Page 1

EDWARD HOPPER AS ILLUSTRATOR

GAIL LEVIN


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EDWARD EOPPER


EDWARD HOPPER AS ILLUSTRATOR GAIL LEVIN

W

W

NOR rON

J

(

OMPAN^ I

WHITNEY

\

NEW

^>

R K

LONDON

ASSOCIATION WITH THE

Ml SE1

\!

OF

AMERICAN

\

R

I


COPYRIGHT

©

1979 BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NEW YORK Printed in the United States of America. All Rights Reserved First Edition

BOOK DESIGN BY ANTON IN A KRASS LAYOUT BY BEN GAMIT

Typography by

Fuller Typesetting of Lancaster

Four-color printing by Eastern Press Inc.

Black-and-white printing and binding

by

Frontispiece: PI. 53.

Edward Hopper,

The Murray

illustration for System,

Illustrations in Pis. 141-66, published in the Farmer's Wife, are

Farm Journal, Publishing Company. mission of

Inc.

Copyright

©

1915,

1916,

1917,

Printing

March

Company

1913. p. 231.

reproduced with the perand 1919 by Webb

1918,

Wells Fargo Messenger, and Pis. 429-34, commercial illustrations for Wells Fargo & Co., are reproduced with the permission of Wells Illustrations in Pis. 224-42, published in

Fargo Bank History Department. Copyright Illustrations in Pis. 243-60, published in

the permission of the Curtis Publishing

Curtis Publishing

©

1916, 1917,

the Country

and 1918 by Wells Fargo & Co.

Gentleman, are reproduced with 1916 and 1917 by the

Company. Copyright

©

Company.

Illustrations in Pis. 307-33, published in Scribner's Magazine, are

permission of Charles Scribner's Sons. Copyright

©

1923,

1925,

reproduced with the

and 1927 by Charles

Scribner's Sons. Illustrations in Pis. 344-67, published in Hotel Management, are reproduced with the permission of Hotel and Motel Management. Copyright 1924 and 1925 by Ahrens

©

Publishing, Inc.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Levin, Gail

Edward Hopper

as illustrator.

Published in association with the Whitney

1.

Museum

of

American Art. Whitney Museum

Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967. I. II. Title. of American Art, New York. NC975.5.H66L48 "J79 74i'-o92'4 79-12577 ISBN 0-393-01243-3

1234567890


CONTENTS 1

OKI

WORD

vii

PRI.I U.I'

IN

ix

R.ODUC ION

I

I

i

HOPPER'S CAREER

VS

AN ILLUSTRATOR

9

ILLUSTRATION \ND HOPPERS MATUR1 STYL1

NOTES LIS

I

-,;

01 PERIODIC

CATALOGU1

01

\I S

ILLUSTRA1 IONS

6i


FOREWORD In

J;uiuai\

the

1920,

paintings was held

the

ai

one-man exhibition

fiirsl

Whitney Studio

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

work during

his

years

thes<

Hopper's work

\n liom uilr.

his

fo,

w.is carried

founding died

to a publit

In

.1

yeai

1976 the

\ii<h<n

she

later,

i<

\\

in

.1

foui

\

i

woi

k ol

ai

nine when

.1

support

hei

Museum

~ \<i h

When

theii

entire

an American

artist evei

>n a

generous

Hoppei Bequest

ih.a will

Mellon Foundation provided

volume catalogue

Norton

\\

\\

Museum

<

Eot

Vmerican

ol

in

raiso

ol

Edward Hoppei

paintings, drawings, prints, and illustrations, to be published in by

foi

through com

1 1 -_;

death

ih<-

to

grant to support curatorial research ol the

culminate

i

Museum

artist's

left

ol the

1

help came

on by the Whitney

bequest

inst itut

5

his

1915 by

in

support

little

recognition;

little

1930 until the

in

estate, the largest

artistii

made

its

and was earning

were receiving

artists

finding

u.i>

Mrs Whitney

mercial an and illustrating

American

Hoppei

founded

lub,

(

Edward Hopper's

i>t

ompany,

ln<

Gail Levin was appointed

.

in

1982

association with the Whitney

Associate Curatoi

ol

the

Hoppei

Collection to conduct this research and to prepare two majoi and

fm

1

1

1

v

Prints

<

exhibitions

and

ol

Hoppei

s

work

Illustrations, foi whit h tins

Complett Prints

serv<

paintings and drawings

as catalogues

I

he

first

hook and

tin

s

/

is

<U-

Edward Hopper:

du ard Hoppei

I

he

second will present Hopper's

fhese exhibitions are planned also to celebrate


1

V1

the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 1

first

exhibition

supported by Philip Morris Incorporated and the

is

Endowment

National

two sponsors are the

Whitney Museum.

for the Arts, the second by Philip Morris,

Over the years

endeavor so closely identified with our

their efforts have

of the

life

how much

positive,

and he rather

This, therefore,

it.

of his life

His attitude toward his

history.

illustrator.

is

them

of

and what part

prolific

work

as

of his art

an

first

presentation of

sought to

his wife,

would enter

illustrator

successfully discouraged discussion

the

a major

private person who, through his

and the watchful protectiveness of

efforts

determine

made each

Whitney Museum.

Edward Hopper was an exceedingly

own

them

a pleasure to express our appreciation to

It is

aspect of the ongoing

These

largest supporters of exhibition activities at the

for their association in this history.

Whitney Museum. The

was never

and study

Edward Hopper

of

an

as

Gail Levin's diligent research was aided by information

from the Reverend Arthayer Sanborn and Clyde Singer. Their cooperation throughout preparation of this catalogue of Hopper's illustrations

was invaluable to Dr. Levin and the Whitney Museum. All research

and

on Hopper builds upon the work of Lloyd Goodrich

his intimate

knowledge of the

artist

from their association more

when Hopper was a member of the Whitney Studio Club and Goodrich was an editor of The Arts, a publication supported by Mrs. Whitney. Goodrich, now an Honorary Trustee of the Museum, than

fifty

years ago

became a curator the

in 1935

and was Director from 1958

Whitney Museum's continuous recognition

particularly in the in 1950

and

to 1968.

Hopper's work,

of

major retrospective exhibitions Goodrich organized

1964, resulted in the

Goodrich's observations of the

Hopper Bequest

artist's

life

Museum.

to the

and work, published

books, meticulously recorded in papers and notes, and simply

We

bered, are also a resource of primary importance.

debted to him for for

His and

and

this

in

remem-

are deeply in-

and

for his enthusiastic support

assistance

our present project.

It is

a personal pleasure to be associated with a

able to carry forward a

commitment

thusiasm of the founder.

I

hope

to

an

artists will

Museum's involvement with Hopper may public institution that

which then continues

is

this

artist

museum which

and sustain the

Tom

en-

note that the Whitney

serve as a

model

dedicated to the work of living

commitment

is

for

any

artists

and

for the life of the institution.

Armstrong-

Director

Whitney Museum

of

American Art


PREEAC'K

I

his

total

volume

is

prelude to

.1

production

published

ol paintings,

volumes.

foui

in

tin-

became apparent

much

his

own

the originals,

in

harsh evaluation

making

trations,

ol

the earl)

in

Hopper's work as an

proofs,

.i>

its

ol

stag

illustratoi

published form)

then

1

Extensive investigation .nut

quality.

up man) more examples

searching turned

Edward Hopper's

ol

drawings, prints, and illustrations, to be

It

research foi the catalogue thai

had survived

atalogue raisonne*

1

Hopper's published

ol

illus

possible to identify most ol the collection ol proofs

if

he saved.

Hoppei

liiniscli

making research all

left

all

no written records

the mori difficult. While

I

hope

an illustratoi

as

thai

I

have

ited

lot

extant examples ol his published illustrations and original artwork,

additional examples ma) com* 01

ol his careei

paintings

those

foi

which appeared Perhaps some

in

illustrations

publications not

ol the dates

advertisements,

to light

ol

-

here,

to h,i\

<â&#x20AC;˘

may

yei

illustratoi

Milton

(

was fortunatt

ederquist,

in

illustrations

l><

asc<

commissions, such

illustrations

woi

k.

ol

as

rtained

how he ob

his years

locating and interviewing Elsi<

who commissioned

his

the commercial

foi

tained them, would also help to illuminate the story I

01

contained

publication

in proofs,

Furthei information on Hoppei

the original drawings

ol

published

known

and places

now known only

mor<

.in

Scoti

an

and

from Hoppei dui


ing the 1910s; although they were invaluable sources of information,

most of the

Hopper's career

details of

as

an illustrator have been

lost

with the passing of his generation. Besides the usual problems of locating, identifying, and dating Hop-

one of the major

per's illustrations,

completing

difficulties in

this study

has been whether to define as illustrations those original drawings or

known

paintings not

and even doodled on be

have been published. Hopper often sketched

to

illustration board, but

much

of this

miscellaneous drawing often produced,

classified as

work can only

it

would seem,

with no specific end in mind.

There the to

are

numerous works,

Whitney Museum

particularly in the

American

of

this

however, that some of these were produced

Victor Hugo's

been able

a

may

Some

publisher.

them

probable,

student exercises for

as

possibly have been these

of

ac-

in hopes

if so, I

have not yet

published form. Inevitably, certain of

in

Hopper's works not included

made

undated or unidentified

actually have been published, but

to locate

It is

other works, such as the illustrations for

L'Annee Terrible, may

of interesting illustrations

Still

volume.

may have been submitted but not

illustration class, while others

to

which were certainly intended

Art,

be illustrations and are thus included in

cepted for publication.

Hopper Bequest

in this

volume might be

classified as

prob-

able illustrations 01 unfinished illustrations. These, however, will be treated in the catalogue raisonne of drawings or watercolors.

In the process of compiling the catalogue raisonne, to collect all of the

volume are

American

have attempted

Hoppers' correspondence. Either original manu-

scripts or copies of all the letters in this

I

in the

from the

Hopper

artist

or his wife referred to

archives at the

Whitney Museum of

Art.

am especially grateful to Tom Armstrong, Director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, for entrusting to me so important a project I

as the

catalogue raisonne of

and continuing support

Edward Hopper and

of this endeavor.

W. Mellon Foundation which

I

for his

encouragement

wish to thank the

Andrew

has generously supported research for

the catalogue raisonne of Hopper's work. I

gladly acknowledge the invaluable help of Lloyd Goodrich, whose

writings

on Hopper

as well as his

unpublished notes from extensive

interviews provide an essential resource.

He

has always generously

made

himself available to me. His early and lasting interest in Hopper's work,

continuing Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney's original commitment this artist, resulted in the I

Hopper Bequest

wish to thank the entire

day-to-day help.

Tom

staff at

Hudspeth

lias

the

to the

Whitney Museum.

Whitney Museum

assisted

to

me on

for their

this project in

many


ways, including helping

me

organize the illustrations. Doris Palca has

added her support

enthusiastically

from

to this project

inception.

its

Anita Duquette was helpful in arranging for photography.

my secretary, am also grateful

Hubscher.

helped conscientiously and typed

script.

to Jennifer Fiur

I

and

teered their time,

summer

interns

would

I

two

Rogers,

excelled in searching for obscure data on Hopper.

like to express

Arthayer

Fleischman,

and Helen

Singer, brary,

and Tara Reddi. who volun-

Goodman and Dorian

Julie

manu-

this

my

who have helped

appreciation to others

important ways: Patrice Bachelard. Alice K. Bradford, Lawrence

in very

A.

who

to

Terry

Tittle.

Sanborn, Charles Scribner

R.

Walter Zcrvos

New

the

ot

Clyde

III.

York. Public

Li-

William Sartain of the Library of Congress, Robert L. Mowery Wittenberg University, Diana Haskell of the New-

of the Library ol

berry Library, Pat Sheidt

ol

the Arts

Gendebien and Daniel Evans

Club

ot

Lafayette College deserve

of

W.

Chicago, and Albeit

special

thanks. I

apprei iate

the-

efforts ol

Hopper's illustrations

ing

fames Mairs

in rare

both

extant examples

which, coincidentally, his grandfather published.

\spmuall tonina

for hei

(trass,

also desei ves I

tasl

also

thank Margarc

and Brian O'Doherty, who knew

\n

this

Novak,

and generously

well

thank

also wish to

I

personal recollections have helped

me

I

volume,

lancy, Barbara

(

Hoppers

the-

shared then reminiscenses with m<

designing

ol

have had valuable conversations with John

through

Farmer's Wife

of the 1

for locat-

conscientious help in editing this manuscript.

who had the- challenging m\ thanks.

theii

and

editor

as

all

those-

who

know Hoppei

to

bettei

have learned much from John

I

both

ol

whom

benefited from Foi

disc

I

hope

these previously ol

ussions with

that

complete

ol

oeuvre.

majoi representational also

be

ol

the-

illustrations will

Edward Hoppei Already

I

W. Brown, manuscript

to read this

am

grateful.

ver)

also

I

eo Steinbc

the publication and

unknown

the development

his

I

which

foi

and conclusions

the content

sponsible-.

own work

took time from then

and make important suggestions,

Baui and Milton

II

I

recognized as the creatoi

am,

I

course,

ol

accompanying add

as they

deservedly

artists ol the

book.

w

famous

as

analysis ol

understanding

to the

ar<

re

inti

one

part ol

.1 .d

America's

ol

twentieth century, Hoppei should

ol

a

group

distinctive

popular

ol

illustrations w ith lasting appeal.

<

..id

I

,e\ in

De< ctiibci

1

8,

]>)-*

EDWARD HOPPER

XI


a

[NTRODUCTION In

every

found

i'.

(ailed,

\n

and

In spiti

changes

this

Edward Hoppei

ni

artist's

mature development

almost

ii"

hooks

01

s

careei

d sin used this aspect 1

of his wor) as

an

"I liis

this attitude

enl

a

1

<>|

American

all.

at

ol

m

to

illustrations,

he covered

Published

1925.

None this

"l

"l

the

period

probably

be

Hoppei himsell

then existence fact,

an

Hoppei

illustrations

190G

American illustration Ins

that

beliel

Formative years,

ol his

many

in

1

his

ol

1935

he

it

up.

he spoke

II

was with great reluctance Ins

group

Ins original

\n. and

What

to death.

ol

illustrations,

them,

it

is

as well as

remarkable

many

ol

along with the various periodicals containing

numb<

what*

<>i

an illustratoi are scant.

mci

toward

large

nations were included ol

(

illustrator, it

Hoppei saved such

\

as

known

cause the authors have not

tions

in

yean From

even acknowledged

<>i

noi

little oi

linked to the work

is

exhibition catalogues on

considered

Given

him

statement

s

worked on during the twenty

Hoppei

intellect

artist's

rsonality,

from birth

little

attention has been given to the

references to

pi

always

is

with slight modification. Changing fashions

is,

mattei altei

oi subject

work

later

nucleus around which the

himself; the central ego,

is

was once, he always

methods

The

the earlier.

in

builds his work in.

development the germ of the

artist's

the proofs

his

drawings and paintings done

Hoppei Bequest

in

the

a

Few othei

to the

Whitn<

originals have survived.

thai

y

illustra .is

dins

Museum However,


most of the originals for Hopper's were probably destroyed. Some productions.

A

have disappeared and

illustrations

illustrations exist only in published re-

few of these publications are so rare that there

When

one extant copy. Others are available only on microfilm. publications

moved

their art

departments

new

to

only

is

various

locations, they often

shipped original drawings and proofs to pulp mills. 2 (Publishers rarely returned the original drawings to the

enough

to insist

on

Some magazines even

it.)

they were important

artists unless

sold the originals to their

subscribers. 3

Today, none of the publications known

than once, often to different

Of

1920s during his

growing reputation

and Hopper's

cities,

Hopper

the originals last

have reproduced Hopper's

any of the originals. Most have moved more

illustrations can locate

in the process.

to

saved,

and most

were

most were done

and

years as an illustrator

as a painter,

illustrations

in the

time of his

at the

of these are

lost

from Everybody's

magazine and Scribner's Magazine.

Hopper

said that he

commercial

was good

Hopper

insisted:

Hopper

Mrs.

In 1935

Hopper claimed

was not interested

his

a single

need

man

Hopper

pretty girls."

it

was forced

I

tried to force

I

wasn't very real."

"I

6

who

country

was always interested in

people waving their arms."

to illustrate for a living, in this

all.

5

have been a poor illustrator because he

in the right subjects:

shovel coal or something."

Later

But

it.

but the editors wanted

architecture,

Defending

to

(Jose-

contradicted, or at least cor-

as Jo)

make some money. That's

myself to have some interest in

know

figures.

4

"Illustration didn't really interest me.

in an effort to

most

art because, unlike

him when she exclaimed: "He never could do

rected,

it

human

he could draw

artists,

phine Verstille Nivison, known

into

commercial

at

hasn't

Hopper had

7

insisted: "I don't

to teach, paint signs,

8

reiterated, "I

was

a rotten

illustratorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; or mediocre,

anyway," and explained that he was not interested in drawing people "grimacing and posturing. Maybe to

do was

to paint sunlight

Hopper revealed "Sometimes

I'd

his

on the

for

money and

wouldn't get the lousy thing." as a

commercial

not very human.

side of a house."

ambivalence about working

walk around the block

wanting the job

in,

am

I

artist

and

1(l

a

the

Museum

of

Modern Art

I

magazine lie

that he

illustrator

wanted

Another time an

illustrator:

same time hoping

at the

Adventure, and other periodicals, but that as the Saturday Evening Post. n In his essay for the catalogue of

What

couple of times before

Hopper admitted

as a

as

°

I'd

to hell

I

had worked

for

Scribner's,

had never aspired

as

high

Hopper's retrospective exhibition

in 1933- Alfred

go

Barr wrote of Hopper:

at

"He


is

now famous but

twenty years his career

for

the point of mystery.

and architecture but

.

