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It’s not just health care... it’s a way of life.

Between the hectic urban centers of Atlanta and Birmingham are 150 miles of beautiful countryside and quaint communities. Hometowns like Bowdon, Bremen, Villa Rica and Carrollton epitomize the quiet charm that makes west Georgia unique. And at Tanner Health System, this southern hospitality goes hand-in-hand with the best in medical care. For the past 60 years, Tanner Health System has been taking care of west Georgia. Tanner’s commitment to our community has never wavered — it’s only grown. From state-of-theart cancer care to nationally-recognized cardiac care and orthopedics, Tanner Health System rivals any healthcare organization in the nation, but we’ll never forget how we got here.

Excellent health care has been a priority for our community since the beginning. Because of their support , Tanner has grown to four facilities, more than 250 exceptional physicians and 2,600 employees — all here to improve the lives and health of west Georgians. At Tanner, quality health care is right down the road — not down the highway. And we’re as unique as the people we serve.

Tanner Medical Center/Carrollton n Tanner Medical Center/Villa Rica Higgins General Hospital n Tanner Medical Group n Willowbrooke at Tanner

To find a doctor near you, call 770.214.CARE or visit www.tanner.org.


What’s inside…

Welcome to

H

Healthy Magazine & Wellness Resource Guide

This Season, Brush Up On Sports Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

ealthy Horizons is a community wellness magazine that is distributed free throughout the Southeast U. S. The goal of the magazine is to provide health education to the community and promote healthy living. Articles in the magazine are provided by healthcare professionals who are committed to: (a) disease prevention, (b) early detection of disease, (c) prompt treatment of illness, and (d) promotion of quality of life. The magazine began as a wellness resource guide for aging Americans. This key aspect of the magazine has proven to be a great resource for our consumers. Input from our local advertisers and consumers reinforce our belief that health education provides our readers with insight and knowledge to assist in making informed decisions regarding his/her healthcare. In the past six years our market area has grown significantly and feedback from our consumers has been positive. In an effort to meet the desires of the market area we have expanded the magazine to include a “Healthy Kids” section and a “Community” section. Again, response regarding the inclusion of this content has been constructive. As many of you are aware, acute and chronic health problems are very prevalent in our society. However, many of these health problems are preventable. Individuals lack the knowledge that is necessary to make informed decisions regarding their health. It is imperative that each individual, regardless of age, race or gender, engage in opportunities that will enhance their well being on a physical, mental, emotional and spiritual level. This holistic approach to health will enable individuals to make educated decisions that are appropriate to maintain their current health status or to seek prompt treatment when disease or illness occurs. Healthy Horizons strives to provide information in the community that is relevant and will hopefully improve the health status of aging Americans. The goal is that Healthy Horizons will serve as a valuable community resource tool and promote quality of life. God bless you as you strive for “Healthy Horizons.”

Ellis Returns Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Staff & Credits

Cover Spotlight Dr Burson, Hero On Many Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Turner Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Stop Suffering with Allergies and Asthma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Center for Allergy and Asthma of West Georgia

Ashbrook Village. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Tis The Season For Eye Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Carrollton Eye Clinic

Complete Care Starts Here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Tanner Health System

Are you the victim of an injury? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Perkins Law Firm

Getting Physically Fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 By Kellie Grubbs Tanner Health System

Impact of Allergies on Your Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Peachtree Allergy and Asthma Clinic

Corner Stones of a Healthy Mouth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Smile Center Villa Rica

Haney’s Drug Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Home Care Solutions For Today. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Guardian Angel of West GA., Inc.

Value of the Funeral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Almon Funeral Home

World-Class Neurosurgical Care, Close To Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 WellStar Surgery Network

Healthy Kids Great Futures Start Here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Boys and Girls Club of Metro Atlanta

Overcoming Childhood Obesity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Tanner Health System

WellStar Health System Youth Villages

Faith & Family Raising Children to be Responsible Adults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Lessons Learned On A Basketball Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Responsible Parenting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 God....On Disciplining Children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Community Focus Healthy Horizons Community Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Carrollton Cultural Arts Center.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 WellStar Corporate & Community Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 The Alzheimer’s Group of Carroll County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Healthy Horizons Community Supporters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Fun & Games Sudoku Puzzle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Word Search: Sunshine- Friend or Foe?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Emergency Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Wellness Resource Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 National Helpful Numbers Directory. . . . . . . . . 47

Publishers

Mark Helms Kim Helms 256-235-1955 mhelms@cableone.net

Office Manager Teresa Tims

256-235-1957 Mark Helms Kim Helms, teresatims@cableone.net Publisher D.H. Ed., MSN, RN Art Direction & Marketing Publisher David Coffey Online at: 256-237-3177 davidhh@cableone.net www.healthyhmag.com

Advertising Sales or to Request Additional Copies: 256-235-1955 Contact us by mail:

Healthy Horizons Magazine P.O. Box 81 Choccolocco, AL 36254 Office: 256.235.1955 • Fax: 256.235.1935

Executive Assistant

Emily Martin Alwine emilyalwine@cableone.net

Contributing Writers

Billy Helms, PhD Kimberly D. Helms, D.H. Ed., MSN, RN Richard O’Connor Lorrie Moody, MEd Kathleen Miller, RN, MS Sherry Kughn Gaston O. McGinnis, MD FACS

The Oaks of Carrollton Assisted Living, where you will enjoy living in elegant, well-appointed surroundings. The Oaks offers a warm, family-like atmosphere with all of the comforts of home and none of the worries of care-taking. Residents are encouraged to live as independently as possible and enjoy a personal and secure environment without the responsibility of upkeep and burdens of living. We offer 27 private suites with private handicap-accessible bathrooms. The community areas offer spacious rooms including areas with fireplaces to enjoy comfortable living. Residents look forward to meal time as they enjoy three meals a day in the elegant dining room. With waitress-style dining, delicious foods with varied menus

are served. In addition there is a beautifully appointed private dining room for small groups. A home-style resident kitchen is available for those who continue to enjoy cooking. Residents may be as active as they choose. Organized on and off campus activities and events are scheduled. The trained and experienced staff is committed to caring about the residents. Individual needs assessments are completed with assistance available with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and grooming. A medication assistance program is also offered. Twenty four hour assistance is available. The Oaks also offers a 12 room secured memory support unit to meet the needs of those who have

early to mid stages of dementia but remain mobile. The resident rooms may be decorated and furnished to provide a familiar and home-like atmosphere for the resident; while the common areas of the unit are an inviting and comfortable setting. The memory support unit provides the structure and assistance needed for those who have memory loss. For a tour or for more information, call 770-834-2242

© 2010 by Healthy Horizons Magazine. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reprinted and reproduced, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Healthy Horizons is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, physician offices, wellness centers, assisted living centers, hospitals and rehab centers. Please call for a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

Community Wellness Guide

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Dr. John Burson,

hero on many levels By Sherry Kughn

Dr. John Burson of Carrollton, Ga., is a 76-year-old physician who pays back his duty to America by volunteering to serve troops stationed in some of the military’s most dangerous spots, Iraq and Afghanistan. He is to travel to the latter in June. The trip will be his fourth overseas tour with the Boots on the Ground program, which readies physicians, including those of retirement age, to serve three-month tours in the military. When Burson is not on a tour, he sees patients at his practice called the Villa Rica Ear, Nose & Throat, in Villa Rica, Ga., and he takes an active part in the business and medical community of West Georgia. When he is overseas, Burson is usually the oldest soldier among his group. In fact, his gray hair was once noticed by the late Iraqi dictator, Sadam Hussein. In 2005, on his first tour, Burson was charged with overseeing the imprisoned Hussein. The dictator was happy to be in the presence of someone closer to his own age. “He was not like I expected,” said Burson. “He was charismatic, loved to write poems and listen to music. He was not worried about being sentenced to death(since) it had happened before.” Thus far, Burson has been on a military tour every other year since 2005. He is not sure the June tour will be his last, as he enjoys being with the young soldiers that he serves. “It takes me two years to forget all the bad parts about a trip and to remember all the good parts,” he said.

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

Such good and bad parts of his tours are described in newsletters he wrote back to his family during his most recent trip: “There is a real emotional high that permeates everyone as we settle into our seats,” he wrote about leaving out from Fort Benning, Ga., to head to Bagram Air Force Base in 2009. As for the bad parts, he wrote, “The turnsin the mountains of Afghanistan were of the hairpin variety and the drop-off was precipitous with either none or m i n i m a l guard rails protecting one from the abyss that lay below. … To make matters worse, nightfall was upon us and maybe it is best when one cannot see the possible dangers.” Bu rs on served with an Infantry Battalion as a physician at an aid station in Afghanistan and served in a combat-support hospital in Iraq. He says once the grueling travel is done and he settles in to his field hospitals, most of his duties as a physician are routine.

About ten to fifteen percent of what he treats are related to combat. “We lost six soldiers during my last trip,” he said. “That is a very sad component of the tour, seeing soldiers with no legs and all kinds of injuries. You get over it, I mean part of it goes with the job, but it is sad.” Burson’s ties to the military began when he was an ROTC student at Georgia Tech during the 1950s. He trained to serve in a war zone but somehow always missed combat assignments before he retired as a lieutenant colonel in 1985. In his civilian life, Burson is a husband of 55 years to his wife, Barbara; a father of four adult children, and a grandfather of six. He says the family has adapted well to his desire to serve tours of duty in dangerous places. His wife copes by throwing herself into projects, such as redecorating their house, while he is gone. “We tease each other about how I have no control over things while I am away,” Burson said. In addition to his duties as a family man, Burson has had a dual career. After high school, he could not afford college, but found a co-op program that allowed him to work and study. He attended Georgia Tech, became an engineer, and, later, became a professor there. During those years, he worked on research projects making metal parts for artificial limbs. His interest in

Burson serves his community well, too. He serves on the board of the Tanner Medical Center. He is the chairman of the board of Tanner Medical Center, former chairman of the Tanner Health Services, founding member and chairman of the board of the Community Foundation of West Georgia, founding member of The Burson Center for job and business incubation, and a trustee, chairman, or director of various other business, medical, educational, and faith-based entities. He is the author of more than forty major reports

and publications related to medicine and engineering, and is a frequent speaker at civic organizations. In recent years, he has become a bit of a media celebrity because of his service to the Boots on the Ground program. Burson said his accomplishments are possible because he has been blessed with good health and ample opportunities. “I usually feel great,” Burson said. “I have the good fortune to have good genes, I guess, and I exercise and eat reasonably well. I figure if I quit doing the things I love, I’ll fall apart.” The following was written by Burson from the Camp Ali al Salem: “The truth of the matter is, we have about worn our military out with Iraq and now Afghanistan . With that in mind, one might expect rather low morale. Au Contraire, these guys and gals are just fabulous representatives of the American people and I hope you are duly proud of them.”

medicine grew, and he decided to obtain a doctorate in medicine. He completed his residency training at Emory-Grady Hospital and became a private-practice physician, first in the Carrollton area.

Community Wellness Guide

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Now Fou Convenie r Location nt st Serve You o !

We Specialize In:

• General Orthopaedics • Sports Medicine & Joint Replacement Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic • Rheumatology • Spine Surgery

Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic, P.C. Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center Continual population growth in the West Georgia/East Alabama area has dramatically increased the need for orthopaedic services. Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic, P.C. continues to be committed to meeting the demand with excellence in physicians and facilities. Founded in 1977 by Dr. Ralph Fleck, Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic has 9 orthopaedic surgeons, a physical medicine & rehabilitation physician and a rheumatologist. The practice has had 3 locations – Carrollton, Villa Rica, and Bremen. In order to optimize care and service for patients, a new facility specializing in spine care was recently opened in Carrollton. Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center is conveniently located at 812 S. Park St. in Carrollton – easy walking distance from the Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic building. It is a comprehensive care clinic dedicated solely to spinal problems – either lumbar or cervical. Dr. Brad Prybis, spine surgeon, explains, “This clinic’s entire staff and its resources are totally focused on care of the spine area. Yes, the practice still

Dr. E. Franklin Pence, M.D. cares for all aspects of orthopaedics, but this stand-alone clinic focuses just on spinal issues. Whether you need a comprehensive examination, x-rays, MRI, physical therapy, or spinal injections, it is all handled here at the Spine and MRI Center. Other than surgery, our patients can now have everything done at one location, which certainly makes it more convenient.” Treatment is coordinated between Dr. Prybis, nursing specialists, physical therapists, imaging specialists, and Dr. E. Franklin Pence, a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation physician. Their philosophy is to begin with more conservative treatments and progress to more invasive treatments only when necessary. Dr. Pence specializes in non-surgical spine care, including x-ray guided procedures (i.e. epidurals, joint injections,

discograms, etc.) He also utilizes a new type of Epidural called a Transforaminal or Nerve Block Epidural. He pointed out, “Patients often have great pain relief and say that it was less painful than expected. The entire procedure takes 5 to 15 minutes and typically they are back to work the next day”. Dr. Pence went on to say “If surgery is indicated, Dr. Prybis is a highly skilled surgeon whose work is known throughout the United States. He is able to perform many different types of spinal surgery, from microscopic and motion preserving surgery to more complex scoliosis and reconstructive spinal surgery. With the addition of the MRI in the new facility, patients can receive diagnostic imaging tests when they need them. It is a relatively affordable choice that is very convenient as the tests are conducted in the same place that your physician practices. A Board Certified Radiologist will interpret your MRI and report his findings to your Physician. Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic Spine & MRI Center is located in the West Georgia Shopping Center next to Staples at 812 S. Park Street, Carrollton, Ga.

helpful information phone:

770-834-0873 address:

712 South Park Street, Ste. 3 Carrollton GA 30117 website:

carrolltonortho.com

Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic, P.C.

Bremen Orthopaedics

Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center

Villa Rica Orthopaedics West Georgia Rheumatology

150 Clinic Ave., Ste. 101 Carrollton, Georgia 30117

Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center

Our Physicians: Ralph E. Fleck, Jr., MD., F.A.A.O.S. Jubal R.Watts, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Charles N. Hubbard, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Gregory S. Slappey, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Anthony W. Colpini, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Brad G. Prybis, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Kevin M. Charron, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Bremen Orthopaedics, Villa Rica Orthopaedics / West Georgia Rheumatology and Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center are all affiliates of Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic.

770-834-0873

Let our professio staff take nal care of you!

