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Healthy Horizons

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Welcome to Team Healthy Horizons! Our Montgomery 2018 edition is filled with information about premier medical care providers and wellness resources in your community along with articles to help you enjoy a healthy lifestyle. In 2016, Alabama and Arkansas tied for the third highest obesity rates in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the River Region, the rates are even higher — 35.7 percent in Montgomery and Macon counties. We talked with Michael Briddell, the City of Montgomery’s health and wellness czar, about local initiatives to encourage residents to adopt healthier habits and their progress towards creating a better quality of life in the region. The Wellness Coalition and Baptist Health Center offered advice for creating your own plan to feel your best and reduce risks for chronic medical conditions. For more than 15 years, our goal at Healthy Horizons has been to provide a vital resource for your wellness and healthcare needs, and we recognize our duty to

consciously maintain relevant content to better serve you. With our passion for God, community and family, this publication is a natural extension of our core beliefs and values. Thank you for choosing Healthy Horizons. Mark and Kimberly Helms

Publisher Mark Helms 256.235.1955 mhelms@cableone.net

Publisher/Events Coordinator Kimberly Helms, D.H.Ed., MSN, RN 256.310.6174 khelms@jsu.edu

Printed by Publications Press 334.244.0436

Editor

Advertising sales or to request additional copies: Phone: 256.235.1955 Fax: 256.235.1935

Patricia Surrett 256.225.6454 healthyhorizons@cableone.net

Office Coordinator

Healthy Horizons PO Box 81, Choccolocco, AL 36254

DeAnn Hightower 256.235.1955 haleydee@cableone.net

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

Graphics Gwen Bishop 256.307.8155 gwenbishop1@gmail.com

Contributors Carl Schmidt 2

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Copyright 2018 by Healthy Horizons Magazine. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reprinted and reproduced, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Healthy Horizons is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, physician offices, wellness centers, assisted living centers, hospitals and rehab centers. Please call for a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.


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Baptist Health Care Foundation

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Giving Back

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Events

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Latest

supplement information

Diagnostic Imaging

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The Jackson Clinic

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Hope here at home

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The road to wellness

! a b m u Z 24

Diabetes at a glance

The Wellness Coalition explains the symptoms of the disease and unveils their new Change Your Lifestyle Change Your Life program for people diagnosed as prediabetic.

Beyond October: Breast health

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Ask the experts

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Safer Teen Driving

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The Family

Birth Center at Jackson

s e c 8 r u 3 o sf e r un & ga m es 41


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Shaping up Montgomery Living a healthy lifestyle is getting easier in the River Region.

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Michael Briddell: Practicing what he preaches

Montgomery’s health czar shares his personal experiences with diet and exercise.

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All about cycling

Montgomery Bicycle Club promotes safe cycling through education, group rides and more.

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Shaping up

community In 2010, the Montgomery metro area gained the unfortunate distinction of being one of the most obese cities in the United States. According to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, the city of Montgomery had a 34.6 percent obesity rate — tying Stockton, CA, for the top spot in the ranking. The annual obesity-related costs in the Montgomery metro area were estimated to be almost $182 million; that’s roughly twice the cost in the least obese cities. Montgomery metro residents ranked 171st for healthy behaviors, ranked 156th for physical health and were worse than the national average when it came to diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, percent of people who have money for enough food,

percent of people who have suffered heart attacks and percent of people who have health insurance. “Montgomery got a wakeup call with that survey,” says Michael Briddell. “I remember when the news broke on a Tuesday that we were worse than the national average. I spoke with Mayor Todd Strange about the need to tell people about resources to help them get healthy. “We started talking to partners like the YMCA and the school system and the mayor decided that the city needed someone dedicated to the issue, someone to be a health czar. I was stunned when I was chosen.” Briddell is the Director of Public Information and External Affairs for the City

of Montgomery. Since 2010, he has also served as the city’s health and wellness czar. “It might be the most important thing I’ve done as a city employee.” After the Gallup data was released, a news conference was held to highlight the issues and how it affected the city and its residents and the need to make changes that would result in a healthier population. “The mayor asked the community for volunteers who would be part of this effort. The response was great,” Briddell says. “People recognized this as a crisis. The Alabama Department of Public Health was amazed that the issue was finally on the radar screen. “Now we had to do something to fix it. It was like trying to take a sip from

Runners start the Montgomery Corporate Challenge 5K run/walk By Patricia Surrett, Editor 6

Healthy Horizons


Montgomery firehose.” The River Region Obesity Task Force was formed to raise awareness of healthy habits and the consequences of unhealthy behaviors. According to the RROTF website (www. riverregionobesitytaskforce. org), membership was open to any group or individual with a desire to address the obesity issue. The first meeting was attended by hospital executives, school officials, dietitians, fitness coaches, nutrition experts, municipal, county and state officials, university and college representatives and even salespeople from weight loss product lines. The Central Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission was tasked with organizing the initiative and identifying funding. “I’m proud the metro

area responded this way. It’s tremendous.” Briddell uses The Wellness Coalition and E.A.T. South as examples of moving Montgomery residents towards healthier lifestyles. The Wellness Coalition provides an array of services in the River Region from teaching people to self-manage chronic health conditions to offering community health worker training to encouraging more healthy stores and fitness opportunities throughout the area. You can find out more about the organization at www. thewellnesscoalition.org. E.A.T. South website (www. eatsouth.org) is an urban teaching farm that engages the local community in learning how to grow and eat healthy food. They offer workshops on an array of topics including caring for chickens, managing

pests and weeds, and cooking healthy recipes. E.A.T. South markets its produce to area restaurants and families to encourage the use of fresh organic foods. “The urban farm and school gardens are important in helping us address the dangers of childhood obesity,” Briddell says. “If we can reach children through these programs, I hope they will learn healthy habits and take that knowledge home.” Briddell says the obesity rate in Montgomery has dropped to 27.1 percent. “Of course, not everyone is at their ideal weight but we’re closer. It’s important to remember that even a 5-7 percent weight loss can make a difference to your health,” he adds. “There’s still work to be done.”