.

He

.

12

was obscure

to figure

make

to

a successful illustrator

\fter

mediocre summer's work in 1915 he began to devote most of

a

Although he wrote Barr a polite displeased with the tone and

letter

some

time

his

he learned to etch. 13

to pot boiling illustration. In his spare time

about

Hopper was

it,

evidently

of the inaccuracies in Barr's essay,

Hopper was outraged. She wrote

but Jo

to

Barr also noted:

uncompromising

too

artist

as a painter of landscape

were devoted exclusively

his student years

painting and illustration.''

He was

is

an

as

now famous

a long letter expressing her in-

dignation to Alice Roullier, the chairman ot the exhibition committee

Chicago Arts Club, where the exhibition was

of the

New

York showing

wed

the publicity, stuff

01— so discouraged,

etc. 1

certain!) did

do plenty

Hi

had no one

to support

He was

he pleased.

in

hand

lus

11

compromise •motives

"It

.

twent) years—a pool

Foi

ol

h< et<

[id

could

.m<l

live

the sort."

thai

such mannei

[77i<

.mil

to

sun

thing

IniiiM 1

to give

him things

fling

sin

mi l

lli

ea

h here irtists

frugal

ol

D

l>

life

easily

Dial]—express

Express

any

illustration 01

and

ol

strictly silk

M

>•]— all

him— lei him go

not his kind to do.

could

he painted

in

1

did

le

nuke him work lus

own

Ins

commercial work

Ins

own

affaii

Same

studio h.is

.1

oui

.is

underwear— nobody's business

didn'i even runabout with the illustration profes-

Hoppei

doesn'l

like at all all this playing

an illustratot and having peopli

an illustratot

's

iends were the painti h. ...

ii

.dso revealed thai

ol his i" ing pii

Ills

the dishes 01 washing oui

not oui sion. \\>>

11

the resi

ek

only poi boiling

pari

loppei

could gel without

Scribner's were wonderful to

work hard— when he was working— but no oni three da

I

il

could not do pretty girls— hi

.ui<l

W

I

much in characta own gail careful not

very

Vs to

draftsman that he could

.1

Did covers of ship yards Wells

more than

all this sob-sister

pot boiling— but was never a wage slave.

of

accomplished

mj

you have any control over

you could prevent

not hum

.

.

She insisted that they

to illustration— such illustration as he

companii

Ins

il

\it.

ommented:

He

.is

Modem

dignity," imploring,

he so relieved

pot-boiling illustration, fo

t

ol

newspapers about being neglected

in

lust] at

Museum

the

at

Hopper "some

allow

to travel after its

it

isn't

ily

up

illustration in lus

"

who kneu Hoppei One, Nathaniel

J

evei

remarked on

Pousetti

Dart, did

his earl)

careei

so publicly

as

with

EDWARD HOPPER


amount

a certain

magazine The an

in

his

Hopper had been

article that

a

"Personally

The

Hopper's work.

one

second

to

letter

the

work

strongly influenced by the

contemporary Charles Burchfield, causing Pousette-Dart

erate his point:

the

Hopper wrote

of condescension.

Art of Today in 1935 to protest Pousette-Dart's assertion

is

see

I

one

first

Charles

two major influences

Burchfield's,

which

to reit-

Edward

in

Winslow Homer's, which

is

basic;

is

directional."

is

Pousette-Dart had become acquainted with Hopper's work in

of

St.

15

Paul,

Minnesota, when he was art director of a publication called Farmer's Wife, for which that in 1922,

Hopper made drawings. Pousette-Dart

when he was

Another

artist to

out

George L. Dyer Com-

art director of the

pany, Hopper had done some

also pointed

illustrations for his firm. 16

remark on Hopper's work

Walter Tittle, a former classmate

at the

beginning in January 1914, lived

for

as

an illustrator was

New York

School of Art who,

more than

thirteen years in the

studio adjoining Hopper's at 3 Washington Square North. In his un-

who

published autobiography, Tittle,

also

worked

an

as

illustrator,

remembered:

He made the

his living at this time

American Express Company

being one of his

He

clients.

by the doing of odd commercial jobs, [actually the Wells Fargo

Company]

designed some of the posters that were

used on the sides of their wagons. Occasionally he had some illustrations to do, and, being well in touch with that field,

Edward

Hopper

neighbors at 3

and

and Walter Tittle, Washington Square North

illustrators

for

the Farmer's

Wife,

were the subject of a feature article in that

magazine

in April 1915.

him

to editors,

bit of

sometimes with

work from

success.

I

I

recommended

succeeded in getting him a

Scribner's magazine almost by brow-beating

friend Chapin, insisting that here was a

man

really too

good

my

old

for him.

Though

his

amused

to see

number

of Scribner's magazine that appeared a few years ago [PI. 312b].

Hopper's at the is all

drawings for

this

publication were small and few,

one of them carefully included

later success

I

was

in the fiftieth anniversary

caused them to claim him as an

asset,

though

time the stories were given almost in a spirit of charity, which

to the credit of the givers. 17

To comprehend

Hopper's subsequent dismissal of

one must examine both the changing; attitudes toward

what relationship,

if

his illustrations,

illustration

and

any, Hopper's illustrations have to the paintings

of his maturity. Gradually, as photography replaced illustration in rep-

resenting reality in most adult books and periodicals, opportunities for illustrators

fantasy.

became increasingly limited

And

to

children's literature

the art world's distinction between illustration -

art" or "art for art's sake

'

became increasingly

clear.

and

and "fine

Yet in 1922, a


year

when Hopper had reached

Carrington seriously,

No one who

peak

his

an

as

James

illustrator,

B.

defensively, contended in Scribner's:

if

follows the development of

modern

can afford to over-

art

men and women who draw for illustration, since past when illustration may be considered

look the work of the

for

the time has long

be-

neath the dignity of the most ambitious art student.

Some

of the

most admired painters of our time were known

in their

and they found the work

of illus-

early da\s as successful illustrators,

and discovered

trating a thorough test of their technical equipment,

between the illustration and the painting was often hard

that the line to define. 18

Cox once

Carrington added: "Kenyon

19

Veronese were the greatest illustrators that ever lived."

Hopper brought

and

to his art

flecting the reserve with

to illustration a cool

that was either overly

Hoppei preferred

detachment

re-

which he dealt with the world around him. His not lend

personality, especially his shyness, did fiction

Angelo and

said that Michael

When

freedom

in the illustration

he had to illustrate to earn

illustrating

involved with

01

what he observed

to depict

manner.

sentimental

to

itself

in

the most matter-of-fact

a living,

he found greater

nonfiction topics, particularly

<>|

Fantasy.

foi

trade

publii ations

Nonetheless, Hoppei was frustrated

at

having to illustrate

attitude was the antithesis "l thai ol the populai

Rockwell,

who even

preferred

listed that

he was not

a

duced mans

Hoppei

1 1

1

1

1

<<>\<is foi

produce work

man

.n i>

Evening

the Saturda

the public.

to be

his

I

artist,

obvious

makes

who can

You've got it

illustrate]

P

all.

who from 1916 \

His

Norman

assignment and

<>n

K"< kwell,

have resented most about having

->t

YOu've got

the fine

"fine

i<>

at

in-

pro-

summarized what

to illustrati

to please

both the

tough on the illustratoi

.in

art

editoi

and

compared with

paint an object any way he happens to interpret

itÂť

Hoppei

rejected not only Rockwell's kind ol sentimental evocations

but also the picturesque fantasies ol illustrators like (

Wyeth, and Maxfield Parrish,

styles ol (

fashionable illustrators

handlei

(

hristy

limited the market

lopment

ol

pi

Hoppei Foi

1

liki

as (

well as the elegant harles

preference

Ins illustration:

inting pi

Howard

Foi

Pyle

N

subjects and

Dana Gibson and Howard

depicting what he observed

photography and the technical >m

to

make

represi ntations

EDWARD HOPPER


and

of reality easily available, offering a cheaper

less

complicated

al-

ternative to commissioning illustrations.

At

issue

is

how much Hopper was

just

able to define "the line be-

tween the illustration and the painting" in

many

The

expression, setting,

and costume.

the illustrator must

complement the words

narrative painter the only story

painting

and

dotal

For

itself.

Hopper's

This

less specific.

that

is

the one he chooses to reveal in the

is

does not utilize the

case,

gesture, facial

of the author, while for the

particularly true

is

il-

to a text, narrative

difference, of course,

reason the painter's story

this

work. Although

same conventions:

of the 2-

own

image linked

lustration can be defined as a visual

painting often utilizes

his

title

is

usually

where the

less

anec-

artist, as in

of the painting as a substitute

caption. Nonetheless, as Carrington asserted:

Painting,

we

are told, has nothing to

lot of stories

primitives

do with

but what a

story-telling,

have been told by the painters, from the days of the old

down

to

our own times. 23

Hopper's paintings and etchings are usually evocative of a certain

and often do seem This

tive.

I

look

convey events isolated from an unknown narra-

to

consistent with a statement

is

Hopper made

in 1956:

the time for something that suggests something to me.

all

think about

it.

Just to paint a representation or a design

to express a

thought in painting

on canvas

concrete,

is

and

it

is.

Thought

is

fluid.

is

I

not hard, but

What you put The more

tends to direct the thought.

you put on canvas the more you never been able to paint what

Artists

mood

I set

lose

control of the thought.

I've

out to paint. 24

during the period Hopper worked

as

an illustrator often de-

veloped specializations in certain types of subject matter. Maxfield Parrish, for example, rendered

dreamy landscapes, while N.

portrayed vigorous, active characters. Jay depicted lower-class city classes,

New

life,

C.

Wyeth

Hambidge and John Sloan

William Glackens portrayed the middle

while Arthur Keller, one of Hopper's illustration teachers at the

York School of Art, created visions

of the life of the wealthy.

Hopper's own specializationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the subjects in which he was especially prolific as

an illustratorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; included

restaurant scenes. This

became themes Despite

"go

his

Jo

own

of

is

offices, ships, railroads,

and hotel and

of particular significance because all of these

major importance

in the paintings of his maturity.

Hopper's remarks that Scribner's allowed Hopper

gait"

and

not his kind to do,"

that they were "careful not to give

-'â&#x20AC;˘"'

it

is

him

to

things

evident from published excerpts of a letter


he wrote to the editor of this magazine in 1927 that even there he

found much

f

want

EDWARD HOPPER

fiction unsatisfactory:

to

compliment \ou

Killers" in the

March

for

printing Ernest

Scribner's. ft

is

refreshing to

Hemingway's "The

come upon such an

honest piece of work in an American magazine, after wading through the \ast sea of sugar coated fiction.

truth,

Of

mush

that

makes up the most

our

of

the concessions to popular prejudices, the side stepping of

and the ingenious mechanism

ot nick

ending there

is

no

taint

in this story. 26

Indeed, looking at the varied illustrations it is

as

he Buddha" in August 1923 or

ruary 1927 were "his kind to do"

1

for Scrib-

difficult to believe that his exotic illustrations for stories

ner's, I

Hopper produced

Edward Hopper, Summei

1

"The Distance

to

Casper"

such

in Feb-

(Pis. 314, 333).

K117

Oil

on

canvas,

,â&#x20AC;˘<

is

inches.

Private collection.


In an interview in 1955, lustration:

"Partly through choice,

more than three days prices because

tions. It

no such

And

letters or

sell a

his living

reality,

27

Yet, the fact

number

large

of illustra-

saying about this

consider that in the years subsequent to Hopper's work as

lessened

them

forcing

to

humor. Simultaneously,

as

the

changed

demand

almost

turn

Hopper's

more and more defensive about

own

competition

as the

portrayal

for

their

exclusively

fantasy

to

painting in America,

it

became

his earlier years as

particularly sensitive

painting

Summer

term

an

illustrator. Fur-

when

a

critic

and

picture apart.

it

The

I

of

remarked of

his

would do

for

Evening, of 1947, that (Fig.

i).

defensively that he had had the painting in the back of

for 20 years,

mode

"illustrative."

an illustration in "any woman's magazine"

actually started

and

too easy to label and therefore dismiss

a realistic painting with the pejorative

Hopper was

of

reputation grew, he became

thermore, as abstraction challenged realism as the leading

oil

is

other documents have appeared.

photography

romantic

work.

didn't get very good

by illustrating, but unfortunately

illustrator, the prestige of illustrators

from

I

know what Hopper was

telling to

time he earned

One must an

I

il-

hire out

to

my own

kept some time to do

able to produce and

would be

at the

was never willing

I

toward

his attitude

didn't often do what they wanted."

I

Hopper was

work

a week.

was a depressing experience.

Illustrating

that

Hopper summed up

it

28

his

He

responded

head

never thought of putting the figures in until

last

summer. Why, any

figures

art director

were not what interested me;

streaming down, and the night

all

around. 29

would it

I

tear the

was the light


CAREER AS

EDEPER'S

AX ILLUSTRATOR graduating from high school

In 1899, aftei

\< u Vol

Hoppei commuted

k.

tion at the

Correspondence School

fourth Micci

but

offered to

.1

1

1

>

York

(

Illustrating at

oi

him

who owned

commercial

stud)

to

where

hase

tion with

li<-

(

remained

Hoppei may have s

move

1

1

.1

first

Vw

to

one month I

I.

ul\

oni

.1-.

visible

1 1

<

1

.1

11

at

ti>i

illustra-

>

Wesi

1

rhirty-

\

<

>.

1

met

commercial

1

1906

l<\

its

yeai

he

Fifty-seventh

!

Street

William Merritt

foundei

and Robert Henri

York where he

1

as earl)

ol

who

Vrt.

prioi

Sloan's

formative years.

81

Foi to

(Fig. 2).

\pnl 1904,

as

lived in the

when Sloan

School

illustrator. s

1

John Sloan

<mi Id respei

during Hoppei

on West

il

and would have

k

next

In-

practii

He continued to stud) illustra Vincent Du Mond, and then studied

\lill<

New York

the

he

Vri

I

artist,

which

1906

until

Robert Henri, but certainl) foi

ol

and Fran

Vrthui Keller

Sloan

School

hase school, aftei

painting with Kenneth

aftei

1

illustration

dr) goods store in Nya<

.1

New York

attend the

formerl) called the (

11

->

parents had nol objected to his becoming an

been familial with advertising illustrations to

n\ daily to

Nyack,

ol

more secure income. Iln> must have seemed more

father,

In-,

1

encouraged

the)

to \< u

hometown

in his

just

same building

substituted

foi

as

Henri

Hopper, Sloan repre

imi 6

had worked

influence

is

particularly


Fig.

3.

Edward Hopper

in Paris, 190^

Robert Henri's Men's Afternoon Life Class at the New York School of Art, is the sixth from the left in the second row from the front. Arthur Cederquist, wearing a smock, is standing behind him, and Henri is seated in the Fig. 2.

1903.

Hopper

center of the front row.

Fig. 4.

Edward Hopper, Le Louvre {Le Pavilion de {â&#x20AC;˘'lore). 1909. Oil on canvas, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine

23 x 28 inches.

N. Hopper.

70.1 174.


Hopper had heard Henri

work

praise the

European

of

such as

artists

EDWARD HOPPER

1

1

Daumier, Courbet, Degas, Manet, Renoir, Rembrandt, Hals, Velasquez,

many

Goya, and El Greco, and like so

other of Henri's students,

he should travel to Europe to see the works of these great masters hand.

with his parents' help, he

So,

did not return until the following August (Fig.

pon

I

a

his

return. Hopper worked

week earning money

New York Hopper had

1909 and 1910. In

show

work

his

during

in art exhibitions

and

3).

for an advertising agency three days

pay for two additional

to help

first-

Paris in October 1906

left for

felt

trips

abroad in

two opportunities

his first

to

During March

this period.

Rl St.

,,.

»->«.*.

New

York.

ecoved from

9-31, 1908, he exhibited with several other Henri students— including

Uouars .

Arnold Friedman. Glenn O. Coleman, George Bellows, Rockwell Kent,

tenons

in

IV

and Guy Pene du Bois—in rented space

He showed The

building at 43—45 West Forty-second Street.

one

of his Paris oil paintings, in the

Exhibition

organized by Sloan, Henri, and Arthui 1910, on Wesl

he settled cial art

New York

in

and

hirt) tilth Street

I

01

freedom

be enlarged

su(

dieu

rcolor, ui

IVi

foi

tions foi

uhi<

1

nol I

sin h

in

as

painting oi any

size,

having

to

Ins

oil

Pis

producing

could

V

K01

on canvas, such

25a

Ins illustrations

crayon, Ol pen and ink

illustration

m

"i

il,

in

z6a

thes<

In in

I

Ins

On en 1

illustrations

Hoppei il><

utilized a

foi

one

<

hara<

tei

to

printing them reversed

1-

in

P foi

1

some

ol

ol the even-

rayon drawing

corrections which did

drawing was photographed

itrange unint* ntional

in

black-and-white illustra

lin illustrations, sui h as

white paint

\t

painted

Houst

I

as

le

white, black, and shades

(Pis.

ol these

the years

nov

drawings.

