number of violent crimes has fallen by 32% since 1990 across America as a whole; in the biggest cities, it has fallen by 64% according to an article in The Economist.

IN LOVE WITH YOURSELF

Beyond school and money, some resent this generation for how it appears more narcissistic than any before. But before we call them out for being oh so vain, consider the new scenario: camera phones and the internet.

Along with service increasing, so is higher education.

In response to this vanity accusation, a Generation Me-er wrote, “Our lives are published, printed, poked, and hashtagged with or without our consent, so naturally they [we] will be more concerned about their looks.” Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and video surveillance cameras are constantly capturing every outfit, hairdo and blemish. Any generation who expects to be debuted around the world would make sure to dress up, dress down, and be concerned about their appearance.

Higher education means higher levels of debt. This debt, along with a floundering economy, has parked many young adults back at home. Far from being like the

Young adults get a bad rap, but circumstantial differences explain that these young adults aren’t as selfabsorbed as some like to think!

A large portion of Generation Me is flipping their title over and proving that they are Generation We.

GRADUATING BACK HOME

WE ME TO WE = HAPPY : TIPS FOR THE NEW GEN

“Keeping up with the Joneses is harder now that Facebook shows you every cool picture all 687 of your 'friends' have ever taken,” writes Paul Hudson. “It takes a toll on how one views one’s own life. The comparing game encourages the exaggeration.” Young adults have high expectations for life and want straight out of college what they see their parents have 20 years after college graduation. Their high expectations are hitting a hard job market and the clash of reality, combined with the hourly Facebook and Instagram reminders of how fun everyone else’s lives are, creates great disappointment. Comparison is the name of the game leading to dissatisfaction and unhappiness. Twenge’s study based on the responses of 1.3 million young people analyzed against the same test questions administered to Baby Boomers in the 1950s and 60s resulted in evidence that the young people today who do focus on self first, suffer from more anxiety, loneliness, and depression. So young people, give Facebook and the Joneses European vacation photos a break. Live life for others by focusing on doing good and being good, and your experience will line up with research and Twenge’s mother’s theory that, by not worrying about your own happiness, happiness will still happen.

“Keeping up with the Joneses is harder now that Facebook shows you every cool picture all 687 of your 'friends' have ever taken.” 28

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docereclinics.com HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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THE TEEN AG E

TROUBLING AMERICAN CO M P E T I T I V E N E S S

RED WHITE AND BLACK &BLUE

WRITTEN BY DALLIN LAW

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BEFORE THE NORMANDY LANDINGS DURING WWII,

General George S. Patton inspired his troops by appealing to their rough and ready American character.

“All real Americans love the sting and clash of battle. . . Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser.” Conflict and competition are stark realities of life, certainly for a general and his troops dealing with mortal combat, but modern research shows that treating every aspect of our daily lives as a battle may be destructive to success and happiness. Evident in sports games, standardized tests, piano recitals, reality TV and a hundred other venues, competition clearly defining winners and losers does seem to be a hallmark of American ideology. This famous general’s philosophies still seem true today; American culture appears uniquely competitive and motivated by conflict. This competitive focus seems to begin quite young, inculcated in part by parents. Despite its accepted prevalence, research is beginning to show that everyone, parents and children should be wary of certain forms of competition, especially as a motivator.

THE PARENT FACTOR

Parents may be at the root of many forms of competitiveness. The way they see their children may partially reveal an American parenting style that emphasizes competition. In a recent international study, researchers asked parents from many cultures to describe their children, and the cultural differences between Americans and Europeans were telling. They found that Americans describe their children most often as alert, intelligent, cognitively advanced, prone to asking questions, independent, adaptable, and rebellious. In stark contrast, Italians and other Europeans describe their children mostly often as even-tempered and simpatico (pleasant, amiable), stressing an emotional and social competency. These different descriptors have

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little if anything to do with a difference in American children versus European. American parents tend to place their children on a cognitive development scale, whereas European parents instead stress emotional and social competency. While parents overseas are content to classify their child as “nice,” American parents are quick to idealize their child as a mover and shaker, a future entrepreneur or artistic revolutionary. They look to distinguish some kind of competitive advantage or early sign of success. It’s important to remember that American children don’t come hardwired from birth to be competitive. Sports surveys of children 5 to 18 show that many children are not interested in many aspects of competition. For example, 65 percent of children say they are in sports to be with their friends, 71 percent wouldn’t care of the score wasn’t kept and 90 percent would prefer playing on the losing team over sitting on the bench of the winning team. Considering that 85 percent of coaches are dads on their kids’ teams, it seems that parents are part of the driving force for teaching children how to view sports and life as a competition. Why do we seem to want to breed competitiveness into our children? American culture and, some would argue, our capitalist economy rely on the theory that rivalry and competition drive success, build character and produce excellence. In the face of harsher economic times, rising college costs, and an uncertain global future, it’s only natural for parents to try to give their children any possible developmental advantage to prepare them for the future. In other words, in many parents’ minds, the sooner kids are prepared for the cutthroat business world, the better. However, this assumption that competition drives success certainly isn’t proven; in some cases competition may actually be the enemy to children’s performance and happiness. A large 2012 meta-study of other studies examining competition and performance shows that in general, there is no relationship

between the two. Competition sometimes helps people perform better and other times it hinders their performance.

PROS AND CONS OF COMPETITION

Other studies elaborate, showing that the prospect of winning can encourage high performance and success and build confidence, which also improves performance. However, when the goal is merely trying not to lose, competition cripples performance. Likewise, if stakes are low and the motivation is not just to win but to achieve mastery, healthy amounts of competition drive progress. Many studies agree that competition can often be a detriment to living a happy life. The competition that our culture relies on and prides itself on can promote anxiety, damage selfesteem and performance and lead to disengagement. How then can concerned parents strike a balance between the often inescapable and institutionalized American obsession with winners and losers and the healthy, constructive form of competition that encourages growth and increased performance? Organizations like TrueCompetition. Org are ”dedicated to reclaiming competition for excellence, ethics, and enjoyment, enable[ing] competitors of all abilities to maximize potential, compete with purpose, and reap a sense of lasting fulfillment.” Perhaps one solution is to look at competition less as domination over another, but a partnership or collaboration to progress. Like weights and gravity, we sometimes need a competitor to give us the needed resistance to grow stronger. In the end, General Patton’s advice might not be great advice for parents to give their kids or for them to live by themselves. While there will always be winners and losers, the objective in life isn’t to beat someone, but to become someone.

SHOULD YOU WORRY?

1. Do you emphasize winning above best effort? 2. Are you afraid to lose? 3. Do you turn daily activities into competitions? 4. Do your social or work interactions suffer because of competitiveness? 5. Do you view competitors as partners or enemies?

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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.

>> Advisor SURGERY

Invincibility B

efore trying any new adventure I contemplate the risk of bodily damage or harm to myself. This wasn’t always the case. I loved to rock-climb, snow ski and mountain bike as I grew up and if I wasn’t climbing higher cliffs, jumping further and going faster with each excursion, I wasn’t having fun.

to have premature wrinkling, sunspots or skin cancer. Decreasing these risks require little. Simply limit sun exposure during peak hours, 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M., wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Apply generously and frequently when in the sun. The best sunscreen is one with good UVA & UVB coverage.

Now before engaging in new adventures I consider what possible injury may be befall myself and what that will mean to me or those for whom I am responsible.

Despite plentiful research to support smoking’s ill effects, an unfortunate number of people smoke. Ceasing to smoke will improve health. It will also benefit your skin. It’s never too late to stop. Your physician will be glad to assist you if you need help to quit.

Patients often discover they have acted just as brashly in their younger years in regards to their appearance. Sun worship, smoking or large fluctuations in weight may, like falling while mountain biking leave injury in their wake. Our faces are especially at risk because they are always exposed. We wouldn’t willingly damage our appearance if what we did left an immediate scar. However, because no obvious damage is immediately present, we bask in the sun, or continue to smoke without concern. Healthy choices regarding what we expose ourselves to or put into our mouths can slow the hands of time. Coupled with healthy exercise habits, we can create a discrepancy between our chronological age and our physical age. Though genetics certainly plays a part, if we take healthy sensible precautions, we give ourselves a great advantage.

What are the best things we can do to retain our good looks? First, limit sun exposure and use sunscreen. The more we are exposed to the sun the more likely we are

Obesity is a plague. Many discover after having weight gain that with perseverance, dietary control and exercise, they can lose unwanted weight. To be most effective, don’t think of diets, but choose to live differently. The health benefits of weight loss are tremendous. Blood pressure decreases, cholesterol lowers, joint stress is decreased, the heart is happier and the likelihood of diabetes diminished. Despite these benefits of weight loss, skin damage may already have occurred. Simple procedures and a good skin care program can often remedy facial-skin discoloration. Minor wrinkles respond well to Botox or Fillers. Loose skin may respond to skin tightening devices. If more significant skin laxity is present, surgical removal is an option. Teens beware. The best approach to forever youth is prevention. If, however, you find yourself looking more aged than you feel, many options are available. In the meantime, go get some sunscreen.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr. Benjamin Dunkley Envision Cosmetic Surgery See online: envisionsurgery.com

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

Dr. Dunkley is the physician providing services at Envision Cosmetic Surgery. He is dual board certified in Facial Plastic Surgery/Otolaryngology and General Cosmetic Surgery. Born and raised in Utah, he now practices Cosmetic Surgery in the state he loves.

