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Healthy Horizons

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s u t u o b a Welcome to Team Healthy Horizons! Our Dothan/Enterprise 2018 edition is filled with information about premier medical care providers and wellness resources in your community along with articles to help you enjoy a healthy lifestyle. We spoke with Tyson Carter, athletic coordinator with the City of Dothan Leisure Services, about the new outdoor fitness court in Westgate Park. A partnership among the National Fitness Campaign, Dothan and local sponsors made it possible to provide a free state-of-the-art workout facility for residents of the Wiregrass region. With a free app, you can follow workouts designed by fitness experts for the court equipment. Lauren Lewey with Firefly Community Yoga in Enterprise has tips for quieting your inner critic and gaining clarity with meditation while strengthening your body with yoga. For more than 15 years, our goal at Healthy Horizons has been to provide a vital resource

for your wellness and healthcare needs, and we recognize our duty to consciously maintain relevant content to better serve you. With our passion for God, community and family, this publication is a natural extension of our core beliefs and values. Thank you for choosing Healthy Horizons. Mark and Kimberly Helms

Publisher Mark Helms 256.235.1955 mhelms@cableone.net

Publisher/Events Coordinator Kimberly Helms, D.H.Ed., MSN, RN 256.310.6174 khelms@jsu.edu

Editor

Advertising sales or to request additional copies: Phone: 256.235.1955 Fax: 256.235.1935

Patricia Surrett 256.225.6454 healthyhorizons@cableone.net

Have a suggestion?

Office Coordinator

Healthy Horizons PO Box 81, Choccolocco, AL 36254

DeAnn Hightower 256.235.1955 haleydee@cableone.net

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

Graphics Gwen Bishop 256.307.8155 gwenbishop1@gmail.com

Contributors Judy Hood 2

Printed by Publications Press 334.244.0436

Healthy Horizons

Copyright 2018 by Healthy Horizons Magazine. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reprinted and reproduced, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Healthy Horizons is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, physician offices, wellness centers, assisted living centers, hospitals and rehab centers. Please call for a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.


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s t n e cont

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Wiregrass United Way raised more than $3 million in 2017 to improve the quality of life for local residents.

Features by Patricia Surrett

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Healthy Horizons


health community Boys and Girls Club: More than just fun and games Helping women one at a time Feeding the Wiregrass Giving back UW agencies A little history and a lot of fun Events

wellness Eve’s Garden Tasty vegan recipes Natural remedies Ask the experts Road trip! Sounds of the South

resources fun & games

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Dothan’s 1st class workout Get outside! Healing a monkey mind 5 exercise styles similar to yoga

8 10 11 12 14 16 17 24 26 27 28 38 40 43

family Steve Hardwick: Angel of the Wiregrass Safer teen driving Our story: Henry County Health & Rehab Protecting children from sexual abuse www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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people helping

people

Wiregrass United Way

plays a vital role in supporting its partner agencies in the region with funding and by raising public awareness of their community services. The United Way partners assist residents in meeting basic and special needs and by strengthening families. “Helping residents in the Wiregrass region is why we do what we do,” says Taylor Thames Wheeler. Wheeler serves as the Dale and Henry County area manager, director of marketing, and state campaign coordinator for Wiregrass United Way. With 42 partner agencies in six counties relying on them, the staff and volunteers take that role seriously. In 2017, hundreds of volunteers gathered to package 20,000 beans-and-rice meals to be donated to the local food bank. “We really didn’t know what to expect. We weren’t sure if it would take a half day or longer,” says Walter Hill, Wiregrass United Way’s chief executive officer. “It took 39 minutes.” The meals were loaded on a food bank van and distribution began the same day. “It went way better than we thought it would,” says Hill. Wiregrass United Way takes its role as a central fundraising organization seriously too. In 2017, they met their campaign goal of $2.84 million which meant they also met a challenge from the Wiregrass Foundation. The challenge included a $400,000 donation from the foundation if the annual goal was reached. The foundation grant can be used for capital improvements, such as playground equipment and computers. “Ninety-nine cents of every dollar stays in local 6

Healthy Horizons

communities,” says Hill. “Along with providing services, they can often use the United Way money as matching funds needed for grants which means more money for services. Our partners can do magic with what they receive.” “United Way can do fundraising more efficiently. None of our 42 partner agencies have a dedicated person to raise money. We have six full-time and one part-time employee,” Hill adds. “When they do their own fundraisers to supplement United Way money, they rely on their day-to-day staff and volunteers. Without United Way, they would have to hire someone, then their money goes to paying that person, not providing services. There’s also the problem of 42 agencies contacting the same people and businesses asking for


community

donations.” United Way has built a network of community leaders, organizations and businesses to promote their agency partners and to secure vital funds. “United Way is a trusted, well-known organization,” Hill adds. “We’re able to work with large companies like Publix and WalMart.” To decide which agencies receive funds and how much will be given to each one, United Way relies on a fund allocation committee made up of volunteers from the six-county area. “They visit the partner agencies, review their financial information and ask questions,” says Wheeler. “We want to make sure our partners are good stewards and donations are well invested.” Ultimately, United Way’s efforts are about making

communities in the Wiregrass region better places to live. Their partners include: • Wiregrass Rehabilitation Center • Salvation Army • American Red Cross • Wiregrass 2-1-1 • Habitat for Humanity • Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts “I believe our United Way is one of the most special ones in the country,” says Phillip Gilley, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of the Wiregrass. To learn more about United Way, its partner agencies and how you can help, visit www.wuw. org. You can find them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Boys and Girls Club: Boys and Girls Club is about more than playing games and babysitting children. “Some people may misunderstand what we’re about,” says Phillip Gilley, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of the Wiregrass. “Our program is committed to excellence and enforcing strong values.” Boys and Girls Club focuses on three main areas: academic success, healthy lifestyle and good character. The afterschool and summer programs serve children ages 6-18, and the club has an open-door policy with no requirement for children to join. As part of the afterschool program, school grades are tracked and conduct reports checked. Students get help with their homework and, if a child has a C or below on their report card, they receive targeted tutoring. Certified teachers help older students. Students in the program have a combined 3.2 grade point average. “It takes a lot of time and money to help them achieve results but it’s important,” says Gilley. During the summer, the club’s day starts with breakfast and then children have free time. They can spend their free time with activities