Southlawn Elementary students participate in National Walk at School Day

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When Michael Briddell was named the health and wellness czar for the city of Montgomery, he was shocked. “I had no personal or professional training in medical care.” Instead, Briddell knew how to communicate. Before serving as the director of public information and external affairs for the city of Montgomery, the Philadelphia, PA, native had spent 20 years working in broadcast journalism, including five years with Montgomery’s WSFA TV-12. He also understood the importance of taking key steps to manage one’s health. Briddell has genetic high cholesterol which can slowly clog the arteries and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. “My mom reminded me that it’s better to avoid a heart attack rather than recover from one. I felt maybe God was trying to tell me that it was time to take the doctor’s warning seriously,” Briddell says. “The diagnosis was a wakeup call.” It was time to take control of his diet and exercise habits. “I’m moving towards being a vegan, no animal products in my diet,” he says. Research suggests removing meat, eggs and other animal products from your diet can reduce the risk of chronic health conditions along with cancer and other diseases. “Sometimes I fall off the wagon, then I get back to where I need to be to maintain my health. It’s a choice,” he adds. “Am I going to have a salad or eat the pizza?” A runner since age 13, 10

Healthy Horizons

Briddell now participates in the Masters Track and Field competitions. “It keeps me running regularly and vigorously. I’m competitive but I’m not so young anymore,” he adds. “With the Masters, I can compete but I don’t have to do it against someone in their 20s. “With healthier food and exercise, I’ve changed my medical diagnosis. I’m now a modest to no risk for a stroke or heart attack. That’s without prescription medications.” How can you get started creating your own healthy habits? First, get a checkup by your healthcare provider to identify any risks so you can exercise and diet safely. Then, do some research. Find something fun to do. If it’s too hard or not fun, it won’t become part of your lifestyle. “If you love basketball, that’s a great way to get moving. Me? I’m not good at it at all so I’m not doing it,” he laughs. “Track and field is fun for me so I’m willing to dive in.” And in Montgomery, the options are growing. “Bike lanes were added as roads were repaved or expanded. There are more than 80 parks in Montgomery so there are nice scenic places to go for a walk. Thirty minutes a day can make a difference in your health.” To find more fitness opportunities for adults and children, check out the YMCA of Greater Montgomery (www.ymcamontgomery. org) and Montgomery Parks and Recreation (www. funinmontgomery.com).

Michael Briddell:

Practicing what he

preaches


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Giving back MACOA: Helping Hands, Open Hearts The mission of the Montgomery Area Council on Aging (MACOA) is to keep senior citizens healthy, happy, independent, and safe in their own homes. Our flagship program is Meals on Wheels, which delivers hot nutritious noon meals directly to the doorsteps of 404 homebound seniors each weekday. In addition, we serve seniors through our Archibald Center and MACOA East Senior

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Healthy Horizons

Activity Centers where we offer activities to meet, learn, travel, and fellowship with peers and the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) that connects volunteers with stations of service in Autauga, Coosa, Elmore, Montgomery, and Tallapoosa Counties. We welcome the community to join us with helping hands and open hearts to #LetsDoLunch by: 1) Delivering Meals on Wheels 2) Volunteering at fundraisers

for Culinary Caper, Swinging Fore Seniors, or International Tasting 3) Making a generous donation to feed the need 4) Serving in our kitchen to help package meals 5) Baking birthday cakes to celebrate birthdays of our clients 6) Donating pet food for the furry friends program Visit www.macoa.org, call (334) 263-0532, or connect with us on Facebook to learn more!


The American Cancer Society, Montgomery Metro Relay For Life event, is held each May. To join our community fight against cancer, and learn more about how you

can help, please visit our website at www.relayforlife.org/montgomeryal. For any questions, email kimberly.myers@cancer.org.

ma ok Festival at Old Alaba Fun at the Alabama Bo at nate, contact them Town! To volunteer or do gmail.com, or find them alabamabookfestival@ abookfestival.com. online at www.alabam

What is your passion? What part of Montgomery-area life would you like to see improved? Thousands of your neighbors donate or volunteer to different organizations

around the area to help improve the lives of others. These are a just a few groups in the area looking for help. Reach out and get involved!

to nourish the hungry The Montgomery Area Food Bank works nity, advancing by educating and mobilizing the commu ing food and other Common Ground works in self-sufficiency and gathering then distribut the Washington Park g opportunities, community to help revitalize necessities. For volunteering and donatin the community and reafoodbank. transform the entire city. Fo contact them at albloom@montgomerya r more information on how you org. For more details, find them online at www. can help, email them at co mmonground@cgmlife.or g or find them online at www.c montgomeryareafoodbank.org. gm.life.

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events April

AISA State Tennis Tournament Lagoon Park (334) 625-2300

February

Jewish Food Festival & Treasure Market 2246 Narrow Lane Road (334) 262-3314 DBA Mardi Gras Block Party Riverfront Park (334) 850-1101

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Healthy Horizons

March

MACOA’s Culinary Caper Alabama Activity Center (334) 263-0532 Delta Sigma Theta Community Health Fair Cramton Bowl machealthfair@ montgomeryalumnae.org

Centennial Hill Health Fair and 5K Run/Walk Maggie Street Baptist Church Campus (334) 625-4636

May

Family Art Affair and Jazz Jams Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (334) 240-4333


August

Summer Flower Show Jasmine Hill Gardens and Outdoor Museum (334) 567-6463 Buckmasters Expo Montgomery Convention Center (800) 240-3337

June

MACOA’s Swinging Fore Seniors Golf Classic Robert Trent Jones, Prattville (334) 263-0532

July

Harriott II 4th of July Fireworks Cruise (334) 625-2100

September

Alabama Antique Trail Sale 256-797-5640 Hank’s Birthday Bash Hank Williams Museum (334) 262-3600

November

MACOA’s International Tasting Southern Homes & Gardens (334) 263-0532

December

Christmas Lights Festival The Montgomery Zoo machealthfair@ montgomeryalumnae.org