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Alas, Acne

4

Try oil-free makeup. Look for the word “noncomedogenic.”

DEALING WITH THE MOST COMMON OF SKIN CONDITIONS WRITTEN BY HEALTHY MAGAZINE STAFF

3

It’s just a red spot, but it weighs on your mind throughout the day. You feel like everyone is looking at it, even if they aren’t. Here is a modern guide to prevention, and the best ways to deal with acne when it rears its ugly head.

Try wearing your hair off your face. Hair gets oily and dirty, and sometimes having it in your face can cause pimples. Keep it clean.

BEING CLEAN DOESN’T WORK?

The National Institutes of Health estimates that 80 percent of all people between the ages of 11 and 30 have an acne outbreak at some point, so don’t go crazy when you have an episode. But if the acne persists, and scarring is starting to occur, it may be time to see a dermatologist and get some help from medication.

1

Deal with stress immediately. Stress changes your body, and may result in physical changes on your face that you don’t want.

COMMON ACNE MEDS: Benzoyl Peroxide: This medicine provides an oxygen-rich environment that the acne bacteria cannot survive in.

5

Change how you shave. Sometimes hand-held razors irritate the skin and lead to acne. Try both to see which is best for you. Whatever the case, make sure the blades are sharp, to avoid bothering the skin.

6

Don’t touch! This is perhaps the most common advice from dermatologists, to simply avoid touching your face.

Retin-A: This is a vitamin A derivative that helps clean out pores, and shuts down overactive oil glands. Salicylic Acid: This comes from the bark of the willow tree. It works to dissolve dead skin cell build up in the pores. This medicine is best for mild to moderate acne. Oral antibiotics: Can help reduce the colonization of bacteria on skin and in hair follicles. Sulfur: An ancient approach to clear skin, sulfur, also called brimstone, is found in many acne treatment products. It exfoliates the skin, dries the acne and also has antibacterial properties. Medications can be a big difference in your appearance years down the road. Remember, however, that acne doesn’t really have a known cause, and medication doesn’t always work. Researchers think changing hormone levels may be to blame, along with heredity, certain medications and a number of other things.

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2

Wash your pillowcase once a week. This is an obvious, yet important tip. Nothing is as intimate with your face as your pillow.

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THE TEEN AG E

YOUTH:

IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD

THE MENTAL FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH WRITTEN BY DALLIN LAW

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HISTORY AND A LITTLE BIT OF LEGEND hold that in the early 1500s Juan

Ponce de Leon, an early conquistador, personally funded an expedition through Florida for gold and slaves but secretly he was really searching for the fabled fountain of youth. According to legend, the fountain held the cure for sickness and age; after a dip, ancients came out adolescents. de Leon took three ships and over two hundred men all over Florida searching for the fountain based on some frankly suspect information. In the following five hundred years, not much has changed; millions more people have traveled and spent huge amounts of money trying to recover the youth they lost, often guided by advertisements or folk wisdom.

the effects of age and plasticity give a scientific basis for the phenomenon of years not matching up with youthfulness. Scientists used to believe that as we age the mechanical structures of the brain irreversibly break down causing diminished adaptability and ability to learn new things and form new thought processes. In a 2006 study, researchers Mahncke, Bronstone, and Merzenich discovered that a large part of reduced brain plasticity is caused by atrophy, or lack of use. By not pushing the brain to adapt and to learn new things, the brain begins to deteriorate, becoming less flexible and powerful than it once was. This effect is not limited to the elderly but applies to an extent to all age groups.

Defining Youth

But let’s stop for a moment and try to pin down the meaning of that slippery word, youth. Technically, youth is fairly hazily defined time somewhere after childhood and before middle age. But more than a span of years, the word signifies a powerfully marketed ideal: beauty, strength, health, vitality, excitement, hope, optimism are all associated with youth. Ironically, many in the youthful age range don’t have the ideal’s qualities, but nostalgia and clever marketing focus our eyes on our past for something we have to somehow rekindle or recapture. In response, many tend sometimes towards obsession, trying to glorify an invented ideal of youth by buying a youthful sports car or contributing to the nearly 15 million cosmetic surgeries performed annually, among other things.

Based on this theory, researchers developed a regimen of brain plasticity exercises that engaged adults in demanding sensory, cognitive, and motor abilities on an intensive basis. They found very encouraging results showing that even with adults already experiencing mental degradation, it’s possible to improve cognitive function by utilizing the brain’s ability to change to challenging stimuli.

The truth is that a large part of the youthful ideal is more rooted in a mindset than an age-restricted physical condition. And counter to currently marketed ideas about youth, this mindset is found by looking progressively forward rather than nostalgically backwards.

The Mental Connection

It’s no secret that many middle-aged adults act more like the elderly and some advancing in years are living more youthful and full lives than people half their age.While there are dozens of biological, lifestyle, and cultural reasons for the difference, an interesting possiblility for the difference is very much a lifestyle choice that can literally change our brain. Brain plasticity is the brain’s ability to adapt or change based on the stimuli that it receives and the tasks that we ask it to perform. The brain is plastic, or malleable, because it physically changes structure, creating more linkages and synapses due to changes in behavior, environment, neural processes, or due to injury. Brain plasticity often diminishes as we age, which results in possible memory problems, difficulty learning, and generally a fixed mindset. Studies focused on

Looking Forward

The youthful ideal is partly made up of spontaneity, hopeful excitement about the future’s possibilities, learning new things; youth’s secret is looking forward with purpose and optimism. Staying youthful in part is keeping our mind curious and active. Perhaps this is why worn out, scheduled-run people in their 30s seem to have more in common with geriatrics. It turns out that even just infusing some youthful excitement into your life can change the way you see yourself, your future and even could benefit your health. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic studied the phenomenon known as “age identity,” or how old someone feels compared to how old they actually are. While this is very subjective and personal measurement, scientists found an interesting correlation. People who felt younger generally lived a more dynamic life, generally felt younger and had fewer mental and physical ailments. Furthermore, people with a young age identity had more confidence and optimism, lived longer, had a reduced risk of disability and high blood pressure, had higher selfesteem, sense of well being and life satisfaction. Hence, two different scientific approaches, both neurological and psychological both support a mental aspect to being youthful. What does this mean for anyone wishing for a fountain of youth? More cosmetics? Eastern medicine? Mineral hot springs? The seemingly trite, but actually powerful answer suited to every age is to just live the fullest, most dynamic life you can. Not only will you keep your mind sharp, but you will feel younger, act younger, live healthier, and simply be a better you.

YOUTHFUL MIND EXERCISES: • Learn a new skill • Start a new art project • Read more cognitively challenging books • Write more • Learn a new language • Try yoga or a new exercise routine • Meet new people • Visit new places Facebook.com/HealthyMag

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THE TEEN AG E

Crayons to Careers T H E M O D E R N W AY T O R E A C H A D U LT H O O D

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL RICHARDSON

STERN LOOKS AND “BACK WHEN I WAS A BOY” SPEECHES WILL ALWAYS BE PARENTAL REMEDY FOR A CHILD’S MISTAKES AND LACK OF RESPONSIBILITY. WITH MILLIONS OF TWENTY-SOMETHINGS RETURNING TO THE NEST INSTEAD OF SETTLING INTO CAREERS AND MARRIAGE, PARENTS MAY BE TEMPTED TO DOUBT THEIR CHILD’S FUTURE, AND TO UNLEASH A BARRAGE OF ANECDOTAL ADVICE FROM THE '70S AND '80S. WHILE IN SOME CASES THE CHILD MAY NEED THE MOTIVATION, MANY PARENTS FAIL TO REALIZE THAT BECOMING AN ADULT TODAY IS WHOLLY DIFFERENT THAN IT WAS 30 YEARS AGO, BECAUSE OF THE NEW ECONOMIC LANDSCAPE, CHANGED PERSPECTIVES AND AN ALTERED PATH TO PROFESSIONALISM.

A NEW ECONOMIC LANDSCAPE In post-World War II America, manufacturing jobs were often how to make a living. Crudely summarized, you could graduate from high school and begin working at a factory, and have enough money to support a family. The ambitious would go to college and then manage the factories. But over time, manufacturing jobs went overseas. After a few decades, we saw the result: you needed to go to college to have a good chance at making a healthy professional living, because manufacturing jobs just didn’t pay enough and weren’t plentiful. College attendance soared. With college attendance came debt. Add to the mixture the rising costs of food and housing, and it’s not a big surprise that young people often don’t settle into careers and family until after their mid-twenties. They simply don’t have the money. Research from Patrick Wightman and Robert Schoeni of the University of Michigan found that the average young adult receives more than $7,000 a year in support from their families. Interestingly, Wightman says, most of these young adults are actually working, but not making enough to survive on their own. “We rarely see kids who are completely supported by parents,” he says. More interestingly, the research shows that this number actually is comparable to how much support young adults have received in decades past. The difference is that the support is coming for a longer duration, for more years. And the data show that the recent recession isn’t what’s driving their kids back to their parents.