“We want to give them experiences that they might not have otherwise.” in the game room, gym, learning center, computer lab, video room, arts and crafts room or playground. All activities are designed to be age-appropriate and to encourage learning, creativity or exercise. In the game room, children might play ping pong or pool. In the arts and crafts center, they participate in weekly projects such as a pottery class taught by the Wiregrass Museum of Art. The computer lab teaches basic skills including a course in online safety. Speakers from police and fire departments visit the club. Even the Game and Fish Department gets involved. They brought a baby alligator to help children learn about wildlife. “Some kids were excited and touched it. Some, not so much,” laughs Gilley. During the summer, club members participate in at least five field trips, such as movies and bowling. “We want to give them experiences that they might not have otherwise,” says Gilley. While club members are having fun, they’re also learning skills to help them succeed in life. “When you think of an etiquette program, some people think of knowing which fork to use and where to put your spoon. Our etiquette program is more practical.”. Children learn how to interact in a variety of social settings like 8

Healthy Horizons

More than just fun and games social media, cell phones and in person. “Those soft skills are often lacking in youth. We teach and enforce those values.” The Wiregrass Boys and Girls Club is part of the national organization which includes 4,800 clubs. Their mission is to provide a safe physical and emotional learning environment for children through programs and mentorship. About 50 percent of the Wiregrass club members come from single parent homes. They may be struggling with self esteem issues. The club teaches personal skills like anger management and how to control stress. Teen club members are encouraged to consider their life plan. “We make sure they graduate from high school and they have a plan for what comes next. Whether it’s career development, attending a community college or university, or finding a job, we’re here for them,” Gilley adds. “We fill the gap they may have in their lives with a caring adult so we can help them become responsible adults.” The Dothan, Rehobeth, Geneva and Slocumb clubs have 320 children in their afterschool programs. Geneva and Dothan


serve 250-275 children during the summer. “People assume because we’re a nonprofit, we receive enough funding through grants and donations. We do have grants and donations, but the cost of a quality program is expensive,” Gilley says. “The kids are worth it.” If you’d like to support the Wiregrass Boys and Girls Club, visit www.bgcwiregrass.org and click ‘Donate’ to learn how you can help with donations, in-kind services, sponsorships and gifts like books, sporting equipment and tickets to events. Volunteers are also welcome. To volunteer, you must complete an application and background check. Gilley says volunteers are also asked about their interests. Whether you enjoy teaching, sports, crafts or something else, matching people with right activities usually makes for happier volunteers. “And that usually makes our kids happier too.” www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Helping women one at a time The House of Ruth provides an array of support for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Serving Barbour, Bullock, Coffee, Covington, Dale, Geneva, Henry, Houston and Pike counties, the organization was founded in 1982 to provide safe temporary shelter to battered women and children. Their mission is to help women one at a time and create social change through education. “Our shelter’s purpose is to keep women and their children alive,” says Beverly Youse. Youse, who joined the organization in 1984, serves as executive director. “We also provide as much support as the victims want.” Women may need help finding a job or daycare, or they might need help obtaining a protection order. “It’s different with each woman. If we don’t know about the service they need, then we quickly educate ourselves. “We don’t advocate particular actions. We inform them of their choices and possible outcomes. While we may not agree with their choices, we want to be their partner in achieving their goals. What we don’t want is to replace the perpetrator in their lives with us telling them what to do.” Throughout a usual month, 30 women and children live temporarily in the shelter as families move in and out. The shelter has 29 beds. “Even if we’re out of beds, we’re never full. We’ll find a sofa, a cot or a futon. We tell the women that we may not have the privacy of a bedroom available, but we can give them a safe space.” Providing support to victims of sexual assault is another mission 10

Healthy Horizons

at the House of Ruth. Going to an emergency room can add to the trauma for a rape victim. If the victim isn’t injured in another way, they may wait three or fours hours if the ER staff is busy with medical emergencies. “During that time, you’re asked

may be called to testify for the case. Through the SANE program, a sexual assault victim is taken to a special room when they arrive at an ER. A House of Ruth advocate and a SANE are paged and usually arrive within 30 minutes. “Whether it’s emotional support

WUW’s annual kick-off event features many local “celebrities” not to go to the bathroom, not to eat or drink anything, not to smoke. Basically, you can’t do anything that might destroy evidence,” adds Youse. “I’ve seen women sent home in hospital gowns after their clothes were collected for evidence. How humiliating is that?” The SANE program aims to provide better care. A SANE is a sexual assault nurse examiner — an RN who is trained to provide medical and psychological care along with the legal aspects involved in a sexual assault. The nurse understands the chain of custody required for evidence collection and

or relaying messages to family who may be waiting, we do whatever we can to make the process less difficult,” says Youse. “Some women just want to go home as quickly as possible. Others want to take a shower, get dressed and even put on makeup. Whatever it takes to make them feel better, that’s what we do.” They also have a 24-hour crisis hotline: 800-650-6522 or 334-6506522. To learn how you can help the House of Ruth, visit their website at www.houseofruthdothan.org or find them on Facebook.


Feeding

the Wiregrass

Providence Christian School distributed lunches recently

Ashford High School’s First Priority group who came out to make the boxes for Brown Bag packing

In 1990, the Wiregrass Food Bank began with a United Way grant and a distribution of 3,500 pounds of food. Since then, the nonprofit has distributed 67 million pounds of food which equals 52 million meals. Currently, the food bank provides more than 300,000 pounds of food monthly to organizations in the region. At its beginning, 25-30 agencies received food; now more than 200 churches, shelters, food pantries and other community organizations are part of the food bank’s network. In 2017, 2.6 million meals were provided to residents. The Wiregrass Food Bank solicits food and grocery products from area grocery stores and food processors. “We’re using food that would’ve been thrown away,” says David Hanks, executive director of the Wiregrass Food Bank. “Wasted food is not doing any good for anyone.” As the food bank receives products, expiration dates are checked and food is reprocessed so it can be given to agencies who distribute it to residents in their communities. The food bank doesn’t distribute food directly to residents. Using the network is a more efficient way, says Hanks. “We wouldn’t be able to keep up with processing the food and dealing with each person who needs it. It would create a bottleneck in the distribution center. That’s why our agency partners are so important. “They know what’s going on in their community and how to best serve residents. We just

couldn’t do it by ourselves.” People in Houston, Henry, Dale, Coffee, Geneva or Barber County can find a list of food bank partners at www.wiregrassfoodbank.com. You can also call 2-1-1 to find the nearest food distribution partner. If you’re a resident age 60 or older with a limited income, the Brown Bag Program can provide monthly food assistance. It’s a supplemental grocery program designed to help seniors whose main source of income is Social Security. The Brown Bag Program serves 1,620 residents each month and is driven entirely by volunteers. For people who want to help with the food bank program, you can drop off food at 382 Twitchell Road in Dothan. You can call 334-794-9775 to schedule a pickup. You can also participate in food drives and fundraisers for the Wiregrass Food Bank, mail a monetary donation to the food bank, or donate online through PayPal. “People may not realize we also are a community facility,” Hanks adds. The food bank provides storage for organizations who may have limited space. “The Boy Scouts are one example. During their annual popcorn sale, they need a secure place to store their popcorn. We also provide space for the Kiwanis Club and other groups during their fundraisers and events.” For more information about the Wiregrass Food Bank, visit their website www. wiregrassfoodbank.com or find them on Facebook: WiregrassFoodBank.