October

Alabama Cotton Festival Downtown Eclectic (334) 541-3581

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wellness

The

R

oa

lifestyle changes Obesity increases the risk of chronic health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis. Diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes can reduce your risk of chronic conditions and may alleviate the symptoms if you’ve already been diagnosed with one or more. “Your health is a work in progress,” says Pamela Green. “Planning is key to your success. Set your

diet

Combined with physical activity, your diet can help you to reach and maintain a healthy weight. It’s also essential for managing chronic health conditions. Create Your Plate is a simple method for losing weight. For example, people with diabetes should fill 50 percent of their dinner plate with non-starchy vegetables such as tomatoes, cabbage and carrots, 25 percent with meat, eggs, beans or other sources of proteins, and 25 percent with grains and starchy foods such as pasta, sweet potatoes and green peas. Visit www.choosemyplate.gov for tips about adjusting the plate method for your personal needs and eating healthy foods on a budget. Keep the healthy food front and center in your refrigerator and cabinets, Green says. If it’s easily available, you’re more likely to eat it. Keep the chips and candy out of sight or don’t buy them at all, she adds. Green says another important step is evaluating what you’re drinking. She recommends water for her clients. “Are you drinking your calories? Many people don’t think about soft drinks, energy drinks and even juice as being high in calories and sugar.”

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Healthy Horizons

goals. Take small steps. When those steps have become habits, set your next goal and move on.” While these tips from Green, manager of the Center for Diabetes at the Baptist Health Center for Well Being, and Molly Stone and Ghandi Daniels of The Wellness Coalition may help manage diabetes, they’re helpful for anyone whose goal is a healthier lifestyle.

exercise Thirty minutes of exercise a day is a general goal to get the benefits of exercise. If you haven’t been physically active, anything to get moving is the best place to start. “Everyone can do something even if you can only walk around your couch for five minutes at a time,” says Green. “Trade your TV time for exercise. Don’t sit for more than 30 minutes at a time and try walking in place during commercials. Other ideas include: s Housework s Family walks s Yardwork s Stand up when talking on the telephone “Make an appointment with yourself for exercise. Unless you have a specific plan, it’s not going to happen,” Green adds. “Just get started and build on that to increase your daily physical activity.”


d to wellness sleep Montgomery Corporate Challenge bicycle race start

Lack of quality sleep may increase your risk for obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and other medical conditions. According to the National Sleep Foundation, the amount of sleep a person needs varies and that some people need more than others. The average adult between 18-64 years old needs 7-9 hours per night. People over age 64 may require slightly less — 7-8 hours per night. To learn more about healthy sleep habits, visit www.sleepeducation.org.

case management Consulting your doctor should be part of your diet and exercise plan, especially if you have a chronic health condition or you’re experiencing symptoms suggestive of disease. Symptoms may include pain, dizziness, shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat and swelling. “People may get overwhelmed by healthcare. It can be confusing and even scary,” Stone says. “We want to help people understand the best way to take care of themselves.” The Wellness Coalition offers free case management

services for adults who have little or no health insurance and have one or more of these conditions: s Asthma s Diabetes s Heart Disease s Hypertension s Obesity s Mental Illness s Another Chronic Health Condition s Often use the Emergency Room for everyday care To learn more, visit www.thewellnesscoalition.org. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Diabetes at Approximately 25,000 residents have diabetes in Montgomery which is higher than the national average. In the surrounding rural counties, the rate is even higher. Across the United States, 30.3 million people are living with diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet and medication to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet or legs. “Some people may not know the signs of diabetes so they could be diabetic for a while without treatment. Then something happens, like passing out, which leads to a trip to an emergency room,” says Molly Stone, executive director of The Wellness Coalition. “The doctor goes over their symptoms and that’s when they find out they have diabetes or they’re at risk. Our goal is to get people diagnosed earlier.”

Military volunteers help construct a walking/jogging trail at Montgomery’s Lagoon Park. 18

Healthy Horizons

Ghandi Daniels, wellness programs coordinator at The Wellness Coalition, says symptoms to watch for include: s Frequent urination s Extreme thirst s Sores that don’t heal s Drowsiness s Increased appetite s Persistent yeast infections s Blurred vision s Weight loss s Numbness or tingling in hands or feet If you’re experiencing the symptoms of diabetes or if you have family members who have the disease, the first step is to talk with your doctor. The Wellness Coalition offers an array of services to help you connect with healthcare providers, obtain affordable prescription medications, and learn to manage chronic health conditions, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma. Visit www.thewellnesscoalition.org for more information.


a glance Prediabetes is a condition that often leads to type 2 diabetes within three years, if left untreated. Losing weight, increasing physical activity and other lifestyle changes may help you avoid type 2 diabetes. “People who have been told they’re ‘borderline’ may not realize that’s a real diagnosis,” says Molly Stone, executive director of The Wellness Coalition. With the Change Your Lifestyle Change Your Life program, The Wellness Coalition is raising awareness and providing education and tools for people who have prediabetes and those who have a family history of diabetes. The initiative includes a lifestyle coach, group support, weekly meetings and other free resources. Visit www.thewellnesscoalition.org/cyl2 to take a simple assessment to determine your risk for prediabetes. CYL2 is conducted in partnership with the Black Women’s Health Imperative through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Call (334) 293-6502 to learn more.

What are the different types of diabetes? Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. The disease usually appears during childhood or adolescence; it can also develop in adults. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. The disease is more common in adults but as childhood obesity rates rise it increasingly affects children. Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy. Blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes. - www.mayoclinic.org

Schools receive ceremonial checks for taking part in National Walk to School Day www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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LATEST

SUPPLEMENT INFO Dietary Supplement Usage Increases The latest results from an annual survey on dietary supplements reveals an alltime high for supplement usage among U.S. adults, with 76 percent reporting they consume dietary supplements. The survey, 2017 CRN Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements, found that nearly nine in 10 U.S. adults have confidence in the safety, quality and effectiveness of dietary supplements overall. Additionally, 76 percent of U.S. adults perceive the dietary supplement industry as trustworthy. In terms of the types of supplements being taken, the survey found that vitamins/minerals are the most commonly consumed supplement category, with

75 percent of U.S. adults saying they have taken these in the past 12 months. The second most popular category is specialty supplements, followed by herbals/ botanicals, sports nutrition supplements and weight management supplements. Overall health/wellness benefits are the main reasons cited by supplement users for taking dietary supplements. Three in 10 consume supplements to fill nutrient gaps in their diet and similar proportions use them for energy. Of those who do not take dietary supplements, nearly half say they might consider taking supplements in the future if a doctor recommended it to them. For more information, visit www.crnusa.org.