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In many respects, telling an 18-yearold today to go out and fend for himself is a lot like telling a 13-yearold in 1950 to go out and survive. Facebook.com/HealthyMag

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“The dominating factor is that it is taking longer for young adults to transition into adulthood,” Wightman says. This transition period is the subject of much study. In fact, researchers have named this new stage of life that previously didn’t exist, settled between childhood and traditional adulthood, calling it “emerging adulthood.” This new stage may exist for a number of reasons, the economic factor being just one. The standard of living is rising, and many young people are used to luxury. The drive to make it on one’s own may be outweighed by the prospect of living in poverty.

NEW APPROACH TO COMMUNICATION AND RELATIONSHIPS

_______ The dominating factor is that it is taking longer for young adults to transition into adulthood _______

communication happened. With texting and social media, young people keep up a “vibrant” social life without ever talking to anyone. The result is that we have a lot of twentysomethings without the basic skills required for professional life and long-term relationships. Yet often this generation feels entitled to respect, high pay and their own work schedule, research shows. Yes, today’s emerging adults do lack some critical skills, which often lands them in parents’ basements, but others are taking the world by storm, and doing it in their own way, and in their own time. Changing economics, new ways of higher education and fresh ideology must all be considered before final assessments are made on our mid-twenties population.

Another vital factor in the creation of the emerging adulthood stage is that young people see marriage and serious relationships differently than their parents. While the choice to get married is much easier to make when you have a stable income and a reasonably sure future, there are other issues. Besides money, young people might also be delaying marriage because they grew up in an era when half of the adults they knew got divorced. Andy Griffith and Leave It to Beaver portrayed families that were just dandy, but not realistic in the eyes of many young people. The rising generation wants to be sure of who they marry, and they aren’t anxious to make a decision. And the ever-rising average age of marriage worries adults, because marriage is what defines part of being an adult, in the eyes of some. Certain mile posts of maturity marked the path to adulthood in decades past, like learning a trade, buying a car and getting married. While many of these mile posts still count for something, many young people just ignore them, and wish people would instead focus on their ability and mental capacity. But not all parents aren’t buying it. According to a survey from Clark University, only half of parents with kids aged 18-29 consider their child to be an adult. Poor, poor misunderstood kids, right? Well, not always. Growing up in the digital age has given the rising generation some great tools, and left them completely devoid of others. A teen in the 80s learned how to speak with others well, to interact professionally, because that was how

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THE HOUSING ISSUE Millions of young adults live with their parents (20.7 million 18 to 30 year-olds to be exact, according to the University of Minnesota Population Center). Some have failed to grasp life by the horns. Others just don’t have the money. “For many recent college grads, starting a career and finding their own place to live isn’t an option in an economy where well-paying entry-level jobs are scarce to nonexistent,” writes Leslie Garisto Pfaff in Rutgers Magazine. “Some have dealt with this new economic reality by going back to school to earn a graduate degree; others have opted to accept low-paying (or nonpaying) internships to gain a foothold in their chosen field. And when you can’t afford to pay the rent, boomeranging to your parents’ home makes a certain degree of financial sense.”

The housing market is doing a little better of late, but the key word here is “house.” Renting is currently terrible, and renting is all most young people can hope to afford. Apartment List looked at 1.8 million listings from 2011-12, and found that rental prices rose by almost 10 percent during that time, significantly surpassing inflation rates. More and more people are renting, and fewer people are buying houses, and the change in demand is causing prices to rise. Last year, according to the Harvard Research Center, there was a 1.1 million increase in renter households, while house ownership fell for the eighth year in row. So why don’t people buy houses? Because the housing market stabbed a lot of people in the back just a few years ago, and because, again, young people don’t have the money. Financial experts generally advise spending no more than a third of your income on housing, but almost 18 percent of households are spending more than 50 percent of their income for a roof over head, according to the Harvard Research Center. And for low income families (and poor college graduates), the percentage is even worse. Sources: apartmentlist.com, jchs.harvard.edu

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FRESH RECIPIES MANGO, JICAMA, PUMPKIN SEED & FRESH HERB SALAD This light yet intense salad is bursting with fresh summer flavors and interesting textures. It is sure to impress your guests at a dinner party or Saturday afternoon picnic. Makes 2 main-course or 4 side salads

2 cups 1 cup 1⁄2 cup 2 tbsp 2 tbsp 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup Pinch

sliced peeled jicama sliced peeled mango raw pumpkin seeds freshly squeezed lime juice cold-pressed olive oil chopped parsley leaves chopped cilantro leaves chopped basil leaves fine sea salt

In a serving bowl, toss jicama, mango, pumpkin seeds, lime juice and olive oil until evenly coated. Set aside to macerate for 15 minutes. Add parsley, cilantro, basil and salt and toss gently. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

TIPS

To peel and chop a mango, cut a small slice from the top and bottom of the fruit to make flat ends. Using a vegetable peeler, carefully peel away the skin. Stand mango upright on a cutting board. Using a chef’s knife, run the blade through the flesh, taking approximately three slices from each of the four sides. When you are close to the stone, use a paring knife to remove any remaining flesh from around the middle.

Excerpted from Eat Raw, Eat Well by Douglas McNish © 2012 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with permission of publisher.

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Pumpkin seeds provide an impressive array of nutrients. They contain healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, manganese, thiamine (vitamin B1) and vitamin E — not bad for the seeds of a common squash.

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CASHEW CHEESECAKE

This rich cake is particularly delicious served with fresh berries and a sprinkle of cinnamon. I like to save this for special occasions. You will need a high-powered blender to achieve the smoothest consistency possible. Makes 16 servings

High-powered blender 9-inch springform pan FILLING

4 cups 1 cup 1 cup 1 cup 1 tbsp 2 tsp

CRUST

raw cashews, soaked (see Tips) filtered water raw agave nectar melted coconut oil (see Tips) raw vanilla extract freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 cups whole raw pecans 1⁄4 cup chopped pitted soft dates 1⁄2 tsp fine sea salt 1. Excerpted from Eat Raw, Eat Well by Douglas McNish © 2012 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with permission of publisher.

2. 3. 4.

MORNING ENERGY BARS

These bars are the perfect way to start your day, as they contain proteins, healthy fats and carbohydrates and an abundance of micronutrients such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. Makes 9 bars

2 cups 2 tbsp 3 tbsp 2 tbsp 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup 1⁄4 cup 3 tbsp 2 tsp Pinch 1.

2.

chopped pitted dates raw cacao powder (see Tips) raw agave nectar (see Tips) water raw cashews walnuts raw whole almonds raw shelled hemp seeds sesame seeds fine sea salt

Filling: In a high-powered blender, combine soaked cashews, water, agave nectar, coconut oil, vanilla and lemon juice. Blend at high speed until smooth and creamy. Set aside. Crust: In a food processor, pulse pecans, dates and salt until smooth (no large pieces should remain). Press into bottom of pan, ensuring that there are no gaps. Assembly: Pour filling over crust and freeze for at least 2 hours or until firm in the center. This dessert can be made ahead and kept in the freezer for up to 1 month. When you are ready to serve, remove from freezer and set aside to thaw for 15 to 20 minutes. Remove pan sides and slice. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 1 week.

TIPS

To soak the cashews for this recipe, cover with 8 cups (2 L) water. Set aside for 1 hour. Drain, discarding soaking water, and rinse under cold running water until the water runs clear. To check if the cake is frozen all the way through, insert a tester such as a wooden skewer or toothpick. If it comes out clean, then the cake is ready to be thawed. For decades, coconut products (coconut oil, milk and flesh) have been painted with the anti–saturated fat brush, based on the assumption that saturated fat increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, recent studies have found otherwise, so long as the coconut products are unprocessed. In fact, an impressive benefit of coconut products is their ability to boost HDL (“good cholesterol”), which helps to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. Coconut is high in a type of saturated fat called medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are unique in the sense that they are burned for energy and are less likely to be stored as body fat.

In a food processor fitted with the metal blade, process dates, cacao powder, agave nectar and water until smooth. Add cashews, walnuts, almonds, hemp seeds, sesame seeds and salt. Process until the ingredients come together to form a sticky mass, stopping the motor once and scraping down the sides of the work bowl. Transfer to a cutting board. Using your hands, press out the mixture until it is 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick and shape into a square about 6 inches (15 cm) long. Cut into 9 bars, each approximately 3 inches (7.5 cm) long and 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide. Place on a platter or baking sheet lined with parchment paper and refrigerate for one hour to set. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

TIPS

There are numerous varieties of dates, but Medjool are my favorite. Although they are generally more expensive, they are larger, softer and ideal for using in raw food recipes. Cacao powder is powdered raw chocolate. Is it similar to cocoa powder but tastes even better, with a deeper, richer flavor. Cacao powder is available in well-stocked supermarkets, natural foods stores and online. If you are transitioning to a raw foods diet or can’t find it, substitute an equal quantity of good-quality cocoa powder. When purchasing agave nectar, be sure to look for products labeled “raw.” Most of the agave nectar on the market has been heated to a high temperature and does not qualify as raw food. If you have concerns, ask your purveyor.

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Butternut Squash Ravioli w/ Butter & Basil

I started roasting the squash first, then made the pasta dough while the squash cooled. While the dough rested, I washed the bowl of the Cuisinart, then whipped the filling together. This gave the flavors of the filling some time to meld while I rolled out the dough by hand. My first attempt looked like an amoeba with vertigo. It's okay if it's not perfect.