Hopper's designs b) cropping

editors did not hestitate to altei "i

it

cut the designs

white substance, however, has tinned graj ovei a

foi

on complications

rel)

enabled him bettei to approximate the tonal values

1

adding

\n

various media

1921

show up when

them

the photographii

l>\

wood engravers, who previously

Everybody's, he worked

Scribner's,

his

01

longei

ii"

in charcoal, |>en<

tual reprodu< tion foi

initially trained to

Inst

reprodu* tion

in

gouachi

Everybody'i

was the

reduced by the camera as the editoi desired. Illustrators

01

submits d

lie

1-27,

Europe

tune screen, this process offered the

hall

drawing

to create a

Hoppei worked tunes

Vfter his last trip to

be reproduced

to

Using the

as the abilities ol

ti

artists

Artists

Davies held April

B.

1

illustrators

ol

weie simplified b)

tasks

Independent

ol

and supported himsell through commer-

work intended

paint

process of transfer. artist

Fig.

.

Louvre,

illustrat

Hopper's generation

diau

Ciry

Harmonie Club

at the old

s

item where the same design

often appeared in various!) altered versions in different articles

Pis

Count

.[*%«-

G«rcporxiaxc School

oi ]lluttT«tkif

C

A receipt for Hopper's tuition from the Correspondence School of Illustrating. 1900.


12

42a, 42b, 47a, 47b). Scribner's actually divided a

drawing photographi-

and printed two smaller reproductions on two pages

cally

(Pis.

323a,

323b). Although the original art for all of his magazine covers is lost, it is safe to assume that some alteration of color resulted in the printing process.

Hopper

illustrated for several trade or business publications includ-

Wells Fargo Messe?iger, the Express Messenger, Hotel

ing System,

Management, The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

and Tavern Topics. These

required factual representations of the daily activities relevant to the periodical's focus illustrations

and generally allowed more

he produced for

fiction in

artistic

freedom than the

magazines such

Adventure,

as

Everybody's, and Scribner's. Probably the most specific demands were the commercial advertisements.

These appear

first

income-producing assignments

first

economic independence.

an

as

to have

illustrator,

been Hopper's

allowing him his

Regardless of whether he was responding to the unpredictable de-

mands nal,

of fiction writers or producing a series of covers for a trade jour-

Hopper

when

excelled

more "painterly"

the editor required what can be called a

illustration.

Rather than conforming

to the style of

simple linear drawings published in magazines such as Adventure,

Hopper was

when he painted or drew more elaborate piccovers for Hotel Management and The Morse Dry

at his best

tures such as the

Dock Dial or

the full-page illustrations for Scribner's or Tavern Topics.

Although Hopper's

forte

was depicting reality rather than represent-

ing some author's imaginary fantasy,

an assignment

as

it

appears that he never received

newspaper

illustrator-reporter, the kind of

an

tion practiced by Henri, Sloan,

illustra-

William Glackens, Everett Shinn, and

others during the 1890s. His greatest degree of expressive freedom in illustration appears in various series of painterly covers for trade publications.

The demanding

pace of meeting art editors' arbitrary publication

deadlines, to which jected,

was incompatible with Hopper's manner of working.

question

"When do you

myself to." until

it

32

paint?"

Hopper

replied,

"When

Mrs. Hopper added, "Eddie always waits for

I

it

To

the

can force

and

it

isn't

knocks him over that he gets up and stretches a canvas." Hop-

per then remarked, "So

fun

and routinely sub-

illustrators are inevitably

all

at all. It's

The most

many people

hard work for me."

say painting

significant events shaping

his formative years stays in Paris.

were three

There,

Hopper had known

in

is

fun.

I

don't find

trips to

Hopper's development during

Europe, particularly the lengthy

October 1906, Patrick Henry Bruce,

since 1903

it

33

when

whom

they were both in Henri's class at


New York

the

School of Art, "introduced him to the work of Impres-

sionists, especially Sisley,

came

edly

Hopper undoubt-

admire firsthand the work of Degas, Manet, and Renoir

to

whose work he had previously learned of

more than any other

artists,

Hopper

late as 1962

think I'm

said, "I

These French

of Paris.

Hopper with

influences, provided

tion in his A\ork both as an illustrator

and

as a painter

still

an impressionist."

and

inspira-

etcher. As 35

While

Europe, Hopper also visited Holland where he became acquainted

in

Rembrandt and

with

work

the

The

Dutch masters, and Spain where he saw

the other

Goya and Velazquez.

of

years following his last trip to

Europe

economic and aesthetic struggle for Hopper.

Europe."

ten years to get ovei

1910 were

in

Much

when

"It seemed awfully crude and raw here

I

During the 1910s and

,;

Vcademy

show fees

to exhibit

K)i

in

took

me

1920s, he sub

the National

ol

and sold them

his prints regularly

although except

prices,

It

Design onl\ to have them repeatedly rejected. 87 Hopper

of

manage

did

time of

a

he admitted.

later,

got back.

mitted his paintings to the conservative exhibitions

the one

foi

purchased From the

oil

he sold no paintings until 1924

;.

he earned

modest

Armory

In these lean years, the

represented

his illustrations

foi

E01

much-needed source

.1

mi omi

Given

his financial needs,

no wondei

is

it

conform, howevei reluctantly,

to

and adv<

editors

rtising

consistent

jtyh

examples

ol ins

work

more sympathetic viously insisted

would

than

foi

to th<

Vmong Hoppei

5

Everybody

comparison

t

ompan

.

in

1906

I.

el

sell

the

foi

on- he

of these illustrations indicates that 1

left

foi

Hopper, ^rt

New (

\<>\V.

founded

oles Phillips

during

\

and

by

(

lareno

had also been this

is

present

several

oi

more

.1

contemporary

While some editors were

Ins illustrations are

Bulletin oj Paris

\

tht

\<

1

three

York

stamp on the back

he submitted these to C. C. Phillips

tmpany, an advertising agency located

Street in

various

formal and subject

just a specifii

attempts to

earliest

ol

integrity ol the illustrator, others ob-

unpublished covers he produced on

usually

different magazines artistii

on more than

demands

willing

u.is

hus, his illustrations in a parti< ulai

I

01 .1

Hoppei

that

to the aesthetic

tg< n< ies

Idventun

periodica] such as

"I

art

Courbet and Daumier and discovered the work of the etcher Charles

Meryon who had produced such enchanted views

of

was prob-

in Henri's class. It

became familiar with the

ably during his stay in France that he of

34

Renoir, and Pissarro."

.1

(

at

t

\

East

oles Phillips

student

at

the

rwenty-second I

New York

Like School

probably how they met, although Phillips

EDWARD HOPPER

13


14

Edward Hopper

Fig. 5.

1906. Coles Phillips

is

was only enrolled in 1906,

(right

foreground)

at

work

in the C. C. Phillips

Agency

in

seated across from him.

in the night class.

and closed

it

While

Phillips started his agency

early the next year, the Bulletin of the

New

York

Edison Company ceased publication with the issue for November 1907, perhaps indicating why Hopper's charming covers were never published.

Soon

after closing his agency, Coles Phillips

cessful career as

The ment

an

suc-

illustrator.

earliest datable

for

began a very

published illustration by Hopper

Brigham Hopkins straw

sometime during 1908

(Pis.

is

an advertise-

hats for the season of 1909,

392, 394).

guess that this unsigned advertisement

40

is

produced

Although one might never by Hopper, the proof was

inscribed in Jo Hopper's hand: "Lettering by E. H.

&

silhouette," evi-

dently so that this would be clear for posterity. This indicates that

Hopper was responsible

for all

but the representation of the

advertisement for the Sherman & Bryan advertising agency of

and Chicago was one of years.

hats

The

New York

several other assignments during the next few

Hopper's use of silhouettes to depict various

and

hats.

his overall layout

for the

men wearing

straw

advertisement are reminiscent of

other art nouveau designs of the period. This early work shows that he

had not yet developed

his

own

distinctive style, although

it

demon-

strated a certain refinement.

The

next datable illustration, also produced for Sherman

& Bryan,


.

was an announcement for buyers of a catalogue for the Wearing Ap-

Show held

parel

40;

(PI.

New York on

in

and therefore must have been drawn

19-26, 1910,

1909

Madison Square Garden

in

in the latter part of

Hopper's black-and-white design, featuring a crowd of

1.

buyers in winter dress, has quite a bold graphic sense with

low depth and caret id use

The

next dated

Sherman

took place in Chicago on March 2-9, 1910

announcing

1

it

Again,

as this ad-

was probably produced

lothing ads, ob\ iously a preo<

1

with

."

.

produced

Sherman

for

Spice

Of Life"

Fashion

for

Clothes also appears to date from Hopper's employment at Sherman

Bryan

PI.

1-'-'

Vnothei

.

Sherman

ol

\

\

From

upation of this agency.

The

Is

.

line.

illustrations

ial

the advertisement "Variety

>tyle,

it>

commen

Hopper's

were-

an adver-

Colossal Exposition of national scope

\

muscles decoratively indicated by patterns of

Bryan

is

Show" which

Hopper's design featured an Atlas figure holding up the

in late 1909.

of

very shal-

Bryan,

&:

(PI. 404).

vertisement was aimed at potential exhibitors,

Many

its

of pattern.

illustration, also for

tisement for "The Wearing Apparel, Textile and Fashion

sign

January

&

Bryan's accounts, Brandegee,

New

Kincaid & Co., clothing manufacturers with tailor shops in Utica,

York, provided Hoppei with numerous assignments which are related

woi

in style to his othei

Sherman

lot

Bryan

&

be

art

yearbook

made

produced

y.

1

:

11

1

^t

<

in his earliest

series

a

favoi

a

1884

hi editoi

foi

i<r,|

ederquist's youngei

three b)

ol

Hoppei

;

illustrations

foi

and

noi

Ins

to press

11

it)

I

01

before February

Engraving Company

mi

shorts .Hid

Henri

Fi

ederquisl was supervis-

his

foi

thi

foi

Pis

28

titl

a

-:

3

New

85

when

1912,

^ 01 k.

the

which

illustrations,

the yearbook were

in Buffalo,

name

undei the

other students and

l>\

titl<

title

.1

(use are

I

the yearbook

made

the

l>\

I

le<

rhe original draw

Âť.'-'

Foi the athletics section, â&#x20AC;˘

foi

Il<

Vrthui

where he misspelled the word, and

he engravings

were di* arded

(

the

1912.

illustratoi

illustrations,

paid

the section entitled "Society

went

and

in his class with

along with those

Hoppei was

Melange,

the

Foi

the artisl

who had been

Vtheletics"

datable to late 1911

ings

but

style,

Easton, Pennsylvania, in

his friend,

the yearbool

foi

the section

(

latei

phase as an illustratoi and would-

included one he subtitled "Greetings"

1'

work

ol this identifiable

Hopper's

brother, Milton Olivei

"Seedy," are published

foi

None

losel) related to

Lafayette College in

ol

these as

1

ing

<

lit

Hoppei

(

very

is

him

rather represents

this agent

k foi

shut,

Hopper depicted an Vtlas-1 ike figure who kneels and holds Lafayette .1

dr< (

ollege

EDWARD HOPPER

15


DV t*Mifoi n

r Robert Henri's class at the New York School of Art, c. 1903-04. Hopper is third from the Kent and Arthur Cederquist. George Bellows leans over the first easel on the left.

Fig. 6.

well

emblem above

his

the

To

his left

stand Rock-

head in place of the usual planet earth. The

and-white motifs for

this

yearbook are related to

Sherman & Bryan agency,

plicated

left.

flat

work

his earlier

yet these designs are often

blackfor

more com-

and more innovative.

Several related illustrations not included in the Lafayette yearbook also exist in proofs (Pis. 386, 391).

These may have been

for

another

yearbook, for Milton Cederquist recalls that he was delighted with

Hopper's illustrations and used figure for "Basket Ball"

is

has a graphic presence of Vol.

IX" probably

all

that the artist sent him.

Hopper's

animated by a large emphatic shadow which its

own. The

indicates that

illustration entitled

Hopper made

a set of

"The

Dial

drawings for a

second college yearbook which has not yet been identified.


By

Hopper managed

1912,

work

to obtain

illustrating for several

EDWARD HOPPER

'7

periodicals including Sunday Magazine, The Metropolitan Magazine,

and Everybody's magazine. At and general

entertainment,

Trumbull White was where Hopper would

Hopper

1916.

time Everybody's published

this

information

During

articles.

fiction,

1911-14,

having moved there from Adventure

editor,

publish his illustrations in the issue of March

first

initially illustrated various fiction stories in

Everybody's,

but for the issue of January 1915 he produced depictions of soldiers in

war

the

for a report

from the magazines correspondent on the European

Hopper did not accompany

front (PI. 11).

the war correspondent, but

he had visited Berlin tor several days during his stay in Europe in 1907.

Hopper's illustrations began

appear regularly in Sunday Magazine,

to

which was included weekly

newspapers

in

in

cities

PL

More important was Week

Business

191

The aim

1).

S\stem. the Magazine of Business, a forerunner

where he published

Hoppei Ion ml

so

Night

of

paintings like Office

in

1953, and Nev

(.ity of

painting Office

ol his

at

York Office

appealing that he later pursu< d 1940

Fig.

ol

Night, Hoppei noted:

at

Office in a Small

7

1962. In writing an explanation \l\

aim was

to ti\

to

air,

with the

me.

In n

1

furniture which has

with

iiiik

1 1

illustrations foi

v

developed

his pictorial

len

conceptions

ads he had produced

vei

lean years.

\

much beyond Bryan

I

\I<

Neil) Whistler,

who had been sionism 1

rr_;

w.is

I

dgai Degas, and othei

influenced by

who were

William Glackens and Everett

example

is

pei utilized

Ins illustration in 1

long narrov

>j

Pis

side with the flooi tilted out

defined

e

l>\

Bryan. in

Hie

spatial organization ol

Harmony

i860

Hopper's illustration

I

in

Green and foi

\n

illustrated.

also

1912,

I

lus

is

where Hop

quite

Hopper's illustration

The Kitchen

paintings smli as

impres

in

sharp diagonal on the

.1

toward the viewer.

both Whistler's etching

iate

contemporaries, includ

tun- from the shallow space ol the frieze-like motifs he did

tli.it

His de

[6

1

ren< h impressionists

March

foi

emblem

Vmerican expati I

who

Shinn,

Everybody's

>.i<

his

Hoppei

1912,

rhis interest

Japanese prints,

shared with painters

in

the simple

signs are often related compositionall) to the art ol

James

Eoi

furniture

the office

of

and Everybody's

Sherman

foi

meaning

definite

System magazine, which provided

needed income during

In his first illustrations foi

,itK

very

a

Perhaps the "very definite meaning

refers to Ins earliei

illustration

it

the sense of an isolated and lonel) office interior rather high in the office

Edward Hopper,

until

'_m\c

'

11.

for Everybody's, January 1915. p. 75.

^\stem Irequently required illustrations of people

les in

in offices, a subject

from 1912

illustrations

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

around the

all

country.

to

â&#x20AC;˘

ol

is

em

in

depai

Sherman related to

1858 and

The Musit

I: s

about

foi

a

left

Ins

Room

Septembei

ol

1912

Fit;.

I'M"

Edward Hopper, Offia

7 (

'il

"ii

canvas,

22

1

;

Night,

at

25

inches.

Walker Art Center. Minneapolis.


PI. 4.

Edward Hopper, illustration March 1912, p. 422.

for Every-

body's,

Fig.

8.

James McNeill Whistler, The

Fig.

g.

James McNeill Whistler, Har-

inches. Freer Gallery of Art, Smithso-

mony in Green and Rose: The Music Room, i860. Oil on canvas, 37% x 27%

nian Institution. Washington, D.C.

inches. Freer Gallery of Art, Smithso-

Kitchen,

c.

1858.

Etching, 8 15/io x

6% Q

nian Institution, Washington, D.C.

PL

46.

Edward Hopper,

illustration for Sys-

tem, September 1912, p. 237.

Fig.

10.

Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt

at

the Louvre, 1879-80. Pastel on paper.

Private collection.


Fig.

Edgai

ii. '/)'

I'l

60

p.

,71.

i

inc

I

»'

_

ha Mum

Edward Hopp

Wew

'

/

'

tun of

Pau

I

Orleans,

1873.

Oil on canvas,

ranee.

>n

foi

S)

U

m

M

I'l.

P

-,

1

*3S-

Edward Hopper,

illustration

Foi

System,

March

191

;


recalls

20

compositions by Degas such

where again the

floor tilts

as

Mary

Cassatt

outward and the wall

is

at

the

Louvre

angled sharply along

the right side (Fig. 10).

A

look at several of his illustrations of

hints that 1873,

Hopper may have studied

and shops

offices

Degas's

one of the best known paintings of an

in

System

The Cotton Exchange

office interior, a

of

theme not

seen nearly so frequently as domestic interiors in the history of art

Like Degas, Hopper, in an illustration of

(Fig.

1 1

May

1913 for System, utilized the spatial device of windows receding

;

Pis. 54, 60, 64, 67).

into the picture's depth in

on

a diagonal along the left side (PI. 60).

The Cotton Exchange, Hopper used

zontal accents

and

the strong vertical

the rectangular shapes of the

windows

to

and

As

hori-

frame the

posturing figures of businessmen. In an illustration for the System of

March

1913, the positions of the female clerk leaning forward

counter and the manager with stances of the

cotton

(PI. 54).