Are you taking too much Vitamin D and too little Vitamin K2 MK7? Vitamin D is having its day in the sun. In recent years, research has associated low blood levels of the vitamin with higher risks of everything from heart disease, diabetes, and cancer to mood disorders and dementia. The findings have not gone unnoticed. Vitamin D supplements and screening tests have surged in popularity. “Vitamin D testing is one of the top Medicare lab tests performed in the United States in recent years,” says Dr. JoAnn E. Manson, the Michael and Lee Bell Professor of Women’s Health at Harvard Medical School. “This is really surprising for a test that is recommended for only a small subset of the population.” Unfortunately, this vitamin D trend isn’t all blue skies. Some people are overdoing it with supplements. Researchers looking at national survey data gathered between 1999 and 2014 found a 2.8 percent uptick in the number of people taking potentially unsafe amounts of vitamin D — that is, more than 4,000 international units (IU) per day, according to a research letter published in the June 20 issue of The

Lack of Vitamin K2 can cause health Lots of people don’t like vegetables. They’ll push them around their plates in an attempt to disguise the fact that barely a bite has been eaten. But leafy green vegetables are a great source of vitamin K, which is essential for your children’s health. In fact, new research suggests that a lack of vitamin K might seriously affect adolescent heart health. 20

Healthy Horizons

The study, which took place at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, found that teens who do not eat an adequate amount of vitamin K foods such as leafy green vegetables are more likely to have an enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart. Each of the subjects wore an activity monitor for seven days to

establish their exercise patterns, and they were asked to keep track of all of the foods consumed during much of this time period. In addition, echocardiography testing was performed, which provided a detailed image of the left ventricle of the heart. The participants who ate the fewest foods rich in vitamin K were


Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). And during the same time period there was nearly an 18 percent increase in the number of people taking 1,000 IU or more of vitamin D daily, which is also beyond the dose of 600 to 800 IU recommended for most people. While there is strong support for vitamin D’s role in bone health, the evidence that it prevents other health conditions is not yet conclusive, says Dr. Manson. Your vitamin D levels reflect many factors. For example: Where you live. If you live in the northern states, you are at higher risk for a vitamin D deficiency because your skin may not be able to produce any vitamin D from sun exposure during the winter months. Your age. Your skin’s ability to produce vitamin D drops with age. If you’re over age 65, you generate only one-fourth as much vitamin D as you did in your 20s. Your skin color. People with darker skin typically have lower levels of vitamin D than lighter-skinned individuals. African Americans have, on average, about half as much vitamin D in their blood compared with white Americans. Your weight. If you have a body mass index above 30, you may have low blood levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D is stored in fat, so in people with obesity, less of the vitamin circulates in the blood.

The foods you eat. Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D. The U.S. government started a vitamin D milk fortification program in the 1930s to combat rickets, a boneweakening disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, which was a major public health problem at the time. Certain health conditions.  People with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, or cystic fibrosis, may have trouble absorbing vitamin D, which can lead to deficiencies. Although the research is still hazy, some women will benefit from taking vitamin D supplements, along with sufficient calcium intake, to promote their bone health. But they don’t require large amounts of vitamin D to get the benefit. “More is not necessarily better. In fact, more can be worse,” says Dr. Manson. In addition, taking a supplement that contains too much vitamin D can be toxic in rare cases. It can lead to hypercalcemia, a condition in which too much calcium builds up in the blood, potentially forming deposits in the arteries or soft tissues. It may also predispose women to painful kidney stones. If you’re taking vitamin D supplements, the take-home message is moderation. Taking too much can limit the benefits of the sunshine

risks in children shown to have three times the risk of a left ventricle enlargement in the heart than their counterparts who consumed more of these foods, including collard greens, spinach, kale, broccoli and blueberries. The teens, in general, were nowhere near reaching sufficient vitamin K intake from their diets, with only 25 percent of them obtaining adequate levels of this vitamin.

vitamin. You probably don’t need more than 600 to 800 IU per day, which is adequate for most people. Some people may need a higher dose, however, including those with a bone health disorder and those with a condition that interferes with the absorption of vitamin D or calcium, says Dr. Manson. Choose food over pills. If possible, it’s better to get your vitamin D from food sources rather than supplements Many people take Vitamin D prescriptions or supplements and have little to no improvements in their Vitamin D levels. This could be due to the VDR gene, which requires more K-2 or other genes such as those that influence methylation. Commonly prescribed cholesterol drugs will interfere with the Vitamin D process too. Consider all the genetic and nutrient testing The Herb Shop Wellness offers and to learn more about natural health and wellness listen to “Winning Wellness” on www. newstalk931.com and find archived shows about Vitamin D and K-2 at www.herbshopal.com.

By Carl Schmidt, ND

The finding that teens aren’t getting an adequate amount of vitamin K in their diets is not good news, considering it is supposed to be a relatively rare deficiency, but a serious one that can lead to bone weakness as well as heart problems. Since there are many nutritious vitamin K-rich foods, it seems like a no-brainer to start incorporating more

of them into our daily menus. If you don’t love the leafy greens mentioned earlier, try edamame, okra, pine nuts, and grapes to up your daily quota. Since vitamin K is fat-soluble, it is more readily absorbed by the body when consumed with healthy fats. The safest and final metabolized form of vitamin K for all ages is K-2 as MK-7. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Find your ride! By raising awareness of cycling and providing education for new cyclists, the Montgomery Bicycle Club is creating new opportunities for safe cycling in the River Region. The nonprofit offers an array of services from sponsoring a challenging safety class to organizing recreational and competitive rides. Bike club president Robert Traphan says the place to start for new cyclists is the organization’s website, www.mgmbikeclub. org. Their free Smart Cycling Videos are designed to help you understand how to ride safely and comfortably and to know your rights as a cyclist. Lane changes, traffic laws and basic bike checks are just a few of the topics. For hands-on learning, the Montgomery Bike Club sponsors the Smart Cycling Safety Course which is ideal for people who want to improve their bike handling skills and become more adept at riding in traffic. The course is comprised of drills and class discussion covering: s Safety s Basic mechanical techniques s Traffic situations s Emergency procedures s Tire-changing techniques 22

