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2018 ANNUAL REPORT


CONTENTS WELCOME

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MISSION

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HISTORY

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LEADERSHIP

6

ORGANIZATION

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RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

11

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

12

FACILITIES

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675 Kimbrough Blvd.

SERVICES OFFERED

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Building #1542

RESEARCH OPTIONS

20

TAMU 4253

ENGAGEMENT

28

BUDGET & RESOURCES

29

MARKETING

30

INTERESTED FACULTY

32

CURRENT SERVICE PROJECTS

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College Station, TX 78843

979-458-1498

hcrf@tamu.edu hcrf.tamu.edu /tamuclinicalresearch/

SELECTED GRANT SUBMISSIONS 35 COLLABORATIONS

36

RESOURCE NEEDS

38

OPPORTUNITIES

39

/HCRF3

CREDITS College of Education & Human Development Research & Development Office Joyce Alexander, PhD Dean, College of Education & Human Development Susan Bloomfield, PhD Associate Dean for Research College of Education & Human Development Richard B. Kreider, PhD Executive Director Nicolaas Deutz, MD, PhD Director of Clinical Research J.P. Bramhall, MD Medical Director

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WELCOME On behalf of the College of Education and Human Development's Research & Development Office, we would like to welcome you to our inaugural issue of the Human Clinical Research Facility (HCRF) Annual Report and first Board of Directors meeting. This report provides an overview of efforts made to date to develop the HCRF into a campus resource for conducting human clinical research at Texas A&M University. We hope that our efforts help move the university forward in conducting human biomedical research into the future. Richard B. Kreider, PhD Executive Director

Nicolaas E. Deutz, MD, PhD Director of Clinical Research

TRANSFORMING HUMAN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY 3


MISSION Toserveasacomprehensivebiomedical researchfacilityin providingsupport toresearchersconductinghumanclinical researchat TexasA&MUniversity.

HISTORY

Efforts to develop the Human Clinical Research Facility (HCRF) began in 2008 when Dr. Kreider relocated the Exerc Kinesiology (HLKN) in the College of Education and Human Development (CEHD). Because facilities supporting hu sf. ft. facility. In 2008-09, efforts began to pursue development of a human biomedical research facility to house t Human Biomedical Research Building to house the ESNL and other HLKN basic and applied labs. The proposal wa major research themes. Submissions include research themes related to genomics, obesity, aging, and translation recruitment of Dr. Nicolaas Deutz and his research team from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences to CTRAL next to the ESNL in the Research Park. As a result, there was greater interest in helping other faculty memb impact ideas. Consequently, Dr. Doug Palmer, Dean of the CEHD, Dr. Rick Kreider (Head of the Department of Hea 10,000 sq. ft. to the Research Park facility so they could work with additional faculty on their projects. While this p they asked for an estimate to build the HCRF and efforts began to make the HCRF a reality. The university decided After several years of planning and construction, the HCRF officially opened on April 11, 2017. Since then, the HCR

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cise & Sport Nutrition Lab (ESNL) to Texas A&M University to become Head of the Department of Health & uman clinical research were limited, the ESNL was located in the Research Park where they paid rent for a 5,000 the ESNL and other related labs. The university supported submission of an NIH C06 facility grant to build a as favorably scored but not funded. Around this time, the university had a call for white papers to help develop nal research. As part of this effort, the CEHD decided to support a signature hire in aging. This facilitated the develop the Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity (CTRAL). This effort led to development of bers conduct their research protocols in the ESNL and/or CTRAL facilities. In 2013, there was a call to Deans for alth & Kinesiology at the time), and Dr. Nicolass Deutz (Director of CTRAL) submitted a proposal to add another proposal was well received, the university did not want to invest in a building not owned by the university. So d to invest about $10.5 million dollars to support this effort with remain funds supported by the CEHD and HLKN. CRF has become a hub for conducting human biomedical research at Texas A&M University.

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LEADERSHIP EXECUTIVEDIRECTOR RICHARDB.KREIDER,PHD,FACSM,FISSN,FACN,FNAK Dr. Kreider serves as Professor, Executive Director of the Human Clinical Research Facility, and Director of the Exercise & Sport Nutrition Lab at Texas A&M University. He served as Head of the Department of Health & Kinesiology and Thomas A. and Joan Read Endowed Chair for Disadvantaged Youth (2008 to 2017). Dr. Kreider has conducted numerous studies on nutrition and exercise and has published three books and over 185 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. His work has been cited over 10,800 times in the literature (h-index 55, i10-index 131). Dr. Kreider is a Fellow of the American College of Sport Medicine (FACSM); a co-founder, board member, and Fellow of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (FISSN); founding Editor-In-Chief of the BioMed Central - Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (IF 3.135); Fellow of the American College of Nutrition (FACN); Board Member of the American Kinesiology Association (AKA); elected Fellow of the National Academy of Kinesiology (FNAK, #568); member of the American Public Health Association (APHA); and, member of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Dr. Kreider has received over 24 million dollars as a PI, Co-PI and/or consultant in internal and/or external funding to support research related to the role of exercise and nutrition on health, disease, rehabilitation, performance, and/or health disparities/equity. Dr. Kreider has received the NSCA Nutrition Achievement Award (2010), Global Health & Pharma Sport & Nutrition Award (2017), and the ISSN Lifetime Achievement Award (2018). Dr. Kreider has been a featured speaker at numerous conferences internationally and serves as a scientific consultant for industry and national professional organizations.