Degas, but so

two male

Not only is

whom

on

a

she speaks are comparable to the

figures negotiating over a table laden with is

the placement of these two figures close to

the picture's overall spatial arrangement, including

the diagonal angle of the counter, the doorway,

and the cabinet, and

"The Hopper

the floor tilted forward. In several office interiors, such as one for

Spur of Pay and Promotion" in the June 1913

issue of System,

used a similar type of curved slat-back wooden Degas's

The Cotton Exchange

office

chair seen in

as well as Degas's familiar device of a

"picture within a picture" seen in works such as Sulking of 1869-71,

another

office interior (Fig. 12; PI. 64).

Fig.^i2.

Edgar Degas, Sulking, 1869-71. Oil on canvas, 12%

1814 inches. PI. 64.

569-

Edward Hopper,

illustration for System,

June

1913, p.

44

The

Metropolitan

Museum

of Art,

New

York;

x

The

H. O. Havemeyer Collection, bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929.


Hopper's arrangement of a seated and standing figure in

his illustra-

EDWARD HOPPER

L'

1

tion tor System magazine of July 1913 recalls Degas's composition in

The

Family of about i860

Bellelli

(Fig.

13;

PI.

Hopper,

67).

Degas, makes use of physical distance to express psychic tension.

like

He

again utilized Degas's compositional devices such as a "picture within a picture''

and

vertical accents

Hopper's

a curved chair to contrast with the strong horizontal

which organize the picture.

illustration for "Tales

on November

16,

1913,

vated, a pastel of 18911

Shinn in both

its

from the Road"

Henri and other

is

J.

to

the

System and Every-

Farmer's Wife, published

Pousette-Dart was art editor.

depicted typical domestic themes for Farmer's to

Ele-

artists of his circle.

work

Paul, Minnesota, where Nathaniel

Avenue

evidence of Hopper's

to illustrate for

body's and began to contribute his

magazine which catered

Sunday Magazine

This illustration resembles the

composition and theme and

During 1915, Hopper continued

He

for

reminiscent of Shinn's Sixth

is

Fig. 14; PI. 103).

roots in the aesthetics of

in St.

and

Wife, a monthly

the rural

interests ot

home-oriented

woman.

The

quality ol Hopper's draftsmanship

illustrations

he made

foi

comparison of Hopper's

Degas,

Fig

Mum

' 'in

['

M

'I'

l'

The

"mi'

particularly strong in the

Wife. For example, a

illustration in the- issue ol Farmer's

Bellelli Family,

Parii

is

nei

s

<

i860.

OH

on canvas

Wift

I'M

nches.

PI.

u-

".

Edward Hoppi (ills

191

;.

[).

1

13.

illustration for


IS

&.

-i"

-a PI.

103.

Edward Hopper,

for Associated

vember

Fig. 14. Everett

illustration

Sunday Magazine, No-

Shinn, Sixth Avenue Elevated, 1899. Pastel on paper, 8 x 12M2 inches.

Collection of Arthur G. Altschul.

16, 1913, p. 9.

ÂŁ Hi,

Fig.

15.

William Glackens,

illustration

for

McClure's, July

PI.

1 <^

-

162.

Edward Hopper,

illustration for Farmer's Wife,

Janu-

ary 1918, p. 174.

1909, p. 273.

January 1918

to

one of

a similar

theme by William Glackens

for

McClure's in July 1909 demonstrates Hopper's more careful, controlled

approach

(Fig.

15; PI.

162).

Where

Glackens's lines appear to

be spontaneously slashed across his composition, Hopper's lines and details are spare

and

precise.

His theme, however,

Glackens's interior, again linking artists in

Henri's

circle.

him

is

reminiscent of

to the earlier attitudes of the


In

Hopper began

1916,

Country Gentleman, the

to illustrate for

Week. Country Gentleman, a

Wells Fargo Messenger, and Every

national agricultural weekly catering to farm

time published It

was

families,

Philadelphia by the Curtis Publishing Company.

in

included popular fiction but focused on farming, country

door

and domestic how-to

living,

on home canning

trated in 1917

were

aimed

for articles

Hopper

such as those

articles

than his more usual

in grisaille, rather

method

or pen and ink (Pis. 244, 245).

are simplified with

il

work

sold his

women working

where he met

who

Elsie Scott

tions foi ten dollars each, a illustrations E01 the Wells

American

streets b)

editorial offices

its

purchased

Ins illustra-

get.

4 "'

Hopper's

Fargo Messenger include domestic and ol trains.

is

the spirit ol scenes

in

such as Sloan, Shinn, and

artists

office

His rendition of a French

bank Society Gene^ale

street corner with the

home.

at

was happy to

that he

scenes as well as various depii tions

ot

walking into

just

recalled that she

pine

in-

Wells Fargo Messenger, a magazine

to the

company's employees, b\

for that

forms

Again the subjects are domestic scenes,

cluding family gatherings, picnics, and first

They

areas of various shades of gray within

flat

crisply outlined in black.

Hopper

illus-

Hopper's illustrations

(Pis. 259, 260).

female readership. His illustrations for

at the

drawing with pent

out-

life,

Country Gentleman are painted of

this

at

(-lac

kens

(PI.

429)In

Hoppei began

1917,

produce covers

to

in

color lor the

Fargo Messenger and b\ 1918 he was also making them

Dock

Dial,

230, 27

employee magazine

He may

.

1

the-

have recalled

French icahsts such

Francois Millet when shipbuilders

(.ustaw

as

Wells Fargo Messenger and

and

factory workers foi System in

servative, nevei

classes.

on the covers

Political

made

11

id social

indicated in ui

.1

a

Daumier, and fean

lloiioic

Dial,

company employees

successoi

its

shared the French realists

attitude he was to

as he-

the mid-nineteenth-century

ol

bet,

the Express

comfortable family and was

.1

mattei "I

featured

an 1

(Pis.

foi

\h^,

magazine during the 1910s Yel Hopper,

and the lowei fact

shipbuilding company

a

Docl

l>>.

the

who -icw up

on

(

The Dry

foi

was called upon to depict workers including

he-

The Morse

foi

oi

tin-

Wells

.ih\.i\s

con

political

,1

desire to dignify

Laborers

Indeed, he presented these groups with the same 1

.

1

k

< -

with

the-

uppei

<

lass

wealth he

Hotel Management during 1924 25

oi

statements were evidently nol on Hoppei

5

mind,

comment on lus etching East Side Interior ol 922 No implication was intended with an) ideol 1

Intel ol 1956

concerning the pool and oppressed

from the so called roneously associated

\sh '

.

.

.

noi

is

there an) derivation

an School' with which m)

(

1

name

nlike his friend fohn Sloan,

lias

been

whose work

ei

cer-

EDWARD HOPPER

23


Hopper's early development, he found no need to ex-

tainly influenced

24

press political viewpoints in either his illustrations or his paintings.

The

Evidently he never wanted to contribute to

December 1912 through April

editor from

whom Hopper

contribute illustrations to

The

rather than out of choice,

Masses.

Hopper

magazine that could not afford

for a

aesthetics interested

Hopper,

41

his

was

to

marry

in

1924, did

Since he illustrated for in-

had no need

certainly to

art

as

1916. Interestingly, another

Henri student, Jo Nivison,

come

Masses, a radical,

magazine where Sloan served

socially conscious, anticapitalist

to

work

pay him. Although Sloan's

humanitarian, Socialist politics did

Nonetheless, Hopper's respect for Sloan was profound, as

not.

he

expressed in his article "John Sloan and the Philadelphians" in 1927:

Sloan's chief interest

which

humanity, but the architecture or landscape in

is

his figures live

always a part of the plastic whole and

is

the slight and casual thing

In the drawings

made

practical purpose.

As

for

it

so often

The Masses

is

most propaganda of

in

satirists.

this sort, society

The

drawings for

In

it.

tensive chronicle of

his

work generally and above

New York

that he has made, Sloan

of the tradition of Daumier, Gavarni in French art to

.

.

.

offered

is

sincerity of Sloan's

magazine can not be questioned and he made some of

for this

ment

and

never

Sloan's satire was harnessed to a

strong medicine for malignant maladies.

finest

to humorists

is

all

is

work

his very

in the ex-

the inheritor

and Manet and the great move-

which they belong. 48

Hopper's intentions are vastly different from the kind of revolutionary political consciousness Millet sought to convey in his depictions of peasants.

One

can contrast the French

painting Planting

artist's

Potatoes of 1861-62 to Hopper's illustration for the Wells Fargo Mes-

senger of June 1917,

and Country" patriotic

"The Wells Fargo Man Does His

(Fig. 16;

duty;

the

PI.

232a). Back-breaking effort

setting

is

middle-class

Bit For

Home

now becomes

America complete with

mother, child, and white picket fence.

Hopper made

his

most

political illustration in

1918 for a wartime

poster competition conducted by the United States Shipping Board (PI. 283a).

His design, entitled Smash the Hun,

hundred

three

dollars in a contest of fourteen

won

the

first

hundred

prize of

posters. Yet,

"Before the poster was reproduced, for distribution, the armistice was

arranged and war posters were no longer needed." Believing that "the poster carries as vital a lesson to-day as

Bert

Edward Barnes,

to use

it

as a

the editor of

it

did at the time

The Morse Dry Dock

(over for the issue of February 1919

was particularly appropriate

as

Hopper had based

(PI.

it

was drawn,"

Dial, arranged

283b). 49 This

the poster design


EDWARD HOPPER

PI.

832a.

Fig.

il

I I

Fine Arts. Boston;

ol

Jr.,

on

photograph

<>l

of

Shea

Petei

one

"I

the shipyard

the angle slab in

Having

(.ift

and Marian Shaw Houghton.

Shaw,

.1

on canvas, 32^x39% Quincy A. Shaw through Quincy A.

rancois Millet. Planting Potatoes, 1861-62. Oil

Museum

inches.

tin-

given

employees who woiked on

him

t<>

experience the atmosphere

visited the shipyard to

shipworkers, Hoppei captured in the postei toughness, and strength both industi

forms

wai

i;il

"t bi idges in the

Hoppei

s

1

'

1

-^ r

.i

1 1 1

nosh the

ii

the

in

he Survey

Revolution

in in

1907

I

Hun

in

relates in

s

teachei

and brawn

steel mills lot the

I

miiImii

\<

Hoppei must have found relatively

pleasant

Pis

since his youth in Nyacl

wood provided

in tin-

the

American the

lineai

v.

Ins

278, 288

|<

i

U

\

work

.

a

illustrations foi ol

the Industrial

Vmerican antecedents

its

rhomas Vnshutz, who

Shinn had also depicted the

in Ins portrayal ol the I

il\

foi

tQl

h.ill

in

The

Mom

He had enjoyed

Nen York,

to the industrial

Ins

in

images

82 b)

-

I

workers

ol industrial

to

Vmong

America

Henri

spun

its

[oseph Stella

Soontime of about 1880

taught Hoppei

17).

among

the smokestacks and

M also owes

1908

Europe and

is//-

en< rg)

tn<

and

figure

ig

sense "I energy,

heroi<

a

1

e.

images and workers depicted b) /

human

represented b)

effort

Barnes

l>\

Hudson

Roebling

i

Dry Dock Dial

representing ships

Rivei port where with

b) Ins fathei he had built himsell a catboal to

sail.

In-

nil

Edward Hopper,

Wells

for 7.

Fargo

back cover.

-

5

illustration

Messenger,

March


PI. 283a.

Edward Hopper, study

tration board, g 1/^ x

Fig. 17.

of

6%

inches.

for poster

The

Charles

Photograph of Peter Shea given

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial.

to

Smash the Hun, 1918. Gouache on Rand Penney Collection.

Hopper by

Bert

Edward Barnes,

illus-

editor


many

deed,

more

of these cover illustrations are simply

conceptions of the same

sophisticated

EDWARD HOPPER

-7

childhood drawings and paint-

subjects in his

ings (Fig. 19).

Hoppers

The Morse Dry Dock Dial

style for

German

been influenced by the flat

covers appears to have

poster style of the 1910s.

forms and the bold placement of forms against a

style

through some

his

ot

use of

model three-dimensional

areas of contrasting; colors as shading- to

trasting color are characteristic devices.

The

flat

ground

of con-

Hopper may have absorbed

American contemporaries such

this

Adolf

as

Treidler.

The Morse Dry Dock Dial of July 1919 mind Courbet's tamous painting The StonePI. 286). Two ot Hopper's four shipbuilders

In designing his cover for

Hopper may have had Breakers of

i<s i'i

in

fig. 20;

have poses that are mirror images ot the two stone-breakers, are seeing the two figures from the opposite direction.

as

Hopper

it

we

praised

Courbet's "mechanical strength," the "physical tone and substance" of

the-

French paintei

more than any other

s

work, stressing thai

ninete< nth

<

entui

j

ourbet had

(

painter."'

thi> quality

1

Fig.

Hoppei

s

commercial

illustration

"Presto!

19171

when

United States Patent

Office

Collar" niihi date aftei registered with the

Eor

fune y

resembles the famous 'Arrow Collai Man'

b)

A

this I'l

convertible Coat collar design

|-

S

was

nedy

Edward Hopper, Yacht, 1895. on paper, 5 x 3% inches. Ken-

19.

Pencil

Galleries, Inc.,

His style here

-

ij^.

an

Breakers,

(>im.i\< 1849.

GemSldegal(

Fig

i"

I

''.in.

\i.

dun

Iron

Voontime,

and Mrs Howard N

<

York.

[oseph Christian l.eyen-

I

14 inches Collection of Mr.

New

1H80-H2. Oil on canvas,

Garfinkli

'7

ii<

.

(

iiulii

1,

/ ''"

Destroyed, I)n sden

Stone

formerly


28

Fig. 21.

Joseph Christian Leyendecker, detail from an advertisement for the Arrow

Man. Courtesy

Collar

of

The Arrow Company, New

York.

decker in advertisements published about

1910 (Fig.

21).

Hopper

seems to have adapted Leyendecker's pictorial device of striated shading as well

Hopper

as the

facial

calm elegance of

his

Arrow

enough about

his

ad for "Knothe Unseen Sus-

felt positively

shirt advertisements.

penders" of about 1917-20 that he kept the original painting on

il-

The image is related to various stiff male who appear in his later paintings such as Office at Night of and Hotel Lobby of 1943 (Figs. 7, 22).

lustration board (PI. 427a). figures

1940

Hopper's love of things French extended beyond Fig. 22.

1943.

The

Edward Hopper, Hotel Lobby,

Oil on canvas, 32 x 40 inches. Indianapolis Museum of Art.

He

nineteenth-century painting.

his

admiration of

was able to design two covers for La

France, the American magazine on French culture, during 1919 and 1920. For the issue of

November

1919,

Hopper chose

of Viollet le-Duc's gargoyles from the north tower of a

panorama

of the city

beyond

(PI. 334).

He may

the image of one

Notre-Dame with

have been inspired

by reading a chapter in Victor Hugo's Notre-Dame de Paris entitled "A Bird's-Eye

View

of Paris."

Hopper's interest in Hugo's writing probably began before els to

France.

He produced

his trav-

a design for a cover or frontispiece to

an

edition of Hugo's Les Miserables which was most likely done as an

assignment for his illustration

class (PI. 436).

for this cover design survives (PI. 435). Later, first

trip to

France

in 190(5-7,

Even

his pencil sketch

probably just after his

he painted an impressive series of water-

color illustrations for an unpublished edition of Hugo's

about the Paris lished in

1872

commune (Pis.

entitled

L'Annee Terrible,

book of poems originally pub-

445, 44G, 447). Hopper's close friend, the artist

Guy Penc du Bois, wrote of him: "Something about the French appeals to him. He has studied their language and knows their literature to an extent exceedingly rare among Americans." B2


In designing his cover for

was aware

tainly

La France

Stryge or

The Vampire

(Fig. gg).

But Hopper's cover

Hopper

of

November

Hopper

cer-

Meryon's etching

Le

1919,

of 1853, one of the artist's best is

much

Henri Le Secq

at

Notre-Dame

(Fig. 24).

On

his cover,

Le Secq with

the

sil-

rail just

gargoyle. Like the Negre photograph, Hopper's

panorama omits the

church

medieval

LCS-MWCRABLC5

famous photograph of

his

in

has replaced the dark figure of Henri

tower of the destroyed

29

known works

houette ol an owl perched on top of the gallery

large

EDWARD HOPPER

closer to a view of the familiar

by Charles Negre

gargoyle captured

around 1851

for

of a similar view in Charles

behind the

Saint-Jacques-de-la-

Boucherie which figures so prominently in Meryon's etching. Possibly

Hopper consulted

essfully captures the

<

For hiscovei

home

closer to

ol

other sources in creating his cover which so suc-

still

La

romance 1

of Paris.

for his inspiration (PI. 335;.

Ri\erside Drive in

Hopper looked

ranee lor the issue of April 1920,

New York

City, he

At Ninety-third Street and

found Anna Hyatt Huntington's

bronze equestrian sculpture Joan of An which

and won the Purple Rosette from the French government

Hoppci

's

choice to utilize this work In one

indicate his respect years his senior;

the

foi

won from

award

Wink-

living in Paris in

1909,

<

ontemporai

who was

Huntington

that

Fig ies

own

only six

previous notice of Joan

Hoppei had written

to lus

PI.

might

government while he was

the French

struggling illustrator, as well as his

ol his

VKT0RHUC01

placed there in 1915

n.11

still

a

ol Arc.

mother:

Edward Hopper, unpublished

436.

illustration

for

Misirables,

c.

Hugo's

Victor 1900-09.