Healthy Horizons

s Hazard avoidance The course is provided by the League of American Bicyclists and taught by certified instructors. “It’s a great way to develop your skills and confidence,” Traphan says. If you’re a new cyclist, the club’s social rides on Sunday afternoons are a good way to get pointers from more experienced riders, adds Traphan. The social rides are family friendly and cater to slower cyclists. Relaxed-pace rides, called My Happy Place, are also available Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Century rides, Bike to Work Day and other activities are organized to meet the diverse

interests of club members, whether you’re cycling for fun, searching for bike-friendly commuting ideas, or looking for competitive challenges. Fundraising rides benefit the group’s mission of cycling education and safety. The club’s calendar is available on their website. Traphan recommends the Montgomery Bicycle Club’s Facebook Group as another resource. The group has more than 1,000 members with a broad range of expertise. You can post questions, offer suggestions and participate in discussions. You’ll also find information about the bike club’s monthly meetings. “We serve the River Region as a whole. Approximately one-half of our members are people from

By Patricia Surrett, Editor

Benefits of

The benefits of cycling include: s increased cardiovascular fitness s increased muscle

strength and flexibility s improved joint mobility s decreased stress levels s weight loss


Choosing a

the communities surrounding Montgomery or people who work in Montgomery,” Traphan says. “We want to impact as much of the area as we can.” Along with providing education and activities for riders, the Montgomery Bicycle Club works to increase cycling safety. The club was instrumental in getting the City of Montgomery to adopt a 3-feet passing ordinance, and it partnered with the Alabama Bike Coalition to get a statewide law approved. Motorists driving on any roadway in Alabama must maintain at least a 3-feet space between their vehicle and any bicycle it approaches or passes. More bike infrastructure, safe parking and more bike signage are also part of the safety initiative. To learn more about joining the Montgomery Bicycle Club, visit www.mgmbikeclub.org. Membership includes insurance for group rides which covers accidents and liability.

cycling Group rides offer the opportunity to make new friends and find support from other cyclists.

With so many types of bicycles and accessories, choosing equipment can be overwhelming. Montgomery Multisport’s Andy Steinhauer says he’s developed a few opinions over the years about how to shop for a bike along with what’s essential and what’s nice to have. Before buying a bike, Steinhauer suggests researching a few questions. s What type of terrain interests you? If it’s paved, do you anticipate short rides in a park or near your home? Or do you plan long rides of 20 miles or more? Or will you be off-road cycling in state parks or on mountain bike trails? s What’s your budget? With a minimum investment of $400 for a quality bike, aspiring cyclists may be tempted to settle for low-cost equipment. That can be a mistake, says Steinhauer. “It’s an investment. Quality equipment can prevent an

X

tras

s Blinking tail light $10 s Water bottle $5 s Water bottle cage $8

s Cycling shorts with padding

40

$

s Rearview mirror $10 s Flat repair kit $50

s Auto rack for transporting bike

80

$

bike

unpleasant experience. Save for better equipment so you have something that is reliable. Find a shop where you’re comfortable. “Bikes are like shoes; they come in different sizes. A professional will use biomechanics to help you choose equipment that fits you well.” A shop with a good mechanic can provide better maintenance and service. You’ll get more value from your investment, he adds. The other essentials include a helmet which will cost $40 or more and a floor pump ($30). For more information about cycling equipment, you can call Steinhauer at (334) 356-7271 or email andys@ montgomerymultisport.com. Montgomery Multisport is a swim, run and bike facility and race management company for multisport events and area runs. The MMS Charities has donated more than $50,000 to local nonprofits. To learn more, visit www.montgomerymultisport.com

&

approximate cost

s Cycling computer for tracking mileage, speed and other statistics $25 s Weather-appropriate cycling apparel Costs determined by personal preferences

(Prices listed are the minimum costs you can expect when purchasing the item.) www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Zumba!

If going to the gym is a struggle and you dread the routine, Zumba may be the answer. With the fitness trend encouraging us to ‘drop the workout and join the party,’ it sounds like a fun alternative for people who hate to exercise. Zumba fitness is a Latin-inspired mix of music and dance steps that creates an invigorating class. According to a study by the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Zumba gets similar results to other moderately intense exercise like cardio kickboxing. During an average 40-minute class, you’ll burn about 370 calories and achieve workouts at 80 percent of your maximum heart rate. “Zumba can be modified for your personal fitness level and abilities. It can be as basic or as intense as you want,” says Fred Shelby, Director of Healthy Living at YMCA of Greater Montgomery.

“It’s not a competition. Your instructor will help you achieve your personal best.” The exercise program was born in the late 1990s in Colombia when a fitness instructor forgot his usual workout music and decided to fill in with his Latin albums. He switched up the class and encouraged participants to follow his dance moves. Now, 15 million people in 180 countries practice Zumba. “Don’t worry if you’re not a dancer. You’ll be fine,” Shelby says. “You’ll start with basic moves and pick up more advanced steps as you catch on.” During your first class, the instructor will explain the rhythmic moves and help you make adjustments, if needed. And, it’s okay if you need to take a break to catch your breath. It’s easy to get back in the workout, Shelby adds. Be sure to wear comfortable

clothes and shoes so you can move freely. “Each instructor has a different style. All of our Zumba classes will have the same basic key points but you’re going to get a different experience with each of the instructors. If your first class isn’t quite what you’re looking for, try another one.” The workout-in-disguise offers an array of physical and mental benefits, from strengthening your core and cardiovascular system to improving balance and coordination. In a study published by the European Journal of Sport Science, female participants had an improved quality of life score and their self-esteem improved 16 percent after eight weeks of Zumba. To learn more about Zumba and other fitness classes offered by the YMCA of Greater Montgomery, visit www. ymcamontgomery.org.