DIRECTOROFCLINICALRESEARCH NICOLAASE.DEUTZ,MD,PHD Dr. Nicolaas Deutz, MD, PhD currently serves as Director for the Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity (CTRAL). For more than 30 years, his research background and expertise focus on nutrition, metabolism, and physiology studies involving the use of stable isotope methodologies, both in humans and animals. Dr. Deutz has published over 300 peer-reviewed publications and has an H-index of 72 and an i10-index of 269. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Clinical Nutrition" with an impact factor of 5.5. Dr. Deutz has received more than 25 million dollars in life-time external funding from NIH, NSF, and companies. Dr. Deutz has extensive experience with isotopic calculations, validation and data interpretation. The stable isotope approaches are used in several studies to unravel the metabolic changes in patients with chronic diseases (i.e., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, mild cognitive impairment and dementia, autism spectrum disorder). This research leads to new insights in protein and amino acid kinetics in subjects with chronic disease and resulted in specific recommendations to nutritional supplements as method for reducing muscle wasting. Recently, he started studying the anabolic effects of specialized nutritional supplements in different chronic diseases and models of disease. Using translational approaches is a logical extension of the body of his research in the field of protein and amino acids metabolism. Education: Dr. Deutz obtained his MD and PhD at the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. He is a medical physiologist and Nutrition Physician Specialist.

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Author Author


OTHERPRINCIPALINVESTIGATORS MARIELLEENGELEN,PHD Dr. Marielle Engelen, PhD, Associate Professor, currently serves as Co-Director and Head of Clinical Research for the Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity (CTRAL). She is an expert in the field of nutrition and metabolism in chronic diseases. Her research focuses on the metabolic alterations underlying involuntary weight loss and muscle wasting in chronic inflammatory diseases, involving the use of stable isotope methodologies, and the effects of dietary modulation and exercise intervention to restore metabolism and physical performance in these patients. As such, she has conducted and supervised many acute studies and coordinating human clinical trials, examining the effects of protein and amino acid intervention in healthy elderly and in those with chronic wasting diseases (i.e., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, cognitive impairment). In addition, she has the expertise in methodology and techniques to examine body composition, muscle function, physical performance, gut and cognitive function, and wellbeing. Education: Dr. Engelen studied Health Sciences (Movement Sciences) at Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. In 1994, she worked as Research Associate at the Dept. of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (Director: Karlman Wasserman, MD, PhD). After she returned to the Netherlands, she worked as a PhD student at the Dept. of Respiratory Medicine at the Academic Hospital Maastricht and obtained her PhD in 2000 (title thesis: "Muscle wasting in COPD: a metabolic and functional perspective"), and subsequently worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Surgery.

MELINDASHEFFIELD-MOORE,PHD Dr. Sheffield-Moore earned her master ?s degree in exercise physiology from the University of Houston and spent four years working at NASA Johnson Space Center as an experiment support scientist. She later earned her doctorate in human bioenergenetics from Ball State University, training with Dr. David Costill ? one of the pioneers of exercise physiology. She completed her National Institute of Health (NIH) funded postdoctoral training at the University of Texas Medical Branch within the Department of Surgery and Shriners Burns Hospital. While there, she completed her training in human metabolism and skeletal muscle biology. For the past 20 years, Dr. Sheffield-Moore has worked at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) in the Department of Internal Medicine. During her time at UTMB as a professor, she has held a number of leadership roles including being the director of the Translational Technologies Key Resource for the Institute of Translational Sciences and a program director of the Institute of Translational Sciences Clinical Research Center. Dr. Sheffield-Moore has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Aging, National Cancer Institute, NASA, and through foundation grants to support her human clinical research program in areas of aging, cancer and traumatic brain injury.

DEANNAKENNEDY,PHD Dr. Deanna Kennedy is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Kinesiology. She received her PhD in Kinesiology (Motor Neuroscience) from Texas A&M University. Her research addresses theoretical questions related to motor synergies and bimanual coordination as well as more applied questions that have important implications for stroke rehabilitation and aging.