Jeffry A. Dressander, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. Dr. Taylor B. Cates, M.D. E. Franklin Pence, Jr., M.D. Indupriya Palasani, M.D. David A Scruggs, P.A.-C Michael C. Gravett, P.A.-C Andrea Maxwell, MSN, NP

Four Locations: Carrollton Orthopaedic Clinic 150 Clinic Ave., Ste. 101 Carrollton, GA 30117 Bremen Orthopaedics 204 Allen Memorial Dr., Ste. 102 Bremen, GA 30110

Villa Rica Orthopaedics West Georgia Rheumatology 705 Dallas Highway, Ste. 301 Villa Rica, GA 30180 Carrollton Orthopaedic Spine & MRI Center 712 South Park Street, Ste. 3 Carrollton GA 30117


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The Right Choice for Your Pharmacy by Randy Turner, Pharm, D,

Choosing the right pharmacy is an important decision for every individual. In today’s world with big chain pharmacies on every corner, it is sometimes easy to forget what a vital role your independent pharmacist can play in meeting your healthcare needs efficiently, effectively and reliably. Independent pharmacies are known for excellent service, speed, accuracy and providing information that is essential to its customers, with a pharmacist and staff who know you, the customer, and your personal needs. Turner Pharmacy is able to address all of your personal pharmacy needs. As an independent neighborhood pharmacy, we focus on prescription and over-the-counter drugs, which means more attention to your medical

requirements than you will find in a chain or grocery store pharmacy. Medications are an investment in your health and it is important to know and fully understand new drugs before taking them and to be aware of any possible interactions that can occur. We have an experienced pharmacist and knowledgeable staff who are here to counsel you and answer any questions you may have. We are here to become familiar with the needs of you and your family so that you can trust that your health is in reliable hands. For the past 23 years, Turner Pharmacy has been providing Carrollton with excellent customer relations, advice, reliability and fast, friendly service. We offer a convenient location on Dixie Street near Tanner

Medical Center and provide free citywide delivery to our customers. We also have quick drive-thru so that you can have your prescriptions filled without ever leaving your car. At Turner Pharmacy we will continue to strive to be the pharmacy that you can trust to meet all the prescription needs for you and your family.

pharmacy

Randy Turner, Pharmacist 821 Dixie Street Carrollton, GA 30117

770-832-7076

  

                    

                                  



                    



          

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

                                               



                                     

                                                 

                  

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Residents living in Ashbrook Village’s cottages can choose additional amenities and services such as housekeeping, laundry and meals served in our assisted living community in a private dining.

dents enjoy beautifully appointed living spaces, delicious meals, engaging social activities, and transportation to doctor’s appointments. There are no long-term contracts, just a simple month-to-month fee. With our safe living accommodations and 24-hour staffing, resident and their families are comfortable knowing they are safe and secure.

Making the right choices later in life “The reason my husband and I moved to can be difficult for senior adults. As they the cottages is because we are planning prepare for life after retirement, many of for the future. Knowing my husband’s them consider their safety and health to health condition, he will one day require be top priorities when making decisions. an assisted living community and I can A residential retirement community is a Residential retirement, cottages, apartments and assistedVeterans living. AsBenefits you like it. wonderful option for active senior adults. continue to live independently while he Ashbrook Village is proud to accept Ashbrook Village, located in Villa receives the care he needs from Ashbrook benefits available for U.S. veterans or the Rica, Georgia, serves the West Georgia Village Assisted Living. It will be convesurviving spouse of a U.S. veteran. Once Chestnut senior adults, area offering independent cottagesHill and is a residential community for active eligibility is determined, residents may nient for me and my entire family.” an assisted living ages community. Nestled 55 and older. It offers everything you need forreceive independent a federal pension of up to $2,000 - Mrs. W from Atlanta on 36 acres, Ashbrook Village is conveper month to help pay for assisted living livingMedical and Hospiassisted living for peace of mind. niently located to Tanner services at Ashbrook Village. Assisted Living tal and 3 miles from Interstate 20 soupscale it is Gracious, mountaintop living: custom cottages, Whether attractive you are considering indeeasily accessible to family members from Ashbrook Village Assisted Living pendent living assisted living, we invite apartments, assistedCommunity living —has now respite care. several destinations. beenoffering specifically deyou to take the time to call us and learn The perfect alternative to seniors who signed and constructed to allow an Weekly housekeeping, linen service, all utilities except telephone, more. You are also welcomed to stop by are interested in Independent Living can abundance of natural light throughout for a tour of our wonderful and exterior maintenance, clubhouse dining, scheduled community. our community. downsize and livealla interior low-maintenance approach provides the ideal solifestyle. Our one and two-bedroom cottransportation and lution aOur fullfor calendar of planned events toM.meet Gary Tallentevery seniors who may need some tages are spacious and include a kitchen, dining area, living room, stagehandicap of life.acces- assistance with bathing, dressing and Executive Director Ashbrook Village medication management. Our resisible bath and washer/dryer hook-ups.

Ashbrook Village is a residential community for active senior adults, ages 55 and older. It offers everything you need for independent living and assisted living for peace of mind.

Gracious living: attractive cottages, assisted living – now offering respite care. Weekly housekeeping, linen service, all utilities except telephone, all interior and exterior maintenance, dining, scheduled transportation and a full calendar of planned events to meet every stage of life.

CHESTNUT HILL is located at 64 Clubhouse Trail, Highlands, NC 28741 75 Herrell Road • Villa Rica, GA 30180 (Located Contact us: 1/2 mile from Tanner Hospital) Ph: 828.787.2114 • Fax: 828.526.5240 GaryTallent.ChestnutHillAtHighlands.com • www.ChestnutHillAtHighlands.com

770-459-8061 • AshbrookVillage.com

Tis the Season for Eye Conditions Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter…We each have our favorite season and here in the South there is something to love about each one. Whether it is the fragrant flowers of spring or the brilliant leaves of fall, the balmy summer mornings or the cool winter nights, we all have our favorite time of year. For many, the seasons bring with them a variety of annoying eye symptoms—itching, burning, and blurry vision to name a few. Let us describe several common ailments that may affect you during the months ahead and give you some insight to their causes.

DRY EYES

Nearly one-in-twenty people in the United States suffer from dry eye. Stinging, burning and episodes of blurry vision are common symptoms. Often patients are surprised to learn they have dry eyes because their eyes “water all the time.” This constant tearing occurs as the brain senses eye pain and tries to flood the eye in an effort to flush out any possible foreign object. Unfortunately, these tears are different from the normal day-to-day tears and can actually make dry eyes worse (like constantly licking chapped lips). Many factors worsen dry eye. Certain medications, medical conditions, even menopause can triple a person’s chances of symptoms. During the dry months there is more evaporation of tears and symptoms worsen further. This turns on more tearing leading to a downward spiral of increasing irritation.

ROSACEA

Many people think of rosacea as an inconvenient skin condition that causes redness and irritation on the face in fairskinned individuals during the warm summer months. Rosacea actually causes a significant amount of eye discomfort (and rarely eye disease) if the eyelids are affected. The eyelids (which are mostly skin) are responsible for secreting the mucus, oil and water necessary for healthy, soothing tears. Rosacea can upset this balance causing thick sticky tears, crusting on the eyelashes and an irritated, burning sensation. Research shows seasonal exposures (wind, cool air, indoor heat, sun and hot weather) cause flare-ups in half the patients with rosacea.

NIGHT DRIVING

Many people notice a decrease in their quality of vision during the winter months. While the Northern Hemisphere is tilted away from the sun, we experience less direct sunlight and more dim days and longer nights. For people with young, healthy eyes, this change in contrast is hardly noticeable. But, people with cataracts, glaucoma, corneal disease or macular degeneration may notice a substantial decrease in their quality of vision. This may be one reason ophthalmologists notice an increase in requests for cataract surgery during the months of November-March. Even young people may notice more blurred vision during the winter. Dilated pupils (the normal response to darkness) decrease the fine-tuning focus of the eye. Some people notice a decrease in their vision quality and may require glasses (or stronger glasses) to combat this phenomenon.

Nearly one-in-twenty people in the United States suffer from dry eye. about strategies to stop. Rosacea patients may notice an improvement with all these suggestions plus may enjoy added benefits by decreasing spicy food and alcohol consumption. Talk with your doctor if these suggestions alone do not help. If you notice a constant decrease in your quality of vision, use extreme caution when driving. Improving your glasses prescription may be necessary. Patients with eye diseases should seek medical attention when they notice a change in vision to determine if the change is due to the environment or subtle progression of their disease. Hopefully these tips will help you enjoy the beauty of each season without the blur. If you have any concern, please contact your eye care professional. The physicians at Carrollton Eye Clinic are happy to work with your optometrist. For consultation, you may reach us at 770-834-1008.

WHAT TO DO?

Here are a few things to help relieve dry eye and rosacea symptoms. Try an overthe-counter artificial tear two or three times a day, especially before reading, computer work or night-time driving. Soaking the eyelids with a very warm washcloth morning and night may also be helpful. Turn down the heat in the house and use a humidifier to increase the moisture level in your home. Add more green-leafy vegetables (talk to your doctor first if you are on certain blood thinners), fish oil and flaxseed oil to your diet and if you smoke, cut down or better yet talk to your doctor

helpful information phone: 770-834-1008

address:

158 Clinic Avenue Carrollton, GA 30117

website:

www.carrolltoneye.com

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Tanner Health System: Complete Care Starts Here The mission of Tanner Health System is to be west Georgia’s healthcare provider of choice, and for more than 60 years the nonprofit health system has grown to provide a complete continuum of care to area residents. Tanner operates three regional hospitals – Tanner Medical Center/Carrollton, Tanner Medical Center/Villa Rica and Higgins General Hospital in Bremen – as well as an inpatient behavioral health facility in Villa Rica, Willowbrooke at Tanner. Tanner’s continuum of care includes state-of-the-art cancer care, a leading cardiac program, revolutionary critical care services, innovative medical imaging, inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services, 24-hour emergency care, surgical services, maternity services, a medical staff of more than 250 physicians representing 46 specialties and more.

want their friends and family. Tanner’s team of highly skilled obstetricians and specially trained nurses provide specialized care for mothers and their new arrivals. Maternity center tours are available at each facility. To schedule a tour at either of Tanner’s maternity centers, call 770.214.CARE.

Following a procedure, the John and gynecologic cancers, chemotherapy Barbara Tanner Cardiac Rehab Center treatments through its Tanner Infusion provides a multi-phase rehabilitation Center and more. program for patients recovering from heart disease, including education on how to avoid future heart problems and live a long and active life.

Behavioral Health Care

Heart Care

Tanner Heart and Vascular Center in Carrollton offers a comprehensive approach to cardiac care, bringing prevention, diagnostics, treatment and rehabilitation together under one roof. Along with a range of treatments, Tanner Heart and Vascular Center provides state-of-the-art diagnostics – including angiography and nuclear cardiology – and a complete approach to recovery. The center and its team of heart specialists were recently recognized as one of the top 10 hospitals in Georgia for coronary interventional procedures in Georgia Trend magazine. Patients recover in a new, 20-bed cardiac progressive care unit, or CPCU, with spacious suites and builtin accommodations for loved ones to comfortably stay in-suite with patients. Staff on the unit are specially trained in cardiac care, equipped to respond to all manner of needs that heart patients may require. 14

Healthy Horizons Magazine

Tanner Medical Group

Willowbrooke at Tanner

Tanner Medical Center/Carrollton

Richie Bland, MD, is a board-certified radiation oncologist with Tanner’s Roy Richards, Sr. Cancer Center.

Cancer Care

Tanner’s Roy Richards, Sr. Cancer Center provides advanced radiation treatments on the most sophisticated radiotherapy delivery system available – the Varian Trilogy with RapidArc. This system allows Tanner to provide extremely accurate treatments for a wide range of cancers, including cancers of the head and neck. The cancer center also offers a wide range of other services, including prostate seed implants, MammoSite RTS treatments for breast cancer and some

Maternity Care

Tanner offers two regional maternity centers – the W. Steve Worthy Maternity Center at Tanner Medical Center/Carrollton and the Maternity Center at Tanner Medical Center/Villa Rica – to provide maternity care in a comfortable and spacious environment that’s convenient and close to home. Tanner’s large labor and delivery suites provide ample room for loved ones to be involved in the delivery process, and adjacent private family waiting rooms give mothers-to-be the ability to discretely determine how involved they

for patients as well as a progressive scope of treatment options. Outpatient services – including partial hospitalization programs and state-approved Core services – are provided at the Tanner Center for Behavioral Health, with locations in Carrollton and Villa Rica. Free, confidential mental health assessments are available by calling Willowbrooke at Tanner’s 24-hour crisis line at 770.836.9551. More information on Willowbrooke at Tanner’s ser vices is available at www.willowbrookeattanner.org.

Willowbrooke at Tanner provides a wide range of innovative behavioral health care, serving patients from throughout Georgia and around the country. Willowbrooke at Tanner provides inpatient care for adults, elder adults, children and adolescents at its 52bed facility in Villa Rica, which offers amenities such as an indoor gymnasium and private courtyards

Tanner also operates Tanner Medical Group, one of metro Atlanta’s largest multi-specialty physician groups. Tanner Medical Group offers a wide range of medical specialties, including interventional and noninterventional cardiology, family medicine, gastroenterology, general surgery, infectious diseases, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, pulmonary and critical care medicine, surgical

breast care and vascular surgery. It has medical practice locations in Bowdon, Bremen, Carrollton, Douglasville, Franklin, New Georgia, Union, Villa Rica and in Woodland, Ala. For a complete list of Tanner Medical Group practices and locations, visit www.tannermedicalgroup.org.

Learn More

With a medical staff of more than 250 physicians representing 46 medical specialties, Tanner has a wide range of healthcare options available for every member of the family. With 24-hour emergency care, advanced diagnostic imaging services, home health and hospice services, immediate care, occupational health services, an employee assistance program, pain management services and more, Tanner is west Georgia’s healthcare provider of choice. To find a physician on staff at Tanner, call

770.214.CARE or click the “Find a Doctor” button at

www.tanner.org

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Are you the victim of an injury?

Don’t become a financial victim, too. By Cliff Perkins, Ann-Margaret Perkins, Jason Perkins and Travis Studdard, Attorneys at Law, Perkins Law Firm, Carrollton, Georgia

For over 50 years our firm here in Carrollton has heard from people suffering from on-the-job injuries, vehicle wrecks, other accidents, or other events leading to disability. Most are experiencing problems recovering a fair amount of compensation from uncooperative insurance companies or employers. Others are struggling through the maze of Social Security Disability. Their financial well-being as well as their health has been stretched – sometimes to the limit. Most of these victims are getting pressure from profit-motivated insurance companies and employers to settle for a small portion of the compensation they truly deserve as a result of their injury or disability. These companies are interested in paying as little as they can rather than an amount that is truly fair.

“For over 50 years our firm here in Carrollton has heard from people suffering from on-the-job injuries, vehicle wrecks, other accidents, or other events leading to disability.”

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Here are two things you can do to avoid becoming a financial victim: 1) Be informed. Learn your rights.