FOR FILLING 2 5-9 3 tblsp. 2 tsp. 1 tsp. salt pepper 1/2 tsp 1 tsp. dash dash 1/3 cup

medium butternut squash, peeled and diced into cubes cloves of garlic (depending on preference), tops and bottoms trimmed but with the skin on extra virgin olive oil freshly ground nutmeg curry

1. Set oven to 400°F. Wash and peel the squash (this is

freshly ground nutmeg onion powder allspice paprika grated parmesan (not the powdery stuff. no.)

a bit tricky, but you can handle it). Cut off the top stem and a small portion of the bottom to make a steady base. Cut lengthwise once, then scoop out seeds. Dice into small cubes. Drizzle olive oil onto a baking sheet and scatter squash evenly; add whole garlic cloves. Sprinkle with nutmeg, curry, salt and pepper to taste. Bake for 20 minutes, then stir. Bake for another 20 minutes or until the squash is soft and shows some browning around the edges. Take the squash out of the oven to cool while you make the pasta.

Note: dismantling a butternut requires a very sharp knife.

FOR PASTA

(FROM AMERICA'S TEST KITCHEN'S THE NEW BEST RECIPE) 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour 3 fresh eggs

2.

Add flour to the bowl of Cuisinart and pulse to evenly incorporate air. Add eggs and blend until a dough ball forms, rolling cleanly around the bowl. There will still be some small bits of dough not in the ball.  If the dough doesn't stick together, add water gradually by teaspoons. If the dough is sticky and clings to the bowl, add flour by tablespoons until it comes together. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for about 5 minutes, adding a bit more flour until the dough feels soft, but not tacky. Wrap in plastic wrap and set aside.

3. Clean Cuisinart and finish the  filling. Add roasted

squash and garlic to the bowl, carefully removing the skins from the garlic first. Add 1/2 tsp additional nutmeg, 1 tsp onion powder, a dash of paprika, a dash of allspice, and salt and pepper to taste. Add grated parmesan. The squash will be sweet, but don't over-salt it. Blend until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl periodically.

4.

Divide pasta dough into three pieces. Cover your working surface with a light dusting of flour and roll the dough out until it is very thin, about the thickness of a tortilla. As you roll, flip the dough every so often, flouring the bottom and top as you work to prevent sticking. When the dough is thin and even, use a pizza cutter (or ravioli cutter, if you have one!) to cut it into 2 1/2 inch strips; loosen strips from countertop by gentle lifting them after they've been cut. Place squash filling by teaspoonamount along one strip, about every 2 to 3 inches. Wet your finger with a small amount of water and trace along the edges of the ravioli strip and in between each bit of filling. Carefully place a second strip of dough on top of the first strip and filling, pressing the air out and sealing each bundle of joy filling. Divide the raviolis with a pizza

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cutter. Set made ravioli on a baking sheet lined with a dish towel while you repeat, repeat, repeat, and repeat, etc.,  until you've used all of your dough.

5. Fill a very large pot with hot water and bring it to a boil. Add at least one tablespoon of salt per quart of water; it should taste like seawater. Turn heat down to continue a rapid simmer, and carefully drop raviolis in to boil. Don't crowd the pot. Cook raviolis for about 4 minutes. 

Things to Know

is a labor of love 1) Making ravioli or and texture  crucial to the flav 2) Fresh eggs are st be really salty mu ta boiling the pas 3) The water for rt. the extra effo 4) It's totally worth

6. Serve topped with butter, finely shredded fresh basil,

parmesan cheese, and pepper. I originally served this pasta with a basil cream sauce, but the raviolis have more than enough flavor to stand alone.

BIO

Kelsey Holloway Murdoch lives in a tiny 21st floor studio in New York City with her husband, Michael, and two fish. Kelsey grew up cooking in the kitchen with her mama and now spends her days talking about food, tasting new ingredients, and educating fellow foodies while working as the concierge of Dean & DeLuca’s flagship store in the high-end Manhattan neighborhood of SoHo. She graduated with university honors from Brigham Young University in August of 2012 with a degree in English literature and a minor in editing. Kels has big dreams of publishing cook books and working as a writer/editor for a culinary magazine.

Check out her blog: rush-slowly.blogspot.com

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RES

TA U RAN REV T IEW

Fraiche Cafe A F R E S H U TA H D I N I N G E X P E R I E N C E

D

iners can tell if a restaurant cares about their food. Those who’ve eaten at Thanksgiving Point’s newest restaurant, Fraîche (pronounced “fresh”) Café can see, taste and feel the culinary integrity. Manager Kaera May and Thanksgiving Point head chef Jason Merryweather pored over recipes for weeks before completing the menu, which is short, with juices, smoothies, salads and three kinds of sandwiches. With every recipe they chose, they modified it to make it their own and to make it better. Their fruit plate, for example, is served with Chobani Greek-style vanilla yogurt and drizzled with spiced agave syrup. The Islander smoothie contains pineapple, banana, coconut cream, fresh orange juice and a shot of lime. Kaera says that the menu was designed to fit into the healthy atmosphere of Thanksgiving Point and its new exercise and spa programs. “Whatever you do here, this food won’t undo it,” she says.

So often, she says, you move backwards when you go out to eat, in terms of your health. Kaera seems to have accomplished her mission to avoid this. After eating at Fraîche, which is located at the Brick Canvas complex, we walked out feeling satisfied but not sluggish. Diners visiting this café become privy to family secret recipes introduced to make the restaurant what it is meant to be. The hummus and black bean dip, our favorite dish on the menu, is actually Jason’s wife’s creation. Kaera says that the café uses the direct farm-to-table approach as much as possible. While dining in some restaurants you can taste that the food has been shipped from some distant land or frozen in some back freezer. Not so with Fraîche. The smoked turkey sandwich, for example, is made on 7-grain wheat bread made at Thanksgiving Point’s bakery only a walk away. Leaving the restaurant, my insides felt contented, not just because the food was excellent, but because someone had served me food that they actually cared about.

OUR FAVO R I T E S :

Hummus and black bean dip Islander smoothie Homemade granola bar, held together by agave

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Other Fresh Restaurants

FORAG E Forage boasts a single set menu created from wild ingredients and surrounding farms and ranches. The restaurant, which is sure to peak increase your food wonder, was created by award-winning chefs Bowman Brown and Viet Pham. It is located at 370 E 900 S in Salt Lake City.

PL U M A L L E Y Plum Alley uses more than a dozen local meat and produce sources for their food, but they transform the local food with a variety of other flavors to create southeast Asian dishes that reviewers rave about. Try the ramen.

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F INC A One of the hippest new restaurants in Salt Lake City, from the creator of Pago, Scott Evans, Finca provides fine Spanish cuisine sourced from Utah producers. Reviewers rave about the vibe, and about the tapas. It is located at 1291 S 1100 E.

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Panned Out PA N COOKING M E AT C A N BE CLASSY

Leaves are changing, the temperature is dropping grills are being covered and put into storage. But that doesn’t mean steak, chicken breasts and pork chops have to suffer. You can get summertime flavor in the midst of the approaching cooler weather, with just a pan. But grilling inside, also called direct-heat grilling, is a little bit different than cooking with charcoal or gas. Here are some keys to success. 48

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YOUR EQUIPMENT

Some pans are better than others for cooking large pieces of meat. In general, go with a thick pan. Cast iron is dependable and cooks well, but is somewhat difficult to clean. Various non-stick pans are also reliable. Make sure your pan’s cooking surface is flat. Some pans bow in the middle, which makes meat cook unevenly.

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CHICKEN IN A PAN STEAK IN A PAN Will steak cooked inside ever be as good as steak off a barbecue? Yes! 1. Make sure your pan is hot. Pat room temperature steak with paper towel to remove excess moisture. This helps the meat sear better. 2. Add oil (about 1 tbsp.), and glide until it covers the cooking surface. Just as the oil starts to smoke, place the steak. 3. Wait 2-3 minutes, and turn. This time depends on how cooked you want the meat. Don’t turn the meat too frequently, though, as this hurts the chances of even cooking and nice color. 4. As the steak is finishing up, add butter to the pan. Take a spoon and lather the steak in the melted butter. Total cook time should be about 6-7 minutes. 5. Let the meat rest for a few minutes, and serve.

PORK CHOP IN A PAN

Chicken is a little more difficult to cook in pan, since chicken breasts are often rounder in shape than a flat steak, and because chicken must be cooked thoroughly to avoid sickness. 1. Pound the chicken breast to an even thickness, using the handle of a heavy kitchen instrument, or the flat of a knife. 2. Heat the pan to medium-high. Add olive oil (about 1 tbsp.) and a slice of butter when the pan is hot. 3. Turn the heat down to medium, and add the well-thawed chicken to the mixed oil and butter. Make sure you hear the sizzle. If there’s no sizzle, the pan isn’t hot enough. 4. Cook this side for about one minute. You are looking for a little color to know when to flip. 5. Flip the chicken breast. If the chicken is sticking, wait another minute before flipping. 6. Turn down the heat to low, and put a lid on the pan. Leave the chicken alone for ten minutes. 7. Turn off the heat, and let the chicken sit for 5-10 more minutes, still covered. It is important to not lift the pan for these twenty minutes, as this preserves the moisture of the meat. 8. If you are worried the poultry isn’t cooked enough, you can make a small cut, and examine the color if the juices. If clear, that is a good indication the chicken is done.