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ORGANIZATION Boar d of Dir ect or s

CEHD Assoc. Dean f or Resear ch

Execu t ive Dir ect or Clin ical Resear ch Dir ect or

Ext er n al Advisor s

St af f

The Human Clinical Research Facility was established to serve as a centralized facility for researchers at Texas A&M University and within the Texas A&M University System to conduct human clinical research trials on a fee-for-service basis. The day-to-day activities within the HCRF are managed by the HCRF Executive Director (ED) and Clinical Research Director (CRD). They receive input from the Board of Directors (BOD), the CEHD Associate Dean for Research, external advisors, and staff. They also report to a BOD who provide input on major initiatives, review and approve the annual budget, and conduct mid-term and end-of-term evaluations on the ED and CRD. Together, they work to provide efficient services for faculty wishing to utilize the HCRF for clinical research on IRB approved projects.

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ExecutiveDirector Responsibilities The Executive Director administratively reports to the Associate Dean for Research in the CEHD. The ED also report's to the HCRF Research Consortium BOD. Primary duties include: - Representing the HCRF at meetings with the university administration as needed. - Management of day-to-day operation of the HCRF including approval of HCRF-related general expenses. - Coordinating fee-for-service (FFS) testing services with the CRD and Principal Investigators (PI?s) in the HCRF. - Ensuring all personnel working in the HCRF undergo and maintain necessary university training and maintain confidentiality of all testing results. - Ensuring FFS services are properly billed on a monthly basis and resources generated are credited to the personnel and labs involved in conducting the services. - Advertising, marketing, and increase engagement of the HCRF for fee-for-service research activities. - Organizing and chairing staff meetings. - Organizing and overseeing annual fee-for-service rate reviews and requests. - Scheduling, setting the agenda, and chairing BOD meetings. - Preparing quarterly and annual reports for the BOD. - Helping set the vision and future directions of the HCRF.

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Clinical ResearchDirector Responsibilities The CRD of the HCRF administratively reports to Associate Dean for Research in the CEHD. The CRD also reports to the HCRF Research Consortium BOD. Primary duties include: - Provide a recommendation about the capability of the HCRF to conduct fee-for-service (FFS) testing on all protocols that involve individuals with medicallycontrolled or managed disease. - Participate in all staff meetings. - Co-Chair BOD meetings. - Assist the ED in representing the HCRF at meetings with the university administration as needed. - Assist the ED in managing day-to-day operation of the HCRF. - Assist ED in coordinating FFS services with HCRF PI?s who oversee and conduct research services. - Assist ED in ensuring all personnel working in the HCRF undergo and maintain necessary university training and maintain confidentiality of all testing results. - Assist ED in determining annual FFS rates for clinical population FFS tests. - Assist ED in preparing quarterly and annual reports for the BOD. - Assist ED and BOD in setting the vision and future directions of the HCRF. - Assist ED in preparing quarterly and annual reports.

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RESEARCHCONSORTIUM The Research Consortium is a coalition of Colleges and Schools at Texas A&M University and Texas Health Sciences Center who have invested in providing up to $500,000 per year in annual support for their faculty to conduct research in the HCRF. This can be through providing mini-grants to their faculty for pilot studies, part of new faculty start-up packages, and/or to provide support for strategic research initiatives or development of new research lines that can lead to new grant submissions. Membership Seats on the Board of Directors (BOD) are filled by appointment in consultation with the Deans of Colleges or Schools that financially support fee-for-service activities as a member of the HCRF Research Consortium. Colleges or Schools providing an annual commitment of $100,000 in annual fee-for-service funding receive 1 seat on the board, those providing a commitment to provide $250,000 in annual fee-for-service funding receive 2 seats on the board, and those providing a commitment to provide $500,000 in annual fee-for-service funding receive 3 seats on the board. The CEHD, as a major investor in the HCRF, has a total of 3 voting members, with at least one member from HLKN faculty (reflecting that department?s investments in the HCRF). The CEHD Associate Dean for Research and the VP for Research (or his/her representative) serve as ex officio members. Board membership size is determined annually based on changes in providing a commitment to funding and/or annual support of fee-for-service activities from collaborating Colleges and/or Schools. Board members are appointed by the Dean of participating College or School. Du t ies The HCRF BOD meets with the HCRF Directors quarterly to discuss progress and provide input about major initiatives. The meetings will be called and chaired by the ED with the CRD serving as Co-Chair. The agenda will include discussion about management of the HCRF, fee-for-service activities provided over the last quarter, anticipated fee-for-service activities, budget overview, and related issues. The BOD meetings will also discuss future plans and initiatives including ways to encourage more TAMUS faculty to conduct research at the HCRF on a fee-for-services basis. Major duties of the BOD include: -

Attend quarterly meetings with the HCRF ED and CRD Establishing by-laws for HCRF governance to be agreed upon by a 2/3 majority vote. Review and approve the annual fee-for-service rate study that is submitted to the university. Review and approve the annual HCRF operating budget. Provide input and feedback about facility and fee-for-service management issues. Identify and provide input on major HCRF initiatives. Perform mid-term and 5-year reviews of HCRF leadership.