First, understand that an insurance company or employer is not on your side when it comes to making up financially for your loss. The business goal of most companies is to make a profit for their owners or shareholders. It is in their best interest to take in as much money as they can, and pay out the least amount possible. The less they pay out, the greater amount of profit goes to their bottom line. And no matter how nice they seem, their business motive is still the same: to make a profit. For example: You may be told that you don’t have a claim. Insurance companies and employers do not want you to pursue a claim because it usually costs them money. Before deciding

“Before deciding that it is not worth pursuing a claim for your injuries, be sure to talk to an attorney who has experience handling cases like yours.” that it is not worth pursuing a claim for your injuries, be sure to talk to an attorney who has experience handling cases like yours. It is almost always free to do so. You may be told that you have to settle your case. This is not true! No one can force you to settle your case. Insurers and employers want to try to settle your case for as little money as possible. While you may want to settle also, what you should settle for is a complicated question that involves a detailed evaluation. Beware of settling too quickly for much less than you should. If you were hurt at work, you have a right to a medical second opinion, but insurers and employers won’t always make you aware of this right. An experienced attorney can help you make the most of this option by advising you whether it is an appropriate time for a second opinion and, if so, locating a doctor who is able to address the particular issues in your case. (Note: To read articles that will tell you much more, visit www.PerkinsLawTalk.com. The articles, “14 Things Your Insurance Company Doesn’t Want You to Know”, and “15 Things

You Should Know About Your Personal Injury Case” are free. The website also provides additional helpful information regarding personal injury and workers’ compensation cases and social security disability claims.

2) Get expert advice quickly – it’s usually free.

One more thing you will often hear from your insurance company or employer is that you should not hire an attorney because it is expensive. The truth is that most legal firms offer free initial consultations and many work on a contingency fee agreement which means that you only pay your attorney if they get something for you. When you select an attorney – like when you select a doctor – choose a specialist. It’s important to choose an attorney who has experience with cases similar to yours. Most accident victims and the disabled have cases that fall under the legal specialties of personal injury, workers’ compensation, or social security disability. Be sure to act quickly because there are often time limits for filing claims that can affect your ability to be compensated for your injuries. Too many injury victims and those suffering with disabilities have become financial victims. Don’t let it happen to your and your family. Attorneys Cliff Perkins, Ann-Margaret Perkins, Jason Perkins, and Travis Studdard specialize in legal services for the injured and disabled. They may be reached at Perkins Law Firm in Carrollton, Georgia or on-line at www.PerkinsLawTalk.com

helpful information Workers’ Comp Offices:

770-214-8885

Personal Injury & Disability Social Security Offices:

770-834-2083

website: perkinslawtalk.com

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Getting Physically Fit

by Kellie Grubbs Tanner Health System If you are like most Americans, you don’t get enough exercise. We spend the day driving at least half an hour to work, sitting at a desk for seven or eight hours (or longer) and then driving home. Once home, things don’t get much better. We rarely choose to take a walk or play sports, electing instead to sit in front of the television to watch the latest episode of some popular sitcom or reality show before heading for bed. We spend the weekends watching more television, like golf, dreaming of how it would be to play like Phil Mickelson. These kinds of lifestyle choices are detrimental. Instead of dreaming of playing golf like Phil Mickelson, make it a point to get physically active so you can do the activities you enjoy for a longer period of time. Physical activity is any movement of the body in which your muscles contract and your metabolism increases. By being physically active, we reap the benefits physically, mentally and socially. Everything from doing laundry to, say, playing golf is considered physical activity. Levels of physical activity can be seen as a continuum. At one end is the person who lives a sedentary lifestyle, and at the other is the athlete who over-trains. Somewhere in the middle is the place to be for optimal health. So, bring out your inner-Phil Mickelson and start moving! To improve on the golf course, a golfer needs flexibility, strength, and cardiovascular fitness – the same elements that are important in any exercise program. Exercise is a subcategory of physical activity and refers to a structured program

geared toward achieving physical fitness. To increase flexibility, it is important to stretch the major muscle groups for 15 to 30 seconds while you breathe normally. A good golf swing twists the body, which requires a full range of motion in the spine, hips, legs and shoulders. This twisting can put a lot of strain on the body, especially the lower back, so the more Kellie Grubbs, right, wellness coordinator with Tanner flexible we are the less Health Source in Carrollton, helps Tanner team member likely we are to suffer a Carrie Koepke with a treadmill at the health center. strain or injury. It is also or an elliptical for 20 to 30 minutes a day, important to remember to warm-up before three to four times a week. The Centers for stretching to decrease the risk of injury. Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) It is more difficult to consider golf a valid recommends 150 minutes of moderate form of exercise if we consistently use the intensity aerobic activity (brisk walking) cart to take us from hole to hole, but it is weekly or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity often the preferred mode of transportation aerobic activity (running or jogging) and because we don’t have the muscular two or more days of muscle strengthening strength or cardiovascular endurance to exercises. walk the entire course and keep our swing Making physical activity a priority is one consistent. By incorporating moderate of the most important fitness decisions you strength and cardiovascular training into will make and as you make it a priority, you your routine, you can help keep your swing will reap the benefits of living a healthier consistent. life. As with any strength training workout, Grubbs is a wellness coordinator with Tanner you don’t have to lift heavy weights to Health Source, a part of Tanner Health System. improve your strength; you can stick with She is certified by the Aerobics and Fitness high repetitions – try three sets of 12 – Association of America (AFAA) and is a certified with lighter weights. You also want to personal trainer with the American Council on focus on strengthening the core muscles Exercise (ACE). of the abdomen and lower back while not neglecting the muscles in the hips, shoulders, legs and chest. For cardiovascular training, try the stationary bike, treadmill

Allergies have a greater impact on quality of life than people realize.

Symptoms of allergic rhinitis (hay fever) leave you feeling tired, miserable and irritable. The chemicals released in our bodies during an allergic reaction can cause fatigue and impaired concentration. Chronic sinus infections, nasal congestion or cough may be seen in patients with allergies.

If YOU have allergies, you may also have undiagnosed asthma or could develop it - Up to 50% of patients with allergic rhinitis or hay fever have asthma.

Unfortunately, many affected individuals have simply accepted that they have to live with their symptoms. They don’t realize that they can feel better and have a better quality of life.

Allergies can be treated in a number of ways

1. Avoid the allergens or things you’re allergic to by wearing mask when exposed to known allergic triggers, closing windows and running the air conditioner during

peak pollen seasons. For many, these measures are” not enough and medications are needed. ‘ 2. Treat the symptoms with medications. 3. Stop the allergic reaction with allergen immunotherapy (drops by mouth or shots). As you are exposed to small amounts of a particular allergen, you gradually decrease your sensitivity and build up your immunity to it. Immunotherapy offers allergy suffers an alternative to a lifetime on medication. Allergy shots (immunotherapy) can help control your allergies and asthma or keep you from developing asthma. Recent studies have shown that among children with seasonal allergies, those treated with allergy shots were half as likely to develop asthma as those who didn’t receive allergy shots.

What are some of the reasons that someone should be screened for allergies or asthma?

1. Do you have a family history of asthma? 2. Do your allergies cause secondary symptoms such as recurring sinus or ear Infections or frequent throat clearing? 3. Do you cough at night, particularly during peak pollen seasons? 4. Do you experience wheezing, chest tightness or cough when exercising? Does your child cough after playing? 5. Do you find yourself wheezing, experiencing shortness of breath or lingering colds, particularly during peak pollen seasons? If you answer “yes” to any of the above questions, then you or your child may

The experienced staff at Peachtree Allergy & Asthma Clinic

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• Take the stairs at work, the shopping mall, the airport – wherever they’re available. • Park so you have to walk. Don’t circle the parking lot searching for that spot on the first row – choose a safe parking spot at the back and walk. • Pair with a partner. Having someone to walk with before, during or after work makes you more accountable and more likely to stick with your routine. • Avoid modern conveniences. Doing things the hard way burns extra calories and builds more endurance. For example, use a push mower instead of a riding lawn mower.

Healthy Horizons Magazine

helpful information locations: West Georgia 150 Clinic Ave. Suite 102 Carrollton, GA 770.832.1984 Buckhead (Next to Piedmont Hospital) 938 Peachtree Rd., NW Suite 507 Atlanta, GA 404.351.7520 Vinings 2740 Bert Adams Rd. Suite 150 Atlanta, GA 678.305.9871

Before you start any exercise program, talk with your doctor. He or she may have suggestions or concerns about your exercise program. And even if golf is not your chosen activity, there are more ways to be more physically active: • Wear a pedometer and try to average 10,000 steps a day (approximately five miles).

need an evaluation - Don’t wait, make your appointment today. Our offices are relaxed family-like environments. Most of our staff has been with us for over 10 years so they get to know the patients really well. Evaluations that we may perform include lung function testing to screen for asthma, sinus xrays and allergy skin testing. The treatment plan is designed just for you. At every visit, we reassess someone’s response to their treatment plan. Our goal is to have patients on the least medicines possible while still maintaining control of their symptoms.

Sharpsburg (On Hwy. 34 between Newman and Peachtree City) 820 Ebenezer Church Rd. Sharpsburg, GA 770.254.8502 website:

www.peachtree-allergy.com

Ariana D. Buchanan, M.D.

Theodore M. Lee, M.D.

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Corner stones of a healthy mouth: By Dr. M.H. Chauhan, DMD

Brushing twice a day using a soft bristle, small-head tooth brush (with a good technique), and flossing at least once a day helps keep the dentist – almost –away! Your gums are part of the foundation that holds your teeth strong in your jaws. However, they often are also the part of the mouth that is the most neglected. One reason being, they are hard to keep clean without the help of your dentist. Gums make a collar around the teeth, and there is a potential space between the gums and the teeth called the crevicular sulcus. This is the area hardest to keep healthy because toothbrush bristles can’t get in, and floss only has access to certain areas. The problem starts when the food we chew contributes in making a film on our teeth called materia alba. The more time this material stays on the teeth, the more complex it gets in its composition, making it tougher to remove. Initially, the film-smear can be removed with brushing and floss. At this time the composition is mainly organic material, including bacteria. But the addition of salivary proteins and cellular debris in our mouths make it stronger. Minerals like calcium, phosphates, and even fluorides help to make it stronger and tougher. As the matrix gets more and more organized the film takes the form of plaque. The presence of bacteria start to cause a host response, which means the gums (which are highly vascular) start to show signs of inflammation: redness and swelling. The redness, even marginal, will lead to bleeding during brushing, which

is one of the early signs of gum disease. Swelling causes the gums to detach from the tooth, which then cause the sulcus space to deepen. This allows for more pathogens to accumulate, furthering the gum-disease process. The continuous accumulation of minerals has now turned some of the plaque into tartar. Because tartar is hard and has an almost rocky consistency, it can only be removed by a hygienist, whether it is above or below the gum line. If left alone, this situation will continue to progress and cause more advanced gum disease - turning gingivitis into periodontitis. This process affects the ligament attachment of the tooth to the socket, and lowers the level of bone supporting the tooth inside the jaw. As a result, the tooth will have less support, making it weaker in the jaw socket and can lead to tooth loss.

pain in the gums, or sensitive teeth among others. Visit your dentist to find out which treatment is needed to restore health. And remember the cornerstones of a healthy mouth is a good oral hygiene regimen at home this will help keep your gums and teeth healthy and keep your dental bill low and that is certainly something to smile about.

helpful information phone: 770=456-7100 address: 614 Highway 61 Villa Rica, GA 30180

Treatment :

As most things prevention is always better than treatment. Using a good technique to brush your teeth twice a day and flossing in between the teeth at least once a day is something that can not be replaced. There are different techniques for brushing and your dental care professional can help you figure out which one is most practical. There are different types of floss which are made to overcome obstacles like tight contacts between teeth or bleeding gums. Once the disease process has set in it may present with a combination of many symptoms for example: bad breath, red bleeding gums, intermittent periods of

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Haney’s Drug Corner, Inc. has been taking care of Carrollton’s prescription needs for over 35 years. Tommy and Linda Haney opened Haney’s in 1975 and its reputation as an independent pharmacy with excellent service and care was built over the years. Tim Oliver, RPH, and his wife, Susan, purchased the store in March 2007 when Tommy retired. They have strived to continue the quality of care that Haney’s has been known for giving. They offer quick, personal service, as well as free delivery. Because Tim takes time to get to know each of his customers, he is able to provide a quality of care that is individualized to meet the needs of each person. When you call Haney’s, your call will be answered quickly by a pharmacist

or a technician. Your medical care is important to them. They want to be available to discuss your needs and be sure that you understand the medicine you are taking and any side effects that it may have. They are always happy to answer any questions you may have. Haney’s accepts most insurance as well as Medicaid. You will find that the prices are very competitive with chains and are often better than chains. Haney’s is a Good Neighbor Pharmacy which was ranked as “Highest in Customer Satisfaction” by J.D. Power and Associates. Because Tim and Susan grew up in Carrollton, and raised their daughters in Carrollton, they have a strong desire to be involved in the community. They support local schools and many local charities. They believe in helping others and helping to keep Carrollton a great place to live. Besides meeting your medical needs, Haney’s carries a variety of gift items. They have Harvest Home Candles as

well as Bean Pod Candles. Nora Fleming serving pieces and Prissy Plates are both very popular items. If you are searching for collegiate or high school jewelry, Haney’s will have something for you! They also carry quality skin care products by Archipelago Botanicals and have added Lindi Skin Care which was developed specifically for cancer patients. Visit Haney’s on the corner of Dixie Street and Ambulance Drive! They would love to have the opportunity to take care of your prescription needs. Just ask any of their customers about their service. They will tell you that Haney’s is the BEST pharmacy in Carrollton!

helpful information phone:

770-834-3393 address:

623 Dixie St. Carrollton GA 30117

Home Care

Solutions For Today!