Pork chops are a misunderstood food. Many people don’t like them because they are often cooked overly well-done, to avoid any food-borne bacteria. The truth is, a pork chop can and should be moist. 1. Heat pan to medium high, and add olive oil and butter, about a tablespoon of each. 2. Just when the oil is simmering hot, add the pork chop. Make sure the pan is hot, as this is key to creating a sear that keeps moisture in the chop. 3. Sear each side for one minute. Then leave the chop for about 3 minutes on each side, covered. Total cook time will be about 6-7 minutes if the pan is at a good temperature. 4. Is it done? One of the best ways to tell is by touch. A well-cooked pork chop will have a slight resistance, but it won’t feel hard and solid. Be patient here, since, taking the chop off too early and cutting into it means you’ll probably have to throw it back on the pan and lose moistness.

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CRASH & BURN BLOOM ONE POINT.

That is what kept world-class BMX racer Arielle Martin out of the Beijing Olympics, after nearly a lifetime of preparation. The disappointment, however, turned to drive for the then 23-year-old from Cedar Hills, Utah, and four years of nothing but training ensued. In 2012, Arielle had a secure spot on the team going to London. “I put the final touches on my Olympic race bike today,” she wrote on her blog that summer. “I’ve been riding its twin that will also come to London for the last week or so, but wanted to keep the race ride as fresh as possible. We leave for London in 10 days!! It’s so incredibly exciting to be this close and I’m jumping at the bit now that some of my buddies are already over there and posting pictures of the village and venues.” But the frustration of Beijing, it turns out, was just the beginning.

Photo credit: Ian O'Roarty

Two days before departure to London, riding in Team USA regalia, Arielle’s bike chain inexplicably broke and jammed in her back tire at the precipice of a jump, sending her flying at 30 mph 10 feet above the ground. The impact was devastating: a near fatal laceration of the liver, and a hole in the lung.

PRO-BMX RIDER ARIELLE MARTIN EXPLAINS HOW SHE WAS ROBBED BY FATE, AND HOW SHE GOT OVER IT. 50

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She remembers lying on the ground, and remembers an ambulance rushing her to the hospital.

“I’m going to London,” she kept saying. “I need to go back, I’m going to London.”

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Photo credit: James Herrera

THE DISAPPOINTMENT AT NOT MAKING THE BEIJING OLYMPICS was mixed with a feeling of injustice. Arielle and others were under the impression that two American women would qualify for the Olympics BMX, which was for the first time ever included in the Games. But the ranking system turned out to be somewhat ambiguous, and Arielle discovered that a crash in qualifying actually took away one of America’s spots in the Games. So even though she was top ten in the world at the time and was never beaten by another American in an international event except in that competition, she was excluded. The qualification process has since been changed. Still, however, only 16 women and 32 men total can compete in the Olympics’ BMX, out of all the riders in the world, making Arielle’s exclusion even more painful.

At the hospital, someone had scissors and was about to cut off her uniform. She shouted no, and that she was going to London. An operation quickly began. When she woke up from surgery, the full weight of what happened sunk in. “It came like a slap in the face,” she recalls. “The team had left without me. Someone showed me the official press release from USA Cycling announcing my crash and Brooke as my replacement. I felt crushed as the reality set in. It was really over.” She remembers whispering to herself the piercing words, “I am no longer an Olympian.” The other riders’ hearts went out to Arielle. Brooke, her replacement, wrote Arielle’s initials on her palm, and held the tribute up to the camera as it panned by.  But the American ladies won no medals that year, and Arielle was stuck with months of recovery, on top of her mental anguish. She had sacrificed everything only to be robbed by fate. Bitterness was unavoidable.

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Then something happened that marked a turning point in her perspective. While she was recovering, news came that her brother in law, competing in a Utah cycling race, had suffered a fatal crash. “At that point I realized that there was more to me than being an athlete,” she says, “and that there’s more to life than the Olympics.” Spiritual moments aided her recovery and helped lift the weight of her experiences, including a visit from Latter-day Saint apostle and icon M. Russell Ballard. She considered retiring, and starting a family. Training to be an Olympian full time meant living in California near the Olympic Training Center. For four years her schedule had gone something like this: ride before breakfast, eat. Train for three hours on different parts of the track, eat. Train until dinner. Six days a week. She saw her husband occasionally when he was on leave, after he returned from his military service in Afghanistan. She had no children, as a child would have been a near impossibility competing at such

Arielle, the day before her crash.

a high level. Only 16 women from around the world make the Olympics in BMX. The sting of being snubbed by two Olympics outweighed the sacrifice of time and physical exertion. She mounted the bike yet again, and began the long, third journey back to the top. “I couldn’t end my 22-year career on that crash,” she says. “I needed to prove something to myself.” Her competitions went poorly at first, but she ended up reclaiming her spot on the US National team for the first World Cup of 2013 in England, where she placed sixth, even after two early crashes. After competing in Argentina and Holland, she found herself the top ranked American rider in the World Cup Series, a position she currently holds. An incredible comeback, yes, and the true spectacle was her determination to fight on despite being knocked down so horrendously and repeatedly. Arielle insists that the crash before London happened for a reason, though she doesn’t understand it completely yet.

For one, her experiences have certainly given her perspective that other people lack. She coaches younger athletes, in addition to her riding, and sometimes sees their lack of vision. She recalls the attitude of one girl she coached who broke her wrist.

“It was like the end of the world for her,” she says. “But you have to have that foresight, that difficulty now will make you stronger in the end.” Doubt is another problem plaguing young people, she says. While it’s about a one-in-amillion chance that you become an Olympian, she says, there is great value in having a mark to move towards. If you aren’t moving toward a goal, than what are you doing? She remembers the best advice she received while going through her most trying moments, being robbed of two Olympics and her health. “The sun is still going to come up tomorrow. Where are you going to be?”

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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.

>> Advisor Oral Health

Healthy Mouth = Healthy Body YOU PROBABLY KNOW THAT PROPER ORAL CARE, INCLUDING BRUSHING AND FLOSSING YOUR TEETH, WILL HELP KEEP YOUR TEETH CLEAN AND YOUR GUMS HEALTHY, BUT DID YOU KNOW THAT EVEN BASIC ORAL HYGIENE CAN HELP WITH KEEPING YOUR ENTIRE BODY HEALTHY? Many dentists and primary care

The Link Between Oral Health and Chronic Disease

A Dirty Mouth

Heart disease has also been closely linked to oral health, although the reasons for the link are still unclear. Part of the connection may be that the risk factors for heart disease and gum disease are similar—such as smoking, being overweight or obese, and eating an unhealthy diet. Some researchers and medical professionals also theorize that inflammation in your mouth can lead to inflammation in the blood vessels, which makes it harder for blood to travel throughout the body, increasing blood pressure and increasing the danger that plaque could break off the walls of the blood vessels and cause a stroke or heart attack.

doctors today understand that the health of your mouth can indicate whether or not you have other potential health issues, and unhealthy mouths can also lead to disease in other parts of the body.

The average person’s mouth has many different types of bacteria. Not all of them are harmful, but if you do not properly care for your teeth, the number of total bacteria in your mouth could number between 100 million and 1 billion—about 1/7 the population of the entire planet—and that number grows every day that you go without proper oral care. While much of the bacteria in your mouth is harmless, and some is even helpful, the buildup of harmful bacteria can cause significant problems, leading to gum disease, such as gingivitis or more severe periodontal disease, tooth decay, and eventually even tooth loss.

Connecting Your Mouth and Your Health

Most experts believe that the link between your mouth and your overall health stems from inflammation, which is your body’s natural response to infection. Inflammation signals your immune system to go to the part of your body that is experiencing the problem so it can fight off the disease. Acute inflammation—the kind that happens when you get hurt or sick—is good for your body because it helps your immune system identify and fight infection, disease, or injury. However, over time if you have frequent and ongoing gum disease causing chronic inflammation, the chemicals released to fight the infection can actually wear down your immune system and make it less effective at defeating disease all over your body, including in your gums and the surrounding teeth and bones.

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The strongest connection between oral health and chronic disease is with diabetes, with many studies showing that inflammation and periodontal disease weaken a body’s ability to control blood sugar levels, which is critical to controlling diabetes. Conversely, high blood sugar levels will contribute to higher levels of sugar in the saliva, creating an ideal environment for more bacteria to grow and increasing the severity of gum disease for diabetes patients.

Other diseases and chronic conditions that may be linked to oral health problems include: • Endocarditis • Premature birth and low birth weight babies • HIV/AIDS • Osteoporosis • Alzheimer’s disease

Protecting from Oral Disease

The best way to protect yourself from periodontal disease is to practice good oral hygiene habits: • Brush your teeth at least twice per day • Floss daily • Eat a healthy diet with lots of fruits and veggies, and limited or no sugar • Visit with a dentist regularly for check-ups “If you visit the same dentist regularly at the recommended six-month intervals,

he or she can identify subtle changes that may indicate a potential problem,” said Dr. Kenneth King, Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Patient Care at Roseman University College of Dental Medicine in South Jordan, Utah. “Things like gingivitis, recession of the gums, tender tissues, bone loss, calculus build-up, and increased number of cavities can all be indicators of a larger systemic problem,” said King. But since the changes are subtle, a dentist may have a difficult time diagnosing these symptoms for someone who comes infrequently for check-ups, or someone who gets a new dentist every couple of years. “Seeing the same dentist at regular intervals over a number of years is ideal, so he or she knows your history and can identify the more subtle indicators.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR William Carroll, DDS

Roseman University of Health Sciences South Jordan Campus www.roseman.edu

Dr. Carroll is Director of Clinical Quality Assurance and Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Roseman University College of Dental Medicine in South Jordan, Utah. He graduated from the UCSF School of Dentistry, completed a two-year AEGD residency at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD, and recently retired from the US Navy after more than 30 years of service.