Vot in g Pr ivileges Each board member will receive one vote with the majority of votes carrying motions. If a supporting college or school has more than one seat, the college or school can choose to have one board member cast more than one vote up to the number of seats they hold. Board members can cast their votes by proxy if they are unable to attend the board meeting.

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BOARDOFD

COLLEGEOFEDUCATIONANDHUMANDEVELOPMENT

TimothyElliott,PhD

Timothy Lightfoot, PhD

Distinguished Professor

Omar Smith Professor

Associate P

Executive Director

Director, Huffines Institute for Sports Medicine & Human Performance

Division Health Ed

Telehealth Counseling Clinic Department of Educational Psychology

Department of Health & Kinesiology

KellyWils

Departm Health & Ki

SUSANBLOOMFIELD,PHD Professor Associate Dean for Research College of Education & Human Development Department of Health & Kinesiology 12

Ex Of Mem


FDIRECTORS

T

COLLEGEOFENGINEERING

son,PhD

GerardL. Coté,PhD

BonnieJ.Dunbar,PhD

Professor

James J. Cain Professor

TEES Eminent Professor

Director, Center for Remote Health Technologies and Systems

Director, Institute for Engineering Education and Innovation

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Department of Aerospace Engineering

n Chair ducation

ment of inesiology

fficio mbers

J.MARTINSCHOLTZ,PHD Professor Executive Associate Vice President for Research Department of Molecular & Cellular Medicine 13


FACILITIES - Exercise and Rehabilitation & Training Facilities - Conference / Lecture Area - Offices for faculty, staff, and research assistants - Data Storage Area - 12 Beds for Overnight Research Studies - Metabolic Kitchen - Physiological Testing (Isokinetic, Balance, Metabolic, Anaerobic) - DEXA Body Composition & Bone Assessment Room - Resting Energy Expenditure Room - Medical Exam & Procedure Rooms (3) - Compounding facility to prepare solution for intravenous infusion/injections - Sample Prep Room - Freezer Room / Biobank - Comprehensive Wet Lab Facilities 14


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CLINICALPOPULATIONSERVICES -

-

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Recruitment for Clinical Study (Chronic Diseases) Recruitment for Clinical Study (Healthy) Screening for Clinical Study Phlebotomy Muscle Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment) Fat Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment) IV solution infusions (not including the cost for tracers and pharmacy) 24-hour Nursing Supervision Height / Weight/ BMI Resting Cardiovascular Hemodynamics and Respiration Skinfold Body Composition Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA) Body Composition and Bone Density Assessment (DEXA) Lung function Handgrip Resting Energy Expenditure MIP MEP Isokinetic Strength Testing (KinCom) Gait Analysis Dietary recall (24h) Neuropsychological Testing + data analysis Behavioral and emotional testing + data analysis Stable Isotope Tracer Metabolism Analysis per sample (not related to ?Advanced Metabolic analysis?) Exercise Rehabilitation (Group Rehab Sessions/month)

SERVICES

GENERALSERVICE

- IRB Application - Data & Safety M - Consulting


SOFFERED

CES

n Assistance Monitoring

HEALTHYPOPULATIONSERVICES -

Recruitment (Apparently Healthy)

-

Entrance Criteria (Apparently Healthy)

-

Phlebotomy

-

Phlebotomy (Finger Stick)

-

Muscle Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

-

Fat Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

-

Height / Weight / BMI

-

Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA)

-

Skinfold Body Composition

-

Body Composition and Bone Density Assessment (DEXA)

-

Resting Energy Expenditure

-

Submaximal Exercise Test

-

Flexibility Test

-

ECG Stress Tests

-

Cardiopulmonary Stress Test

-

Endurance Capacity Test

-

Anaerobic Capacity Test

-

Isotonic Strength Assessment

-

Isokinetic Strength Testing (KinCom)

-

Dietary Record (4-d)

-

Cognitive Function / Psychological Inventory Assessment

-

Exercise Training (3 sessions per month/group training sessions/hours)

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BIOCHEMICALANALYSES GENERAL -

Acetate/Propionate/Butyrate Amino acid concentration profile in plasma/blood Amino acid concentration profile in tissue intracellular Amino acid enrichment (4 -10 amino acids) in tissue intracellular Amino acid enrichment (4-10 amino acids) in plasma/blood Amino acid enrichment (<4 amino acids) in plasma/blood Amino acid enrichment (<4 amino acids) in tissue intracellular Amino acid enrichment (>10 amino acids-PULSE) in plasma/blood CBC w/Differential Panel Citrulline concentration in plasma/blood ( Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Enzyme Panel) Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Full Comprehensive) Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Glucose & Lipid Panel) D2O enrichment