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k c a b g givin

Looking for a way to get involved, help others and your community? There are plenty of nonprofits in our area to help people from all walks of life. Not interested in any of these? There are plenty more to choose from!

Abuse Partnership Inc

334-699-2813 wiregrasspartnership.com The specific goal of the partnership is to create a sense of awareness and ownership of the drug and alcohol problem by the community and to involve as many citizens as possible to develop and implement solutions. They 12

Healthy Horizons

organize youth events such as by providing a coordinated Red Ribbon, Prom Promise, network to promote selfand skits and puppets shows for sufficiency. younger children. If you’d like to help, the Dothan Rescue Mission Partnership takes monetary 334-794-4637 donations. dothanrescuemission.com The Dothan Rescue Mission Coffee County Family is a haven of hope for the lost and lonely, who call the Services Center streets their home. They offer 334-393-8538 hot food, clean clothing and Coffee County Family temporary shelter. Services Center is located in Volunteer opportunities Enterprise. It is committed to include mostly donations of aiding families with needs and normal household products issues in an effort to promote and clothes. Please visit their family stability. They strive to support and strengthen families website for a list.


SAMC Foundation

334-673-4150 samcfoundation.org SAMC works to advance healthcare and wellness in the communities served by Southeast Alabama Medical Center and its affiliates through philanthropy. The group helps fund both present and future equipment, technology, facility expansion and program needs Individuals, businesses and groups in the community can get involved by volunteering for one of their fundraising or outreach events. Check their website for opportunities!

to 10 children at a time from ages 2 to 18. The Wiregrass Children’s Home could not be successful without the dedication of volunteers. From cooking a meal to cutting the grass to organizing gift items, they always need your help! Visit their website for a current list of volunteering opportunities.

Wiregrass Children’s Home

Wiregrass Hope Group

334-692-5100 wiregrasschildrenshome.org WCH is licensed to care for up

334-793-5433 wiregrasshope.com Wiregrass Hope Group is a faith

based organization that has been serving the community since 1983. The group provides compassionate care, encouragement and practical support for young women and families facing an unplanned pregnancy. The organization has expanded to include a character and relationship education program, individual marriage mentoring and counseling, and marriage and pre-marriage classes. Volunteer and donation info can be found on their webpage.

Providing Personal, Professional Care in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility

Complete Obstetrical Care High-Risk Obstetrics Ultrasound Incontinence Care Family Planning Services Gynecologic Surgery Infertility Treatment & Counseling

Ellen D. Phillips, MD, FACOG Thomas W.C. Robinson, MD, FACOG Guy M. Middleton, MD, FACOG John H. Gordon, DO, FACOG

1118 Ross Clark Circle, Suite 402 Dothan, AL s 334.673.3633 www.dothanobgyn.com

Mon-Thurs 8a-5p Closed Fri

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334-677-6270 n Alfred Saliba Family Services Center 334-836-0217 Clinic: 334-673-3940 n American Red Cross East AL Chapter 334-792-9852 n Barbour County RSVP • 334-687-6055 n Boy Scouts of America Alabama-Florida Council • 334-793-7882

n Coffee C. Family Services Center • 334-393-8538 n Dothan-Houston County Substance Abuse

Partnership • 334-699-2813 n East Geneva County Senior Citizens Center 334-886-3115 n Elba Public Library • 334-897-6921 n Enterprise Public Library • 334-347-2636 n Enterprise School Health Services • 334-347-9531 n Enterprise Y.M.C.A. • 334-347-4513 n Eufaula Daycare • 334-687-2510 n Exchange Center for Child Abuse Prevention • 334-671-1966

c. •334-793-2321 n n I s l r i Guid G eD og so fA e County Public L l a m D k r ib r a e O za

n 4-H Program, Barbour County • 334-775-3284 n 4-H Program, Coffee County • 334-894-5596 n Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind

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n Boys & Girls Club of Lake City • 334-616-7882 n Boys & Girls Club, The Wiregrass • 334-793-5650 n Boys and Girls Club of Southeast Alabama

334-445-0512 n Catholic Social Services • 334-793-3601 n Christ Child Circle • 334-684-3955 n Christian Mission Centers • 334-393-2607 or 334-393-4215 n Clayton Senior Center • 334-775-3494 14

Healthy Horizons

n Family Service Center Barbour

334-687-2896 n Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama, Inc. Karlyn Edmonds • 800-239-6636 n The House of Ruth, Inc. • 334-793-5214 Domestic Violence • 334-793-2232 Sexual Assault • 334-793-7784 24-Hour Crisis • 334-793-2232

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When you need help, or want to give assistance, here is a complete list of the Wiregrass area’s UW agencies.


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A little history & a lot of

Laura Murray wants it all. And is working hard to make that happen. Currently a stay-at-home mom, freelance designer and now coloring book author, Laura left the corporate marketing world after 15 years because she really wanted to get back to art. An avid coloring book collector, she now has close to 30 in her collection, BUT there was one thing missing. “I couldn’t find an Alabama coloring book, so I just made one I would like,” Laura said. This is when the real work began. Laura not only

wanted great pictures to color, but she wanted to be sure the history and information for each county were correct along with using what each Alabama county is famous for. It took Laura about nine months to draw all the images, she said. “I was on a mission. I had an eureka moment and I wanted to get it done.” The first county she drew was Wilcox County. “I was excited to do a Gee’s Bend quilt,” she said. Although she was already an avid traveller, Laura took the time to make sure she found everything our state had to offer. “I even toured some of the antebellum houses because I knew I had to put one in the book,” she said. Once the drawings were finished, she compiled a spreadsheet with the things she had drawn by county, then it took her another month to research and write the copy. Laura is currently touring the state and has even been contacted by history professors and history buffs. Find her coloring book on Amazon or at Books -A-Million.

Laura’s healthy habit “Getting rid of extra stress did more for my health and well-being than anything else I’ve ever done.”