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Healthy Mag.com


HERNIATED LUMBAR DISC RESEARCH STUDY Spine Specialists at the SMART Clinic (Sandy, UT) are recruiting participants to take part in a study of an Investigational new drug to treat patients with a singlelevel lumbar disc herniation (protrusion/extrusion type).

Qualified participants will either receive a single injection of study drug (into the herniated disc) or receive a control injection (an injection with no medication) and will attend study visits for up to two years to evaluate reduction of the herniated disc and leg pain/back pain symptoms.

YOU MAY QUALIFY IF YOU:

Are 30 to 70 years of age

Have a single level herniated disc causing moderate leg pain for the past 6 weeks to one year

Physicians’ Research Options, LLC

SMART Clinic

Facebook.com/HealthyMag

Have not had a previous lumbar surgery procedure

Can undergo Xray and MRI procedures

Have not had resolution of back pain/leg pain following 6 weeks of medication treatment and/ or Physical Therapy, and/or spinal injections

Qualified participants receive study related medical examinations, lumbar xrays and MRI’s, laboratory analyses and time and travel compensation during study participation

10011 So Centennial Pkwy, 340/150 Sandy, UT 84070

www.PROSLC.com

801-352-9228

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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.

>> Advisor Hormone Therapy

The “Thyroid Game” HERE ARE SOME OF THE SIGNS OF ADRENAL PROBLEMS: • Low blood pressure • Lightheadedness when standing up quickly • Allergies • Inability to handle stresses • Feeling worse after exercise • Sugar/salt cravings • Mood swings • Chronic tiredness

Some people (maybe even you or your spouse) have been faked out by your own body. You have been taking thyroid medication all these years and, when all is said and done, it never really helps. Oh, you had glimmers of feeling better, but no, you’ve spent much of your life tired, overweight, overstressed, and burned out. One of the main reasons that your thyroid medications are not working has little to do with your thyroid and everything to do with your adrenals. The adrenal glands are the “stress-handling” glands of the body. If they are weak, your thyroid will seldom give you the energy and vitality you seek in life. In the many functional endocrinology (hormone) seminars I attend, I hear experts say all the time:

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

“Giving thyroid to a patient with low

Take our test: if you’d like more information, or want to take an adrenal fatigue test, go to utahwellnessinstitute.com and click the “Self Test” tab. Look at the other hormones and see if you have adrenal and thyroid issues. Good hormone levels are critical to overall wellbeing. Dr. Robert Jones is the Clinic Director at The Wellness Institute in Draper, Utah.

adrenal function is like whipping a tired horse. Fix the adrenals first!” And that is precisely why your thyroid medication is not helping. At the Utah Wellness Institute, we always check to see if your adrenals are weak (by blood tests). If they are, you must treat them concurrently with the thyroid.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Robert Jones, D.C.

The Wellness Institute Hormone Therapy healthy-mag.com/robertjones Having a healthy balance of hormones is critical to a fulfilling life—and this is our specialty. Our wellness program also includes nutritional analysis and modifications, whole-food dietary supplementation, personalized exercise programs, a blockbuster medical weight loss program if needed, and education regarding your pH balance.

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Healthy Mag.com


Facebook.com/HealthyMag

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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>> Advisor Surgery

Dumbo. Mickey Mouse. Goofy.

A

ll names my patients with prominent ears have been called. You know those kids. Their ears stick out from the side of their head in a most distracting fashion. While they talk to you, you are watching their ears. When you sit behind them you can’t help but stare. My son was one of those kids. My wife took him with her to her first appointment with a new doctor. That doctor walked in the room and said to her, “Whoa! Those are some elephant ears. Are you going to do something about that before he starts school?” She was devastated. Even a doctor may say the worst of things. I remember the day my son lost the blessing of childhood obliviousness and became aware of his own appearance. We were in a hotel and he was sitting in front of a full length mirror. He suddenly began to laugh hysterically. I mean he was falling over laughing. We were perplexed. “Look at my ears!” he managed to squeak out. From then on he was always aware. No amount of loving parental talks about loving your differences and being special made a bit of difference.

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That is where otoplasty comes in. Otoplasty is a surgical technique to reshape the ears or “pin” them into a more natural position. It usually involves an incision in the back of the ear and sometimes one on the front. If there is too much cartilage in the bowl of the ear, contributing to their exaggerated shape, a small amount of that cartilage can be removed.

be addressed. Otoplasty is usually done as an outpatient procedure. It takes a couple of hours. There is some initial pain, but it is relatively brief and easily treated with medication. The head is wrapped initially and when the dressing is removed a head band is worn for a few weeks to support the new shape and allow the ears to fully heal. Normal activities can generally be resumed during this time.

The most common cause of prominent ears is that a major fold of the cartilage of the ear fails to develop. If you look at the profile of an ear, the major fold forms a Y shape. Some individuals are missing the top branch of that Y and thus the fold that holds the ear close to the head is missing. The missing fold can be recreated by reshaping the cartilage with sutures— kind of like sewing a fold into a garment. Often this condition runs in families. My son comes from a long line of prominent ears, in varying degrees.

After my son’s surgery he was thrilled. I kind of missed his trademark appearance. Most kids look instantly more mature after otoplasty. But he didn’t miss it at all. His happy expression said it all; “My ears are like doors, they used to be open and now they are closed.”

Junior High is a rough time for any adolescent. Often we recommend that a youth have this corrected before hitting that rocky road. But even when this condition extends into adulthood, it can

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr. Dayne Petersen NuVista Plastic Surgery nuvistaplasticsurgery.com

Dr. Petersen recently moved his practice here to Utah after spending several years on the teaching faculty of the University of Oklahoma. To learn more about Dr. Petersen and Breast Oasis, the non-profit he supports, visit his website www.nuvistaplasticsurgery. com

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>> Advisor Women's Health

" I re ce n tly ran ac ro s s Two Poem s , Th a t I q u i t e l i ke d , T hey m ay n o t h ave mu c h t o d o w i t h ob s t e t ri c s , Or p er hap s , t h ey mi gh t . "

BEC O MING A DAD Old women say that men don't know The pain through which all mothers go, And maybe that is true, and yet I vow I never shall forget The night he came. I suffered, too, Those bleak and dreary long hours through; I paced the floor and mopped my brow And waited for his glad wee-ow! I went upstairs and then came down, Because I saw the doctor frown And knew beyond the slightest doubt He wished to goodness I'd clear out. I walked into the yard for air And back again to hear her there, And met the nurse, as calm as though My world was not in deepest woe, And when I questioned, seeking speech Of consolation that would reach Into my soul and strengthen me For dreary hours that were to be: "Progressing nicely!" that was all She said and tip-toed down the hall; "Progressing nicely!" nothing more, And left me there to pace the floor. And once the nurse came out in haste For something that had been misplaced, And I that had been growing bold Then felt my blood grow icy cold; And fear's stern chill swept over me. I stood and watched and tried to see Just what it was she came to get.

I haven't learned that secret yet. I half believe that nurse in white Was adding fuel to my fright And taking an unholy glee, From time to time, in torturing me. Then silence! To her room I crept And was informed the doctor slept! The doctor slept! Oh, vicious thought, While she at death"s door bravely fought And suffered untold anguish deep, The doctor lulled himself to sleep. I looked and saw him stretched out flat And could have killed the man for that. Then morning broke, and oh, the joy: With dawn there came to us our boy. And in a glorious little while I went in there and saw her smile! I must have looked a human wreck, My collar wilted at my neck, My hair awry, my features drawn With all the suffering I had borne. She looked at me and softly said, "If I were you, I'd go to bed." Her's was the bitterer part, I know; She traveled through the vale of woe. But now when women folks recall The pain and anguish of it all I answer them in manner sad: "It's no cinch to become a dad." By Edgar A. Guest

T HE HA N D T H AT RO C K S T H E C RADLE IS T HE HA ND T H AT RU LE S T HE WO RLD Blessing on the hand of women! Angels guard its strength and grace, In the palace, cottage, hovel, Oh, no matter where the place; Would that never storms assailed it, Rainbows ever gently curled; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rules the world. Infancy's the tender fountain, Power may with beauty flow, Mother's first to guide the streamlets, From them souls unresting grow--

Grow on for the good or evil, Sunshine streamed or evil hurled; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rules the world. Woman, how divine your mission Here upon our natal sod! Keep, oh, keep the young heart open Always to the breath of God! All true trophies of the ages Are from mother-love impearled; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rules the world.

Facebook.com/HealthyMag

Blessings on the hand of women! Fathers, sons, and daughters cry, And the sacred song is mingled With the worship in the skyMingles where no tempest darkens, Rainbows evermore are hurled; For the hand that rocks the cradle Is the hand that rules the world. By William Ross Wallace

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Mark Saunders, MD

Obstetrics & Gynecology Personal Care drsaundersobgyn.com Dr. Mark Saunders is a well-respected board certified obstetrician and gynecologist that has been practicing in the American Fork area for over 16 years.