Guardian Angel of West Georgia, Inc. is the areas leading and the oldest in-home care provider. We offer the very best and compassionate care for the elderly. It is our goal to improve the physical, emotional and spiritual wellness of our clients and that is exactly what we do– EVERYDAY!! Guardian Angel can tailor a program specifically for the needs of the client with the many services we offer and our experienced in-home care providers. If you have a specific scheduling question in mind, we will come out and do a free, no obligation assessment to help you decide what works

best for you. If you have a long term care policy, we will gladly file that for you every month at no extra charge. We can accommodate your needs because we do not have specific shifts. However, we do have a four hour minimum and can cover 24/7. The services we offer our clients that are specific to their needs include: non-medical home and respite care, bathing and personal hygiene, companion services, medication reminders, meal preparation, light housekeeping as well as laundry. Services that may be required outside of the home may include: assistance to the doctor, assistance to appointments, shopping and errands. We will come into the clients home or stay with them in the hospital, assisted living, etc. We think you will be pleasantly surprised at how reasonable our rates are. Guardian Angel of West Ga., Inc. is licensed and insured. All of our in-home care providers are extremely understanding, skilled and experienced in caring for the elderly. We carefully screen our staff with background checks, and reference

checks. We do monthly in-service and annual TB tests to make sure our workers are always kept up to date with their training. We will strive to have workers of high moral integrity and trained in the care of the elderly. If your loved one wants to be cared for at home, then that’s exactly where we will care for them because your loved one deserves to have all the comforts of their home. Guardian Angel is locally owned by Lyn Easterwood. After being in the healthcare field for a number of years, Lyn bought the business in 2003 and her mission is to provide and render personal care to our elderly and to others in need. The elderly as well as others deserve to have the best care possible and Guardian Angel provides the highest level of care EVERYDAY!!

helpful information phone:

770-836-0766

address: 275 Garst Road Carrollton, GA

Guardian Angel of West GA., Inc. Providing service at: • Homes • Nursing Homes • Hospitals

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

Lyn Easterwood– Owner 275 Garst Road Carrollton, GA. 30116 Community Wellness Guide

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Value Of The Funeral

• Acknowledge that a life has been lived • Allows mourners to remember and honor their loved one in a special way • Servers as a central gathering place for family and friends to give emotional and physical support to one another • Provides closure for the bereaved • Initiates the grieving process • Confirms the reality and finality of the death • Encourages mourners to face the pain of their loss and express their thoughts and feelings • Helps survivors to better cope with their grief and enables them to move forward with their lives.

World-Class Neurosurgical Care, Close to Home According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, over two million neurosurgical procedures are performed each year. And those brain and spinal surgical procedures are not what they used to be. Increasingly more high tech and less invasive, brain and spinal surgery is safer, quicker and more successful than it was even a decade ago. So says William J. Benedict, M.D., neurosurgeon for WellStar Health System. On staff with the System since 2007, Benedict recently was tapped to lead and expand the neuroscience service line for WellStar.

State-of-the-Art, Dedicated Neurosurgical Care

“WellStar’s state-of-the-art when it comes to neurosurgery,” said Benedict. “You don’t need to travel across the country or across town for world-class care.” “At WellStar, we have a dedicated neuro intensive care unit, with nurses who eat, drink and breathe neurosurgery,” he explained. “We have dedicated floor nurses on a dedicated neuro unit. And in the operating room, our nurses are neuro specialists as well. It’s truly subspecialty care.” Neurosurgeons diagnose and treat brain and spinal disorders, such as brain tumors, aneurysms, malformations and bleeding; and spinal cord compression, tumors and deformities.

Pioneering Surgical Innovation

Benedict’s practice is 60 percent spinal surgery and 40 percent cranial surgery. He is proud that WellStar is the only health System in the area – and the first to consistently offer – minimally invasive, endoscopic surgery for tumors of the pituitary gland. “In the old days – and by that I mean 10 years ago – this surgery required a fairly large incision,” said Benedict. “Now we go through the nose with tiny television cameras, or scopes, and make only a small hole in the sinus cavity.” Benedict partners with WellStar colleague John Chastain, M.D., an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist and surgeon, on this unique surgery. He cites this multi-disciplinary approach as

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just one of the many advantages of receiving neurosurgical care at WellStar.

The Advantage of Integrated Healthcare

“The sophistication of our systemwide imaging capabilities is second to none,” Benedict emphasized. Imaging, a critical component in successful neurosurgical care, is a WellStar strength – the System offers the largest and most comprehensive imaging network in metro Atlanta. “Our high-resolution, 3T MRI System offers unsurpassed detail,” said Benedict. “And we can perform functional MRI, which helps determine exactly which part of the brain is handling critical functions such as thought, speech, movement and sensation. This type of precise imaging is essential for not only assessing the effects of stroke, trauma or degenerative disease, but planning surgery.” Also, thanks to WellStar’s Picture Archiving and Communications System, patient images can be reviewed by Benedict, no matter which WellStar facility performed the study. “I can review imaging studies immediately, and get patients precisely where they need to be within our System,” said Benedict. “I can oversee cases and act as on-call specialist.” Benedict explained he often provides such consults to WellStar Emergency Department physicians for head or spinal trauma cases.

WellStar Accolades

WelStar Kennestone Hospital recently received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Get With the Guidelines” – Stroke Silver performance Achievement Award. The award recognizes WellStar Kennestone Hospital’s commitment and success in implementing a higher standard of stroke care by ensuring that stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted standards and recommendations.

WellStar Cobb Hospital is accredited by The Joint Commission as a Stroke Center of Excellence. The Joint Commission is the industry organization nationally responsible for continuously improving the safety and quality of care provided to the public through the provision of healthcare accreditation and related services, which supports performance improvement in healthcare organizations. WellStar Neurosurgery is located at 55 Whitcher Street, Suite 130, in Marietta, and 100 Market Place Boulevard in Cartersville. To make an appointment or for more information, call 770-422-2326.

About William J. Benedict, M.D.

• Doctor of medicine from Loyola University, Chicago • Residency in general surgery at Loyola University Medical Center; named Resident of the Year in 2001 • Completed six-year residency in neurological surgery at Loyola University Medical Center •Member, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons • Former assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory University • Has worked as a staff physician at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Grady Memorial Hospital

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A special section of

Healthy

Overcoming Childhood Obesity

As your children grow out of their toddler years, excess weight can become a serious concern – perhaps putting them at risk for some very grown-up health problems. Helping Children Develop a Healthy Lifestyle for a GREAT Future Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta

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When Should You Be Concerned About Your Child?

At your child’s regular checkups, the doctor will look at body mass index (BMI) and growth charts to determine if he or she is within healthy weight limits.

No Laughing Matter

one of the best things available to them in their community. Lastly, the character & leadership development program, BGCMA empowers and encourages their youth to become global citizens who support and influence their Club and community and sustain meaningful relationships with others, as well as develop a positive self-image and good character while respecting their own and others’ cultural identities. This program includes teen leadership programs, age-appropriate leadership clubs and community service projects. Through these programs these young adults are able to understand and appreciate philanthropy while receiving recognitions and honors for their tremendous works. BGCMA believes every child has the potential to be great and lead a healthy life. Through a well rounded focus on critical life elements, academics, health and fitness and overall character development, Clubs help kids find a healthy balance. Being a healthy child and a healthy adult is more than just exercise and nutrition – it’s having inspiration, self-esteem and the knowledge to make healthy choices in all stages and areas of lives. To f ind out more about B oys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta, visit www.bgcma.org.

If your child is overweight, it’s important for you to address the problem. That’s because overweight kids are at risk for developing typically adult health problems, including type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Plus, unlike their slimmer peers, they’re much more likely to develop serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease.

The Skinny on Childhood Obesity

Just how serious of a problem is childhood obesity? Consider these facts and figures: • During the past three decades, the childhood obesity rate has more than tripled. • Today, about 16 percent of children and teens are overweight and nearly one-third are obese. • Children with a high BMI are more likely to have enlarged hearts, putting them at risk for heart disease later in life. • According to one study, 60 percent of obese children have at least one heart disease risk factor, such as high cholesterol or blood pressure, and 25 percent have two or more risk factors. • Type 2 diabetes, previously seen mostly in adults, is increasingly common among children. Experts believe childhood obesity is the cause. • Overweight children are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome, which is really a group of health problems, including high blood sugar, high blood pressure and low levels of “good” cholesterol, which put kids at risk for diabetes and heart disease.

A recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine found that when it comes to weight loss, cutting calories is essential. Making these simple changes will help reduce calories, which can lead to weight loss: • Make sure your child eats breakfast every day. Eating breakfast prevents overeating later. • Eat meals together at the table. Watching TV while eating is distracting and can lead to mindless overeating. • Never force your child to eat when he or she isn’t hungry. It’s OK if your child doesn’t clean his or her plate. • Stock your home with low-calorie snacks like fresh fruit, carrot and celery sticks and low-fat yogurt instead of junk food like chips and cookies. • Don’t buy sugary drinks like juice and soda — even if they’re labeled “natural” or “organic.” Offer your child water, plain or flavored seltzer or low-fat milk instead. • Limit trips to fast food restaurants to no more than once per week. Fast food is high in calories and low in nutrition — even most items that are marketed as healthier options.

Get Them Moving

Doctors recommend that children should exercise 60 minutes a day most days of the week, but that doesn’t necessarily mean 60 minutes of organized sports. Even the National Football League has launched a “Play 60” campaign aimed at encouraging children to actively play for at least an hour daily. Parents who take an active role can help kids get off the couch and onto the playing field, according to a study in Health Psychology. Children are more likely to participate in sports when their parents think it’s important. Playing sports in childhood can lead to a healthier adulthood. Regular exercise and participation in sports boosts physical fitness, controls weight, builds self-esteem and teaches cooperation, self-discipline,

and perseverance. Motivating kids to move takes more than talking. Children are more physically active if their parents are active and provide occasions for exercise. Start by helping your youngster find a sport that’s fun and interesting. Let children try a variety of physical activities to find out what they like and what they’re good at. Find sports programs through schools, parks and recreation departments, and religious or civic organizations. But enrolling in a program is just the beginning of commitment. Your child also will need the proper equipment, transportation to practices and games, and your emotional support for learning a new skill. It’s also important to play it safe. Talk with your doctor before your child begins a new physical activity routine or sport. A pre-sports checkup should include a complete physical exam. Don’t rule out sports if your child has had a chronic health problem. Instead, check with your doctor about what activities are appropriate.

Talk to Your Doctor

A physician can provide further guidance and advice, helping you develop a diet and exercise plan that will work best for your child. To find an area physician who can help you and your child overcome obesity, call Tanner Health System’s 24-hour physician referral line at 770.214.CARE. For a list of pediatricians on Tanner’s medical staff, click the “Find a Doctor” button at www.tanner.org.

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healthy kids

healthy kids

Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta (BGCMA) encourages their youth to BE EDUCATED, BE LEADERS AND BE HEALTHY for a GREAT future. With numerous programs focusing on academic success, character & leadership development and healthy lifestyles, BGCMA takes pride in guiding their youth, especially those from disadvantaged circumstances, in becoming productive adults. BGCMA consists of 26 Clubs in 11 different counties along with a Youth Art Connection (YAC), a gallery and workshop for aspiring young artists, and Camp Kiwanis, a 160-acre residential camp. These Clubs accommodate on average 3,000 youth per day ranging from 6 to 18 years old. Each Club typically includes: a learning center, game room, technology center, fine arts room, full court gym, meeting rooms, athletic fields and a dedicated teen center. With academic success being a vital part of becoming a productive adult, BGCMA

emphasizes being educated. The academic success programs foster life-long learners setting higher college and career goals for tomorrow and providing access to tools and technology that will prepare them for their future. Along with academic success, they encourage their youth to develop their creativity and cultural awareness through knowledge and appreciation of the arts. Overall academic success includes: tutoring and homework assistance, college and career preparation, creative writing and fine arts classes and digital art and photography classes. Young artists are also able to display their work in exhibits and workshops. Being active is also essential for overall health and becoming a productive adult. BGCMA promotes being healthy with the healthy lifestyles program which develops fitness, positive use of leisure time, skills for stress management and social skills. Triple Play, Falcon Fitness Zones (FFZ), MakeA-Splash, and Camp Kiwanis are specific programs that keep the youth physically active while educating them on healthy eating habits. Healthy lifestyles also focuses on gang resistance training, drug and alcohol preventions and teen-based mentoring so youth are able to make the right decision when faced with peer pressure. Survey results show that 57 percent of national Club members said the Club “saved their life” and 90 percent stated the Club was

Eating Right


This season, brush up on sports safety Submitted by WellStar Health System

The spring sports season is in full swing and that means many children are suiting up for activities such as baseball, track and field, soccer, softball and tennis. Before you sit down in the stands to root for the home team, make sure to take extra steps that ensure your child’s safety this sports season. More than 3.5 million children ages 14 and under will receive some type of medical treatment for sports-related injuries each year, said Brooke Schembri of Safe Kids Cobb County, which is a national organization run locally by WellStar Health System and Cobb & Douglas Public Health. Further estimates from the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation, Inc., (NYSSF) estimate that more than 5 million children seek treatment in hospital emergency rooms from sports injuries each year. “It is estimated that half of all sportsrelated injuries among children can be prevented,” Schembri said. “Protective equipment, safe playing conditions, and the development and enforcement of safety rules help reduce the number and severity of sports injuries.” Each sport comes with its own injury risks. Generally, the most common types of injuries sustained by children related

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to sports occur to ligaments, tendons and muscles, in the form of sprains or strains. Only about 5 percent of sport injuries involve broken bones, according the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Below are a few tips for making this sports season safe and successful. Get the right gear. Protective equipment is essential for all players and will vary by sport (including padding, eyewear, mouthpieces, face guards, and protective cups). Consult with the team coach for specifics. Also, it’s important to wear protective gear during practice and during games. “Most organized sports-related injuries (about 62 percent) occur during practices rather than games,” Schembri said. Beat the heat. To stay hydrated to combat high temps and humidity, players should drink plenty of fluids before, during and after practice or play. They should wear light, breathable clothing to keep the body cool and minimize play during extreme temperatures and humidity. Coach yourself. Find out who your child’s coach(es) are and if they are trained for CPR and first-aid. Many times, the coach is the first one to help an injured player so their ability to provide immediate care or have an understanding can be crucial to players. To sign up for a local CPR/First-Aid class, call 770-956-STAR. Get physical. Most school sports and

many team sports require a child to have an up-to-date physical prior to playing each season. There’s a reason for this: a physician can monitor your child’s health on an annual basis and detect of any possible health problems that could pose a threat to a child’s sports participation. Time out. Anytime a player is in pain, they should stop any physical activity as not to worsen the injury or situation. Additionally, players should take breaks periodically. Rest periods during practice and play can reduce injuries. Safety first. Coaches and parents are responsible for teaching children the proper techniques for their sport, which can greatly prevent injury. Additionally, they should discourage any sort of dangerous moves, such as headfirst sliding in baseball or softball. For more information on sports injury prevention, please visit: American Academy of Pediatrics www.aap.org National Youth Sports Safety Foundation www.nyssf.org Safe Kids Worldwide www.safekids.org For more information on Safe Kids Cobb County, please visit www.safekidscobbcounty.org

Ellis returns home For Ellis, 2010 was a great year. It was the year he came home from foster care. Ellis had been in foster care for 10 years. Most people who knew him didn’t think he ever could live in the community, at home with a regular family – his family. But he proved everyone wrong. Everyone except Angela White. A Youth Villages intensive in-home counselor, Angela knew that one of her first family reunification cases at Youth Villages was going to be one of her most difficult ones. It proved to be her hardest – but also one of the most rewarding. Ellis was born with autism and developmental delays, and his mother did not want to raise her son. An aunt took him in, but, eventually, there seemed to be only one place for the child: foster care. When Angela was assigned to bring Ellis home, she started by talking to everyone who knew him. Relatives, teachers and caretakers could not handle his destructive behavior. He was too aggressive, they said, and needed to be watched constantly. Still, Angela had hope. She did a family search, looking for anyone – an aunt, a cousin, a grandparent – who would give the child a chance. Tiffany, Ellis’ cousin, agreed to try. They started by getting Ellis reacquainted with his cousin, whom he hadn’t seen in so long. Then, they started working on his problem behaviors – hitting himself with brushes and belts, bursting into angry fits, throwing himself against walls. Slowly, they learned what triggered his behaviors and how they could motivate Ellis to change his ways.