I

American

New

Vrt,

York;

Hopper

on

Museum

paper. 8 x 5*4 inches. Whitney of Josephine N.

Les

Pencil

70.

Bequesi 1

565

7

|

Ml

'-SB. I

â&#x20AC;˘ ',

Charli

-

M' ryon

/

Fi^. 2

â&#x20AC;˘

-.

de

I

I

rniversit\

onnecticuL

\n

ni

1.

Charli

fiallery,

in< si

Negri

Notre-Dame, una

'il

li<

\i

1.

1.

I

//

/

Photograph, 13% M< tropolitan Mu

Fig. 25.

Ann.

Ire,

1915.

1851.

of

he

statue

New

York.

third

at

1

Hyatl Huntington, Joan \

version ol

Riversidi

Mm ci, New

Drive

York.

the bronze tl

Ninety-


Paris

decorated in honor of Jeanne d'Arc as she has recently been

is

3<>

canonized in Rome."

53

About

own

time he produced his

this

illustra-

tion of Jeanne d'Arc, which was probably never published (PL 449).

Hopper produced tions with restaurant

a

number

of

and theater

French impressionists and

magazine covers and other

scenes, subjects

popular

\vith

American contemporaries,

his

illustra-

both the

particularly

Glackens, Shinn, and Sloan. His illustrations for Tavern Topics, a magazine given

away

to visitors in hotels in

tured these themes

(Pis. 336, 341).

New York and

For example, the issue of February

1920 includes a restaurant. This illustration position

August

ment

Glackens's illustration

to

31, 1912 (Fig. 26;

of the table

dicate that

of

is

more

March

Renoir's

it.

is

notably close in

A Broad

336).

tilt

and checkerboard design

com-

its

Mating

Prairie

PL

similarity of shape

and

the Glackens illustration

Fig.

26.

William Glackens,

Ira Glackens.

31,

illustration

1012. Chalk, black

n%x

12%

for ink,

A Broad

subtle than that of Glackens. His cover for Tavern Topics

Mary

The Loge

Prairie

heightened with

inches. Collection of

and

at this early

box

Cassatt's

at the theater, recalls such impressionist

Woman

in

of 1874 (Figs. 27, 28;

Black

PL

at the

Opera

of 1882 or

341).

VieL

Mating, August white on paper,

of

place-

of the floor in-

Yet Hopper's use of light and shadow, even

1921, depicting a

paintings as

for

The

Hopper may have known

learned from date,

and the

Philadelphia, fea-

Mr. and Mrs.

PI.

336.

Edward Hopper,

Topics, February 1920, p.

6.

illustration

for

Tavern


For the cover of Tavern Topics

photograph

for April

as the basis of his design,

Hun

winning poster Smash (he Tavern Topics

(PI.

Hopper

utilized a

he had for

his prize-

1923,

just as

:;

1

Included in the issue of

342).

February 1923 was a photograph of Fifth Avenue

for

EDWARD HOPPER

at

Forty-second Street tor a feature entitled "Controlling Traffic'" (Fig. 29).

Hopper seems

to

have worked horn

ol this

which was not actually published.

Hopper

many

has borrowed

of the photograph's architectural forms

tower featured in the center

for his cover including the traffic control

and

photograph, although the

given him another view

may have

magazine's editor, Elsie Scott, site

this

chun

several

on the right

h towers

side.

He

depicted a city bus

with passengers visible on the open top deck and a policeman gesturing

While both the bus and policeman

the composition's foreground.

in

views in the published photograph,

are present in othei

pears to have invented his

The

only sales records

own

versions

Hoppei

ap-

his cover.

foi

Hopper's illustrations to turn up so

ol

those foi Scribner's, where

Hopper

sold his

far are

drawings in 1918-25. These

Mary Cassatt, Women in Black Opera, 1880. Oil on canvas. 32 x

Fig. 27.

records,

now

provide a picture lustration

Brandywine Museum

in the

and

two drawings

on Septembei

the following Decembei

lished

ing Ear"

Pis

However,

;o8

107,

drawings was on Septembei til

the issue ol February

to appeal his fust cles^

in print

that followed,

Joseph

[31

last

and $175

to Scribner's

Chapin,

editor. In his

first

"The Hearthree

<>|

his illustrations

each

foi

ol

$100

foi

the arti-

Scribner's all

memoirs

art

who commissioned

editoi

accounts an exceptionally likable (

hapin noted

his

own openness

new work: my aim

w.is

It

.Hid especially tor

i<>

>

practio

one might

maintain

iympatheti<

a

toward the beginner, hoping

the house even

made

ol

il

we

seeing

tailed ill

to

attitude to

n

toward the

artist

make

Friend

least

do business togethei

callers,

because

om

nevei

Foi

.1

years

I

knew when

Fig.

find in

.1

portfolio the

makings

ol a future celebrii ini

tins

Chapin, who published the work

dents such as \ hsh the

last

(

Wyeth and Maxfield

illustrations hv

ol

Howard

Parrish, also

Pyle and his stu-

managed

to

pub

Hopper, who had been recommended

to

Pierre

28.

Loge,

I

I

of Fine Arts. Bos-

Henry Hayden Fund.

were returned to him.

from Hopper, u,h by

illustrations

stor)

lie received a total ol

["he originals

Hawley

and accessible to

Pis

two drawings sold

Museum

and these were not published un-

mal ing them the

1927

26 inches.

and they were pub-

1918,

his final sale to Scribner's ol

192-,,

29,

27,

foppei sold his

1

Henry Van Dyke's

foi

il-

at the

ton: Charles

example,

tual publii ation. Foi

to Scribner's

h adds lord. Pennsylvania,

(

time gaps between the sale of an

of the variable

its a<

in

187,].

hes

ondon.

'

taguste

Renoir,

Oil on canvas,

ourtauld

Institute

31%

The x 25

Galli ries


TAVERN TOPICS

32

Controlling Traffic run,

..1

ntffi,

'

.

|

.

1.

oni

,,

ihr

III

.

t..t

.

If)

01 1/

'

tni>

<

,1, 1

<•

<

'Unit'ii

..III.. I \ I

I

11'

;

I.,

II

fin

nii'i

1

-

!l„

,.

iflh

I

I

.

Fig. 30. George Bellows, Polo at Lakewood, 1910. Oil on canvas, 45 x 63

inches. Arts,

The Columbus

Gallery of Fine

Columbus, Ohio.

rin

,"«

iniii,

;.'/...

1

,

Hi,

l„ .,,1,,

>,,

\

„„l 1

Fig. 29.

Photograph of Fifth Avenue at Forty-second Street published Tavern Topics of February 1923.

tion for "Controlling Traffic" in

Edward Hopper, French

Fig.

31.

Day

Bicycle Rider, 1937. Oil on can-

Six-

vas,

19^ x

17V2 inches. Collection of

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hackett.

as

an

illustra-


him by Walter

Hopper

sold

Tittle.

work

to

On

the threshold of his success as a painter,

Chapin

and forthright manner. 55

the editor's fairness

During the years Hopper

came

encouraged by

as late as 1925, evidently

magazine be-

illustrated for Scribner's the

increasingly interested in realistic fiction, the genre of story most

who could deal with reality were most appealing to Hopper. Nonetheless, his own assignments at Scribner's still required that he capture many overly

appropriate to his

style.

dramatic situations

(Pis.

Contemporary American

writers

327, 330).

Hopper's choices of subject matter for the covers in the

duced during 192} and 1925

he pro-

series

Hotel Management, a trade magazine,

foi

are consistent with his earlier fascination with impressionism. All of these covers show

cues the impressionists favored: people at leisure

><

were also popular

out-of-doors. Similar themes

American

whom Hopper

artists

Management

lor

painting Polo

at

knew. Foi example,

October 192

Lakewood

of

athleti*

Fig.

i<>

(oppei

1

Hotel Management. Although some IctK

scenes,

Hoppei ridei

While

French

s

al

he rarely again

resi

Six

.

I

with

Ridei

action

themes

foi

Sloan

thes<

Path

his

colors

1924,

making

employed

foi

I

recalled Renoii

P

with relaxed

Pis.

work

which wen-

;i:

s

.1

-,

Perhaps

,

in

ol

various

We

can only

.n tists

such as

an endeavoi to produce

lien to his sensibilities.

seem increasingly Irrelevant,

I

hen

deco postei

ari

lineal

style

The

Like Renoir,

I

uncheon

bright, is

yel

["he

com

probably also

d<

Hotel Management

nun and women

.

rathei

painting watercolors which he began

themes.

Foi his delightful cover of

may have

1939, appeal

ol

these covers are surprisingly

influenced by contemporary

Vpril

motion, by contrast

in

I

static.

1924 and

Octobei

foi

painting

to the

illustration

patible with the open-aii

In

1937, he those to show the

ol

111spn.1iK.11

foi

By this time he was already in

motion.

Hoppei repeatedly chose uncharacteristii

may have looked

riesoi covers with subjects

lie

hided ath-

in<

vigorous

Hotel Management illustrations

Bellows, and Renoii

to sell

the depi< tion

paintings

such

equestrian subjects

Bridh

the insistence ol his editor,

spe< ulate thai he

is

various sailing pictures seem rathei

frozen and the proportions distorted .it

who had been

on the covers he designed for

Hotel Management

present

the three horses in

Hotel

,17

illustrations

s

ol his latei

dealt tele

IIi-.

i

his covers ol

1925 successfully

!>. B

PI

jo

seen particularly

activity

of other

his cover for

1910 by Ceorge Bellows

ol

the themes pe< uliai

ol

work

the

depicted polo players, recalling the

j

Hopper's classmate under Henri Oik-

in

o\

foi

|une 1925

the Boating

Hopper chose

Ih.pper

J 'at ty ol

a festive outdoor scene

eating and drinking. Mis renewed intei

EDWARD HOPPER

3

:'.


Fig. 32.

Edward Hopper, Bridle Path,

1939. Oil

on canvas, 28

x 42 inches.

The San

Francisco

Museum

of

Modern

Art.


known

Renoir, whose work he had

in

est

Rnel Galleries

New York

in

articles

this exhibition

The

57

corner into the middle ground

left

This diagonal

line

marked by the placement

is

two poles supporting the gaily striped scalloped awning

of

both Renoir

in

outward and

Hopper. In both compositions the tables are tilted

and

organiza-

close to Renoir's receding diagonal

is

which extends from the lower

of the picture space.

35

The

Renoir's masterpiece,

reproducing the painting followed.

Hopper's composition

tion of

axis

EDWARD HOPPER

Durand-

at the

Boating Party of 1881, was featured in

of the

and several

work

1922 and by the subsequent attention

in

paid to Renoir in local art publications."'

Luncheon

may have been

Paris,

in

sparked by a visit to the exhibition of the artist's

the spectator views the scene from above. In the design of his composi-

and

tion

in the

sunny theme

Hopper's illustration

itself,

is

reminiscent Fig. 33. Pierre Auguste Renoir. Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881. Oil on

of Renoir.

Hopper's cover for Hotel Management of July 1925, featuring a

woman

playing tenuis. appeals remarkably

composition

to

On

illustration

Sloan's

similar in

Court

the

Heights for the Philadelphia Inquirer of Februan PI.

from

trations

Ins

lose, as

is

the profile and ba<

Hopper's illustration

Even

\

\

i<

-w

Sloan's

band

side

1

lust

1

the

at ion.

(

Hopper's

so,

Hoppei

across

5

Hoppei enlarged

opposite Mile

ol

Sloan's ability,

also

is

1

Fig

.1

llai.

notably

Id-

may

ol

vision

playing tenuis.

lines

indicating in

the

is

Hat.

like

Sloan's Vs

in

topped on the right

surrounding

foliage.

and minimized

the foreground

shown

small,

game

is

singles

emphasizing the elegant form

Degas's,

to

convey

the graceful

well have served as inspiration

Management

illustrations

Foi

dynamism

ol

Hoppei when

M though

Moan was

patterned postei st\lc influenced by [apanese punts and

nouveau which was

1,11

from

Hoppei

-

overriding concern

three-dimensionality, his work may have provided genera] clues simplification

ink For

in bla< k

people and scenery.

ol

is

ground.

he designed his Hotel

art

necessary

Foi

Hoppei

to

with

foi

the

produce such direct and em

Fig- 34-

both

covers

if

1

postei

One

can compare,

and book covei

Foi

foi

example, Sloan's illustration

William

I

for

indsey's Cinder-Path '/airs

foil!]

Wissahickon the 12,

[di.it

Phillips

male partnei and the couple competing on the

ol the playei in the Foi

at

is

the (oint. In Sloan 's illustration the

but the opponent

activity

woman

composition and

female playei

th<

the importance ol hei

athleti.

The

spectators stretches in a near hoi izon

ol

entir<

curving horizontal

by

adepi

iow d

the

ol

design emphasizing the outline contours

tal

1892

he overall angle

I

while Sloan's was done

in coloi

is

linecut reproduction

1

68 inches.

Hopper was familiar with some newspaper illusown illustration classes and from later years after he

had become well acquainted with Sloan. i

x

Collection. Washington, D.C.

Wissahickon

at

12.

canvas, 51

Certain!)

156).

quite

theme and

its

\i

1.

Philadelphia 1892.

1

SI,

On

111,

Heights,

the Court at

illustration

Inquirer,

for

February

John Mo, in Trust, Delaware

Museum, Wilmii


of 1896 with Hopper's cover tor Hotel

36

(Fig.

35;

Management

Hopper depicted

tended, leaping a hurdle with lyrical ease.

CINDERrPATH TALES

WILLIAM LINDSEY

of August 1925

357). Sloan showed a running male athlete, arms ex-

PI.

in a similar

linear fashion a

male and female bather, arms extended, gracefully

running into the

sea.

Hopper's angle of vision

straight

is

ahead rather

than Sloan's off-center approach. Hopper simplified and flattened his design but never to the extent of Sloan's decorative manipulations.

Yet

less

than two years

Hopper expressed

later,

deep

in writing his

admiration for Sloan:

Sloan

and

one of

is

t

to the point

ose rarely fortunate artists

and without obvious

that looks like truth figures

its

that

process.

which looks

have the unaffected gestures of the

The

observed. of

and not

object

drawn

is

who

seen

distort unconsciously

His

the distortion

is

like distortion.

.

.

.

human animal when

.

.

.

Sloan's design

is

un-

before one becomes conscious

first

design or the linear structure which holds the various units

gether.

His

to-

the simple and unobtrusive tool of his

visual reaction. It attempts tenaciously

and ever the

surprise

and un-

Pierre

Auguste

Renoir,

balance of nature, as did that of Degas. 58

BOSTON:COPELAND AND DAY # Âť $ PRICE $ 1.00 Fig.

35.

poster

John Sloan, illustration for and book cover of William

Lindsey's

Cinder-Path

Tales,

1896.

Photomechanical lithograph in black and brown ink on brown paper, 17% x 1

1%

inches.

John Sloan Trust, Dela-

ware Art Museum, Wilmington.

Fig.

36.

Dance

at

canvas,

70%

Bougival, x

38%

1883.

inches.

of Fine Arts, Boston.

Oil

on

Museum


For his cover design of Hotel Management for September 1925,

Hopper again may have pieces (PL

recalled

may have

Renoir's Dance at Bougival of 1883

358).

EDWARD HOPPER

37

one of Renoir's impressionist masterin-

Hopper's own version of an elegant outdoor dancing scene

spired

Like Renoir, Hopper focused

(Fig. 36).

dancing

foreground and

in the central

composition on a couple

his

ground plane out

tilted the

toward the spectator, again creating the sensation that we view the

ground Hopper has repeated

scene from slightly above. In the middle

Renoir's choice of Fashionable people seated at a table drinking and talking.

Hopper

also plated the leathery foliage of trees at the top of

his composition

yond the narrow space

Even

feeling. is

warm

intimate,

Renoii to achieve a broader, more expansive

ol

Renoir's paintings. Hopper's sensibility

inspired b)

it

strikingly different.

The man's

Yet Hopper's space extends be-

as in Renoir's scene.

While Renoir depicts

dancing couple in an

his

and wooden.

relationship, Hopper's couple appears

stiff

do not nunc sensuously

as in the

legs

the music

to

Renoii

work, but are rather unnatural and urn esponsive.

Hopper's covei

Hotel Mai

ol

ni

three hguics on a hilltop overlooking a

ver)

lame hotel located

reminiscent oj

ol

panoramic view

.1

by a bod) ol water (PL

1868

ig

I

,7

of a village or It

159).

on the hilltop

figure

and the

the watei

to

strikingly

is

Bazille's

one

Bazille's painting

In

.

lepresents

in-")

anothei impressionist painting, Frecleri<

the Village ol

yond the

Octobei

E01

View

also sees be-

village

below.

r Village,

35%

Like Bazille's,

is

divided into registers

Whethei Hoppei knew

watei. village, the land beyond, and the sky. Bazille's picture 01 nol ol

ol hilltop,

here his aims and approai h are similai to those

the impressionists. In

Hoppei experienced

1924

when

in

colors

and

|.inn.u\

om

Gallery sold

the Brooklyn

Novembei

in

in

developnu

who through tratoi skill

first

the

make

to

necessity

.1

hud

nt

I

in

at

last

yeai

toward

his

own

has followed the

starts

his

grind and

living, the

work

th<

I

ol

Ins

common

pun

Rehn

\I

published

il

.mule on .is

well as

lot

ol

the paintei

htsman and acquiring

ol

self-expression

sufficient

illus-

technical

spare huh. and

in

when recognition

hard earl) training has given to Sloan

invention thai the

watei

his

careei

can

at

paintei

.1

K

his

in

fm.ilh the complete emani ipation from the dail) job

comes

.is

ol

Franl

the

1927, his

same

h.u

esses

passage that applies to himsell

a

to Sloan, revealing his attitude

1

later,

sua

purchased one

exhibition

Scribner's

John Sloan, Hoppei wrote

John Sloan

Museum

Ins fust

Onl) three years

appeared

lustration

his first financial

paintei seldom achievi

.1

facility

and

.1

M

<!<

i8fi8.

inches.