By Gwen Bishop 16

Healthy Horizons


s t n eve ongoing

Foster Fest Dothan - (334) 793-3097 Wiregrass Museum of Art’s First Saturday Family Day Dothan - (334) 794-3871

january

Wiregrass Renaissance Faire Enterprise - (251) 213-5763

march

Southeast Alabama Highland Games Dothan - info@seahg.com

april

Hardee’s Pro Classic Dothan - (334) 793-0399

may

Children’s Festival in the Park Enterprise - (334) 348-2682 Dothan Area Botanical Gardens Tour (334) 793-3224 Memorial Day at Folklore Dothan - (334) 702-2337

Morris Slingluff Memorial Golf Tournament Dothan - (334) 794-6585 Slocomb Tomato Festival Slocomb - (334) 886-2334

july

Fireworks at the Fairgrounds Dothan - (334) 793-4323

august

Dothan Artifact Show Dothan - www.dothanshow.com South Alabama Pro Rodeo Classic Ozark - (334) 774-9448

september

Low Country Boil Dothan - (334) 794-3452

october

Claybank Jamboree Arts & Crafts Festival Ozark - (334) 774-9321

november

National Peanut Festival Dothan - (334) 793-4323

Landmark Park’s Annual Touch A Truck Dothan - (334) 794-3452 Headland’s Daylily Art & Garden Festival (334) 693-3303

june

Alabama State Games Dothan/Ozark - (800) 467-0422 www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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The City of Dothan has partnered with the National Fitness Campaign (NFC) to help residents live a more active lifestyle. The NFC’s mission is to provide free fitness opportunities for everyone in the United States. Dothan became the second city in the country to benefit from the NFC initiative to open 100 outdoor fitness courts in 2018. The outdoor fitness court is a bodyweight circuit training system with 30 pieces of equipment, shockresistant sports flooring and exercise stations that allow up to 28 people to use the court at the same time. “The court makes first class equipment available to people who can’t or don’t want to pay for a gym membership,” says Tyson Carter, athletic coordinator with the City of Dothan Leisure Services. “It works at any fitness level. Whether you’re a beginner who never exercises or the most fit CrossFitter, the moves can be modified to fit your abilities. As you work out, you can graduate from the basic routine to an expert workout.” The training system is based on seven basic movements: core, squat, push, lunge, pull, agility and bend. The equipment allows you to leverage your body weight for a simple workout that can be completed in seven minutes. The system was developed by experts in the field and is shown to burn more calories per minute than most other forms of exercise. You can find videos of beginner, intermediate and expert workouts at www.nationalfitnesscampaign. com. You can develop your own custom movements for a unique workout, or you can use the free Fitness Court App to get tips from personal trainers and find longer workouts. The app tracks your progress and allows you to compete in fitness challenges. Dothan’s outdoor fitness court is in the city’s largest park — Westgate Park. The nearby 3.5-mile trails for walking, running and biking made it the perfect location. “The National Fitness Campaign wants courses located near trails to give people the full workout experience. You can do strength and resistance training at the outdoor court and the trails provide a 18

Healthy Horizons

cardiovascular workout,” says Carter. Westgate Park includes an indoor heated pool, gym, and racquetball and volleyball courts in the recreation center. The park also has a sports complex for soccer, baseball and softball along with a playground. “It’s an amazing fitness court and it added a really nice piece to the park,” Carter adds. City leaders began working to bring the outdoor fitness court to Dothan after city manager Mike West received an email about the program. “He often passes on ideas to the city departments to get our opinions, to see if we think it’s interesting,” Carter says. “As a fitness enthusiast, I thought it was an amazing opportunity. We contacted the National Fitness Campaign office in San Francisco and asked how to start this journey.” The approval came with a $10,000 grant from the NFC. Dothan’s Leisure Services staff started contacting local businesses for donations. “We developed our contacts, made our pitch and explained how the court would benefit the overall quality of life in our community.” The sponsorships included $10,000 donations from Michelin, Barge Design Solutions, the Dothan Kiwanis Club and the Mike Schmidt family. The local convention and visitors bureau contributed $15,000. The city commission provided $25,000 and the site work needed for the court. “We are fortunate to have city officials and community leaders who place importance on personal fitness as well as recreational sports,” says Carter. Dothan’s outdoor fitness court opened March 24 with an opening day training camp. The National Fitness Campaign was founded in 1979 by Mitch Menaged with the goal of transforming public spaces into community fitness hubs. The program began with simple paracourses and evolved into the outdoor court which was designed by experts in engineering and military fitness training. Westgate Park is open daily from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m. To learn more about Dothan’s Leisure Services programs, visit www.dothan.org, click departments and choose leisure services.


Dothan’s

health

1st class workout

By Patricia Surrett, Editor

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Get outside! Need a little exercise inspiration? Spending time outdoors and moving your body is a great way to get in shape or stay in shape. Plus, the added

Gardening Although weeding is fairly tedious, all of the bending, stretching and heavy tools involved with gardening is nothing but healthy. Then there’s the added benefit of fresh food.

Jogging

Jogging, running, walking whichever you choose you will definitely feel better! Play music on your cell phone for an instant stress buster.

Casual Sports Badminton, volleyball, softball or any number of casual sports will not only improve your physical fitness, but is more fun than sweating it out at a gym.

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Healthy Horizons

benefits of fresh air and a bit of sun, make it even more appealing! Below are six ideas to get you started on the road to better health.

Hiking Hiking is a great low-impact exercise. Search online or ask around for trails and parks in your area. The more hills, the better. A technology-free workout is a great way to unwind. Yoga, or any other mat or stetching workout can be more enjoyable when done outside. Roll your mat up, put on those comfy clothes, and enjoy the fresh air. Better yet, find a scenic spot to do your stretching.

Yoga

Building Construction work is a great workout. Not looking to build anything anytime soon? Contact your local Habitat for Humanity and volunteer. It’s a win-win.