ADVANCEDMETABOLIC -

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Gut Function and Nutrient Absorption (study + analysis) Anabolic response to food (study + analysis) Digestion and absorption of nutrients (study + analysis) Protein synthesis/breakdown (study + analysis) Tissue (muscle, fat) protein and fatty synthesis Metabolic kinetic phenotyping using an 20 stable tracer mixture intravenous pulse (study + analysis) Biobank with 15 year of samples of human studies that received stable isotope solutions


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Finger Stick (Glucose and Lactate) GSH/GSSG concentration in plasma/blood GSH/GSSG concentration in tissue intracellular GSH/GSSG enrichment in plasma/blood GSH/GSSG enrichment in tissue intracellular Glucose enrichment in blood/plasma Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) ? Average Kit Cost Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) ? High Cost Kit Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) ? Low Cost Kit Immulite Analysis ? Low Cost Assay KIC/KMV/KIV/HMB in plasma/blood PAH in plasma Record Storage Saliva Collection Sample Handling & Preparation

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RESEARCHOPTIONS COLLABORATION

The HCRF currently houses five Principal Investigator assessing the role of exercise and nutrition on health, management in healthy and medically-controlled clinic collaborate on grant proposals as CoPI?s or CoI?s with A&M Health Science Center, and TAMUS and assist t

FEEFORSERVICE

Internal and external at cost rates have been approve capabilities offered by the HCRF. HCRF staff work wit collected in the HCRF. Once collected, the results of t IRB. Costs for services performed are invoiced month Colleges or Schools who are members of the HCRF R service rates depending on their level of membership. their faculty to use for pilot and/or research projects.

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rs who have significant clinical research experience , performance, rehabilitation, and/or disease risk cal populations. HCRF PI?s are available to h researchers at Texas A&M University, the Texas them in conducting human clinical trials in the HCRF.

ed by the university for each of the services and th the PI?s to obtain IRB approval and have their data tests are forwarded to the PI as per the approved hly until the project is complete. Faculty belonging to Research Consortium receive discounts on fee for . These colleges have designated some funding for

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PROJECTIN

Faculty members or external sponsors follow the process below when co activities are independent and separate from those undertaken by PI?s h

- If a faculty member or external sponsor wants to conduct research i discuss the project. - The HCRF Directors refer the faculty or external sponsor to the app options. - Services conducted by ESNL staff will be directed to Dr. Kreider. Se Services conducted by the Aggie Translational Medicine (ATM) lab w neuromuscular and cognitive assessment will be forwarded to Dr. D each director will be involved in discussions. - If the HCRF PI(s) feel the project can be done in the HCRF on a FF - Once the budget is finalized, a Memorandum of Understanding (MO outlines invoicing and payment options will be obtained from the fac - If a faculty member or sponsor wants the HCRF to perform a service staff will submit a request to add the service to the Department of Ac - For FFS testing offered by the HCRF, HCRF staff will work with the P testing, facilities, and oversight for their IRB application. Once appro HIPPA guidelines and HCRF staff will explain the procedures related - If the faculty member and/or their students want to assist in data col lab/center training and compliance requirements and be listed on th - Data collected by the HCRF for FFS activities will be managed and service-conducting HCRF PI. - Faculty and/or sponsors who requested the FFS activity will have ac publication. - The HCRF will be acknowledged in all publications resulting from FF

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INITIATION

ontracting for fee-for-service activities in the HCRF. Fee for service housed in the HCRF conducting their externally funded research.

in the HCRF on a FFS basis, they contact the HCRF ED and/or CRD to

propriate HCRF lab/center director to discuss the study and FFS testing

ervices conducted by CTRAL staff will be directed to Dr. Deutz. will be directed to Dr. Sheffield-Moore. Services related to Deanna Kennedy. If potential services involve more than one lab/center,

FS basis, they will work with the HCRF ED to develop a budget proposal. OU) to fund the project that confirms commitment to fund the project and culty member or external sponsor. e not currently on the approved list of services and fee rates, HCRF ccounting Services in the Division of Finance & Operations for approval. PI to make sure they have necessary information to describe HCRF oved, a copy of the signed IRB will be forwarded to the HCRF following d to any testing to be conducted in the HCRF prior initiation of any test. llection, they must complete all necessary university, HCRF, and related he IRB as study personnel. stored at the HCRF as per approved IRB under the supervision of the

ccess to non-personally identifiable data for independent analysis and

FS activities as the site of data collection.