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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>> Advisor Allergies

6

Global Warming

Extends Weed Allergy Season TIPS TO COMBAT HAY FEVER MISERY

F

eel like there’s no end in sight when it comes to fall allergy misery? Blame global warming. Not to start a global warming debate, but research does suggest that with global warming, nasal allergy during the weed pollen season— also called hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis—lasts up to three weeks longer than it used to, and the further north you live, the longer you have to wait for relief. The rise in pollution and carbon dioxide essentially feeds ragweed as well. Ragweed thrives on carbon dioxide. One of the most allergenic of all pollens—ragweed—pollinates starting in mid-August. Most of the weeds pollinate from August until the winter frost comes. One ragweed plant alone can produce up to one billion pollen grains, and each grain can travel more than 100 miles. One in 10 Americans is affected by the sniffling, sneezing and itching of ragweed allergies. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) suggest those who

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be time to see a board certified allergist, who can provide more effective treatment. One option is immunotherapy—allergy shots. The treatment involves regular injections with pollen allergens. Immunotherapy can significantly lessen or get rid of nasal and eye allergy symptoms altogether. Allergy shots cannot only reduce allergy symptoms and medication use, it can prevent the development of asthma and the development of other allergies. Effectiveness of allergy shots really does depend on who is administering them, so make sure you find a qualified, board-certified allergist.

suffer from hay fever follow these six steps for relief:

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

GET A JUMP START

Mark your calendar to remind you to take medication before ragweed allergy symptoms start. August is when the plant blooms in most of the country, but it’s a little later in the South.

KEEP THE POLLEN OUTSIDE OUT

Ragweed travels with the wind—so close windows in your house and car. COME CLEAN After spending time outdoors, shower, change and wash your clothes. Clean your nasal passages too by using a saltwater rinse. MASK YOUR MISERY Wear a face-mask when you garden or mow the lawn. Better yet, assign those tasks to family members who don’t suffer from hay fever. CONSIDER A CURE If nonprescription medication isn’t doing the trick, it may

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

6.

DON’T LET UP TOO SOON

Because the nasal and eye symptoms of associated with ragweed allergies can linger after the pollen can no longer be detected in the air, don’t stop your allergy medication immediately.

To learn more about asthma and allergies, including hay fever, visit www.rockymountainallergy.com Come visit with one of our board certified allergists!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Douglas H. Jones, MD Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma & Immunology rockymountainallergy.com Dr. Jones specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of all conditions relating to allergies, asthma and immune system disorders. He is board certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology and the American Board of Internal Medicine. He earned his MD from Penn State University and completed his specialty training at Creighton University.

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>> Advisor Surgical Weight Loss

The

Hour Glass Effect The whole eating factory function of the stomach is very complicated and still not understood completely. One of known triggers for us to feel satisfied after eating is volume. In the stomach wall there are small switches that are turned on when we eat a significant volume. These switches then send a signal to the brain to lower or turn off our hunger. If we eat a lot then we feel "full". If we keep eating then we become sick. Placement of a Lap-Band creates an hour glass contour of the upper stomach. As food enters the upper portion the restricted neck creates pressure on the upper pouch and gives the sensation

of fullness. Most people have had this phenomenon to a lesser degree. It occurs when you don't eat for a significant period of time then notice that you didn't eat as much at the next meal. The common belief is that the stomach shrunk. In reality the stretch switches were turned on sooner due the stomach recoiling back to its usual size. The Lap-Band magnifies this effect so you are more easily able to eat small portions without feeling so hungry. Not drinking with meals and waiting for a while after eating will help the hunger stay away. The Lap-Band is adjustable to customize how much restriction there is around the stomach.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Darrin F. Hansen, MD, FACS The Lap-Band Center UtahLapBand.com

Set Yourself Free

HOPE. HELP. LASTING WEIGHT LOSS.

Darrin F. Hansen, MD., F.A.C.S.

801-LAP-BAND Facebook.com/HealthyMag

HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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play / september 2013

arts& recreation

13-14

1-31 TINKERING

On loan from the Exploratorium in San Francisco, the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point has a new exhibit full of awesome interactive pieces, like pulleys, computer circuits, turntables, paper airplanes, bicycle wheels, video and animation systems.

www.thanksgivingpoint.org/visit/museumofancientlife 

UTAH SYMPHONY TCHAIKOVSKY'S 1812 OVERTURE

1-9 MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL

World class jazz, classical and traditional music will be featured at this festival, held at Star Hall in Moab.

435-259-7003

4-7

The Utah Symphony will present this powerful classic at the Abravanel Hall in Salt Lake City.

801-355-ARTS

BRIGHAM CITY PEACH DAYS

A tradition more than a hundred years old, Peach Days brings about 50,000 people every year. A host of events are scheduled.

www.bcareachamber.com

4-25

13-14 TCHAIKOVSKY'S 1812 OVERTURE

SEPTEMBER CONCERT SERIES, THANKSGIVING POINT

19

MUSE

British prog rockers Muse will bring their The 2nd Law World Tour with special guest Cage The Elephant to EnergySolutions Arena September 19th. This is one show you will not want to miss!

smithstix.com

Thanksgiving Point’s stunning venue will be home to a new concert series in September. Come enjoy music from Amy Whitcomb, Missy Lynn and more.

www.thanksgivingpoint.org

5

PLAIN WHITE T'S

Best known for their hit song "Hey There Delilah", the band's latest single "Should've Just Gone to Bed" promises to be a hit too. Utah State Fair. Reserved Seat Ticket includes Fair Gate Admission $24.00 Advance / $29.00 Day of Show

6

7

Amy has just released a new album and will be performing that and #1 hit favorites from the last three decades @ the Utah State Fair. Reserved Seat Ticket includes Fair Gate Admission $24.00 Advance / $29.00 Day of Show

utahstatefair.com/tickets

OLD CAPITOL ARTS AND LIVING HISTORY FESTIVAL Come enjoy living history exhibits, demonstrations, artisan booths and local food, at Territorial Statehouse Park, on Main Street in Fillmore, UT.

AVENUES STREET FAIR, SALT LAKE CITY

Booths, art and refreshment abound in this classic northern Utah fair. Live music too!

www.slc-avenues.org

10

MUSE

AMY GRANT

6-7

9/19

utahstatefair.com/tickets

.38 SPECIAL

80's southern rock / Lynard Skynard related hit band performs such hits such as "Hold On Loosely" and "Caught Up In You" @ the Utah State Fair. Reserved Seat Ticket includes Fair Gate Admission $24.00 Advance / $29.00 Day of Show

1-21 THE CURIOUS SAVAGE, HALE THEATER OREM The Curious Savage, written by John Patrick, is a comedic play about Ethel P. Savage, a woman whose husband recently died and left her approximately ten million dollars.

haletheater.org

1-28 TARZAN, HALE CENTER THEATER, WVC

Six days a week all of September, including additional matinee performances, the Hale Center Theater in West Valley presents Tarzan, the timeless jungle classic.

801-984-9000

utahstatefair.com/tickets

10 SAVES THE DAY

The band Save the Day will be at In the Venue in Salt Lake City. The show starts at 7:30 pm.

www.inthevenueslc.com

11

PARACHUTE

Parachute will perform at In the Venue at 7 pm.

www.inthevenueslc.com

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Healthy Mag.com


fitness events 9/7

SEND YOUR EVENTS TO US AT EVENTS@HEALTHY-MAG.COM

U 0F U 'RUN FOR HER LIFE!'

Run for Her Life! The 7th Annual Susan Sandoval Run for Ovarian Cancer – Saturday, September 7th, 2013 This 7th annual event is a 5km fun run held in Sugarhouse Park that celebrates and honors ovarian cancer survivors, their families, and friends. All funds raised go to The Ovarian Cancer Education, Awareness and Research fund created in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Utah.

Sept5-15

801-585-0067 http://bit.ly/Hgz7Ne

6,7

MAN GAMES

Heber is the location for this year’s Man Games, which is a 10-part obstacle competition for individuals and teams. It should be fun to watch, even if you choose not to participate. Also, it isn’t just for boys.

mangames.com

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HIKE FOR HUNGER

Organized by the Christian Center for Park City, this event’s purpose is to fight hunger locally and globally. Hiking will begin at Snow Park Lodge in Deer Valley. Registration begins at 2pm, or you can register online.

healthy events SEP

DOWNTOWN FARMER'S MARKET

SEP

WASATCH FRONT FARMER'S MARKET

www.ccofpc.org/hike-for-hunger.html

14

BIG COTTONWOOD MARATHON & HALF MARATHON

Runners are set to experience an elevation drop of more than 3,000 feet as they descend through Big Cottonwood Canyon on their way from the mountains into the city at the Big Cottonwood Marathon & Half, which makes its second annual running just before the first official weekend of fall in mid-September 2013, here just a few miles south of Salt Lake City.

http://www.bigcottonwoodmarathon.com 

15-21 CYCLING ESCAPES: 5 NATIONAL PARKS

See all of Utah’s wonders in seven days, on a 435-mile bike ride. Everything is organized for you and included in the price, including lodging every night, dining at fine restaurants, luggage transport, experienced guides and entry into every national park.

cyclingescapes.com

21

714-267-4591

NORDICTRACK TOP OF UTAH MARATHON

The 15th annual Top of Utah Marathon will be run in Cache Valley Utah, starting at Hardware Ranch Wildlife Management Area. It is a downhill race, though not too steep.

www.topofutahmarathon.com

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MILLION MILES AT MILLER

Come participate in a cycle ride of your choice: century, metric, thirty miler or a 4.5 mile family ride. This event, which also includes a host of family activities, will be held at the Miller Motorsports Park in Tooele.