Many people struggle with what’s often known as the “monkey mind” — racing thoughts and feeling restless or confused. The monkey mind part of your brain becomes easily distracted, and it can be difficult to control when it insists on being heard. Finding stillness through meditation and yoga may be the solution when you need to quiet your inner critic and cultivate more calm and focus in your daily life. Lauren Lewey, an instructor at Firefly Community Yoga, says increased mental and emotional clarity is possible by reconnecting with your body and breath. “The mind is a stressful thought machine. We’re thinking about the past or worrying about the future, wondering if we’re making the right or wrong decisions, and worrying about what we should be doing, “It’s overwhelming. You can quiet that inner critical voice with yoga and meditation and live in a more relaxed state of being,” Lewey says. At Firefly, students are taught to focus on their breathing while doing yoga sequences. Instructors don’t use music during classes. “Our society is so addicted to entertainment, iPhones, social media and constant noise. Silence can be healing,” Lewey adds. A 2011 World Health

Organization report called noise pollution a “modern plague,” stating that “there is overwhelming evidence that exposure to environmental noise has adverse effects on the health of the population.” When you live in a relaxed presence and tune out some of society’s noise, you’ll learn to rely on your intuition which can make decisions easier and give you more self-confidence. “Whether you call it intuition, gut feelings, God or something else, with that connection, life becomes more peaceful and you trust the deeper knowing within yourself.” Rutgers University published a story in 2016 that found a combination of meditation and aerobic exercise reduced symptoms of depression by 40 percent. The study participants improved their ability to focus and were less susceptible to feeling overwhelmed and anxious. They were also less likely to ruminate about the past. Other benefits of meditation and yoga can include: • Improved flexibility and mobility • Weight loss • Stronger core muscles • Less back pain • Less pain from rheumatoid arthritis • Relief from asthma symptoms

Healing a monkey

mind

By Patricia Surrett, Editor

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• Improved heart health and lower blood pressure • Improved digestion • Better sleep • Better mood • Fewer migraines What can you expect at your first class? At Firefly, the instructors begin by teaching students to consciously connect with their breath while doing yoga postures. Lewey says the yoga moves can be modified to fit your abilities. “I’ve had classes where students ranged from teens to people in their 70s,” Lewey adds. “We have men and women in our classes.” Classes last an hour and 15 minutes. You should wear loose, comfortable clothing that will allow you to move freely. Bring a yoga mat, hand towel and water. Be patient as you learn the poses, alignment and flow of the class. “You’ll feel benefits after the first class. I’ve had students who say 22

Healthy Horizons

they’re sleeping better after two or three sessions. If you’re going to class three times a week, after a month you’ll see a shift in the way you’re interacting with life. You won’t be as reactive or nervous. It’s life changing.” Firefly Community Yoga is in the Enterprise Recreation Center. Classes are $5 per session. If you can’t afford the fee, the instructors will work with you on the cost. To

learn more about Firefly Community Yoga, visit www.ffyoga.org. You can also find them on Facebook: @ ffyoga. If you want to start with the basics of meditation, you can learn to relax, clear your mind and connect with your breath with free guided meditations. Headspace offers a free 10-day course; sessions last 10 minutes per day. It’s available in the App Store or Google Play.


exercise styles similar to

yoga Tai Chi

Tai Chi is a soft, gentle martial arts practice of Chinese origin that emphasizes balance, concentration, and fluid movements. It’s non-contact, so your focus will be on your movements.

1

Qigong

2

Qigong is a Chinese martial art that focuses on energy. Gentler and simpler than Tai Chi, anyone who can take deep breaths can do it.

Pilates

3

Pilates’ emphasis on linking the breath with movement serves to enhance the mind-body connection and reduce stress and tension. When practiced regularly, Pilates also increases flexibility, improves core strength, posture and other structural problems.

Dance

4

Dancing can be a wonderful way to express yourself and your feelings through bodily movements. Dance is so popular that your choices are pretty much endless, so you’ll have plenty of varieties to try until you find a class or teacher that works for you.

Martial Arts

5

There are plenty of more ‘combat’ focused martial arts that also require intense concentration and integration of the body and mind. These are beneficial for improving energy, self-esteem, and discipline, not to mention teaching you how to protect yourself!


eve’s At Eve’s Garden in Dothan, you’ll find a burger without beef and chickless salad on the menu. In Alabama, where we love our fried food and meaty dishes, a vegan café may seem out of place. Check out Yelp.com and you’ll find Eve’s Garden gets many five-star reviews. A post by Kate H. recommends the nachos and calls the café “a healthy oasis.” Vegan food is plant-based and free of animal products, such as meat, eggs and dairy. Food without meat or dairy is likely to have less saturated fat which may reduce the risk of chronic illnesses. Many vegan dishes have less calories, and studies have shown vegans have a lower body-mass index which means they are in a healthy weight range. Even if you’re not ready to go all in, eating more vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains and less animal-based products are good choices when you want a healthier lifestyle. Kerry Deal, who owns Eve’s Garden, encourages people to eat more fresh foods, and she works with customers to find substitutes for favorite foods. If you like French fries, sweet potato fries can be a better choice. Deal recently expanded the café to include a larger salad bar and more seating.


wellness

garden Customers can choose to dine in or take away, and daily lunch specials are available. The menu offers an array of dishes, including pizza, paninis, tunaless salad, nachos, tacos, zucchini pasta and ham chao sandwiches. Eve’s Garden is also home to a holistic clinic and health store. Deal provides services for adults and children which may alleviate conditions like asthma, ADHD, high blood pressure and allergies. The clinic even offers foot detox baths. You’ll find organic beauty products, supplements, non-GMO condiments and dry goods, house-made granola and more in the health store. The desire for a healthier lifestyle inspired Deal to open Eve’s Garden in 2013. Originally, the café had only raw food items which was later expanded to vegan dishes. Deal wants to help others with making healthy choices. Through Eve’s Garden, she makes it possible for her customers to find good foods with potential healing capabilities. You’ll find Eve’s Garden at 2323 West Main Street in Dothan, and it’s open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. For more information, look for Dothan Eve’s Garden on Facebook. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Tasty vegan recipes Healthier Granola 7 c. old-fashioned oats 1 1/2 c. chopped nuts and/or seeds 1 1/2 c. shredded coconut 3 T. pure vanilla 1 1/2 c. applesauce 1/4 c. honey Spices to taste Preheat oven to 275. In a large mixing bowl, combine dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix wet ingredients well, then add to dry mix. Using your hands, mix until the dry ingredients are well coated. Please note, you do NOT want mush or a wet mix. If

it seems too dry, add a little more applesauce and mix between each addition. Use 2 or 3 baking sheets (lipped are best) and evenly distribute mix without packing it down. If you bake at the same time, be sure to stagger the pans so heat will distribute better. Toss the mix in each pan once every 10 minutes. Two pans will take about 45 minutes, three maybe 40. The granola will still feel soft, but if the granola starts smelling overcooked, it is. Once completely cooled, store in sealable bags or large mason jars.