France.

Hopper's composition,

I

iu

Ba/ille.

Oil on

View of the

canvas,

52%

x

Musce Fabre. Montpdlicr,


Basket

fj

Ball

A

PI.

386.

Ball,"

c.

Edward

publication

*&

Fig. 38.

/^

"Basket

unknown. Private

collec-

tion.

Edward Hopper, Night Shadows, 1921. Whitney 31.691.

Gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt

Hopper,

1911-12. Proof of illustration,

Etching,

6%

x

8->4e

inches.

Whitney Museum

of

American Art,

New

York;


ILLUSTRATION AND

HOPPERS MATURE STYLE In

ol

ifjitt-

periences

mature

Hopper's negative attitude toward the work,

an illustratoi undoubtedly exerted some influence on his

as

During

art.

formative years

Ins

as

an

->t\l<

he

artist

preoccupied with illustration. [*he relationship matter and

his early ex-

both his

ol

necessarily

w.is

mi

latei

I

inn

must be examined and defined

to his illustration

ordei to establish a cleat picture ol Hopper's developmeni as an

in

artist.

Since his careei as an illustratoi coin< ides with and encompasses the

he devoted to making etchings,

years

relationships

there

between

are

il

two

lu-

t

is

Certainly

mon

motifs and subjects Several themes occui

tions

and

latei

Hon "Basket

in

an etching

Ball'

becomes the focus In .11

on

1

11

One

1

.ill

I

"i

ol

his etching

lii>

illustra

example, Hopper's yeai book

illustra

peared in the [anuary by deserted pari

1

9

1

benches,

1

.1

produced

story entitled

issue ol .1

theme

etching of 1921 Night in the Park

such as that from

in

si

Night Shadows

Hoppei

illustrations F01

Issociated

com

ar<

Hopper's

1912, preceding the etching by nearly ol

there

in

deals with the issue ol the obvious shadow

probability

what

to considei

necessary

/

a '

1921

ol

undated

this

,

depicts a solitary

PI

7

Sunday Magazine

ol

;g

PI

Fresh Start," whii h ap-

\

refined to poignancy i.

[8

illustration

decadi

I

Fig

which

in

man

Hopper's

Othei illustrations

Novembei

16,

mm

;


and Farmer's Wife of December 1917 represented the interior of

40

train, a

theme which Hopper developed

in his etching

a

Night on the El

Train of 1920 and in House Tops of 1921 which depict elevated trains

New York

in

City (Figs. 40, 41;

Associated Sunday Magazine of across the composition while

Pis.

103, 161). In

an illustration

for

May 4, 1913, train tracks cut horizontally men walk into its depths (PI. 93). In

Hopper's etching American Landscape of 1920, the tracks again cut the composition, but cows

now

tread

where men walked

(Fig. 42). Several illustrations of trains for

in the illustration

the Wells Fargo Messenger

during 1917 and 1918 precede Hopper's etching The Locomotive of 1923, but here drawings

done

in France

during the period 1906-g are

the precedent for both the illustrations and the etching (Figs. 43, 44, 45; Pis. 230, 235).

Perhaps Hopper's most successful etchings were East Side Interior of 1922 tive

and Evening Wind of 1921; both of these reveal

woman

in

an interior

setting.

a contempla-

Hopper's illustration for System

magazine of January 1913 had shown the contemplative

woman

in the

domestic interior with a picture on the wall and curtained doorway

behind her similar

PI.

7.

Edward Hopper,

to that in East Side Interior,

although he presents

a

illustration for

Everybody's, January 1914, p. 102.

Fig. 39.

ney

Edward Hopper, Night in the Park, 1921. Etching, 6% x 8% inches. Whitof American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper

Museum

70.1046.


Fig

[o

Edward Hopper,

El Train. 1920. Etching.

Philadelphia I

he

I

Museum

ol

Night on the ;'j

S inches.

\it:

purchased:

farrison Fund.

\\

r

/

-

\

> I

**>< I

&

#

-.

//â&#x20AC;˘ I

.

*^>

1

1

1

I'l

1

-

mm mtx

1

Edward Hopper, i'|i

7

|>

151

illustration

foi

Farmer'

11

f<

I

li

inches

Fund.

Edward Hopper, House Tups. Philadelphia

Museum

ol

\ii;

1921.

purchased

Etching, rh<

<>

K

Harrison


Fig. 42

Edward Hopper, American Landscape, 1920. Etching, 7 J x 12% inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper Fig. 42.

/1>

70.1005. PI.

Edward Hopper,

93.

May

4,

illustration

for Associated

Sunday Magazine,

1913, p. 10.

Fig. 43.

Edward Hopper, The Locomotive,

Museum

of

American

Art,

New

1923. Etching,

7%

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

x

9%

inches.

Hopper

Whitney

70.1039.

Edward Hopper, The Railroad, 1906/07 or 1909. Conte and wash with 17% x 14% inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1049. Fig. 44.

touches of white on illustration board.

Edward Hopper, People by the Seine, 1906/07 or 1909. Conte and wash on 14% x 11% inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1339. Fig. 45.

illustration board,

~^r PI-

93

ift** 'Tffi

Tf^B I

Fig. 43

Fig- 14

ÂĽ>'


PI

Fir. 16

Edward Hoppei

Fig.

)').

ney

Museum

ol

East Sid*

American

\n

Interior, 1922. Etching,

New

\oik:

Beqw

|

inches. Whit; sephine N. Hoppei 70. .

1020.

PL

50.

Fig.

17

Edward Hoppei I

<

K\

.

1

r

<

!

Hoppei

Museum of American IM

1

*

[anuai

illustration for 5

Evenii

tot,

Edward Hopper,

New

Wind

\n\V.

igsi

',13, p.

Etchii

Bequest ol [osephini

illustration for

I

18.

-'i

\

inches.

Hoppei

septembei igsi, p. 5

-

i'i

.

Fig. 17

Whitney

70.102s.

v


44

mood

very different social class and

(Fig. 46;

PI.

open window with the curtains blowing

fore an

vironment similar

PL

(Fig. 47;

impossible to

tell

the etching or the illustration, but the similarity

Sometimes themes appeared

first

a

woman

be-

in the breeze, an en-

Evening Wind of the same year whether Hopper first produced

to that in his etching

18). It is

In September

50).

Hopper portrayed

1921, for an article in Everybody's,

is

significant.

an etching and subsequently in

in

an illustration. For example, Hopper etched The Cat Boat in 1922,

and another sailboat The Henry Eord

Management

of a sailboat for the cover of Hotel

PL

(Figs. 48, 49;

tion

346).

The

on the cover

cafe scene

Hotel Management for June 1925

of

illustra-

The Cat Boat. Again, Hopper's outdoor

Les Deux Pigeons of 1920

his etching

September 1924

in

compositional arrangement of this

quite similar to that in

is

in 1923, while he used the motif

sensuality of the couple embracing

is

(Fig.

50;

now

PL

relates to

While the

355).

missing, the cafe setting

with round tables, folding chairs, and standing waiter looking on

is

repeated.

But usually work,

was the illustrations that predicted Hopper's

it

as in the office interiors

he made during scenes, focusing

which evolved from various

New

mainly on the audience, such

York Movie of 1939, and

(Figs. 51, 52, 53;

PL

Management

January

and

for

First

1925 later

of

Tavern

as the cover of

Two on the Row Orchestra as

Cabaret scenes such

341).

Two Comedians

in

illustrations

the 1910s, particularly for System magazine. Theater

Topics for March 1921, recur in works such 1927,

later

as the

Aisle of of

1951

cover of Hotel

appear in Girlie Show of 1941

1965 (Figs. 54, 55;

PL

350). Several res-

taurant themes occur in the illustrations such as that for Everybody's of January 1914, Associated

Sunday Magazine

of

January

11, 1914,

and

New

Tavern Topics of February 1920, and again in paintings such as

York Restaurant of about 1922, Automat of 1927, Chop Suey of 1929, Tables for Ladies of 1930, and Sunlight in a Cafeteria of 1958 57- 5 8 59> 6 °; pls 8 -

>

A woman

>

l11 )-

then in Hopper's etching Evening

developed in paintings such

61,

in a City of 1944,

63;

(12,

PL

It

is

have cramped

The

Of

33).

the female figure tration.

window appeared The Metropolitan Magazine,

standing in a bedroom before an open

as early as July 1912 as an illustration in

Morning

(Figs. 56,

is

of 1921; this

theme

is

and

A Woman

course, in his etching

freedom

[opper's style

compositions of some

also

Moonlight Interior of about 1920-23, in the

Sun

and

of these paintings,

all

of 19O1

nude, a liberty Hopper could not take in his

this lack of I

as

Wind

in

making

illustrations

that

(Figs.

illus-

may

and made him resent these endeavors. ol

Hopper's best paintings were often pre-


Edward Hoppei Boat, 1922. Etching \n New \'<il inches. Whitne) Museum "I Modern Bequest oi [osephim \ Hoppei 70.1008. I

-

I

3

'

i<Âť

1

1

,

.-

11 Edward Hoppei lli' \m Institute of

15 inch<

1

Ford

'

(

hi'

1

1923

Etching,


Fig. 50.

Edward Hopper, Les Deux Pigeons,

1920. Etching, 8*4 x 10 inches. Philadelphia

Museum

of Art.


y<K 53 Fig

-

,

l>i

iimmond

I

ibbi

Vet

nch<

lisle,

i

Museum

_ ~

Oil on

ol

\m

i

i

Gifi

in

of

••

Edward Hoppei

j

,; i

rbledo

ITm

inches

:

i

Edward I

Two

Edward Hoppei

-,i

York

\4ovit

Museum

b<

1

"l

Oil

1939

Modern

on can New

Vrt,

Ifori

id

/•

Hoppei

(.in-

Rot

'

Hirshhorn

in

I

Orchestra,

Garden) Smithsonian Institution, Washington, in!

31

1

/

l

Hoppei

ha

Private

(hi ikI

Hopp

jo iik

Girlit

colli

1

/

(

1951

Museum and

Show,

1941

Oil on

Sculpture

l>(

Oil

on

cai

Hon (

omedian

1965

Oil on cai

illection 1

-,i


' Fig. 56.

inches.

PI. 8.

Edward Hopper,

Am

Edward Hopper, New York Restaurant, 1922. Oil on Hackley Art Museum, Muskegon, Michigan.

canvas,

29%

x

24M

illustration for

Everybody's, January 1914, p. 103.

Fig. 57.

Edward Hopper, Automat, Edmundson Collection.

Art Center;

1927. Oil

on canvas, 28

x 36

iches.

Des Moines


Tables for Ladies, 1930. canvas, 8.

Edward

Hopp

<

i

hop ^uey,

1929. Oil

on canvas, 32

Art,

New

inches.

York.

38 inches. Collection of Barney Ebsworth.

1. '.

â&#x20AC;˘

1

Hoppei 1

S

mnecticul

I

158

Oil

cai

bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark

60

inches

Oil on

The Metropolitan Museum

Vale University Art

of


dieted, even

5°

worked

of the restaurant in in Everybody's for

down on

a space

attention,

out, in various illustrations. For example, the space

Chop Suey

relates to that in

January 1914

formed by two

counters,

A

table, the central focus of

and

The mood

table tops create sharp angles

is

quiet.

The windows,

and divide the

space.

curved backs of bentwood chairs are counterpoints to the

Management

otherwise angidar shapes. Hopper's cover for Hotel

January 1925 features a couple

sitting at a table in

with another couple visible beyond them of arranging these figures

Chop

our

placed in front of the corner where the two walls meet.

is

softly

In both, one looks

(Fig. 58; PI. 8).

walls.

Coats hang on hooks along the wall.

The

Hopper's illustration

is

for

the foreground

Hopper's method

(PI. 350).

quite similar in this illustration and in

Suey. In both, one sees the back of the female in the fore-

-

ground and focuses on the background

is

shown only

face of her in profile,

companion. The

and part

cut off by the border of the picture in a

other impressionist painters.

A

nearly

that in the foreground of this Hotel

Other compositional his paintings

PI. 33.

The

Edward Hopper, Metropolitan

abound.

similarities

An

of her head

manner

Degas and

posed couple to

identically

cover

is

visible in

(Fig. 59).

between Hopper's

illustration for

in the

and body are

typical of

Management

Hopper's painting Tables for Ladies of 1930

woman

illustrations

and

System magazine in January

illustration for

Magazine,

si

July

V

1912, p. 45.

1

1

m

ÂŤ

E-&~

K

vm

1

II

Fig. 61.

Edward Hopper, Moonlight

inches.

Private collection.

Interior,

c.

1920-23. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29


Fig. 62.

Edward Hopper. Morning

Williams College

1

Hopper, A

Woman

in

the Sun, 1961

Museum

Oil on canvas

of Art.

10

in a City,

1944. Oil

on canvas,

11

â&#x20AC;˘>'>

inches.

Williamstown, Massachusetts.

60 inches

<

ollection

<>f

Mt. and Mis. Albert Hackett.


woman

1913, for instance, depicts a

52

open doorway

in the

Noon

clapboard house similar to Hopper's painting High

A

64; PI. 49).

of a white

of 1949 (Fig.

few unnecessary details like the man, the number and

doorbell, and the potted plant have been eliminated in the oil paint-

ing which

now encompasses

ception of the illustration

the entire house, but the original con-

quite similar in

is

painting done thirty-six years evolved,

as

has his use

illustration of

of

later.

light

The

French bank predicts

Drug

corner storefront in his painting

Hopper's penchant for

design to part of the

profundity of the

mood

has

and shadow. Likewise, Hopper's

Company showing American

1917-18 for Wells Fargo &

soldiers before a

its

his

manner

of depicting the

Store of 1927 (Fig. 65; PI. 429).

tions. In the painting,

is evident in both composihowever, Hopper was able to choose the mood

and message he sought

to convey,

city architecture

and the

figures,

were not included. Interestingly, Hopper's Saloon, did include a

number

no longer necessary,

earlier oil of 1913,

Corner

of figures (Fig. 66).

Thus, while there are compositional devices in Hopper's paintings

moved

that are quite close to his illustrations, he

simplification in his oil paintings.

We

convey the message necessary to the forced to include details he

consistently toward

can conclude that in order to illustration,

Hopper was

often

would never otherwise have chosen.

In-

deed, perhaps the essence of Hopper's urge to attain simplicity

summed up

in his

comment

that

what he wanted

sunlight on the side of a house" and in his

to

is

do was "to paint

monumental

oil

painting of

Empty Room (Fig. 67). Although Jo Hopper claimed that Hopper never "compromised" on his illustrations, it is clear that some of the work he did was much more attuned to his sensibilities than that for certain other publications. Surely Hopper chose to apply for work on specific periodicals, 1963 Sun in an

particularly trade publications, because they offered a steady diet of

more

palatable and

more predictable

subjects.

Thus, because of

long and deep love for ships, he tried out successfully for

Dock

Dial. His interest in trains

the Wells Fargo Messenger. His

no doubt encouraged

of

who had bought

Tavern Topics. Perhaps

his

The Dry

his interest in

work on Tavern Topics resulted from

the demise of the Wells Fargo publications Elsie Scott,

and the subsequent

work, from their editorial

shift of

office to that

his past successes there inspired

him

to try

another hotel-related periodical, resulting in his steady employment PI. 49.

Edward Hopper,

System, January 1913, p.

illustration for

his

at

La

Hotel Management. Certainly he found

it

France because of

French culture and pleasant

attractive to illustrate for

17.

his

enjoyment

of

memories of France. Fiction, however, represented greater

problems

for the illustrator:

the author's product was unpredictable and the illustrator's assign-


IwardHoppei

if

â&#x20AC;˘

Woon

ig4g

Oil

on cam u

sfl

(o inches

Collection of

Mi and Mrs. Anthony Haswell.


-

ment even more

54

trators of

trator

contemporary co

was aptly expressed by popular

illus-

Flagg's article of 1915 entitled

"A Challenge

and inviting writers

his illustrations

The Hopper

thorstrate" them.

Over There

illus-

In his article Flagg lamented the difficult task of the

by publishing

illustrator

many

frustration experienced by

fiction

James Montgomery

to Authors."

When X>u Go

The

specific.

illustrations

which have the

to "au-

least rela-

tionship to his later art are those for fiction which appeared in Adventure

and

Everybody's

(Pis.

168,

illustrations for Everybody's in

For

183).

among

example,

his

1921 are depictions of African tribal

Hopper

warriors at battle, surely an alien topic for the quiet

(PI.

26).