7

August brings sweet corn, tomatoes, squash and a lot more to Salt Lake area farmers markets. August and September are the best months for fresh produce in Utah, so take advantage and fill your basket with summer's bounty. slcfarmersmarket.org

Thanksgiving Point to provide a variety of fresh produce and hand-made products from local vendors. Come get your fruits, vegetables, jellies, and jams at the Farmer's Market held on the Water Tower Plaza. thanksgivingpoint.org

BACKYARD GARDENING WORKSHOP

For just $5, come take a class from gardening experts at the Thanksgiving Point Gardens, to make your backyard into an Eden. Learn how to propagate, divide plants and more.

visit.thanksgivingpoint.org

SEP/OCT MONTICELLO FARMERS MARKET

If you are down south this September, go to Monticello Farmers Market, held every Thursday at Veterans Memorial Park.

utahscanyoncountry.com

20-21 WHAT A WOMAN WANTS EXPO

Shop til you drop!! Grab your girlfriends and plan on spending the day! We've got everything women want! On the spot makeovers, skin care, the latest in home decor, to health and wellness.

www.whatawomanwantsshow.com

millionmilesatmiller.com

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WATCHMAN 100 CENTURY RIDE

This ride starts in Springdale, Utah and continues under the shadow of Zion National Park. In Southwestern Utah the sun shines more than 300 days a year. On this ride you will travel through Sand Hollow State Park and view the majestic scenery of Zion National Park.

www.spingeeks.com/events/watchman

OCT 3-4 SENIOR EXPO AT SOUTH TOWNE EXPO The Senior Expo is Utah’s premier exhibition event where you can Explore, Learn, and Connect with resources to assist those navigating the transitions of aging.

http://seniorexpo.slco.org

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013

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HEALTHY MAGAZINE M E D I C A L A D V I S O R S AESTHETICS & LASER

JEFFREY AYERS, MD MEDICAL DIRECTOR

Elase Medical Spa

Healthy-Mag.com/Elase

ALLERGY & ASTHMA

EYE CARE

PHILLIP C. HOOPES ,MD

Hoopes Vision Correction Center Healthy-Mag.com/Hoopes

ORTHOPEDICS/SPORTS MED

TREVOR MAGEE, MD

Salt Lake Regional, The Center for Precision Joint Replacement

Healthy-Mag.com/SLRegional

FUNC TIONAL MEDICINE

SPINE CARE / SURGERY

Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

RedRiver Health and Wellness Center

The SMART Clinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Jones

Healthy-Mag.com/Redd

Healthy-Mag.com/SmartClinic

B A R I AT R I C M E D I C I N E

HORMONE THERAPY

SPINE CARE / SURGERY

Utah Wellness Institute

The SMART Clinic

DOUGLAS H. JONES, MD

O. LAYTON ALLDREDGE MD, FACS

JOSHUA JAMES REDD, DC

ROBERT JONES, DC

South Valley Surgical

Healthy-Mag.com/RobertJones

B A R I AT R I C M E D I C I N E

INFERTILIT Y

SCOTT ADELMAN, MD

MICHAEL GIOVANNIELLO, MD

Healthy-Mag.com/SmartClinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Alldredge

DARRIN F. HANSEN MD, FACS

The Lap Band Center

Healthy-Mag.com/Hansen

RUSSELL A. FOULK, MD

Utah Fertility Center

801-492-9200 Healthy-Mag.com/Foulk

INSURANCE C A R D I O LO G Y

AMANDA DONOHUE, DO

Jordan Valley Medical Center

801-263-2370 Healthy-Mag.com/Donohue

COSME TIC SURGERY

BENJAMIN DUNKLEY, DO

Envision Cosmetic Surgery

See online: envisionsurgery.com

D E N TA L : C O S M E T I C

WALTER MEDEN, DDS

Elite Smiles

Healthy-Mag.com/Meden

STEPHEN L. BARLOW MD, VICE PRESIDENT

SelectHealth

DON BIGELOW, DDS, PC

K. Don Dental

Healthy-Mag.com/Bigelow

AUTUMN SPENCER COSMETOLOGIST, OWNER

Seasons Salon and Day Spa

Healthy-Mag.com/Seasons

SKIN CARE

DOUGLASS FORSHA, MD

South Valley Dermatology

southvalleydermatology.com

Healthy-Mag.com/SelectHealth

INSURANCE

DENNIS HARSTON MD, MBA, CMO

Altius Health Plans

V E I N T R E AT M E N T

HARRISON LAZARUS, MD, FACS

21st Century Vein Clinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Lazarus

Healthy-Mag.com/Altius

M E N ’ S H E A LT H

LANE C. CHILDS, MD, FACS

Western Urological Clinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Childs

D E N TA L : G E N E R A L

S PA

W E I G H T LO S S

STEVEN E. WARREN, MD

Align Wellness

Healthy-Mag.com/Warren

M E N ’ S H E A LT H

STEVEN N. GANGE, MD, FACS

Western Urological Clinic

Healthy-Mag.com/Gange

H E A LT H Y M A G A Z I N E

E X P E R T PA N E L D E N TA L : G E N E R A L

ORTHOPEDICS/SPORTS MED

CLINICAL RESEARCH Lynn R. Webster, MD, FACPM, FASAM | LifeTreeResearch.com

Roseman University of Health Sciences

Precision Joint Replacement Center

COSME TIC SURGERY Kirk Moore, MD | Just The Right Curves

WILLIAM CARROLL, DDS

www.roseman.edu

AARON HOFMANN, MD

Healthy-Mag.com/SLRegional

DIABETES

M E N ’ S H E A LT H

JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Men’s Health Center

LAURA WESTERN

Healthy-Mag.com/JDRF

D E N TA L : FA M I LY Joe Maio, DDS | Apex Family Dental w

Healthy-Mag.com/Men

PERSONAL TRAINERS Nick & Preston Rainey | Body4Change, LLC

OBSTETRICS & OBGYN

Treehouse Athletic Club

Obstetrics & Gynecology Personal Care

Healthy-Mag.com/Treehouse

D E N TA L : C O S M E T I C Rodney S. Gleave, DMD | Cosmetic & Implant Dental Arts

ANDREW PEIFFER, MD, PHD

FITNESS

BROOKE KITTEL

COSME TIC SURGERY Trenton C. Jones, MD | Cascade Cosmetic Surgery Center

PREGNANCY/BABY Eliott Spencer, PhD, Co-Owner | Utah Cord Bank

MARK SAUNDERS, MD

W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H Mark Saunders , MD | Dr. Saunders OB/GYN

drsaundersobgyn.com

V E I N T R E AT M E N T Mountain Medical Vein Center and Medspa YO G A JT, Studio Manager | BE HOT Yoga & Pilates Studio

EYE CARE

PHILLIP C. HOOPES, JR., MD

Hoopes Vision Correction Center Healthy-Mag.com/Hoopes.Jr

ORTHODONTICS

BRANDON W. FAIRBANKS DMD

YO G A Alexandra Bassett, Director | Yoga Central

Fairbanks Orthodontics

Healthy-Mag.com/Fairbanks

I F YO U A R E A L E A D I N G P R O V I D E R I N YO U R F I E L D A N D W O U L D L I K E TO B E CO N S I D E R E D F O R H E A LT HY M AG A Z I N E'S P R O V I D E R D I R E C TO R Y , P L E A S E E - M A I L U S AT D I R E C TO R Y @ H E A LT H Y - M A G . CO M O R C A L L 866. 884. 32 5 8 62 HEALTHY MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2013 Healthy-Mag.com


Healthy MAGAZINE

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR MEDIA AFFILATES

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Salt Lake City, Utah

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Boise, Idaho

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Las Vegas, Nevada

Better health. Better communities. Once city at a time...

stardocs MEDIA

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ABC | HEALTH.LOCALNEWS8.COM

Idaho Falls, Idaho

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Life Happens. G Life Happens. Get Covered.

Help secure your physical and financia To find out how, callAltius your Altius Help secure your physical and financial health with Health Plans. b

To find out how, call your Altius broker or our local office today. We have coverage types for everyo

We have coverage types for everyone:Group Health Group Health Individual and Family Medicare Advantage

Dental

Individual and Family Wellness Programs

Medicare Advantage And more!

everyone value from their Today, everyone needs toToday, get more value from theirneeds insurance.toYouget owe itmore to yourself to comparison shop. insu

(801) 355-1234 (801) 355 www.altiushealthplans.com www.altiushea

This is a partial description of products underwritten by Altius Health Plans and in no way details all of the benefits, limitations, or exclusions of the plans. Please refer to the Member Handbook and Medical Benefits Brochure to determine exact terms, conditions and scope of coverage, including all exclusions and limitations and defined terms.

This is a partial description of products underwritten by Altius Health Plans and in no way HEALTHY MAGAZINEexact SEPTEMBER 2013 65 Member Handbook and Medical Benefits Brochure to determine terms, conditions a

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Healthy Magazine | September '13