Black Bean Burgers 1/2 onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 baby carrots, shredded 1 can black beans, drained 1 T. cornstarch 1 tsp. garlic powder (optional) 1 tsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. seasoned salt Olive oil for frying Saute onions and garlic until soft, about 3-5 minutes. Set aside. In large bowl, combine beans and carrots and mash until almost smooth. Add sauteed veggies and stir. Combine dry ingredients in a small bowl, add to mash and mix with hands until everything seems well distributed. Form into patties, about 1/2” thick and the size of the bun or bread you will be using. Heat frying pan and 1-2 T. oil over medium heat (cast iron is great for this), put in burgers. Cook well on one side before flipping as the burgers fall apart easily. Use whatever toppings you like. 26

Healthy Horizons

Notes: Using small amounts of spices, no more than 1 T. for the spice you want to taste the most, such as cinnamon is sufficient. Peanut butter is a good replacement flavor for spices, but be sure to account for the change in “wet” ingredients. The same for dry “flavors.” Lower the amount of nuts or coconut and you can add chocolate chips, raisins or craisins. The recipe is very forgiving, so after you’ve made it once you’ll get a feel for changing out the ingredients to suit your own tastebuds.

Mushroom Burgers Portobello mushroom caps can be used for either the burger or the buns and you would prepare them the same for either use. They can be grilled or cooked in a frying pan. If grilling, coat both sides well in olive oil and rub in whatever spices you would like. I generally only use garlic powder. Using a brush to apply a light coating of oil as the mushroom cooks is recommended. For frying, gently rub in the spices, then fry in olive oil over medium heat. How long you cook will depend on your taste, from 5-8 minutes on each side.


Natural remedies

Getting your skin care and remedies back to a more natural state is much easier than you think. If you have already started using essential oils, the move to herbs is a fairly easy move to make. Dried herbs may be purchased (there is a good selection online), but many can be found in the wild or grown at home. The plantain I used was from my yard and I purchased the calendula. This basic salve can be used on minor cuts and scrapes and is gentle enough for children. It also makes a good basic hand softener. If you do use essential oils, you can add oils to this after you remove the salve from the heat.

Basic Skin Salve 1/4 c. dried plantain (Plantago) 1/4 c. dried calendula Approx. 2 c. high grade olive oil (I use California Olive Ranch) Beeswax There are a few ways to make the infused oil, which we’ll need to do first. The quick method is using the stove, but I recommend giving that a full day for the strongest infused oil. In a quart saucepan, fill with about 3/4” water. Bring to boil. While you’re waiting for the water, add the plantain and calendula to a pint jar and fill to within 1” of the rim. When water has started boiling, turn heat to low, and put jar in the middle of the pan. Using something small (I use disposable chopsticks), slowing

stir the oil blend a few times. Let oil set in water for an hour, stirring occasionally.. Remove jar, stir carefully and let cool, about 2 hours. Repeat process at least 2 more times. To drain the mixture, I use a pretty good size funnel and coffee filters. Place over whatever container you will store the oil blend in (be sure it has a good lid). To get the best of the infusion, also squeeze out the herbs. This infusion has to be stored in the refrigerator (oils turn rancid fairly quickly). This is a good base blend and you can use it for several different recipes. It’s usable until the oil starts smelling ruined. The salve: Warm approx. 1/2 c. infused oil in a small stainless steel pot. Keep heat low, at least no higher than medium. If you use medium, work fast. Continuing to heat the oil too high, too many times will change its efficacy. Add approximately 4 T. of beeswax beads, or you can break chunks of a bar. Stir continuously until wax is melted, and remove from heat immediately. Pour into a lidded container and let cool before you put the lid on. Depending on how “thick” you want the salve, the amount of wax can be increased or decreased.

Top, two different types of plantain, either will work fine. Below, the oil and herb mix will harden when kept in the fridge.

Notes: Never use aluminum or cast iron when working with herbs or essential oils. Use wood or stainless utensils. Always use dried herbs when making infused oils as the water content of fresh herbs may cause mold growth in the oil.

All recipes courtesy Gwen Bishop www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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ew!New!New! Send in your questions and we’ll find the answers! Shoot us your health and wellness questions on Facebook (@ healthyhorizonsmag), Twitter (HealthyHorizon6) or www.ReadHealthyHorizons.com and we’ll find an expert to answer your questions! I have mild back pain. What can I do to relieve it before I see my doctor? Lynn M.

Most acute back pain gets better with a few weeks of home treatment. Overthe-counter pain relievers and the use of heat or ice might be all you need. Bed rest isn’t recommended. Continue your activities as much as you can tolerate. Try light activity, such as walking and activities of daily living. Stop activity that increases pain, but don’t avoid activity out of fear of pain. If home treatments aren’t working after several weeks, your doctor might suggest stronger medications or other therapies. Depending on the type of back pain you have, you can try the following: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve), might relieve acute back pain. Take these 28

Healthy Horizons

medications as directed by your doctor, because overuse can cause serious side effects. mayoclinic.org

I have to stand long hours for work. How can I avoid back pain at the end of the day? Bethany S.

The following can help you to minimize your risks of low back injury when you are doing standing work: • Remember to move around. It will help to improve circulation and reduce muscle fatigue. • When you take breaks stretch. Gentle stretching during a break will help to ease muscle tension and improve circulation. • Watch your posture. 1. Stand in a stable posture with you feet on a firm surface. 2. Try to avoid twisting the lower back around to reach things and move your feet so that your whole posture changes instead.

3. Try to minimize bending movements. If you must bend for objects that are in front of you try to bend at the knees rather than the back. 4. Avoid overreaching. If you must reach up to a high level, get something firm to stand on, such as a stool of steps. 5. Avoid reaching over obstructions. If possible move the obstructing object or change your position before you reach for what you need. 6. Lean where you can. Leaning on a solid support helps to reduce fatigue when you’re standing. This might be a support that you can lean back against, a support that you can lean against sideways, or a support that you can lean forwards against or hold on to. • Keep your back strong and supple - try to exercise to strengthen your back muscles, and do activities, like Yoga, to maintain flexibility. (taken from spineuniverse.com)


Our digital issues are a great way to read the latest Healthy Horizons magazines on your phone, tablet or computer. Interactive links to websites, social media and more allow you to connect quickly with health and wellness resources in your community. Sign up for your FREE subscription at www.readhealthyhorizons. com, and we’ll notify you each month when the latest issue is available.