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FEEFORSER Clinical PopulationRecruitment Recruitment for Clinical Study - Chronic Diseases

$339.78

Recruitment for Clinical Study - Healthy

$196.73

Screening for Clinical Study

$243.97

Clinical PopulationServices(CTRAL) Phlebotomy

$44.41

Muscle Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

$208.62

Fat Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

$208.62

IV solution infusions (not including the cost for tracers and pharmacy)

$112.83

24 hour Nursing Supervision

$1,691.33

Height / Weight/BMI

$31.91

Resting Cardiovascular Hemodynamics and Respiration

$11.68

Skinfold Body Composition

$47.34

Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA)

$60.38

Body Composition and Bone Density Assessment (DEXA)

$55.56

Lung function

$57.48

Handgrip

$48.57

Resting Energy Expenditure

$102.32

MIP MEP

$66.07

Isokinetic Strength Testing (KinCom)

$67.18

Gait Analysis

$129.24

Dietary recall (24h)

$115.81

Neuropsychological Testing + data analysis

$136.00

Behavioral and emotional testing + data analysis

$136.00

Stable Isotope Tracer Metabolism Analysis per sample

$161.45

Exercise Rehabilitation (Group Rehab Sessions/month)

$54.77

Rate study approved th Department of Accounting Services in the Division of Finance & Operations in November, 2017. New services added in April, 2018 and August 2018

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ERVICERATES HealthyPopulationServices(ESNL) Recruitment - Apparently Healthy

$62.84

Entrance Criteria - Apparently Healthy

$33.19

Phlebotomy

$20.56

Phlebotomy (Finger Stick)

$16.43

Muscle Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

$69.34

Fat Biopsy (including cleaning of equipment)

$69.34

Height / Weight / BMI

$13.97

Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA)

$15.82

Skinfold Body Composition

$15.20

Body Composition and Bone Density Assessment (DEXA)

$23.39

Resting Energy Expenditure

$49.41

Submaximal Exercise Test

$42.98

Flexibility Test

$7.18

ECG Stress Tests

$52.43

Cardiopulmonary Stress Test

$110.03

Endurance Capacity Test

$178.44

Anaerobic Capacity Test

$19.72

Isotonic Strength Assessment

$24.70

Isokinetic Strength Testing (KinCom)

$42.50

Dietary Record (4-d)

$20.83

Cognitive Function / Psychological Inventory Assessment

$23.29

Exercise Training (3 sessions per month/group training sessions/hours)

$82.24

External sponsors are charged 10% above internal rates.

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FEEFORSER General Analyses/ Services CBC w/Differential Panel

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$9.24

Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Full Comprehensive)

$44.76

Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Glucose & Lipid Panel)

$17.66

Cobas Comprehensive Serum Panel (Enzyme Panel)

$20.73

Amino acid concentration profile in plasma/blood (CTRAL001)

$135.87

Amino acid concentration profile in tissue intracellular (CTRAL002)

$223.05

Citrulline concentration in plasma/blood (CTRAL003)

$58.33

Glucose enrichment in blood/plasma (CTRAL004)

$58.33

Amino acid enrichment (<4 amino acids) in plasma/blood (CTRAL005)

$92.28

Amino acid enrichment (<4 amino acids) in tissue intracellular (CTRAL006)

$179.46

Amino acid enrichment (4-10 amino acids) in plasma/blood (CTRAL007)

$140.77

Amino acid enrichment (4 -10 amino acids) in tissue intracellular (CTRAL008)

$213.42

Amino acid enrichment (>10 amino acids-PULSE) in plasma/blood (CTRAL009)

$232.84

KIC/KMV/KIV/HMB in plasma/blood (CTRAL010)

$92.28

Acetate/Propionate/Butyrate (CTRAL012)

$70.40

Urea enrichment (CTRAL013)

$87.39

GSH/GSSG enrichment in plasma/blood (CTRAL019)

$72.86

GSH/GSSG concentration in plasma/blood (CTRAL020)

$106.81

GSH/GSSG enrichment in tissue intracellular (CTRAL021)

$334.87

GSH/GSSG concentration in tissue intracellular (CTRAL022)

$193.99

D2O enrichment (CTRAL023)

$69.78

PAH in plasma (CTRAL024)

$32.84

Finger Stick (Glucose)

$2.40

Finger Stick (Lactate)

$3.07

Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) - Low Cost Kit

$20.45

Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) - Average Kit Cost

$25.07

Hormone Analysis (e.g., ELISA or EIA) - High Cost Kit

$31.43

Immulite Analysis - Low Cost Assay

$21.15

Urine Collection

$13.10

Rate study approved bty the Department of Accounting Services in the Division of Finance & Operations in November, 2017. New services added in April, 2018 and August 2018


ERVICERATES Saliva Collection

$10.43

Algometer Pain Assessment

$8.92

Sample Handling & Preparation

$17.61

Sample Storage (Freezers)