Our digital issues are a great way to read the latest Healthy Horizons magazines on your phone, tablet or computer. Interactive links to websites, social media and more allow you to connect quickly with health and wellness resources in your community. Sign up for your FREE subscription at www.readhealthyhorizons. com, and we’ll notify you each month when the latest issue is available.

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health

BREAST HEALTH

Beyond October Breast Cancer Awareness Month has come and gone, but with one in eight women being diagnosed with breast cancer annually, this is a topic that’s worth discussing year-round. During October, you wear the pink and hear the statistics, but you think, “it will never happen to me,” and you move on with your busy life.

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UAB Medicine Breast Health Clinic Surgeon, Dr. Kertrisa McWhite, is challenging you to change your thinking and focus on your breast health beyond October. “Have regular conversations with your primary care doctor about the best way to meet your needs. Do monthly checks at home and be aware of any changes that may arise.” Dr. McWhite says the best thing she can do is listen to her patients. While she is a fellowship- trained surgical breast oncologist with more than 13 years of experience; she knows that her patients are the experts of their own body. “My goal is to educate my patients about “When a patient thinks something is out of the ordinary, they are normally right. their process and That’s when we are ready to help with an individualized plan. I believe in personalized medicine. Treating breast cancer is as much about the medical and scientific aspect as it help them make the best decisions about is about the personal relationships patients build with their physicians.” surgery and treatment. There’s not always A breast cancer diagnosis or anything atypical in your breast can be scary, but one right answer, but fortunately the River Region is now home to the UAB Medicine Breast Health there is a right answer Clinic. Here you will receive comprehensive, compassionate, state-of-the-art care. Dr. McWhite and her staff are dedicated to being with you every step through all diseases for that individual and that’s what we find of the breast; both benign and malignant. together.” “My goal is to educate my patients about their process and help them make the best decisions about surgery and treatment. There’s not always one right answer, but there is a right answer for that individual and that’s what we find together.” Will you take Dr. McWhite’s challenge and think about your breast health yearround? It could take you far beyond October.

To learn more about the UAB Medicine Breast Health Clinic and Dr. McWhite, please visit www.baptistbreastsurgery.com. To make an appointment, call (334) 271–0280 - no doctor referral necessary. SERVICES OFFERED: • Breast ultrasound • Fine needle aspiration • Ultrasound guided core needle biopsy • Ultrasound guided vacuum assisted biopsy • Insertion of Marking Clip

• Risk assessment for breast cancer and for hereditary cancer • Genetic testing for BRCA and other hereditary mutations • Partial mastectomy (lumpectomy) • Total mastectomy

• Reconstruction • Sentinel node biopsy • Skin and Nipple Sparing Mastectomy

BREAST HEALTH CLINIC

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NEW! When trying to lose weight what is more important - eating less calories or exercising more? Cutting calories through dietary changes seems to promote weight loss more effectively than does exercise and physical activity. The key to weight loss is to consume fewer calories than you burn. For most people, it’s possible to lower their calorie intake to a greater degree than it is to burn more calories through increased exercise. That’s why cutting calories through dieting is generally more effective for weight loss. But doing both — cutting calories through diet and burning calories through exercise — can help give you the weight-loss edge. Exercise is also important because it can help you maintain your weight loss. (taken from Mayo Clinic)

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Send in your questions and we’ll find the answers! Shoot us your health and wellness questions on Facebook (@healthyhorizonsmag), Twitter (HealthyHorizon6) or www.ReadHealthyHorizons.com and we’ll find an expert to answer your questions! Below are sample questions/answers to give you some ideas.

I’m single and have difficulty making healthy meals for one. I often just throw something together quickly. What are your suggestions for preplanning or making single serving portions? Meal planning is one of the easiest things you can do to set yourself up for healthy eating success. Things to consider when planning are: How many meals do you need? How much time do you have to cook? Now it’s time to choose meals that fit the bill. Look to personal favorites or peruse recipe sites for ideas. Consider the time of year, what’s in season, what you enjoy eating and what’s on sale. Consider overlapping ingredients to minimize waste and cooking with a plan for leftovers to make the most of your food budget and time.

Consider creating a master recipe list. Every time you find a new meal you love, add it to the master list. Put together your grocery list and shop. Don’t forget to jot down quantities for each ingredient and take a quick inventory of what you already have to avoid overbuying. Save time at the store by grouping your list as they appear in the store. Finally, prep and cook. Set aside a few hours after you shop to do things like chop vegetables, grate cheese, make sauces or otherwise prep what you can in advance. You can even measure out spices in plastic bags, parboil potatoes and pre-roast vegetables. For single serve portions, you can either use online portion services that can change the amount of the recipe, or cook the entire recipe (most serve four), and freeze the three remaining portions. (taken from My Fitness Pal)


What Amazon has taught us about Henry Ford, creator of the Model T Ford, is quoted as saying, “You can have any color you want, so long as it’s black”. A local department store salesperson says, “We have that dress in midnight blue, in sizes 3 and 7, but I’m not sure when we will get any more sizes in stock”. Amazon says, “We have a variety of sizes, colors, brand names, and we can have it to you tomorrow if you like, or we have other items and shipping options”. Personal choice has grown tremendously over the years due to advancing technology, the computer, internet, and sites such as Amazon. And so it is, that Healthcare, and our industry, diagnostic imaging, is no different. A few years ago, your physician would send you to the hospital based imaging center, and that choice was rarely questioned. Many times it was your only option. But as healthcare advanced, both hospital based and freestanding imaging centers grew and became more competitive. And as more choices became available, more questions arose concerning the best choice for your diagnostic imaging needs. A recent survey of patients showed that the two most important factors when choosing an outpatient imaging enter were low out-of-pocket costs and convenience. A third consideration was avoiding long wait times to get an imaging appointment. In these areas IMI/Montgomery Open MRI excels in customer service excellence and superior healthcare delivery. As an independent