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family

By Patricia Surrett, Editor

Steve Hardwick

Angel of the Wiregrass 30

Healthy Horizons


It started with a simple plan to bake some pound cakes and raise $500 for a family struggling with the expenses of their child’s illness. In less than four years, Steve Hardwick has raised more than $140,000 to help children with life-threatening illnesses and their families in the Wiregrass region. Three years ago, Hardwick heard about Cody Hayes, a 17-year-old from Ashford who was diagnosed with leukemia. Hardwick realized how difficult it must be for Cody’s family to deal with his illness while trying to manage the cost of traveling to Children’s Hospital in Birmingham for treatment. “My plan to raise $500 by baking pound cakes turned into $9,500,” Hardwick says. Cakes for Cody led to more fundraisers which have helped 10 children. The Dothan businessman (who owns Hardwick Flooring) can’t take all the credit; three local ladies also help with the baking. “It’s a moving experience. You’re trying to lift up these children but often you find that actually they’re lifting you up. Cody was always trying to make others feel better even while he was fighting for his life.” And when Cody’s fight ended, Hardwick was deeply affected. “It was a life changer for me.” As Hardwick met more families who had lost children, he wanted to do more. “Children should be celebrated and remembered. People forget. They go on with their lives,” he adds. “We needed something to remind us, something that might

comfort grieving parents. Let them know we won’t forget.” So once again, he made a plan. Hardwick approached local officials about erecting an Angel of Hope in Dothan and began a fundraising campaign to make it possible. The Angel of Hope statue was inspired by the book “The Christmas Box” by Richard Paul Evans. The first monument was dedicated in 1994 in Salt Lake City, UT. More than 130 angels have been dedicated in the U.S. along with one in Japan. The statues are memorials for children. It usually takes two years to

complete an Angel of Hope project. “We did it in four months. Once we started, we were going through with it. We weren’t stopping for nothing. “The Angel of Hope is meant to give comfort to families who’ve lost children. But it’s also for anyone who has lost a loved one,” Hardwick says. “We wanted a location where people spend time. It’s a reminder that children should never be forgotten. We wanted to celebrate children no matter their age or how long it’s been since they passed.” The Wiregrass Angel of Hope

is in Westgate Park in Dothan. When the memorial was dedicated in 2016, more than 400 people attended the service. An annual candlelight vigil is held in December. “I’m very proud of the Angel of Hope.” Search online for Wiregrass Angel of Hope to learn more about the memorial. Donations are accepted to pay for maintenance costs of the monument. Hardwick’s fundraisers have also made it possible to place headstones on the graves of three children. “I never intended to do headstones but there was a need so it just happened.” There was another need that had bothered Hardwick for a long time. In 1937, an angry mob shot and lynched an 18-year-old in Henry County. Wesley Johnson was a young African American accused of a crime that he didn’t commit. His death is known as the last mob lynching in Alabama. Johnson was buried in an unmarked grave in Little Rocky Mount Free Will Baptist Church. “That always bothered me. He was someone’s child.” More than 80 years had passed so finding the location of the grave wasn’t easy. Hardwick found some of Johnson’s family and eventually found his grave. A headstone was erected, engraved with “the truth shall set you free” at the request of Johnson’s family. “He was a young boy who was killed unjustly. I just thought that it’s never too late to try and right a wrong.” www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Healthy Horizons


Safer teen drivinG Automobile crashes are the number one killer of teenagers and the number one cause of disabling injuries for teens. Sadly, many of these accidents are preventable. Leslie Brown is the coordinator of Alabama Safe Kids at Children’s of Alabama. She said parents play an important role in encouraging their children to be safe as a driver and a passenger. “Parents can start by talking to their child when in elementary school about being a safe passenger,” Brown said. “Things like modeling safe behavior, wearing a seatbelt every time and putting the cell phone down. They’re going to do what we do.” In Alabama, the Graduated Driver License Law is a mandatory restriction in place for inexperienced drivers. One of the requirements is that a new driver may not have more than one non-family passenger in the vehicle with them other than the parent, guardian or a supervising licensed driver at least 21 years of age. Brown said parents should become familiar with the Graduated Driver License Law and download a Teen Driving Agreement for their new driver to sign. This helps to establish important ground rules to keep the new driver safe. And Brown says, if the teen violates any of these rules there should be consequences. “Take away keys when they don’t follow rules,” she said. “You can also offer rewards when they do make good choices.” Brown said it’s important teens and adults do these three things: s Obey the law s Wear a seatbelt s Put down the cell phone Children’s of Alabama offers links to the Graduated Driver License Law, the Teen Driving Agreement and more resources for parents and teens. Go to www.childrensal. org/Safe-Teen-Driving-Toolkit to access.

Brown has teenagers of her own, so talking about safe driving isn’t just part of her job description, it’s personal. “I always say to my teenagers, ‘Are you a great friend or a good friend?’” she said. “I tell them, ‘Encourage your friends to wear their seatbelts. Ask, ‘Can I send that text for you?’ instead of allowing them to text and drive.” Getting a new driver’s license is an exciting time for a teenager. By helping them to know the law and apply safe driving practices, parents can play an important role in keeping their teens alive. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Protecting children from

sexual abuse

It’s estimated that 1 million children are abused every year. Many abuse victims suffer from sexual abuse. Deb Schneider is the executive director of the Children’s Hospital Intervention and Prevention Services (CHIPS) Center at Children’s of Alabama. She says even though it’s a difficult subject, it’s important parents teach children that their bodies are “private property.” “Parents should be having an ongoing conversation with their kids. This is not a one-time thing,” Schneider says. “It’s good to look for teachable moments, like when you see a private property sign, or during bath time, or when you see an Amber Alert.” Schneider says often when people try to entice children, they trick them with what she calls bait. “They use things like toys, candy or money,” she says. “They also will try to keep them from telling about the abuse. They may threaten to harm them or someone they love if they tell.” She advises parents to educate children to understand what “bait” may look like and how to seek help if they find themselves in an uncomfortable situation. Children should understand the “I Can Plan.”

Teach Children the “I Can Plan:” Try to say NO Try to Get Away Tell Someone It’s Not Your Fault If a child reports a suspected incident of sexual abuse, Schneider advises parents to stay calm, thank the child for telling, assure the child you will get help and contact the authorities, whether it’s the local police or Department of Human Resources. Schneider says hard as it may seem to stay calm, it’s very important to not 36

Healthy Horizons

frighten the child and not ask too many questions so the child will continue to share when asked by authorities. Authorities are trained to conduct interviews with children to help prosecute an abuser. The CHIPS Center has abuse prevention resources available.