Over time, Ellis’ difficult behaviors became less frequent and, eventually, subsided. After 10 years in foster care, Ellis finally came home to his family. He loves being home. Home to Ellis is “my blue house” with “my Tiffany.”

Youth Villages in West Georgia: Effective Help for Children, Families and Former Foster Youth Youth Villages’ Intensive In-home Services: Youth Villages began providing intensive in-home services to families of children with emotional and behavioral issues in West Georgia in 2008. Our goal is twofold – strengthening families to prevent children from having to leave the home to receive the help they need and helping children who have been placed into foster care, residential treatment or other out-of-home care to return home to their families or a relative as quickly as possible. Youth Villages sees hope where others may have given up. We know that children with challenging behaviors – like Ellis had – can successfully live with their families when they receive effective help. Youth Villages’ intensive in-home services program provides help to families in their own homes, three times a week or more often. The results are amazing – more than 80 percent of children and families continue to live successfully at home two years after leaving our programs. Residential Treatment at the Youth Villages-Inner Harbour Campus: At the Youth Villages-Inner Harbour Campus, we provide help to children who have experienced abuse and neglect, are dealing with serious mental health issues, learning disabilities or other issues that make life in the community a daily struggle. Located on 1,200 acres of rolling hills in Douglasville, Ga., the Youth VillagesInner Harbour Campus provides a haven for children who need time apart from their families and usual surroundings to heal, receive intensive treatment and find hope for a different future. In addition to regular therapy and a supportive academic environment, children may participate in a host of nontraditional therapeutic and fun activities, including equine therapy, adventure ropes courses, learning to care

Healthy

for d o g s a n d other animals, canoeing, the campus’ renowned African Drumming Program and leading brain-based therapy that provides an alternative to treating ADHD and other learning disabilities with medication. Helping Former Foster Youth Become Independent Adults: Youth Villages is starting our transitional living program to help young adults who are aging out of foster care and lack family or other support make a successful transition into independent adulthood. Transitional living counselors help young adults define their life goals and work on the steps they need to take to achieve them. Without continuing help, studies show, former foster youth are significantly more likely than non-foster youth to become unemployed, homeless, incarcerated and have an unintended pregnancy by age 19. In addition, former foster youth are much less likely to finish high school or obtain a GED, and even less likely to enter and finish higher education. Youth Villages’ transitional living program, which is mostly privately funded, helps former foster youth find stable housing and employment, finish high school and continue their education or enter a job-training program. Become Involved With Youth Villages: Youth Villages, a private nonprofit organization, will help more than 17,000 children and families in 10 states and Washington, D.C., this year. Named one of the Top 50 Nonprofits to Work For by Nonprofit Times and Best Companies Group in 2010, Youth Villages has been recognized by Harvard Business School and U.S. News & World Report, and was identified by The White House as one of the nation’s most promising results-oriented nonprofit organizations. To volunteer, donate or learn more about Youth Villages, go to www.youthvillages.org or call Mary Norman at (404) 320-2969.

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Raising Children To Be Responsible Adults Billy R. Helms, PhD

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ealthy Horizons is always pleased to receive requests from our readers as to specific themes for us to address. “Raising Children to Be Responsible Adults” is a popular request. This is a formidable task but we’ll do what we can to provide some insight into the matter.

“The Web” provides hundreds of articles dealing with this very matter. There is quite a diversity of thinking as to how to achieve the desired goal. Many of the studies offer similar suggestions. We’ll try to give so good common sense thoughts that should help. Please understand that I am definitely not a “child psychologist.” That is a very specialized field and I have almost no training in it. Biblically we get an excellent directive in Proverbs 22:6, “Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he is old he will not depart from it.” This verse likely refers specifically to training a child according to his aptitude, talents, disposition, etc., but the idea of “train” involves the whole of the individual. When Moses was giving the Law to the children of Israel he admonished the people, “you shall teach them diligently to your sons [children].” (Deuteronomy 6:6) This is a clear directive to parents to provide their children with everlasting principles for life. At the top of my list of “musts” is that parents must be responsible adults their selves! “What you do speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you say” is a pretty good reminder that we must first lead by example. Some parents are more concerned about their own wants than to their responsibilities to their families and to society. In such cases children are left without good examples. Irresponsible parents will likely foster irresponsible children. Sadly there are multitudes of children living in single parent homes. Children need two really good parents to help them to meet their own obligations as they mature. To be good role models parents should free themselves of the accumulated gar-

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bage from their own lives. If you don’t face up to those things and resolve them and correct you own thinking and actions it will likely filter down to your children in a very unhealthy way. Children need positive examples to copy. Akin to the above children should not be raised by baby sitters, television, and a myriad of electronic gadgets. They need your love, affection, attention, and time! Perhaps we would all do well if our lives were less hurried and cluttered with less important matters. Remember your children are strongly influenced by what they see and hear and by people of influence, good or bad, in their lives. Parenthood is one of God’s greatest gifts. The biggest job you will ever have is to raise your children responsibly. You need to be the best moral, well-adjusted, accountable person possible if you are to do the right thing by your children. At the risk of repetition let us again affirm that children live what they learn from whatever source. Now for some sensible steps, in no particular order you can take to help your children mature in responsibility: Early on teach your children to put their toys away, to clean up their own messes (as early as 3 or 4, and you may help). Provide appropriate consequences, reward or punishment, in relation to task accomplishment. At about the same age you should help them to understand that every family member is responsible for cleaning their own room, picking up their dirty clothes, towels, etc. Certainly it is not too much to expect of a person who has slept in the bed, lived in the room, worn the clothes and dried with the towel to be responsible for them. Teach them to take responsibility for their actions. This will serve them especially well in their future. I’m a strong believer in appropriate punishment for unacceptable behavior. Yes, that means spanking when necessary. Always remember that you should never spank while you are angry. Probably the best rule of thumb is to spank with your hand on the well padded posterior. When you hand hurts, they hurt. You certainly don’t want to physically harm them, but you do want their attention.

Allowances are usually appropriate and provide opportunity to teach responsibility in financial matters. The allowance should be reasonable but not excessive. Children should know what they have to provide with their money. Perhaps some of the treats they enjoy should come from their funds. Once these things have been determined the child should know that there is no additional money until the next allowance day. Advances on allowance can undo the “responsibility factor.” Dispense with “baby talk” when it is age appropriate. Help them to learn to talk, and think, as adults. Once your children are in school they will learn more responsibility. One of the most difficult lessons is the actions have consequences. We want to be supportive of our children, but we must not take their side when they are wrong. Their teachers in school are almost always right in their assessment and discipline of the children. Don’t “go to war” with those who are teaching them. If you see what you believe to be a mistake on the teacher’s part, do not talk about it in the child’s presence! The matter can usually be cleared up quickly by meeting with the teacher and school officials. Let them learn to deal with problems as best they can. You can always intercede if you see a genuine need to do so. The child learns and matures and he finds the right solution. Teach your child obedience. Yes, I know that “obedience” has become a po-

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litically incorrect word. If the child is allowed to be disobedient at home, he’ll try it at school and in many other areas. A failure to instill this virtue will ultimately result in a very troubled adulthood. Remember that society has little tolerance for the rebel. The disobedient person will ultimately come up against authorities that will enforce obedience in some very unpleasant ways. It’s better to learn it at home. Your child can’t learn if you do his homework for him! Education is his job and we must encourage him to become deeply involved in the process. Home-

work, tests, etc., have a purpose. It gives the teachers insight into what is lacking in the child’s understanding. Remember that in the real adult world, he’ll have to stand on his own and do his own work or suffer dire consequences. All children need to learn to respect the person and property of others. An early understanding that everything isn’t mine and that I can’t run roughshod over others will lay a good foundation for respect of other people and their possessions. This also helps to be a person who willingly shares with others. The result will be a healthy self respect

and an outgoing personality. Closely akin to the last item is learning to give. A generous contribution to the Lord’s work is mandatory. Many charities can use more funds. The warmth that comes from the heart of the giver can be clearly seen. Children who see the parents helping other people with their needs will likely be givers as well. Finally, and this likely should have been first, train your children spiritually. From birth they should be taken to church for Bible classes and worship. Help them to develop a strong conviction on spiritual matters. Let it be to them a top priority.

“Lessons Learned on a Basketball Court”

handler. Some of the longest hours of my life had been some of the best hours of her life.

preacher, a work colleague, a family member or maybe a friend. We all need help from time to time. We may need a teacher or a parent to help us see the error of our way. We may need a colleague to show us how to use a new machine at the office. We need to take advantage of the knowledge and the talent others can share with us to help us be better. In the Bible, in Ecclesiastes 3:1, it reads, “To everything there is a season… This may be my season of learning life lessons on the basketball court. I will take advantage of the opportunities to find the good in all situations, to build on the strengths of others and to continue to strive to be a better person.

Article submitted by Holly H. Box

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ave you ever asked yourself or anyone listening– “why me”? I found myself wondering this just the other day. My daughters are playing basketball in the local city league. The team my daughters are playing for really has everything stacked against them. Most of the girls, including my youngest daughter, have never played basketball, the coach, who just graduated high school, has never coached, the team had no equipment to practice with and had it not been for our church, would not have a place to practice. The other local team has unlimited availability to the local elementary school gymnasiums. Sounds like a lost cause, or is it? As I watched our team “scrimmage”, it really looked like the varsity team playing the junior high team, against the other local team the other night, I started thinking about what really matters.

Lesson One: Look for the good in all situations. As I watched the other team, with four experienced adult coaches, run all over our team on the court, I noticed my youngest daughter smiling. Remember she has never played basketball. During the pregame drills she was learning how to dribble and shoot the ball. She was so proud of herself for not having too many traveling calls. To her this was a great night. She was becoming a better ball

Lesson Two: Look for the strengths in all people. My oldest daughter, and three members of the team that have actually played basketball, have the opportunity to be leaders on the team. As I calmed her down after the “scrimmage” I told her to be the leader for her team by encouraging her other teammates. As we talked about the strengths each individual

“Each and every girl brings something special and unique to the team.” member brings to the group, we saw how a team can only grow when they build on each other’s strengths. Each and every girl brings something special and unique to the team. We have some with the best team spirit, some encourage others to try harder and some may actually score during the season.

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Lesson Three: Look for ways to be better. As I watched most members of the team travel the wrong way on offense, travel the wrong way on defense, not know the difference between offense and defense, I saw firsthand why we need someone to help us be better – a coach, a teacher, a

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Responsible Parenting

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Being a responsible parent… is there a tougher job in all the world? Article written by Richard O’ Conner, Minister, BS Secondary Education and Masters Degree in Ministry

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t’s been said many times but it is no less true, that any one can bring a child into this world– it doesn’t take any special intellectual or social prowess– but it takes a very special person to be a good, solid, responsible parent! As parents we certainly want to give our children what they need (we also try, at times, just to give them what they want). And giving children what they need is a full-time job! I’m not telling you anything if you are raising a couple of toddlers right now or have young grandchildren, but raising children is not for the faint of heart! You heard about the lady getting on a bus with thirteen children. The bus driver asked, “Are these all your kids or are you just on a picnic?” To which the lady responded, “They’re all mine and it is no picnic!” So let’s just think of a few things that will help us be the responsible parents God expects us to be.

Responsible Parents look to God for guidance. “Unless the Lord builds the house, they labor in vain who build it” (Psalm 127:1). God is the giver of all life and is the source of all good things. Teaching your children about God early in their life is the key to them having a life-long relationship with Him. Of course you know that this means you, as a parent, must have a relationship with God through Christ. Teach your kids to pray – there is nothing like listening to your kids pray for the dog and cat, their teachers, their friends, grandparents and mom and dad! Read to them the great stories of the Bible. Kids are fascinated by the stories about Noah and the ark, David and Goliath as well as

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Daniel in the lion’s den and Jonah in the belly of the whale! The great thing about these stories is they don’t begin with “Once upon a time”. They are TRUE! Be sure to take your kids to church services. Sunday school and worship are great tools to help you in your spiritual walk with God as well as helping you help your kids in theirs!

Responsible Parents TELL their kids they love them. I know that sounds like such a little thing but actually saying the words “I Love You” to a child means so much. Are you aware of the countless number of children who never have a parent speak those words? Now there are those who say, “I show my love” and that’s important too, as we will see in a minute. But there is something great about hearing it! Your kids need the comfort, confidence, affection, acceptance and affirmation which comes through those three little but powerful words, “I love you!”

Reponsible parents spell love T-I-M-E! It’s true– your kids want and deserve your time. Other than being a Christian example for your children I know of no other attribute that will bless your children more than spending time with them and expressing your love for them. Absentee parents miss more than ball games, plays, graduations and school ceremonies– they miss the chance to see their children, encourage them and simply be there for them. Nothing substitutes for a parent’s presence. Grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, and friends may all be present for an event but if mom or dad doesn’t show... it’s just not the same. I understand that emergencies sometimes arise and cause parents to miss a special event - but never let it become habitual. True enough, there may be another ball game next week, but your child will only graduate from kindergarten or high school once, or perform in that school play once or play that “once in a lifetime ball game” only once. So remember there are some events that will never come around again—so don’t miss them! Remember: your kids need your presence more than they need your presents! So parents...teach your children about the God who created them… tell them you love them every day… and spend precious time with them… they will always remember it and love you for it!

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God…On Disciplining Children Article written by Richard O’ Conner, Minister, BS Secondary Education and Masters Degree in Ministry

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iscipline. Not the most popular word in our society. The dictionary tells us it means “training to act in accordance with rules.” In this article I want us to look at the discipline we, as parents, are called upon by God to instill in our children. God tells us to “Train up a child when he is young” (Proverbs 22:6). So we know that God directs parents to begin this process at birth and continue it, in one form or another, for life. Now the methods will differ when our kids are forty and have families of their own, but we are still disciplining them when we are setting positive examples for them and our grandchildren, right? A synonym for “discipline” is the word “tutor”. A tutor, as you know, is one who teaches, instructs and encourages. So you see your job as a parent isn’t over when the kids leave the house!