Despite the older Hopper's defensiveness and generally negative

work

attitude toward his early

in illustration,

we can conclude

experiences as an illustrator helped to shape his mature

of his work, Hopper's illustrations reveal artist's

admitted, "After (il

development during took up etching,

I

What he was

one of the

PI.

for

& Company

Edward Hopper, illustration Wells Fargo & Company brochure,

vital forces influ-

his formative years.

my

not so willing to admit was that in his work as art

would take

The embryonic Hopper who would become one

the future.

most outstanding

As Hopper

paintings seemed to crystal-

an illustrator there are glimpses of the direction his

Wells Fargo

of

comments. Rather than take away from the unique quality

his negative

lize."

that his

Many

and quality not indicated by

the illustrations have a graphic strength

encing the

art.

realist painters

is

in

of America's

present in the illustrations even

429.

though he that there

1917-

resisted total

involvement with them. Indeed,

was an unconscious continuum from much of

work through

his

mature

his

it

appears

commercial

art.

Âť a 8 ,

i

~''

I i

"1

1

El

.

.^^Bst

1

1^

:

1

L_ Fig. 65.

__

1 1 Edward Hopper, Drug

40 inches.

Museum

Store, 1927. Oil

of Fine Arts, Boston.

on canxas, 29

Fig. 66.

Edward Hopper, Corner Saloon, 1913. Oil on The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

24 x 29 inches.

canvas,


I

67

Edward

Hoppa

Sun in an Empt

Roon

1963. Oil

on can

1

pinches I'm. nr

collection.


NOTES i.

"Edward Hoppei 6 (February ig

2.

Objects"

Nathaniel

tor,

Rowland

,

Ait 3

|.

Museum,

p

1972),

Age

of

\pnl

io

\11iLMi .in

Illustration

14.

\i

1

New

Myi' Ibid

Post,

conversation with Edward Mop-

House

ol

Strangers Wortl

m

ralkin

g

Lloyd Goodrich

Edward Hoppei

Vbram

31.

1

Quoted

in

Decembei

(..ill

In<

1

957)1 p

I'

in

Etchings

Uexandei

Edward

157.

1

by

i

lettei

t

ss.i\

ii

the)

wanted

Waltei

have

Comment," The

The

article to

Art

which

"Thomas Craven Prophet, Surgeon The Art of Today, 5

mlr.

Comment,"

"Editorial not

use urn ol 1

11

Pousette-Dart,

been

Vmerican

"The

located,

but

p.

11.

These

illus-

may be among

Hoppei Bequest

tin

in the

the

Whit-

An

Pursuit

autobiography, Wittenberg

in

1933,

December

1934), pp. 7-9.

Pousette-Dart,

Nev York: Hopper,"

from

letter

learning of Jo's

lditorial

1935), p.

unidentified originals in

1,

of

referred was lertakei

1

trations

1

a

which

to use Barr's

Pousette Dart,

February

I).,. mli<

N

1

.11

1

p.

Harry

Witness

erican Painting

'l

/

Winston, 196s

Silent

reprinted ,

orpoi in

Prii

!â&#x20AC;˘

Eliol

ig

Hun:

Three

York:

ii>.

Uexandei ;

(Nevt

|.

I

Hoppei

935.

Ibid

mi'

of

I

is

for then catalogue.

Nathaniel

News Washington Square

the

collection

to Alice Roullier, g

and gives them permission

16

"173;. p

this

in

embarrassment ovei

his

resses

it

Novi

Uso

Chicago

brary,

of

Edward Hoppei

B.

I

Museum

Whitney

tin

\ ork.

Arena Winsten, 'Wak( i

This

1933.

"i

7.

Boasl

sent:

November

Jo Hopper's papers, was not the rather she mailed an abbieviated.

toned-down version dated 25 and 26 November 1933, now in the Modem Manuscript Collection, The Newberry Li-

6.

North

actually

in

letter

Random

irk:

1

Alice Roullicr. 25

in

found

'7-

archives ol

1946,

urn of

11.

p.

manuscript,

Delaware

Edward Hopper, exhibition catalogue Modern Art, 1933). p. 9.

Jr.,

Mum

Jo N Hoppei

O'Doherty, American Masters: The Voice and the

Briai

11

American

(Wilmington:

catalogue

Lloyd Goodrich, notes r.

Alfred H. Barr, \i h York:

Ibid

pi

10

12.

iid.,

(, olden

1880- /pi./, exhibition

.

Dart],

u.

p

,

The

Elzea,

Hopper to the The Art of Today,

from

[letter

Pousetti

|

1

ol

Happiness," unpublished

niversity Library, Springfield,

Ohio.

Rineharl and 18.

Janus

B,

(

arrington

an Illustration and the Re-


productive Arts," Scribner's Magazine, 72 (July 1922),

p.

view with the author, 9 July 1976. Miss Scott worked as an editor in the advertising department at Wells Fargo

as

New

123. 19-

Ibid., p. 126.

20.

Norman an

Rockwell,

Told

As

Illustrator,

City, N.Y.:

Norman

Rockwell,

Thomas

to

Doubleday, i960),

p. 359.

My

Rockiuell

"who

illustrator

He must

number

of people will understand as to

fine arts

what he

tions of the picture

Quoted

painter"

it;

and there must be

trying to convey.

is

must conform

.

.

.

Then

40.

Ferber, "American Illustration:

A Century

of

American

26.

in

42.

1

43-

"Traveling Man," Time, 19 January 1948,

29-

Quoted

30.

For John Sloan's illustrations, see Edgar John Bullard

p. 60.

"John Sloan and the Philadelphia Realists 1890-1920" (master's

thesis,

as Illustrators,

University of California at Los

1979), for

infiueiice of Sloan's etchings

on Hopper.

Quoted

in

S3'

Quoted

in ibid.

34-

Barr,

35

Quoted

44.

37-

at

not

familiar

and

per-

Company was later The company

City Engraving

taken

never

March 1965

46.

p. 10.

Katharine Kuh, The

Artist's Voice:

3,

Degas:

Museum

The

'Office

Arts

Night,' "

at

Mind (New

York:

Harper and Row,

1976),

Artist's

of Art,

"Pictures Within Pictures," pp. 90-146.

Hopper,

it

seems, would

sell

his illustrations

whatever price a periodical was willing

to pay,

some-

Miss Marian Ragan, 10 February 1956,

Jo

Nivison

made

illustrations

John Reed, which appeared

p. 16.

by Walter Tittle in

to

his

published autobiography, and by Elsie Scott in an

in

for "Happy The Masses, 5

Valley,"

by

(July 1914),

pp. 14-17.

49-

Edward Hopper, "John Sloan and the Philadelphians," The Arts, 11 (April 1927), p. 174. "This Month's Cover," The Morse Dry Dock Dial, 2

50.

There

(February 1919),

un-

inter-

Museum, Montclair, New

Jersey.

1962),

Hopper was able to exhibit his etchings at the National Academy in 1921, 1922, 1923, and 1924. In 1932 he declined membership in this organization because it had to

Edward Hopper

collection of the Montclair Art

Talks with

Harper and Row,

O'Doherty, American Masters,

This has been attested

"Edward Hopper's

times, as in the case of Scribner's, getting more.

47-

in

was

illustrations

to take the project.

Reff,

45- See note 38.

consistently rejected his paintings in previous years. 3 8.

chap.

p. 41.

P- !35-

Quoted

he

do the

Magazine, 52 (January 1978), pp. 134-37. For additional examples of this device in Degas's work, see

Metropolitan

Prints

an analysis of the

O'Doherty, American Masters,

Seventeen Artists (New York:

36.

that

felt

from Edward M. Sibble to Milton Cederquist). Edward Hopper, explanatory statement accompanying a letter of 25 August 1948 to Norman A Geske, Walker Art

Theodore

Edward Hopper: The Complete

(New York: W. W. Norton,

in

Electric

Gail Levin,

III,

Angeles, 1968).

Hopper,

The

had

Center, Minneapolis. For an analysis of this painting, see

in ibid.

32.

now

circum-

the

returned the originals to Cederquist and at some point

82

April 1955, pp. 9 and 33.

com-

1909,

over by Niagara Frontier Engraving.

Suzanne Burrey, "Edward Hopper: The Empty-

See Gail Levin,

well

discarded them (according to a letter of 29

28.

3*

who remembers

college life to

suaded Hopper

ing Spaces," Arts Digest,

reads:

retailers,

styles for

speak with Milton Cederquist,

to

Arthur Cederquist

(June 1927), p. 7o6d.

Quoted

was fortunate

enough with

Arts," p. 123.

25-

decided change in

will be a

(New York:

Coles Phillips

stances of Hopper's contribution to his college yearbook.

23- Carrington, "American Illustration and the Reproductive

Three Hundred Years, p. 298. Hopper to Roullier, 25 November 1933. Jo Edward Hopper to the editor, Scribner's Magazine,

of

Watson-Guptill Publications, 1975). The advertisement, which is aimed at

I

March-14 May

Eliot,

she

For examples of illustrations by Coles Phillips and the

eighty-nine years old,

1972), p. 13.

24-

when

Topics after the Express Messenger

precedes the selling season.

1850-1920," in

22

illustrations

and

pared with 1908." Such advertising by wholesalers usually

Illustration, exhibition catalogue

(New York: The Brooklyn Museum,

Tavern

for

"There

Rockwell, Artist

Dead at 84," by Edwin McDowell, New York Times, November 10, 1978, p. A29. S.

the

American Girl" The Art

of Americana,

Linda

Wells Fargo Messenger

for

source for facts about his career, see Michael Schau. "All-

there

to the proportions of the

"Norman

remembered buying Hopper's

both

had ceased publication. 39-

the propor-

(ibid).

in the artist's obituary,

report that she

worked

express a specific idea so that a large

are deadlines, taboos as to subject matter.

magazine"

(Garden

has to satisfy his client as well as

himself.

no mistake

& Company during the First World War. Reading in the York Times about the Hopper project at the Whitney Museum, Miss Scott, then ninety-two, contacted me to

Rockwell constantly

emphasized the distinction between "a

and an

Adventures

p. 3.

are only a few

known

instances of Hopper's work-


ing from a photograph.

began

to

utilize

During

this

period,

photographs more often

as

illustrators

56.

an aid in

their work. 51.

52.

Goodrich,

54.

notes of conversation

with

Edward Hopper,

57.

The

Guy Pene du

ceived extra attention

Bois,

"The American

Paintings of

Edward

pp. 234-47. This text offers a lengthy account of

Joseph Chapin's method of working, but makes no men-

Hopper. The location of

memoir, excerpted here,

is

his

unknown.

complete unpublished

when purchased by Duncan

re-

Phillips

in late 1923.

1931), p. 191.

Edward Hopper to his mother, Elizabeth Griffiths Smith Hopper (letter from Paris), 18 May 1909. Quoted in Roger Burlingame, Of Making Many Books: A Hundred Years of Reading, Writing and Publishing N n

tion of

York,

This painting

Arts, 5 (April 1924), p. 203.

20 April 1946.

Ibid.,

New

For example, see Forbes Watson, "Le Dejeuner des Canotiers,"

York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1946), p. 235. 55.

catalogue Seven Paintings by Renoir, by Royal Cortis-

was published by Durand-Ruel, Paris and

â&#x20AC;˘923-

Hopper." Creative Art, 8 (March 53.

The soz,

59.

Hopper, "John Sloan," pp. 172-73. Hopper, "John Sloan," p. 172.

60.

James Montgomery Flagg, "A Challenge

58.

to

Authors,"

Everybody's, 33 (October 1915), p. 417. 61.

Quoted

in

Bui

Spaces," p. 10.

rev,

"Edward

Hopper:

The

Emptying


1

LIST OF PERIODICALS Adventure. Published twice a month by the Ri

N

pany zine

ventures. (Plat*

167

i

Populai Monthly"

aim York

to

|nii<'

/

and

was then taken

il

\ne.

newspapers:

Sim,

Tribune, Baltimore

.is

V

1911

Sunday

with

.1

1.1

edii

.is

nd

emphasi

^-

r

1.1

ol nonfit tion

tu

.ir

l<

Detroit

with the

c

I

'I

the

uk

company from publi< ation of electricity

the Edison

I

mo.' through

h< li

m

in

still

is

Ridgeway Company.

the

w.ts

and

editor,

il

this

al

all

was an entertainment magazine with an Ik

1

ion

(Plates 1-31 b)

1918 as

.1

supplement

.1

Sunday

title ol

Week

Corporation,

New

\.mL.

wrekl\ entertainment magazine.

\l

to

.1

numb* PI

1

1

it<

ol s

Sunday

m

was

Il

wspapi

is

261 -272)

11

i/<

Published monthly from 1900

to

fiction,

the rural home-oriented

1939,

cati red

it

woman. Originally

1

founded

tri<

publication

Cincinnati 1/<

York Edison Company. Published b\ the

'

Bulletin of 1

nonfiction,

approximately 500,000. By 1921, when

w.is

blished by Every

/

also issued

Courier,

\>\

rrumbull Winn

ms on serialized

to the interest ol

numbei

sm.ill

1

and

Ik tion

his

co-

Tribune, Boston Post, WashBuffalo

life.

I

had become editor, the magazine became

ird

to

Journal,

national weekly, circulation

l;$-26o)

1914

Previously

from 1915

Herald,

-•

a

tout. lined

It

Published monthly to

II

Farmer's 1

Plates

I'lnladrlplna

Cleveland /-

Sun,

mercial-Tribw

became

it

-,(10.(100.

time the circulation Sewell

weekly,

issued

part of the

Chica k

Minneapolii

tabloid

\

1

ody's.

/

From

cm pi

Sundc

Pittsburgh Post 'i

1916,

no

\im<

fiction.

following

1911. In 1016

in

Leslie's

imerican

to

u>)

ociated

the

Frank

as

name was changed

publisher was Philips Publishing

rhi

operativel) and simultaneously ot

issw

first

its

Publishing, Springfield, Ohio, and

'II

/

With

1876, th<

from Octobei 1906

1

pany

approximately

in

1906

in

Country Gentleman. Purchased by the Curtis Publication Com-

both with emphasis on rural

-'23)

Magnum

American

om-

with special emphasis on western and sea ad-

fiction,

'it

I

A maga-

Arthur Sullivant Hoffman, editor.

"lork.

Novembei

1907,

when

il

intaini d artii les dis< u

resumed publication

in

[une nio8 as

Monthly and continued publication through

at

Winona, Minnesota,

Paul, Minnesota,

Nathaniel

Pousette-Dart

l>s

the

the time

w.is

an

publication

Hoppei

editoi

had moved

illustrated

al

tins

by

the

time.

foi

it.

(Plates

1.11-166)

Hotel Management. Published monthly lishing

Company

in

\ew York

with

fames

S.

Mm

ns

Warren

Pubas

its

is)

ed

\

trade publication dealing with

the

practical


business problems of hotel

management, including

and

policies

Scribner's Magazine. Published

monthly by Charles Scribner's

methods of hotel organization and management throughout

Sons,

the world, contributed by a group of editorial advisors. (Plates

Bridges was editor and Joseph

344-361)

during the time Hopper's illustrations were published. Fiction

La France, An American Magazine. Published monthly

in

New

York by La France Publishing Corporation from August 1917 to August 1921 with Claude Riviere as editor-in-chief. It then

became

New

France through

May

1919,

and from June through

and

New

York, from January 1887 through

articles

included

on the

travel,

Survey Graphic.

monthly

in

New

fine arts

magazine of

published illustrated

weekly The Survey. (Plate 343)

combining popular

fiction

with

verse features covering such subjects as politics, the arts,

di-

and

sports. (Plates 32-37)

its

Employees' Association and

the general interests of the company. Bert

Edward Barnes was

editor. (Plates 273-306)

Profitable

Advertising:

whatever

social exploration, reaching out to

A monthly

Shaw Company, Chicago,

Illinois,

from 1900

tides

feature of the

W.

1917. It con-

to

tained articles discussing techniques of business management. It

was superseded by Magazine of Business

came Business Week

tion to hotel guests in staff

in 1928,

which

be-

in 1929. (Plates 38-84)

Tavern Topics. Published monthly

The Morse Dry Dock Dial. A monthly magazine published by the Morse Dry Dock and Repair Company in Brooklyn, New York, from 1918 to 1923, for

1948.

System, the Magazine of Business. Published by the A.

The Metropolitan Magazine. Published monthly by the Metropolitan Magazine Company, 286 Fifth Avenue, New York. A general-interest magazine

307-333)

"An

culture in the United States, containing articles in both French English. (Plates 334-335)

affairs. (Plates

York from 1921 through

of a tenerous progress are astir."

and

Robert

art editor

social interpretation

September 1919 was published as Victory. A magazine devoted to developing greater understanding of French history and

magazine of

1939.

were featured, but other topics

biography, and public

A

May

Hawley Chapin was

New

in

New York

for distribu-

York and Philadelphia. Editorial

included Elsie Scott. (Plates 336-342)

Wells Fargo Messenger. Published monthly in

Wells Fargo Headquarters

at 65

New York

Broadway from 1913

to

from

June

1918 as a house organ for the company's employees. Succeeded

The Magazine

of

Publicity.