For more info, call 205-638-2751 or visit www.childrensal.org/CHIPS


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believes feedback is crucial for continual improvement. We are asking for your feedback related to our articles and content. Please take time to complete the brief questionnaire below and you will receive a FREE Healthy Horizons T-shirt for participation. By completing the questionnaire you will also be entered in a quarterly drawing to win a $50 gift card. Where did you see our magazine? _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________

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Sounds

of the South Whether you attribute the distinctive Muscle Shoals sound to a group of creative, driven people who were passionate about music or you believe the folklore about a Native American girl who sang with the Tennessee River as it flowed through the region, the legendary studios in the Shoals became ground zero for some of the biggest hits ever recorded. Aretha Franklin recorded her unforgettable “I Never Loved a Man (the Way I Loved You)” there in 1967. And she was soon followed by artists such as The Rolling Stones, Rod Stewart, Cher, Bob Seger, Willie Nelson and Percy Sledge. FAME Studios and Muscle Shoals Sound Studios worked magic in the ‘60s and ‘70s — the Stones’ Keith Richards called it ‘Rock and Roll Heaven’ but by the 1980s, the studio at 3614 Jackson Highway was no longer in use and the building was deteriorating. The magic never really left the Shoals and the area once again gained worldwide attention when the Muscle Shoals documentary was released in 2013. Soon after, Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine created a charitable division of Beat Electronics. Their first project was the restoration of Muscle Shoals Sound Studios to the authentic state of the its heyday. “The documentary was the catalyst that reignited the spark that made this area the hit recording capital of the world,” says

Judy Hood. “The documentary rocked our world in the best possible way.” Judy grew up in Sheffield and has been a marketing and communications leader for more than four decades, working with the TimesDaily newspaper, Alabama Music Hall of Fame, Coffee Health Group and International Paper before creating her own consulting company. Her personal ties to local music history run deeper than her professional relationships in the region. Her husband is Swamper bassist David Hood and her stepson is Patterson Hood, co-founder of the band Drive-By Truckers. When the award-winning documentary brought a renewed interest to Muscle Shoals, the Florence-Lauderdale Tourism Center began receiving requests for tours of local studios and the Alabama Music Hall of Fame. The tourism center staff turned to Judy for help and the Swampette Tours were born. “Since I’m married to a Swamper, I have always jokingly called myself a ‘Swampette.’ That’s why we called them the Swampette Tours,” Judy says. The interactive tours are about sharing the magic of the music. You’ll get an insider’s look and behind-the-scenes perspective of the iconic studios where singers and musicians like James Brown, Paul Simon, Jimmy Buffett, Duane Allman

By Patricia Surrett, Editor s Photos courtesy Judy Hood

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Healthy Horizons


“There’s just something about that place. Something to this day no one can explain.” Donna Jean Godchaux, member of the Grateful Dead, 1972-79, and Florence native

and Mavis Staples worked. The tour begins at the FlorenceLauderdale Tourism Center with the Muscle Shoals movie trailer. Then, you’ll travel by trolley bus to the FAME recording studio, the original Muscle Shoals Sound Studio at 3614 Jackson Highway and the Alabama Music Hall of Fame. Thousands of people from across the U.S. and around the world have taken the tour. “It’s always interesting to see the reactions from people when they

step into Studio A at FAME or when they walk through the door at 3614 Jackson Highway. Sometimes they get a bit emotional. It’s not unusual for grown men to shed tears when they enter these sacred spaces,” Judy says. “The music that was recorded here was the soundtrack of so many lives.” The tours are small (less than 40 people per group) which makes the experience more intimate. While the tours have been given only on a few dates per year in the past, that

may soon change. Judy says more Swampettes have been recruited and she plans training sessions so tours can happen more often. Muscle Shoals is a 5-hour drive from Dothan so plan for a weekend getaway. To learn more about the Swampette Tours or to find lodging recommendations, go to www.visitflorenceal.com. The critically acclaimed documentary about Muscle Shoals is available through online streaming services. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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s e c r u reso ADULT DAY CARE Wiregrass Adult Care 334-792-0022 Dothan 334-897-3151 Elba 334-393-7919 Enterprise ADULT EDUCATION Enterprise State Community College 334-347-2623

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Pilcher’s Ambulance Service 334-794-4444 40

Wesley Place 877-677-5208

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SE Alabama Medical Center 334-793-8143

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DIALYSIS Davita 334-685-3255 DCI Dialysis Clinic 334-793-3519 Fresenius Kidney Care & Dialysis 334-340-4055 Dothan 334-393-0024 Enterprise EYE CARE Dothan Optometric Clinic 334-794-8797 Eye Care Associates 334-794-1175 Family Eye Center 334-309-8080 Enterprise 334-245-6544 Luverne 334-440-7534 Ozark 334-697-3100 Troy

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Medical Center Enterprise 334-347-0584

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Legacy Therapy & Wellness 334-699-2348 Physical Therapy Specialists of Dothan 334-673-2422 PODIATRY Alabama South Family Podiatry 334-678-7036 The Foot Specialist 334-671-1441 PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS Dothan Medical Associates 334-794-1148 Hillside Family Practice 334-475-2067

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REHABILITATION CENTERS

PHARMACIES Bryan Pharmacy 334-347-5111 Bryars-Warren Drug Co. 334-347-2506 Dalton Pharmacy 334-585-0246 Abbeville 334-697-4920 Troy Scott-Cook Pharmacy 334-712-2000 PHYSICAL THERAPY Enterprise Therapy Center 334-393-7500 Health Actions Physical Therapy 334-305-0222 42

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SENIOR CENTERS Southern Alabama Regional Council on Aging334-793-6843 TRANSPORTATION Wiregrass Transit Authority 334-794-4093 URGENT CARE CLINICS AllSouth Urgent Care 334-340-2600 American Family Care 334-564-8255 Dothan 334-650-6078 Enterprise First Med 334-793-9595 Ivy Creek Urgent Care 334-347-2027 UROLOGY Urological Associates 334-794-4159 Wiregrass Urology 334-347-0561

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Where is MY business?

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Get listed here!

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BITEWINGS BLOOD BRACES CAVITY DECAY DENTAL HYGENIST DENTIST ENAMEL

FILLING FLOSS GLOVES GUMS INSTRUMENTS LOOSE TOOTH MASK MIRROR NAPKIN

SMILE TEETH THIRTY TWO TOOTHACHE TOOTHBRUSH TOOTHPASTE WATER XRAY

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Healthy Horizons features premier health and wellness resources in the Wiregrass region to help you live a well-balanced lifestyle.

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Healthy Horizons features premier health and wellness resources in the Wiregrass region to help you live a well-balanced lifestyle.

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