But what about when they’re young… discipline seems like such a hard job. The questions are many and the answers few. As a society we tend to listen to the “experts” in child rearing. Some say when a child misbehaves put him in time-out and it will change his behavior. Others suggest the removal of a favorite toy or game as punishment for an improper outburst. And at times those may be just what a child needs. Yet as a Christian preacher my expert on the subject is still God. After all, He is the only one who raised a perfect Son, right? So what does God say about corrective discipline? It’s important to remember that discipline can be both positive and corrective. For example, positive discipline is practiced when a child brings home a good report card and you give them a reward; their soccer team loses a big game and you encourage them and love them and help them through the loss. Corrective discipline is much more difficult and maybe that is why we are hesitant about implementing it and often inconsistent in our practice. Yet, God is clear that we should stand firm about correcting our children when they demonstrate bad behavior. Listen to the following verses: “If you do not punish your children you do not love them, but if you

love your children, you will correct them” (Proverbs 13:24 NCV). Those of us who have been around a while remember the verse like this: “He who spareth his rod ha-

told your child you were going to whip them and they started crying before you touched them? God says, don’t become weak and fail to punish them. The old

“It’s important to remember that discipline can be both positive and corrective.” teth his son: but he who loveth him chasteneth him betimes” (KJV). That verse speaks to the love of a parent for their child. “Love them?” God asks, then correct them! And sometimes that correction calls for corporal punishment. God’s word on corrective discipline smacks right in the face of the well meaning parents who sometimes say, “I love my kids too much to spank them.” For the parent who believes whipping is “too harsh” listen to God’s message, “Don’t fail to punish children, If you spank them they won’t die” (Proverbs 23:13). Now they may sound like they are dying but God has an answer for that too. “Chasten thy son while there is hope, and let not thy soul spare for his crying” (Proverbs 19:18). Ever

saying, “This is going to hurt you more than it will hurt me” is true, ask any good parent. Yet God tells us the real reason we do this, “If you spank them you will save them from death” (Proverbs 23:13). I think that “death” could be two-fold. A child who is consistently and fairly corrected when he is young is less-likely to involve himself in those sinful behaviors that might take his life early. Also, teaching, instructing, and correcting a child when he is young is the best way to set that child on a course that will ultimately lead him away from the second death in hell into life eternal in heaven. And that is just what God wants…all his children at home with Him.

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ce n e r e f f i D a Making Business 2 Business Expo Anniston City Meeting Center • Anniston, AL Left: David with Chick-Fil-A Cow • Right: Expo participants moving from booth to booth enjoying food & fun

Jackson Hospital Foundation “Swinging Fore Healthcare” Charity Golf Tournament Montgomery, AL • Above: David and Teresa at Healthy Horizons booth waiting for the next team

RMC Foundation Charity Golf Tournament Silver Lakes Country Club Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail Glencoe, AL

Baptist Health Care Foundation Prattville Baptist Hospital Golf Classic Robert Trent Jones Capitol Hill Golf Course Prattville, AL Top: Tommy McKinnon and David with the Healthy Horizons sponsor sign Bottom: David and Mark teeing off for Charity University of Alabama Staff & Faculty Health Fair University of Alabama Campus • Tuscaloosa, AL Top Left: Teresa and Big Al Top Right: David at Booth Bottom: Front of Coleman Coliseum where the event was held

Anniston Army Depot Employee Appreciation Day Anniston Army Depot • Anniston, AL Top: Healthy Horizons booth with both golf carts used at many functions. Bottom: Healthy Horizons Boat to be used for Kid’s Fishing events, etc.

Children’s Hospital Teddy Bear Giveaway Birmingham, AL • Top: Front of Hospital Bottom: David, Teresa and Mark holding the bears given away to patients

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May Day Celebration International Motorsports Hall of Fame Talladega, AL • Top: Seniors from various centers enjoying the entertainment and lunch. Bottom: Mark & Teresa at Talladega booth

The Cultural Arts Division of Carrollton Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Arts Department was formed in 1978 as part of a GCA Development Grant. Programming has grown over the years to include a Cultural Arts Alliance, a community theatre, chorus, and orchestra, a public collection of art, art camps and classes for all ages, outreach programs, and numerous special events including the annual Meccafest Fine Arts and Crafts Festival. Our community has a large number of theatre supporters. Our theatre program for ages four through senior adult performs fourteen different productions annually. Two self-supporting theatre groups have spun off from our twenty-five year old adult Community Theatre. All musical plays performed by Primary Theatre are written and scored by local playwrights. These minimusicals are shared with children’s theatre companies across the world including Israel, South Africa and Singapore. One-Act comedy plays are also written and produced for our senior adults. Our legal board, appointed by Mayor and City Council, is the Carrollton Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Arts Commission, which governs all recreation department’s programs. The Carroll County Cultural Arts Alliance serves as an advisory board to the Cultural Arts Division of the Carrollton Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Arts Department, which implements art programs. The board consists of persons from the city, county and private school systems, State University of West Georgia, visual and performing artists,

business-persons and other citizens with an interest in the arts. They are elected for a three-year term by the membership. The board meets monthly to evaluate and plan. They work as volunteers to offer feedback on programming to meet the needs of a diverse population. A permanent home for the arts was approved in 1998 when the citizens of Carrollton voted $3 million in Special Local Options Sales Tax funds to build a cultural arts center one block west of the Carrollton town square. The City of Carrollton funded $2.2 million and funded the purchase of tables, chairs, and other furnishings in the amount of $70,000. 4.1 acres of land, appraised at $1.4 million, was donated by the Ray Fulford family. The 40,000 square foot facility has a 262 seat theatre, 3000 square foot art gallery for exhibitions, a galleria for permanent art collection, theatre rehearsal room, dressing and costume rooms, scene shop, choral rehearsal room with built in risers and sound buffers, and an educational wing with four classrooms, two storage rooms and a kiln room. The theatre has wheel chair seating at the front, and center of the theatre to allow patrons a choice of seating. The entire facility is accessible for wheelchairs. A recent tour included 20 children in wheelchairs and eight walkers. The children were able to access everything including the stage and scene shop. The $5.2 million Carrollton Cultural Arts Center opened on August 27, 2002 with a weeklong celebration of activities. Since then, all of our programs have expanded and many

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new ones have been added. Community Chorus went from approximately 25 singers to 140 with each concert series. Chorus is currently in rehearsal for “A Tribute to Disney,” their spring concert to take the stage in April. The Art Center drew in the many local visual artists, leading to the formation of one of our most active volunteer groups, the Carrollton Artist Guild. The Artist Guild is very active in the empty bowl project that benefits the Carroll County Soup Kitchen and they host the MeccaFest Fine Art Show held the second week of each October. This was followed by the formation and still growing Carrollton Creative Writer’s Club. Carroll County Community Theatre was delighted to have a permanent home and a large, fully equipped scene shop. This group produces live drama, comedy and musical theatre. Currently they are in rehearsal for the March production of Willy Wonka, which will include flying actors and a “Wonkanator” provided by Flying by Foy out of Las Vegas. Willy Wonka will use a live orchestra to accompany the sixty plus actors on stage when they open in March. The Cultural Arts Division’s regular programming includes fourteen theatre productions for children, teenagers, and adults, twenty-seven summer art camps, a

growing youth orchestra, Adult art clubs, an Art In Education series of touring musical, dance and theatre companies; West African Drumming, Children’s Dance (tap and ballet), creative writing and juried art contests for local High Schools; an award winning outreach program, year round classes for children and adults in art and music, visual exhibitions in two galleries, and many special events throughout the year. This spring we will be hosting the National Watercolor Show followed by the International Watercolor Show. The International show is only coming to two galleries: a gallery New York City and the Carrollton Cultural Arts Center. For more information, to register for a class, or to order tickets call 770-838-1083 or email Art Center Manager Penny Lewis at plewis@carrollton-ga.gov

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A special section of WellStar believes in life well-lived WellStar Corporate & Community Health believes in giving individuals the tools and education to live a life well-lived. Our staff promotes health and wellness to the communities we serve by providing you and your family a variety of convenient and affordable health screenings and education classes. Corporate & Community Health also works with companies to promote healthy lifestyles while making it convenient for employees to participate in programs at the worksite. WellStar Corporate & Community Health has a world-class team of nurses, lifestyle instructors and health coaches ready and willing to promote healthy lifestyles and provide quality health education. Here are some of the classes and programs that the Corporate and Community Health team can offer. We can also tailor a program to meet the specific needs of your organization or employees. Call 770-793-7285 to learn more about these offerings, including costs, schedules and locations, unless otherwise noted.

Safe Sitter

Safe Sitter is a nationally-recognized babysitter education program. It is a highquality training program that gives young adolescents age 11 and older the skills to be safe, nurturing babysitters. The competencybased, interactive curriculum was written by a pediatrician and teaches safe and nurturing child care techniques. Teaching methodology includes hands-on manikin practice, small group interaction, role-playing, games and discussion. Topics covered include: • Babysitting as a business • Babysitting ethics • Basic first aid • Behavior management • How to care for a choking infant or child • Injury prevention • Personal safety Registration and pre-payment are required.

School Health Programs

WellStar Corporate & Community Health offers two School Health Programs providing free 45-minute presentations for grades K-8. The programs are offered in Marietta City and Cherokee, Cobb, Douglas and Paulding county school systems.

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The Elementary (K-5) School Health Program provides health and safety information on the following topics: • Anger Management • Physical Activity • Dental Hygiene • Poison Protection • Internet Safety • Water Safety • Nutrition • Wheel Safety • Personal Hygiene For more information on the Elementary School Health program, please e-mail elementaryschoolhealth@wellstar.org or call 770-793-7453. The Adolescent (grades 6-8) School Health Program will offer two health topics to include: • Nutrition • Physical Activity For more information on the Adolescent School Health program, please email adolescentschoolhealth@wellstar.org or call 770-793-7453. The programs meet the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum Objectives and are presented by qualified instructors. Presentations are scheduled through each individual school.

Safe Kids Cobb County is committed to reducing and preventing injuries to children in Cobb County by: • Distributing safety equipment to families in need • Providing safety education to parents, caregivers, children and youth • Raising public awareness of preventable injuries • Supporting public policy on child safety In partnership with WellStar and Cobb Public Health, Safe Kids Cobb County hosts ongoing safety events and education throughout the year to provide parents and caregivers with the information and equipment they need to help keep children injury-free. Safety programs include: • Car seat • Fire • Home • Pedestrian • Poison • Water • Wheel (Bicycle, scooter, skateboard, etc.)

CPR/First Aid

Inspections involve checking current installation of child safety seats, checking for recalls and a demonstration on how to properly install a seat. Child safety seat inspections are available by appointment. Please call 770-514-2369. To join the coalition or for more information about Safe Kids Cobb County, please call 770-793-7450 or 770-852-3285 or visit www. safekidscobbcounty.org.

American Heart Association classes range from basic CPR for new parents and caregivers to advanced CPR geared to medical professionals. Classes combine video instruction with hands-on training by experienced professionals. Registration and pre-payment are required. Classes offered include: • Combination CPR/First Aid • Family & Friends CPR • Healthcare Provider and Refresher • Heartsaver CPR (Adult/Child/Infant)

Defensive Driving

Safe drivers of all ages are created through a personal commitment to drive in ways that save lives, time and money. Our National Safety Council, six-hour, classroom-based course teaches drivers how to drive safely and responsibly. Drivers learn new skills that can make the difference between life, death, health and injury. Many insurance companies offer a reduction in premiums based on successful completion of the course and eligibility requirements. Check with your insurance carrier for more information on discounts. Registration and pre-payment are required.

Safe Kids Cobb County preventing accidental injury.

Safe Kids Cobb County works to prevent accidental childhood injury, the leading killer of children 14 and under. Safe Kids Cobb County is a member of Safe Kids Worldwide, a global network of organizations dedicated to preventing accidental injury.

Permanent Child Safety Seat Inspection Station

Speaking about Wellness

WellStar has launched a speaker series called “Speaking about Wellness.” This program provides our community with health and wellness educational programming for all life stages. At WellStar, we believe in health and wellness education for the mind, body and spirit that will empower our community to “get well, stay well and live well.” “Speaking about Wellness” includes: • Speaking about Wellness for Women • Speaking about Wellness for Young Women • Speaking about Wellness for the Family • Speaking about Wellness for the Community For more infor mat ion, pl e as e c a l l

770-793-7385.

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The Alzheimer’s Group of Carroll County

The Alzheimer’s Group of Carroll County is a not-forprofit organization with a mission to provide education, support, and respite to those in our community coping with Alzheimer’s disease. Approximately 24 years ago a need was recognized and this Group was conceived. Several of the founding members continue to be involved with the Group and other current members have been with the Group for many years. The Group has books, reading material, videos, and other education materials available for loan. Group members are available to speak to organizations upon request. There is a bill board is in the community promoting the help line where individuals may ask questions and receive information, support, and resources. In addition, to promote the mission of education an annual resource day is sponsored in the community. This helpful event provides a full day of speakers, resource materials, and information for caregivers regarding coping with their journey with Alzheimer’s disease. Support groups are held the first Tuesday of each month at 10 am and 5:30 pm at The Oaks of Carrollton Assisted Living. The group has a facilitator that leads the group and coordinates speakers for the group. The format of the group is to have a speaker of interest to the attendees followed by a time of sharing among the

group members. Often attendees learn that they are not alone in their struggle and learn from one another on how to better cope with their situation. In addition, the Group sponsors an annual Alzheimer’s Fun Day which provides opportunity for the caregiver to take the family member with Alzheimer’s to a community event in a safe environment where socially questionable behaviors are acceptable. Entertainment and lunch is provided for all. Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease is a twenty four hour a day seven days a week difficult responsibility. The caregiver needs a respite break to take care of themselves and their personal business, to shop or even to take a shower or a nap. Caregivers in need are referred to the Group and may be providing limited respite care provided by a reputable caregiver company. The services provided by this group are supported by donations from the following sources: • Memorial and honorary donations may be made. Tax deductable Donations may be sent to Post office Box 1273 Carrollton, GA 30112. • Local and national grant opportunities.

“Promising never to forget those who can no longer remember.”

• Two major annual fund raising events including The Annual Benefit Dinner and Silent Auction held the Friday evening before Thanksgiving. This event includes a catered meal with entertainment along with a silent and live auction. It is s a fun event for all while raising money for this worthy cause. Secondly, a golf tournament is held in the spring providing another successful fund raiser. The golf tournament is held at a local golf course with golfers coming from near and far to play in this much anticipated event. • Business and community groups may adopt the Alzheimer’s Group of Carroll County to benefit from their financial support. • All money raised stays local to be used in our West Georgia area helping those in our community coping with Alzheimers disease. The Group members work cooperatively to achieve these tasks. The Group leadership consists of a President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer that are accountable to the Alzheimer’s Group Board. Most who are involved with this Group have been touched personally and/ or professionally by Alzheimer’s disease and feel a great passion for this work. The Group is open to anyone who is interested in making a positive contribution to this cause. Anyone desiring more information about resources provided by the Group or how to become involved with this Group, call 770-832-9010.