freestanding facility, we can offer extremely competitive pricing, same day appointment times, and short wait times, avoiding the emergent and urgent “add-on” appointments that occur in a hospital based center that can delay your appointment time and change your 1 p.m. appointment into a 4 p.m. three hour wait. At IMI/Montgomery Open MRI, we believe that ultimately there is one consideration that surpasses all of the factors above, and that is the quality of the services being delivered. Our chief radiologist, Ross Barnett, M.D., is also our CEO, owner, quality assurance inspector, as well as our boss. His passion is the treatment of his patients. Radiology and the attention to detail that it requires is his gift, his calling. His training and years of experience is exceeded only by his compassion for the patients he treats. He understands a mother’s anxiousness or a husband’s anxiety or a woman’s nervousness in knowing without a doubt that the radiologist is taking the utmost time and care in viewing

the images that will determine the course of treatment for them or their loved ones. The staff at IMI/Montgomery Open MRI share the same goals and passion as Dr. Barnett. They were hired because of their dedication and desire to serve the patients that have made the decision to utilize IMI/Montgomery Open MRI as their imaging provider. So the next time you get to choose your preference for a diagnostic imaging center, we hope you will tell your practitioner that you choose IMI/Montgomery Open MRI for your diagnostic imaging needs, and place us in your “cart”. Should you have any questions or need additional information, please call or visit our website at www. southernradiologyspecialists.com, and give us the opportunity to serve you. See why thousands of patients in the River Region have made IMI/ Montgomery Open MRI their choice for diagnostic imaging. You have a choice! Choose us!

By IMI Marketing Department www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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Hope

HERE AT HOME Receiving a cancer diagnosis is devastating news that no one should ever have to face. Unfortunately, according to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 1,688,780 people in the United States heard this news in 2017. Once receiving the diagnosis, the question top of mind for most people is, “What are my treatment options?” and for many they also have to ask, “How far do I have to travel to receive quality care?”

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Thankfully, this second question isn’t a worry for people in the River Region. For the past 30 years, the Montgomery Cancer Center has provided world-class care here at home. As our community has grown and advanced, so has the Montgomery Cancer Center. Yet, their commitment to patients remains the same. Montgomery Cancer Center Administrator, Susan Reed says, “We treat our patients and their families like part of our family. We never lose sight of our goal and mission - to take total care of you.” Offering state-of-the-art diagnostic testing in both laboratory and imaging services while providing patients with a team of compassionate and dedicated medical oncologists, the Montgomery Cancer Center provides hope right here at home. And for folks in the Prattville and Millbrook areas—home is even closer than before. The Montgomery Cancer Center recently expanded to Prattville Medical Park offering cutting-edge cancer care from a team of board-certified oncologists and highly-trained oncology nurses. This 15,000 square foot outpatient clinic is home to 24 infusion bays for patients undergoing chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Conveniently located off I-65, the clinic also offers 10 exam rooms, a state-of-the-art laboratory, a dedicated pharmacy for specialty oncology medications, financial counseling, nutrition services and chaplain services. In addition to the Prattville expansion, the Montgomery Cancer Center recently received another major accomplishment that sets them apart. Earning Full Accreditation with Commendation from the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer is a prestigious recognition that is only awarded to the best of the best. Achieving this accreditation shows that the Montgomery Cancer Center is not only meeting nationally recognized standards for the delivery of quality cancer care, they are exceeding them.

If you or a loved one are one of the millions who are faced with a cancer diagnosis, let it be comforting to know that the Montgomery Cancer Center offers hope here at home. To connect with the Montgomery Cancer Center, please call (334) 273-7000 or visit www.montgomerycancercenter.com to learn more.

PRATTVILLE MEDICAL PARK

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family

Safer teen Automobile crashes are the number one killer of teenagers and the number one cause of disabling injuries for teens. Sadly, many of these accidents are preventable. Leslie Brown is the coordinator of Alabama Safe Kids at Children’s of Alabama. She said parents play an important role in encouraging their children to be safe as a driver and a passenger. “Parents can start by talking to their child when in elementary school about being a safe passenger,” Brown said. “Things like modeling safe behavior, wearing a seatbelt every time and putting the cell phone down. They’re going to do what we do.” In Alabama, the Graduated Driver License Law is a mandatory restriction in place for inexperienced drivers. One of the requirements is that a new driver

may not have more than one nonfamily passenger in the vehicle with them other than the parent, guardian or a supervising licensed driver at least 21 years of age. Brown said parents should become familiar with the Graduated Driver License Law and download a Teen Driving Agreement for their new driver to sign. This helps to establish important ground rules to keep the new driver safe. And Brown says, if the teen violates any of these rules there should be consequences. “Take away keys when they don’t follow rules,” she said. “You can also offer rewards when they do make good choices.” Brown said it’s important teens and adults do these three things: s Obey the law s Wear a seatbelt s Put down the cell phone

Brown has teenagers of her own, so talking about safe driving isn’t just part of her job description, it’s personal. “I always say to my teenagers, ‘Are you a great friend or a good friend?’” she said. “I tell them, ‘Encourage your friends to wear their seatbelts. Ask, ‘Can I send that text for you?’ instead of allowing them to text and drive.” Getting a new driver’s license is an exciting time for a teenager. By helping them to know the law and apply safe driving practices, parents can play an important role in keeping their teens alive. Children’s of Alabama offers links to the Graduated Driver License Law, the Teen Driving Agreement and more resources for parents and teens. Go to www. childrensal.org/Safe-Teen-DrivingToolkit to access. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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ADULT DAY CARE Parkview Adult Day Health Service (334) 262-4111

CANCER CARE CENTERS

Pickett Family Chiropractic (334) 730-0077

Successful Living Center (334) 264-1790 Troy Adult Day Care Center (334) 566-8036 ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP Alzheimer’s of Central Alabama (205) 871-7970 Frazer Church 334-272-8622 AMBULANCE SERVICES Advanced Air Ambulance 1-800-633-3590

CHIROPRACTORS Mission Square Chiropractic (334) 649-6300

Woodling Chiropractic & Wellness (334) 566-5295

Montgomery Cancer Center (334) 273-7000 Montgomery (334) 351-1000 Prattville CARDIOLOGY