$20.85

Record Storage

$3.50

AdvancedMetabolicAnalysis (bundledservices) Gut Function and Nutrient Absorption (study + analysis)

$2,006.85

Anabolic response to food (study + analysis) $2,874.63 Digestion and absorption of nutrients (study + analysis)

$2,252.85

Protein synthesis/breakdown (study + analysis)

$1,687.04

Tissue (muscle, fat) protein and fatty synthesis

$1,141.77

Metabolic kinetic phenotyping using an 20 stable tracer mixture intravenous pulse (study + analysis)

$3,752.20

Biobank with 15 year of samples of human studies that received stable isotope solutions

$12.81

General Services IRB Preparation (Clinical Population Study)

$1,556.44

IRB Preparation (Apparently Healthy Study Population)

$1,123.94

Data & Safety Monitoring (per hour)

$61.50

Consulting (per hour) - Deutz (per hour)

$236.88

Consulting (per hour) - Kreider (per hour)

$182.58

External sponsors are charged 10% above internal rates.

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ENGAGEMENT 76 108 TOURS

COLLABORATING

fACULTY

37

28

FFS Pr oj ect s in pr ogr ess

pr oj ect s discussed wit h indust r y

Gr ant s or pr oj ect s in discussion

$613k

21

2

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act iv e IRB Pr ot ocol s

consor t ium member s

$9.4 M ext er nal f unding engagement 28

10

submit t ed

gr ant s $22.6 M


BUDGET&RESOURCES

FY19Personnel Expenses

General Expenses

-

-

ED(25%FTE) CRD(25%FTE) Admin Assistant (25%FTE)

Centrex(Cable/Phones) Gas.Air Miscellaneous

$6,200 $6,000 $6,000

Internal AdministrativeRate(23%) External AdministrativeRate(33%)

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MARKETING Videos

HCRF Tour

HCRF Interactive Tour

Grand Opening

30


Brochure

BrandedEmail

Website

NewsMedia

Social Media

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INTERESTEDFACULTY AgricultureandLifeSciences

Education&HumanDevelopment

Mark Faries Fuller Bazer Guoyao Wu Luis Tedeschi Sarah White Thomas Welsh Lawrence Dangott Alex Thomasson G.K. Jayaprakasha Bhimu Patil Chaodong Wu Boon Chew Clintion Allred Erin Giles Guo, Shaodong Joseph Awika Karen Kubena Linglin Xie Peter Murano Robert Chapkin Rosemary Walzem Stelbe Smith Susanne Talcott Yuxiang Sun Giri Athrey Corliss Outley

Cynthia A Riccio Julie Thompson Steven Woltering John Lawler Stephen Crouse Christopher Woodman Jim Fluckey John Buchanan Lori Greenwood Melinda Moore Steven Riechman

Architecture Chanam Lee X. Zhu Zhipeng Lu

Athletics JP Bramhall

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Engineering Ana Diaz Artiles Gerard Cote Mary Mcdougall Michael Madigan Balakrishna Haridas Arul Jayaraman Bjorn Birgisson Dezhen Song Hangue Park Ulisses M. Braga-Neto Steven Wright B Zoghi Sheng-Jen "Tony" Hsieh Mark Lawley Farzan Sasangohar Satish Bukkapatnam Michael Moreno Pilwon Hur Prabhakar Pagilla


Geosciences

Nursing

Steve Dimarco

Nancy Downing Robin Page

Anthony Knap

HealthScienceCenter Fen Wang Choudhury, M. Keith Young

Liberal Arts Maren MacNamara Darrell Worthy

Medicine Carrie Byington Robert Carpenter Gang Han Cheryl Walker Rod Dashwood Wallace McKeehan Gianfranco Alpini Joseph Rutkowski Mariappan Muthuchamy Shannon Glaser David Zaweija Robin Fuchs-Young Jun-yuan Ji David Earnest William Griffith Farida Sohrabji, Ph.D. Samba Reddy

PublicHealth Marcia Ory Mark Benden Lisako McKyer Joe Sharkey Samual Town

Sciences Timothy Scott Thomas McKnight Hans Schuessler Valen Johnson

VeterinaryMedicine David Threadgill Ivan Ivanov Annie Newell-Fugate Gladys Ko Poter Weston Robert C. Burghardt Shridhar, Vidya

Other Grace Akinyi-Joseph Jason Hellmann Lt. Comm. Sherriff Qammer Abbasi Yi Li

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CURRENTSERVICEPROJECTS

- College of Engineering, Research Consortium, Silver Level - $500,000 (Invoiced) - College of Nursing, Domestic Violence Study - $30,842 (In progress - Invoicing Monthly) - CEHD - EPSY, Sample Storage - $4,191 (Invoiced) - Natreon, Research Consulting - $7,879 (Invoiced) - Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute Citrulline Analysis - $12,768 (Waiting for Samples) - College of Nursing, Salivary Estradiol and Progesterone - $40,061 (Waiting for Samples) - Student Health Services (Referrals as Needed) - College of Nursing, Quote for RO1 (Submitted) - Department of Nutrition & Food Sciences, Weight Loss Study - $12,353 (Scheduling Participants) - Department of Entomology, Clinical Trial - $5,100 (IRB in Preparation)