Community Wellness Guide

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A special section of

Healthy

MARINE Healthy Horizons: Making a Difference

Healthy Horizons is very fortunate to be engaged in community events and Health Fair shows throughout the Southeast. Involvement in various activities enables the team at Healthy Horizons to provide health education to vulnerable populations in the community. These opportunities allow valuable interaction between health educators and the public. Healthy Horizons has formed collaborative relationships with sponsors in the area who share our vision of improving the health status of consumers, patients and families. Charitable donations from our sponsors and continued support from local advertisers enable our team to participate in community events such as fishing events and benefit golf tournaments. We appreciate your continued patronage to our sponsors and advertisers. We are grateful that “Healthy Horizons” is “Making a Difference”.

We invite you to come and see the full line of NauticStar deck boats, Nauticstar bay boats, Yamaha Jet Boats, Interceptor performance boats, G3 Pontoon Boats, Yamaha Wave Runners, Yamaha Outboards, Mercury Outboards, Mercruiser stern drives, Mercury Jet Drives, and Evinrude E-tec Outboards.

We have pre-owned boats and jet ski’s to accommodate every budget and style. We go out on the water with you to check out your new or used boat before you buy it. We also carry the full line of YAMAHA generators and GOLF CARTS– WE ARE HERE ON THE WATER AND AT YOUR SERVICE!

256-357-2045 800-780-2045

• New & Used Boats • Yamaha Waverunners • Full Service Marine and Service Center • Wet Slips and Dry Storage

21130 Hwy. 431 Wedowee, AL 36278

www.wedoweemarine.com 40

Healthy Horizons Magazine

Community Wellness Guide

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MOTTLED AGE SPOTS SKIN BEACH MELANOCYTES EXCESSIVE

Fun & Games

Sudoku Puzzle

Name

Sunshine– Friend or Foe?

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains Sudoku Sudoku Puzzle the numbers 1 through 9. There is only one solution to thePuzzle puzzle. Date

900010030658 (key # 1)

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through to 9. There is only one solution to the puzzle.

Easy

Name

Date

900200005035 (key # 1)

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through to 9. There is only one solution to the puzzle.

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6 4 2 8 3 5 9 5 3 7 2 8 1 2 8 6 5 9 3 4 3 9 2 1 6 4 1 7 8 6 2 4 7 4 8 3 7 3 8 4 5

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Moments Bloopers taken from “Kids Say the Best Things About God” by Dandi Dale Mackall

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5 9 7 1 3 8 5 2 5 8 7 1 Difficult

How does God get those leaves to grow back onto the trees? And how does God keep grass growing back, no matter how many times you cut it off? Now that’s something! –David, age 8 I know what makes God angry. It’s when God’s creations don’t turn out so good, like cockroaches and my brother. –Alex, age 7 When I get to heaven I’m going to get God to tell me about creating the funniest creatures like anteaters and penguins and platypuses and maybe my friend’s Uncle Jimmy. And then we’ll laugh our heads off. –Dixon, age 8

Courtesy of edhelper.com

I can’t wait to get to heaven! There are streets of gold and you can play right out in the middle of them without getting yourself run over! Plus, you can play on a baseball team and not be the last one picked. –Jack, age 6 I’ wondering if we all get exactly the same kind of house in heaven, no matter if you are rich or poor or just minimum wage because you don’t get to take your allowance with you. –Becca, age 11 God talks to you way down deep in the bottom backside of your head. So when other people scream at you in the front of your head, you can’t hardly hear God. –Katy, age 9 Courtesy of edhelper.com

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

By Gaston O. McGinnis, MD, FACS

W

ithout the sun there would be no sunrise, no sunset, no tress, and no grass. Life would not be possible without the sun and yet we cannot withstand the full rays of the sun. Icarus learned this truth the hard way. According to Greek mythology, Icarus and his father were imprisoned in the labyrinth on Crete. Daedalus, the father, contrived a plan and constructed wings of beeswax and feathers and they flew away with ease. Daedalus warned Icarus not to fly too close to the sun, but he did it anyway. The wax melted and he fell to his death. Even today some young people have difficulty accepting advice of elders and get too close to the sun. With our dependence on the sun it is easy to understand how many cultures worshipped a sun god. Even in JudeoChristian literature God is equated with light and evil, or the absence of God is equated with darkness. With all the blessings on the sun there are problems such as skin damage which can progress to cancer. So what it this stuff beaming down outside looking so pretty and felling so good? What we are interested in is part of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum. This group includes electric waves, radio waves, infrared (heat) rays, visible light, ultraviolet light, roentgen rays, gamma rays, and cosmic rays differing principally in wave length. Ultraviolet light is classified and A, B, and C depending on wave length, with C being the shortest. All of the C and most of the B is blocked by a fragile layer of ozone—and that layer of atmosphere has a hole in it. We can live on this earth only because of this thin layer. There are ten to one hundred times more A than B, but B is one thousand times as effective in producing redness and five hundred times more effective in producing pigmentation of the skin. The amount of radiation we receive from sunlight is not constant. It varies according to the time of day, time of year,

ULTRAVIOLET REDDISH SUNTAN EPIDERMIS ACTINIC KERATOSES SUNBURN

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Courtesy of edhelper.com

Find each of the following words in the puzzle above. Radiation Cosmetic Solar Lentigines Wrinkles Mottled

Age Spots Skin Beach Melanocytes Excessive

Skin Cancer Aging Uneven Pigmentation Exposure Ultraviolet

nearness to the equator and the altitude. As ultraviolet light strikes the skin, some light rays are reflected and a part of the light is transmitted to produce changes. Vitamin D is produced by sunlight, but only a few minutes are needed. Although B produces more tan, A penetrates more deeply and produces pigmentation in a deeper layer, primarily the dermis. Unlike B it also causes photo aging and changes which can lead to skin cancer. Some feel that these changes are more severe than those produced by B. Skin cancer was first described in 1814. The relationship to sunlight was first appreciated in 1874. Now in 2010 we have an estimated one million new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer per year. Actually, we don’t know the true

Reddish Sun Tan Epidermis Actinic Keratoses Sunburn

incidence. Cancer registries don’t even record skin cancers. Every third new cancer is skin cancer. One in five Americans will have skin cancer. It is by far the most common cancer if Caucasians and continues to increase. Some authorities estimate that the incidence will double in twenty-five years. The rate of increase is currently about five percent per year. Skin cancer has been called the quiet twentieth century epidemic. To add tour concern, we have not yet seen the effect of the loss of ozone layer and the effects of tanning salons because there is a ten to twenty year lag time before the effects of increased exposure is evident. The epidemic will increase as we enter the twenty-first century.

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Wellness Resource Directory

Emergency Directory EMERGENCY DIAL 911 AMBULANCE Ambulance 770-537-9911 (Bremen, Buchanan, Tallapoosa) West Georgia Ambulance 770-832-9689

AMBULANCE SERVICE-AIR Omniflight Helicopters Carrollton 770-838-1810

HOSPITALS Bremen Health & Wellness Center 770-537-5555 Douglasville Medical Center 770-947-3000 Emory Parkway Medical Center 770-732-7777 Floyd Medical Center 706-509-5000 Higgins General Hospital 770-824-2000 Piedmont Newnan Hospital 770-253-1912 Tanner Medical Center-Carrollton 770-836-9666 Tanner Medical Center-Villa Rica 770-456-3000 Wellstar Medical Center 678-581-5900

OTHER EMERGENCY NUMBERS American Red Cross 1-866-724-3577 Battered Women/Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-334-2836 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives 1-800-800-3855 Committee for Missing Children 678-376-6265 1-800-525-8204 (24 HR) Crime, Trauma, Death Scene & Bio Terrorism Clean-Up 1-888-979-2272 CSX Transportation Police Department 1-800-232-0144 Drug A 24 Hour A&A Abuse Abacus Action Hotline 1-800-487-3218 EMA Local 770-830-5882 (Carroll County) 770-550-7839 (Haralson County) EMA State 404-635-7000 1-800-879-4362

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

EMA Federal 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) TTY 1-800-462-7585 Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) 404-679-9000 Fire Non-emergency 770-537-3331 (Bremen) 770-646-0077 (Buchanan & Haralson County) 770-832-3456 (Heard County) Forest Fire 770-646-5501 (Buchanan & Haralson County) 770-836-6715 (Carroll County) 706-675-3568 (Heard County) Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) 404-244-2600

Police Non-emergency 770-537-4441 (Bremen) 770-646-5246 (Buchanan) 770-834-4451 (Carrollton) 770-574-7211 (Tallapoosa) U.S. Marshall 404-331-6833 U.S. Secret Service 404-331-6111 United Way 2-1-1 To Find or Give Help Dial 2-1-1 404-614-1000 (outside Atlanta)

Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 (Throughout Ga.) 404-616-9000 (Metro Atlanta) 404-616-9287 (TTY)

Tanner Hospice Care 770-214-2355

ELDER LAW

Garrett Drug Co. 770-537-2364

Covington, William D. 770-214-9961

Lovvorn Drugs 770-537-8889

Scana Energy 877-467-2262

Norfolk Southern Railroad Police 1-800-453-2530

DENTIST

Grace Assisted Living of Bremen 770-537-6800

Georgia State Patrol

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) 1-800-799-4TTY (1-800-799-4889)

Evercare Hospice & Palliative Care 770-417-2018 866-846-1310

Apothecary Shoppe Pharmacy 770-459-9499

Georgia Problem Gambling Helpline 1-800-699-7117

National Response Center 1-800-424-8802

Tanner Behavioral Health 770-836-9557 (Carrollton) 770-456-3266 (Villa Rica)

West Georgia Center for Diabetes 678-796-0681

Gas South 866-762-6427

National Hopeline Network 1-800-784-2433

Altus Healthcare & Hospice 770-456-4643

Cottage Landing 770-830-8857

Coweta-Fayette EMC Natural Gas 770-502-0226

Mental Health 770-537-2367

Peachtree Allergy & Asthma Clinic 770-832-1984

HOSPICES

HOSPITAL EQUIPTMENT & SUPPLIES

Georgia Natural Resources 1-800-241-4113

Homeland Security 1-800-BE-READY 1-800-237-3239

Harbin Clinic 706-295-5331

Hastings, Jill PhD 770-214-0470

DIABETIC SERVICES

NATURAL GAS

Call Before you dig Dial 8-1-1 or 1-800-282-7411

Family Counseling & Education Clinic 770-832-7721

Ashbrooke Village 770-459-8061

Georgia Drug Abuse Helpline 1-800-338-6745

Georgia Utilities Protection Center, Inc.

Center for Allergy and Asthma 770-836-7987 (Carrollton) 770-459-0620 (Villa Rica) 770-537-2323 (Bremen) 770-683-4050 (Newnan)

Tanner Home Health 770-834-5438

ELECTRICITY

Georgia Power Company 1-888-660-5890

Paulding County 770-387-3700 (Cartersville)

Associated Counselors 770-830-1300

ASSISTED LIVING

Georgia Crisis & Access Line 1-800-715-4225

Heard County 770-254-7200 (Newnan)

Buchanan, Ariana MD 770-832-1984

UTILITIES Carroll EMC 770-832-3552

Haralson & Polk County 770-749-2200 (Cedartown)

COUNSELORS

Smile Center Villa Rica 770-456-7100

Georgia Crime Victim Assistance Helpline 1-800-338-6745

Carroll County 770-459-3661 (Villa Rica)

Healthfield Home Health 678-840-4475

ALLERGY CLINICS

TELEPHONE AT&T Residential---1-888-757-6500 Business---1-866-620-6000

WATER Carroll County Water Authority 770-832-1277 City of Bowden 770-258-8980

Guardian Angel of West Georgia 770-836-0766 Love and Legacy of Bremen 770-537-6800 www.loveandlegacyassistedliving.com Merrill Gardens At Carrollton 770-214-1988 Stewart House Retirement Living The Inc. 770-838-0303 The Oaks of Carrollton Assisted Living 770-834-2242

AUTISM SERVICES Carroll County for Retarded Citizens 770-834-6232 Carroll County Center for Family 770-830-7979

City of Carrollton 770-830-2000

Carroll Count y Family Connection Authority 770-214-2080

City of Mt. Zion 770-832-1622

Children’s Healthcare of West Georgia 770-838-8640

City of Roopville 770-854-8136

Communication Partners Inc. 770-830-8622

City of Temple 770-562-3369

Morningstar Family Resource Center 770-832-1603

City of Villa Rica 770-459-3656

Professional Park Medical Services 770-832-6861

Haralson County 770-646-5375 Heard County Water Authority 706-675-3358

Macmillan, Timothy James PC 770-834-0871 Perkins Law Firm 770-214-8885 Price, Pyles, Dangle, & Rooks PC 770-830-9000 Thomas, Charles A. Jr. 770-562-3028

HOPITALIZATION, MEDICAL & SURGICAL PLANS Butler Sheila J & Company 770-834-4291

HOSPITALS Floyd Medical Center 706-509-5000

Wallis, James W. Jr. 770-830-0500

Higgins General Hospital 770-824-2000

EYECARE

Newton Medical Center 770-786-7053

Carrollton Eye Clinic PC 770-834-1008

FUNERAL HOME SERVICES

Piedmont Newnan Hospital 770-253-1912

Almon Funeral Home 770-832-7056

Tanner Medical Center-Carrollton 770-836-9666--Carrollton 770-456-3000—Villa Rica

Georgia Memorial Park 770-432-0771 or 770-952-4478

MEDICAL ALERT SYSTEMS

HOME HEALTH CARE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

Philps Lifeline 866-714-5295

Bowden Valu-Rite Pharmacy 770-258-3366

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT-SERVICE & REPAIR

Tallapoosa Home Care Co. 770-574-9126

Matrix Mobility & Healthcare Products 770-456-8018

Willowbrook at Tanner 770-456-3266

HOME HEALTH SERVICES

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Central Home Health An Amedisys Co. 770-832-9310

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

Potters Behavioral Medicine Clinic 770-459-8799 Willowbrook at Tanner 770-456-3266

Evercare Hospice & Palliative Care 770-417-2018 866-846-1310 Grace Assisted Living of Bremen 770-537-6800

Bowden Homecare DME Inc. 770-258-5055 Environmental Medical And Gas Service 770-459-5920 Garrett Drug Co. 770-537-2364

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Wellness Resource Directory Jim Cash Pharmacy 770-646-3570