Zink Chiropractic & Wellness (334) 270-3333 COMMUNITY AGENCIES Community Action Agency (334) 567-4361 River Region United Way (334) 264-7318

Care Ambulance (334) 262-2550 Excelsior Ambulance Service (334) 213-0200

DENTAL CENTERS Complete Dental Care of Montgomery (334) 277-9570

Haynes Ambulance (334) 265-1208

HSI Montgomery Primary Health 334-293-6670

ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES Country Cottage (334) 260-8373

Jackson Hospital Heart Center (334) 293-8292

HSI River Region Health 334-420-5001

Elmcroft of Halcyon (334) 954-1945

Montgomery Cardiovascular Associates (334) 280-1500

Prattville Dental Care 334-290-8095

Diversicare (334) 263-1643

River Region Cardiology (334) 387-0948

Hillview Terrace Health & Rehabilitation (334) 272-0171 Prattville Health & Rehabilitation (334) 365-2241 Rehab First & Capitol Hill Healthcare Center (334) 834-2920 38

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Southeastern Cardiology Consultants (334) 613-0807 Montgomery (334) 351-9883 The Jackson Clinic Cardiology (334) 264-9191

EAR, NOSE & THROAT Central Alabama ENT Associates (334) 277-0484 ENT Associates of Alabama (334) 272-8644 Montgomery Otolaryngology (334) 834-7221 Dr. Wilton McRae (334) 807-8448


ELDER LAW Davis & Associates (334) 671-3990

HOME HEALTH SERVICES Alacare (334) 244-9125

Kotouc & Vogel Law Firm (334) 409-0088

Freedom Home Care (334) 262-8156

Red Oak Legal (334) 239-3625

Home Instead Senior Care 334-215-9577

Montgomery Area Mental Health Authority (334) 548-2578 Hayneville (334) 279-7830 Montgomery (334) 365-2207 Prattville (334) 567-8408 Wetumpka

EYE CARE Downtown Eye Care (334) 387-0500

Right at Home (334) 517-1045

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Alabama Gynecology Associates (334) 288-1950

Montgomery Eye Care Associates (334) 260-8511

HOSPICE Amedisys Hospice (334) 395-7789

Montgomery Women’s Health Associates (334) 281-1191

Baptist Hospice (334) 395-5000

OB-GYN Associates (334) 279-9333 Montgomery (334) 365-6088 Prattville (334) 770-4801 Troy (334) 567-7182 Wetumpka

FITNESS CENTERS Anytime Fitness (334) 239-7396 Metro Fitness (334) 396-0040 Pure Barre (334) 834-7790

Hospice of Montgomery (334) 279-6677

YMCA (334) 269-4362

Southeast Hospice Network (334) 260-2916

HEARING CENTERS DeRamus Hearing Aid Centers (334) 543-0034

HOSPITALS Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System (334) 272-4670

Miracle-Ear Hearing Aid Center (334) 245-0197

ORTHOPEDICS Advanced Orthopedic Surgical Specialists (334) 262-0523 Alabama Orthopaedics Specialists (334) 274-9000 Montgomery Spine Center (334) 396-1886

Montgomery Hearing Services (334) 263-2150

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES At Home Medical (334) 274-0088

Pattillo Balance And Hearing Center (334) 649-3541

Custom Medical Solutions (334) 273-9993

HERBS & SUPPLEMENTS

Medical Place Inc. (334) 262-4283

PARKS & RECREATION Montgomery County Parks & Recreation (334) 832-7181

Midstate Medical Services (334) 263-6034

Montgomery Parks & Recreation (334) 625-2300

MENTAL HEALTH Crossbridge Behavioral Health (334) 286-3116

Prattville Parks & Recreation (334) 595-0800

HSI River Region (334) 420-5001

Southern Orthopaedic Surgeons (334) 613-9000

Wind Creek State Park (256) 329-0845 www.readhealthyhorizons.com

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PEDIATRICS

RADIOLOGY& IMAGING SERVICES East Montgomery Imaging Center (334) 277-1210

East Center (334) 354-3935 Elder Abuse Hotline (334) 262-7378 Meals on Wheels (334) 240-6765 Montgomery Area Council on Aging (334) 263-0532 SURGERY

HSI Autaugaville Family Health (334) 365-4524 HSI Capitol Family Health (334) 356-3608 HSI Chisholm Family Health (334) 832-4338 HSI Montgomery Primary Health (334) 293-6670

Jackson Imaging Center (334) 834-3671 Montgomery Primary Health (334) 293-6670 RENAL CARE

HSI River Region Health (334) 420-5001

TRANSPORTATION Montgomery Area Paratransit (334) 240-4012

HSI Southside Family Health (334) 288-0009

URGENT CARE The Jackson Clinic (334) 240-2334

PHARMACIES Adams Drugs (334) 272-0802 Baptist Tower Pharmacy (334) 286-3200 HSI Montgomery Primary Health (334) 293-6670 HSI River Region Health (334) 420-5001 Richardson’s Pharmacy (334) 262-5775 PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS East Montgomery Family Practice (334) 271-5700 Montgomery Family Medicine (334) 396-9100 The Jackson Clinic (334) 293-8888 40

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Vaughn Urgent Care (334) 395-9933 REHABILITATION Excel Rehabilitation (334) 532-0220 HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital (334) 284-7700 King Rehabilitation (334) 270-4111 Montgomery East Physical Therapy (334) 244-5892 SENIOR SERVICES Archibald Center (334) 240-6767

UROLOGY Jackson Urology (334) 281-7666 Mitylene Park Dr (334) 293-8588 Pine Street WELLNESS CENTERS HSI River Region Wellness Center (334) 420-0280 WOUND CARE CENTERS Institute for Advanced Wound Care (334) 286-3444 Wound & Hyperbaric Medicine Center (334) 293-8138


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Profile for Healthy Horizons Magazine

Healthy Horizons Montgomery 2018  

Healthy Horizons features premier health and wellness resources in Montgomery, Alabama and the surrounding communities to help you live a we...

Healthy Horizons Montgomery 2018  

Healthy Horizons features premier health and wellness resources in Montgomery, Alabama and the surrounding communities to help you live a we...

Profile for healthy

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