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SELECTEDGRANTSUBMISSIONS -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Nutritional modulation to minimize resistance exercise induced metabolic deregulations and improve training responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. NIH, 4/1/2017, $3,500,000. Marielle PKJ Engelen. (Scored, Resubmitted) Human biomedical research development initiative. TAMU RDF, 10/16/2017, $1,500,000. R.B. Kreider, N.E.P. Deutz, S. Bloomfield. (Not funded) Healthy workplaces, healthy employees: multi-scale environmental approaches to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. NIH, 10/16/2017, $3,597,649. X. Zhu, B Zoghi, C Lee, Marcia Ory, M. Benden, S. Town, Z. Lu, R.B. Kreder (Scored, Resubmitted) Interdisciplinary advanced robotics facility. TAMU, 10/16/2018, $1,150,000.00. P. Pagilla (PI), S. Dimarco, A. Knap, D. Darrell Worthy, B. Haridas, J. Buchanan, R.B. Kreider, A. Thomasson, B. Birgisson, P. Hur, M. Lawley, D. Song. (Funded) Effects of rice bran ingestion on markers of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, eating satisfaction, and weight loss in overweight and sedentary men and women. Anderson Global Group, 10/31/2017, $146,533. R.B. Kreider. (Approved in Concept) The relation between the meal macronutrient distribution and plasma metabolites to model the composition of meals of patients with diabetes II and cardiovascular disease: PathsUp. ERC ? TAMU, 11/1/2017, $318,697. N.E.P. Deutz. (In review). Natreon research & development program. Natreon, 1-12-18, $1,530,000. Kreider (PI). Considering launching in 2019. Development and commercialization of a nutraceutical to reduce the risk of concussions and traumatic brain injury. TAMU X-gen Grant, 3-29-18, $1,000,000. B. Patil, G.K. Jayaprakasha, G. Athrey, S. Reddy, R.B. Kreider, L. Greenwood. (Advanced to full proposal phase). Point-of-care diagnosis and monitoring of respiratory disease through exhaled breath analysis. TAMU X-Grant, 6/29/18. $1,000,000. R. Guitierrez-Osuna, Pao-Tai Lin, Gerry Cote, R. Jafari, S. Sukhishvili), N.E.P. Deutz, X. Xu. Funded. Blue Gogi research & development program. Blue Goji, 7/2/18, $1,016,589. R.B. Kreider (Awaiting contract execution).

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COLLABOR Agriculture&LifeSciences -

Department of Animal Science Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics Department of Family & Community Health Department of Horticultural Sciences Department of Nutrition & Food Sciences Department of Poultry Science Department of Recreation, Parks, & Tourism Science

Architecture -

Department of Landscaping, Architecture & Urban Planning

Education&HumanDevelopment -

Department of Educational Psychology Department of Health & Kinesiology

Engineering -

TEES Food Protein Research & Development Center Department of Aerospace Engineering Department of Biomedical Engineering Department of Chemical Engineering Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Department of Engineering, Technology & Industrial Distribution Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering Department of Mechanical Engineering TEES Center for Remote Health Technologies & Systems

Liberal Arts -

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Department of Psychology


ORATIONS Medicine -

Department of Psychology & Behavioral Science Department of Epidemiology & Statistics Department of Medical Physiology Department of Molecular & Cellular Medicine Department of Neuroscience & Experimental Therapeutics Department of Pathobiology

Nursing -

Department of Forensic Health Care Department of Pre-Natal Care

Pharmacy PublicHealth -

Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Department of Health Promotion & Community Health Sciences

Science -

Department of Biology Department of Physics and Astronomy Department of Statistics

VeterinaryMedicine&Biomedical Sciences -

Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences Department of Veterinary Physiology & Pharmacology

Institutes -

Institute for Bioscience & Technology Institute for Genome Sciences and Society Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies Vegetable & Fruits Innovation Center 37


ResourceNeeds CoreFacilitySupport - Operating Expenses - Service Contracts - Base Nursing / Medical Support - Bridge Support for Staff Between Funding - Parking and Walkway from PEAP (Lot #95)

External FundingIDC?swithPI?sOutsideColleges/Schools Increasing Engagement andUtilizationfromOutsidePI"s Development

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FutureOpportunities

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HCRF 2018 Annual Report  
HCRF 2018 Annual Report  
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