West Georgia Obstetrics & Gynecology 770-834-0170

A Driving Advantage 770-830-0045

General Surgery Services 678-840-5703

Lovvorn Drugs 770-537-8889

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS

NAACP CC Reentry Service 770-834-6025

West Georgia Center for Plastic Surgery 770-834-6302

Southern Therapy Services, Inc. 770-832-2484

West Georgia Laser Center 770-834-2470

Tanner Cardiac Rehabilitation 770-838-8289

TRANSPORTATION

Tanner Rehabilitation 770-824-2291

ACT Express Transportation West Ga 770-838-4376

West Georgia Therapy Center 770-456-3472

Hamil Transportation LLC 770-646-3125

SENIOR CITIZENS SERVICES

Southeast Shuttle 770-832-7786

ACT Express Transportation West Georgia 770-838-4376

3-D Transportation 770-947-0080

Amberley Senior Community 770-505-1099

WHEELCHAIRS-LIFTS & RAMPS

Med Reps Online 770-214-7655 Tallapoosa Home Care Co. 770-574-9126

MEN’S HEALTHCARE West Georgia Urology 770-834-6988

Southern Therapy Services Inc. 770-834-7436

ORTHOPEDICS Carrollton Orthopaedics 770-834-0873

PHARMACIES

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

Apothecary Shoppe Pharmacy 770-459-9499

Floyd Behavioral Health Center 1-800-365-3548

Carrollton Pharmacy 770-834-7733

Ridgeview Institute 770-830-5905

Clayton Pharmacy 770-537-2321

Tanner Behavioral Health 770-836-9551 770-456-3266

Garrett Drug Company 770-537-2364

Tanner Employee Assistance Program 770-834-8327 888-732-5422

NURSING HOMES Carrollton Manor Inc. 770-834-1737 Countryside Health Center 770-646-3861 Heritage Healthcare of Franklin 706-675-6674 Pine Knoll Nursing & Rehab Center 770-832-8243 The Oaks of Carrollton 770-834-3501

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY Carrollton Obstetrics & Gynecology 770-214-2229 Comprehensive Breast Care Center of West Georgia 770-214-5810 Douglas Women’s Center PC 770-941-8662 Healthcare for Women 770-214-2121 Rome Women’s Health Center 706-234-7915 Tanner Breast Health of Villa Rica 770-456-3400 Villa Rica OB/GYN 770-456-3850 West Atlanta Women’s Health 770-489-7011 West Georgia Center for Plastic Surgery 770-834-6302

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Healthy Horizons Magazine

Good Neighbor Pharmacy 888-467-7867 Haney’s Drug Corner 770-834-3393 Jim Cash Pharmacy 770-646-3570 Lovvorn Drugs 770-537-8889 Plaza Discount Pharmacy 770-459-5741 The Village at Mirror Lake 678-840-8788 Rite Aid Pharmacies 800-748-3243 Tallapoosa Drug Company Inc. 770-574-2339 Turner Pharmacy 770-832-7076 Walgreen Drug Store 770-838-1678/Carrollton 770-456-9284/Villa Rica

Area Agency on Aging of Northwest Georgia 706-802-5506 Cato’s Care 770-854-5795 Comfort Keepers 678-715-8624 Greenbrooke Senior Community 770-505-1099 Stewart’s Village 770-459-204

Advanced Med Equip Inc 770-834-7609 B & W Handicap Equipment Inc. 770-460-1909

WHEELCHAIRS-RENTING Apothecary Shoppe Pharmacy 770-459-9499

WHEELCHAIRS & SPECIAL NEEDS TRANSPORTATION ACT Express Transportation West Ga. 770-838-4376 Retrieved October 10, 2008: Area Agency on Aging. http:// www.adap.net/resource/agencies.htm. Retrieved October 10, 2008 from: The Real Yellow Pages, West Georgia, GA June 2008-2009. Metro Directories, Austell-Douglasville-Powder Springs 2007-2008. Retrieved November 11, 2009 from: www. Yellowbook.com Retrieved November 8, 2010 from: www. Yellowbook.com Disclaimer: Healthy Horizons provides this elder resource directory free of charge. Healthy Horizons strives to assure that the information contained in this directory is accurate and up to date. However, the user is advised that Healthy Horizons does not endorse the organizations listed in this directory, nor does exclusion in this directory signify disapproval. The consumer is strongly encouraged to seek information from the organization and assess if this organization meets your particular needs.

rce Local Resou ry to ec ir D line! Available On

“Visit the Healthy Horizons website at www.healthyhmag.com for more informative topics on Health and Wellbeing.”

Healthy www.healthyhmag.com

National Helpful Numbers Directory

SLEEP DISORDER CENTER

Aging

Brain Tumors

West Georgia Sleep Disorders Center 770-832-2775

American Health Assistance Foundation (800) 437-2423

American Brain Tumor Association (800) 886-2282

Eldercare Locator (800) 677-1116

Brain Tumor Society (800) 770-8287

National Institute on Aging Information Center (800) 222-2225 (800) 222-4225

Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation (800) 228-4673

SOCIAL SERVICES INFORMATION & REFFERAL PROGRAMS Bremen Food & Clothing Bank 770-537-0920 Carroll County CASA Inc. 770-838-1964

PODIATRISTS

The Medication Program 770-258-7060

Advanced Ankle & Foot Centers 770-838-4151

The Medication Program 678-796-0000

Village Podiatry Group—Douglasville 678-838-4443

West Georgia Habitat for Humanity 770-838-0399

West Georgia Podiatry Associates PC 770-832-3546

online

Allergy/Asthma Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (800) 929-4040

National Brain Tumor Foundation (800) 934-2873

Cancer

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation (800) 462-9273 Us Too! International  (800) 808-7866 Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization (800) 221-2141 English (800) 986-9505 Spanish Diabetes/Digestive Disorders American Association of Diabetes Educators (800) 338-3633 American Diabetes Association (800) 342-2383

Alzheimer’s

American Cancer Society, National Cancer Information Center (800) 227-2345

Alzheimer’s Association (800) 272-3900

American Institute for Cancer Research (800) 843-8114

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, Inc. (800) 932-2423

SPECIAL EVENT SERVICES

Alzheimer ’s Disease Education and Referral Center (800) 438-4380

Cancer Hope Network (877) 467-3638

Division of Diabetes Translation (877) 232-3422

PULMONARY SERVICES

The Powell House 770-456-0055

Arthritis

Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation (800) 366-2223

Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International Hotline (800) 223-1138

Pulmonary & Critical Care of West Georgia 770-456-3380

SURGICAL SERVICES

American Juvenile Arthritis Organization (800) 283-7800

Kidney Cancer Association (800) 850-9132

Drug Abuse

West Georgia Lung & Sleep Medicine LLC 770-838-5864

Carrollton Surgical Group 770-834-3336

Arthritis Foundation (800) 283-7800

National Bone Marrow Transplant Link (800) 546-5268

REHABILITATION

General Surgical Associates—Douglasville 770-949-4000

Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. (800) 886-5963

National Cancer Information Center (800) 422-6237

National Institute of Arthritis (877) 226-4267

National Marrow Donor Program (800) 627-7692

Drug Free Workplace Helpline (800) 967-5752 Drug Help (800) 488-3784 Drug Policy Information Clearinghouse (800) 666-3332

Community Wellness Guide

47


National Helpful Numbers Directory Housing and Urban Development Drug Clearinghouse (800) 955-2232 Parents Resource Institute for Drug Education (PRIDE) (800) 279-6361

Fire Prevention National Fire Protection Association (800) 344-3555

Fitness Aerobics and Fitness Foundation of America (800) 446-2322 For Professionals (800) 968-7263 Consumer Hotline American Council on Exercise (800) 825-3636 American Running Association (800) 776-2732 TOPS (Taking Off Pounds Sensibly) Club (800) 932-8677 Weight Control Information Network (877) 946-4627 YMCA of the USA (800) 872-9622

Headache/Head Injury American Council for Headache Education (800) 255-2243 Brain Injury Association, Inc. (800) 444-6443

Heart Disease American Heart Association (800) 242-8721 Heart Information Service (800) 292-2221

HOMELESSNESS

Alliance for Aging Research (800) 639-2421

National Child Care Information Center, ACF (800) 616-2242

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (800) 822-2762

National Clearinghouse of Rehabilitation Training Materials (800) 223-5219

American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (800) 213-7193

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Service (800) 356-4674

American Association of Critical Care Nurses (800) 899-2226

National Jewish Medical and Research Center (800) 222-5864

American Council for the Blind (800) 424-8666 American Counseling Association (800) 347-6647

National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness (800) 444-7415

Hospital/Hospice Care Children’s Hospice International (800) 242-4453 Hill-Burton Free Medical Care Program (800) 638-0742 National Association of Hospital Hospitality Houses, Inc. (800) 542-9730 National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (800) 658-8898 Shriners Hospital for Children Referral Line (800) 237-5055

IMMUNIZATIONS

Impotence Information Center (800) 328-3881

American Speech-LanguageHearing Association (800) 638-8255

LIVER DISEASE

International Hearing Society (800) 521-5247

Arthritis National Research Foundation (800) 588-2873 Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (800) 477-8892 Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (800) 635-1196

Substance Abuse

Seniors Eye Care Program (800) 222-3937

National Inhalant Prevention Coalition (800) 269-4237

Violence

Prevent Child Abuse America (800) 556-2722 Research to Prevent Blindness (800) 621-0026

Radiation National Association of Radiation Survivors (800) 798-5102

Rehabilitation

Federal Emergency Management Agency (800) 879-6076

Safety

American Parkinson’s Disease Association (800) 223-2732

International Chiropractors Association (800) 423-4690

Lighthouse International (800) 829-0500

Prevent Blindness Center for Sight (800) 331-2020

United Ostomy Association (800) 826-0826

International Childbirth Education Association (800) 624-4934

Smoking, Tobacco and Health Information Line (800) 232-1311

National Stroke Association (800) 787-6537

Dystonia Medical Research Foundation (800) 377-3978

Parkinson’s Disease

Guide Dogs for the Blind (800) 295-4050

National Technical Information Service (800) 553-6847

Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors (800) 888-2876

Immune Deficiency Foundation (800) 296-4433

Smoking Quit Line of the National Cancer Institute (877) 448-7848

National Family Association for Deaf-Blind (800) 255-0411 x275

College of American Pathologists (800) 323-4040

Glaucoma Research Foundation (800) 826-6693

Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind, Inc. (800) 548-4337

Smoking

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (800) 352-9424

Lung Disease/Asthma/Allergy American Lung Association (800) 586-4872

Federal Information Center, GSA (800) 688-9889

Glaucoma Research Foundation (800) 826-6693

National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (800) 537-2238

Hepatitis Foundation International (800) 891-0707

Asthma Information Line (800) 822-2762

U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission Hotline (800) 638-2772

Foundation Fighting Blindness (800) 683-5555

National Alliance of the Blind Students (800) 424-8666

National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering (800) 736-2216

Foundation of America (800) 727-8462

Safe Sitter (800) 255-4089

American Heart Association Stroke Connection (800) 478-7653

CDC National Prevention Information Network (800) 458-5231

Asthma and Allergy

Braille Institute (800) 272-4553

National Pediculosis Association (800) 446-4672

Abledata (800) 227-0216

National Institute on Deafness and Other Disorders (800) 241-1044

Healthy Horizons Magazine

American Occupational Therapy Association (800) 729-2682

Blind Children’s Center (800) 222-3566

Louisiana Center for the Blind (800) 234-4166

Association of Operating Room Nurses (800) 755-2676

National Family Association for Deaf-Blind (800) 255-0411 x 275

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American Nurses Association (800) 274-4262

(800) 424-8422

Stroke

American Liver Foundation (800) 223-0179

National Jewish Medical and Research Center (800) 222-5864 (Lung Line) (800) 552-5864 (Lung Facts)

Vestibular Disordered Association (800) 837-8428

Office of Boating Safety, U.S. Coast Guard InfoLine (800) 368-5647

National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention (888) 232-3228

American Society for Deaf Children (800) 942-2732

John Tracy Clinic (800) 522-4582

Lighthouse International (800) 829-0500

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center (800) 949-4232

IMPOTENCE

Hear Now (800) 648-4327

Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (800) 457-6676

Professionals

Hearing/Speech

The Ear Foundation at Baptist Hospital (800) 545-4327

National Safety Council (800) 621-7615

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Center (800) 575-9355

National Headache Foundation (888) 643-5552

Dial A Hearing Screening Test (800) 222-3277

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (800) 955-4572

Medical Institute for Sexual Health (800) 892-9484

National Immunization Information Hotline (800) 232-2522

DB-Link (800) 438-9376

National Parkinson Foundation, Inc. (800) 327-4545

Danny Foundation (800) 833-2669 National Highway Traffic Safety Hotline (800) 424-9393 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Service (800) 356-4674 National Program for Playground Safety (800) 554-7529

SAMHSA’s National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (800) 729-6686

Surgery/Plastic Surgery American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (800) 332-3223

National Domestic Violence Hotline (800) 799-7233

Women Endometriosis Association (800) 992-3636 National Osteoporosis Foundation (800) 223-9994

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. (800) 441-2737

National Women’s Health Information Center (800) 994-9662

American Society of Plastic Surgeons, inc. (800) 475-2784

PMS Access (800) 222-4767

Suicide Prevention

Women’s Health America Group (800) 558-7046

National Hopeline Network (800) 784-2433

Women’s Sports Foundation (800) 227-3988

The Trevor Helpline (800) 850-8078

Reference: Print Source: 2010 Toll-Free Numbers for Health information, National Health Information Center, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.

Trauma American Trauma Society (800) 556-7890

Vision American Council of the Blind (800) 424-8666 Better Vision Institute/Vision Council of America

Community Wellness Guide

49


We can all

breathe

a little easier… …thanks to Peachtree Allergy & Asthma Clinic. We have provided individual, patient-centered care for over 31 years! Our objective is to ensure that each patient has a satisfactory and pleasant experience, while receiving the highest quality of medical care. At Peachtree Allergy & Asthma…

You’re not just a patient, you’re family!

We treat:

• Asthma • Allergic Rhinitis (hay fever) • Chronic Sinusitis • Chronic Cough • Urticaria/ Hives • Eczema • Food Allergy • Anaphylaxis • Insect Allergy • Recurrent Infections Dr. Ariana D. Buchanan, M.D. Theodore M. Lee, M.D.

Peachtree Allergy and Asthma Clinic, P.C. 150 Clinic Avenue • Suite 102 Carrollton, GA

770.832.1984

peachtree-allergy.com

Please see our editorial section on page 26 of this publication for additional locations and information. No representation is made that the quality of Allergy/Immunology Services to be performed is greater than the quality of Allergy/Immunology Services performed by other doctors.

West Georgia  

Healthy Horizons Magazine