Boston,

by the Express Messenger in July

1918

after

Wells Fargo

Massachusetts.

merged with American Railway Express Company. The editor

the interests

was Edward Hungerford and the editorial

"A Monthly magazine devoted exclusively to of Advertisers and Publishers." Kate E. Griswald

was publisher. (Plate 443)

Scott. (Plates

224-242)

staff

included Elsie


PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS Oliver Baker: FigJ 61, 67 Geoffre) Clementi

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CATALOGUE OF ILLUSTRATIONS COMPILED I

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WEI1S FARGO MESSENGER

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275

274

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277


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I91S

278


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MORSE DIAL

FEBRUARY

19*9

283b

283a


286


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September i9*9


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MOR SE DIAL

March 1920

DIAL. II

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MAIL,

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OCTOBER. 1920

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10c Per Copy 34'

Shops and Shows Notas Hispano-Americanas

$1.00 Per Year


Complimentary to Guests

Shops and Shows

IS cents per

Copy

$1.50 Per Year


MANAGEMENT

IN

TWO SECTIONS SECTION ONE

AHRENS PUBLISHING COMPANYincNEW YORK

3 DOLLARS A YEAR 25 CENTS A COPY

MANAGEMENT

in

two sections section one

AHRENS PUBLISHING COMPANY'ncNEWYORK

3 dollars a year 2s cents a copy

345

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MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT

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44°


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L'ANUEE TERRIBLE

145


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453


454


456


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V

j

>^

Illustrations

(January i.

of

l"i

Ben Blow, "The New Boy." Everybody' ,.

"Johnny Simmons .1

wai bonnet,"

|>.

numbers

ol

Vast

the boys," II

L>f>

ig

|Âť.

.llii

into a pulp,'

fell

to work, tn^.i^in.n in

ilic

manufacture

30.

1

Indians were snuffed out by each one of

132.

he

'nntf.'

"p.

1

;

;

yelled.

'Dern

me,

I'll

beat

your face


Illustrations for 4.

Ben Blow, "Old Maje Departs," Everybody's, 26 (March

"Engaged himself pleasantly with

a

5. "With speed the newcomers cast fight ensued, and mud was 'pasted,' " 6.

"

of clothing.

had noticed

Illustrations for

traces of tears

on

7a. Proof.

7b. P. 102.

Unpublished proof.

p. 422.

water-splashing

Doc Henderson,

astute

Fatty's cheeks," p. 425.

Emerson Taylor, "A Fresh

B.H.

A

p. 423.

'What's the matter? Been gettin' into trouble, Henery?'

observer,

7c.

huge bowl of mush of milk," off the curse

1912).

Start," Everybody's, 30

(January 1914).


/

7b

merson

G>avi

>


',

,6a> 9a

8a. Proof.

8b.

"You look

like a sailorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; you

do!"

p. 103.

ga. Proof.

gb. "It ain't so hard,

maybe,

if

you've

never been free," p. 105.

wtwkry

Illustrations for Frederick Palmer, "Fred-

Palmer

erick

the

Front,"

19*5)10.

P. 72.

in

Germany:

Everybody's,

My Day 32

at

(January


^

11 a.

I'roof.

lib.

P Proof,

ub. P

Illustrations I

In

for

R

Edith

Hero BusineM

/

Mirrii

trybody's,

»9*5)«

l

I

1

j.

P

TV

"I

In-

youth's

(

-•<

1

wi re

vouringl) on O'Brien's face,"

li\< |>.

d

753.

32


15.

"Every time one of those sixty kids has a birthdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; I get

a cake," p. 755.

Illustration

for

Louise

"The House That

Hale,

Closser

Patty Built," Everybody's, 41 (July 1919).

"He ran ahead up the ragged sides them on with a grenade in hand," p. 16.

Illustrations for

Stephen French Whitman,

body's, 45 (September 1921). Part 17.

"At

last it

of the fair

panion," 18.

i5

of the crater,

1

waving

35.

"Sacrifice," Every-

of a five-part novel.

was yellow and crinkled, that magazine picture

unknown which had become

for

him

a living

com-

p. 4.

"Lilla kept

on her desk a magazine-picture of Lawrence whom she had never seen," p. 5.

Teck, the explorer,


8

ig.

"Madame

tune.

Zanidov, the clairvoyant,

Shi

black savages.

picturi II,-

ground and covered with

I

hiikI a

lit-

.1

cloth

people

bod) I

is

telling

the

in

ih.it

is

Lilla's

clearing

for-

an

stretched on the

can nol describe the one

';

who who .1

lies

tall

J)J).

in the

midst ol them. Hut

has lo\ed you.'

man,

IO-I

a

I.ill.i.

stranger.

If

I

feel

that

it

is

some one doorway

raising hei eyes, saw in the

was Lawrence

leek, the explorer,"

1.

1


Illustrations for

Stephen French Whitman, "Sacrifice," part

2,

"As Lilla crossed the sidewalk to her car, an eddy of wind head high, a whirl of snowflakes that resembled a wraith. A month later the newspapers published a 20.

raised before her,

dispatch reporting the death of Lawrence of savages," pp. 30-31.

Teck

at the

hands

Everybody's, 45 (October 1921).

"Now and then for a moment she forgot his infirmity; he became the hero of an idyllic scene. But unlike those heroes he spoke oidy of the moment, since it was only the moment of which he could be sure. 'You are here,' his eyes said to her. 'I have this hour at least. Nothing else matters,' " pp. 40-41. si.


Illustrations for 22.

"

What

flection

in

is

Stephen French Whitman, "Sacrifice," part

it?'

she exclaimed,

minor. She saw herself

a

white and a link- wild.

down I

11

.hios-, ivai

PP-

and turned

One

to catch

her

3,

re-

in a curious aspect also,

of her shoulder-straps

had slipped

her arm. David carefull) pronounced the words,

Rysbroel '

38-39-

wasn'l

it?

Acs.

He brought me bad

Everybody*. 23.

15

(November

1921).

"In the equatorial forests where the

Mambava spearmen

dwelt unconquered, the black king, Muene-.Motapa, sat in the royal house listening to a story-teller. At the story-teller's gesturesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;since gestures were needed to explain these wonderschains clanked on his wrists," pp. 152-53.


.

ti

e ' •»t ~^%;.

.rjl

1

1*

BT

Illustrations for 24. "Still

*

^P^

Stephen French Whitman, "Sacrifice," part

kneeling on the hearth,

other as though he were seeing a

Hamoud

him now

4,

contemplated the

for the

first

time.

Of

sudden, the habit of protection grappled with his resolve,

Everybody's, 45 (December 1921).

and might have conquered had he not recalled the sufferings The newspaper was in his left hand," pp.

of the beloved.

116-17.


25a. Illustration. 1921. Oil

Museum Hopper

of

American

Art.

on canvas, 27x39 inches. Whitney York: Bequest of Josephine N.

New

70.1168.

25b. "Lilla began to float toward

him over

the floor that she

no longer felt beneath her feet, so that her disembodied spirit might be merged with this other spirit. But abruptly an invisible force seemed to check her progress midway, and she stood before him with her arms lifted in what appeared to be a frozen gesture of horrified denial," pp. 132-33.

Illustration for

Stephen French Whitman,

"Sacrifice," part 5.

Everybody's, 46 (January 1922). 26a. Illustration, 1921. Oil

Museum Hopper 26b.

of

American

Art,

on canvass, 27/39 inches. Whitney York; Bequest of Josephine N.

New

70.11*17.

"Then without warning, came

the charge. Lilla

became

aware of an apparitionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; a sort of naked harlequin, magnified by a towering head-dn ss. Another followed, crouching paralhzed before that inexorable advance," pp. 168-69.

_

'

1


Illustrations for

Walter De Leon, "Everything Save Honor,"

Everybody's, 46 (May 1922). 27.

"As we raced through the gate,

I

inserted

my

foot between

Kitanoya's pudgy knees," p. 36. 28a. Illustration, 1921-22. Oil on canvas, 27x39 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1169.

28b. "Skilfully Paul it

close,

drew the auto abreast of them and edged

perilously, recklessly close to the rocking, rumbling,

freight-car," pp. 42-43.

27


Illustrations for Philip Gibbs,

"The Game

of Poverty," Every-

body's, 46 (June 1922). 29.

"Her next performance was

her roll and throw

man 30.

at the

full

diamond crown,

step forward,

old man!'

"

to

break a piece of bread from

with unerring aim at a one-armed young

other side of the room."

"Janet stood

little

it

and

I

in

the

like

a

p. 40.

lamplight. She was princess.

Paul

made

put m\ hand on his arm and

wearing a

a

sudden

said, 'Steady,

p. 47.

:!>

29


Illustrations for Louis

Lee Arms, "On and On," Everybody's,

48 (January 1923). 31a. " 'You

by see,

it,

have made a statement. You are going to stand break.' She gazed at him tragically. 'Don't you

make or

Jimmy?'

"

p. 4.

31b. "'Well, think car," p. 13.

it

over,' said Bodie,

stepping out of the


THE MERRY. MERRY CUCKOO A

*3«v

eft

* i^r-.

--

.

-JL\

ONE ACT JEANNETTE MARKS PL AY IN

t

V'

itiT~~

:;-

\ Illustrations for Jcannctte Marks.

32.

F. 45.

33.

"Anni<

34.

"Ye're

Dalben," 35.

now

.

(July 1912).

sweetheart, did ye hear the cuckoo singin'?" p. 45. neglect in' chapel

and

the

forgettin'

Lord, Annie

p. 45.

"She waits in

"The Merry, Merry Cuckoo," The Metropolitan Magazine, 36

.1

moment— the

heads arc well above the wall

amazement," p

Up U

=

vw

' -

*

',-,

;i


Illustrations

"The

for

Knock

of

Philip

Prescott

Frost,

Opportunity,"

The

Metropolitan Magazine, 37 (March 1913). 36a. Proof.

36b. to all

"They shook hands rather formally, appearances, and said their good-

by with a hardly noticeable

tremor,"

p. 47.

37a. Proof.

37b. "

'We

health,'

who

ain't

said

the

in

business

for

our

corpulent gentleman

received him," p. 48.

37 b

39a


Illustrations for

John

I.

Harden, "Fitting the Policy

the

to

Prospect." System, 22 (August 1912). 38.

" l.il

1,000

man

insured

my

in

polio .ind \ou will be the most heavily

When

territory.

will advertise the fact in every

you pay the premium,

county in the state."

p.

I

162.

39a. Proof. ;<nl>.

"When

policy

'>n

In-,

ii

was pointed out

own

life

In-

to

him

that by an insurance

could protect

the

interests of his

concern that borrowed money only because of his personal endorsement ol its notes. Ik immediately put on his hat and went to tin examinei ." p, 164. ["he

thirty

them

I"

lot

who wanted an income

engineei

policies ol

$1,000 each

their paid

up value

sixty five

took

when he learned he could

cash

he needed the money,"

i()().

as

aftei

p.


4i.

"In ten years

this

bank has

lost

four

two by death and two by resignations, and has suspended once for presidents,

lack

funds.

of

would

you were

If

the

cost

to

die

it

holders Si 00,000

stock

before you could be replaced. Isn't that

sum worth

protecting?" p. 169.

Illustrations

for

Carroll

D.

"What Makes Men Buy?"

Murphy,

System,

22

(September 1912). 42a.

"The

advertising manager's pencil

had been busy.

'Isn't

that

what you

mean?' he inquired, tossing a diagram across the table. 'I have followed the returns from copy of different types for the last five years

a relation

and

between

it

seems to

my

me

there

is

"reason why," de-

or persuasive copy and the spontaneity of demand,' " pp. 228-29.

scriptive

4'


h

-

1*1).

Republished

-â&#x20AC;˘;

~

Man

Right tide and figure

1915

ipped, .Hid illuatratioi the top

.it

-I

Hi>

form

1

app<

il

and pride had nothing

tow

-il

motiv( t.il

I'..-

1

to

the appeal "1 the '.1

(

p

then comfoti

like

the

selling

mon p

tution, foresighi

and

pari n

231.

4. r,


T EH

** 45

44

44.

"He

learns to

make

a

mental purchase for the

class of trade

he seeks and to

study the motives that impel his prospect to buy," p. 232. 45.

"In every business interview there

result 46.

is

aimed

"Modern

at

and

certain motives

is

certain point to be carried.

A

certain

to get that result," p. 235.

Nothing is too daring and paragraphs with dynamite," p. 237.

selling bears the other way.

whistles for attention

a

must be aroused

for

it.

It

steam-


Illustrations for W. C. Holman, "Keeping Home," System, 23 (January 1913). 47a.

"Your personal influence

is

Retail

Trade

a strong advertisement. So

at

is

the courtesy of your clerks." p. 13. 17b.

Republished,

System, 25

Hopped, mustache added

to

(May

man's

1915),

face,

and

p.

461.

Image

price tags elimi-

nated.

IT

$

1

'


4 8 left

on the things you display. Many a woman about the price, and will walk out without buying, will come forward and buy if she sees plain

48.

who

"Put price

tags

will not ask a clerk

price tags," pp. 14-15. 49.

"Better than allâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; since your selling efforts can be concen-

trated

on a comparatively small fieldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; you can have your clerk

make calls on prospective customers make them yourself," p. 17.

49

in

every direction.

Or


t

-,.,.

In

.ill

your advertising,

make youi

personality

felt.

8 right

Make

mini townspeople feel that you in person are talking to them.

Make people

wish to

visit

youi store every day," p.

18.


5i left

Illustrations for Carroll D.

Murphy, "Buying More with Each

Wage-Dollar," System, 23 (March 1913). 51. "There is pleasure, enthusiasm and the germ of individual growth in any work which a man can do well." / "Interest in the task is the key that unlocks the latent powers of workers;

and

interest

means

right placing," pp. 226-27.


V

5a

nor pin him in charge foreman who had observed

'Wh) 'I

.1

eloping in the p

tig

German

as

the pattern rooms,

<>l ÂŤ r

1 1

-

kn.uk

foi

details

'

sug-

which

he approached fifty-eight,"

right


53-

"The

Borden's

leak

own

peatedly

showed

itself

investigations.

noticed

an

experienced

ployee of forty-five at work girls

at

through

He had

the filing cases.

among

Efficiency

re-

emthe

was

costing too much," p. 231. 54.

"More than

time

is

half this store manager's

spent on the floor with his work-

ing force, and he thus maintains a personal

bond with

rank and 233-

54

file

practically all of the

of his

organization,"

p.


I

Carroll

for

Illustrations

"The Man

the

for

D.

Job,"

Murphy,

System,

23

(April 1913). 55.

"Twenty minutes

boys handed i

urate paper.

.in

hour.

.

.1

.

The

line

mental alertness," 56.

"He

is

expen

of

the

workers

who

s'irK

â&#x20AC;˘

later,

one of the

neat and

fairly

ac-

he second applicant took

I

.

gave

finish

a

in

p.

in

nervous settle

time

required

to

on each youngster's \<>2.

deciding type

l><

and

down when

tween stead)

the rush

hour comes and handle the work point by point regardless of how fast it pours in." p.

105.

i.


57ics

many

"In

cases, too, intelligent

and independent mechan-

get out of patience trying to fathom the obscure queries of

the application blank

and quit

Illustrations for Carroll D.

Good,'

"

in disgust," pp. 406-07.

Murphy, "Helping

Men

to

'Make

System, 23 (May 1913).

58a. Proof.

combined his pracand theoretical knowledge in a new design for the lathe on which he had worked. The design reduced the cost of one

58b. "Assigned to the drafting room, he tical

part sixty-five per cent," p. 466.


58c.

Republished. p.

136.

System,

26

Cropped top and

(August left,

record of

in

59a. Proof. In one organization, .m employment committee informal!) clacks the

all

the employees of a given

grade whenever a vacancy the grade

trustful

man

is

thus comes in

to be filled

The

next above.

loi

self-dis

considera-

tion .ind help," pp. 468-69.

VI'


6oa. Proof.

"The

6ob.

sales

manager makes himself welcome and spends

a great deal of time in every shop.

than reprimands the buyer locally

unpopular brands,"

who

He

counsels with rather

orders too heavily or stocks

p. 471.

Illustrations for Carroll D.

Murphy, "The Spur

and

of Pay

Promotion," System, 23 (June 1913). 61. " 'Just leave

man whom tion. it.

'I

Now,

me where

used to hope for I

I

am, Mr. Simpson,' replied the

he had called in to offer him an important promoguess,

I

am

this sort of

thing and worked for

too old; the job looks too big for

me

to tackle,' " p. 562. 62.

for

"The heads

of the departments in which the candidates promotion work are usually consulted. Often different

candidates are invited to the employment

personal judgment

may

office in

order that

reinforce or correct the testimony of

their records," p. 565.

61

60b


6s


63a.

and

"The commute* rjii

up

ii

pul

In grade, the ratings ol tlx

proffered

every

roppt

(I

alongside the

and

1),

23.

p.

in

ih'

have been

department

light

and putting night study on the work

he

is

I

could earn the

promoted,

Illustrations

p.

chance

I).

.it

of Ins

Murphy, "Living up

the

years

.^

by

chut

place d

I

â&#x20AC;˘

18.

might

had no ">ui-' In

into

to

Youi

Em

"t'3).

I

1

Ins assistant

partment,"

.1

m

1

that

Inst

Âťl

p

I

1

ployrmt nl Systi

takii

many my job

as

others, but

I

Flopped and

top.

been

noi

n,i

July

right,

left

1l1.1t

.1 1<

committee were tabulated, checked,

.',111'

figured

st

objections and finally adopted." pp. 566

foi

63b. Republish'^! c

position

flown to the point ol identical value. Grade

01

th<

hut io suggest frankly in

the

othei

<!


66.

"By Australian

members

elect

ballot the employees

of an

com-

arbitration

mittee to hear serious complaints as to

working conditions," pp. 20-21. 67. "

'Suppose you hold him over

and recommend him ritory. go,' the

'I'm

for

some other

He's too valuable a

man from

firing

man

.

.

.

ter-

to let

the factory suggested.

him' was the answer, dog-

gedly given," p. 23.


Illustrations foi

Win

eler

Sammons, "Your Business Tomorrow,"

V*

System, 24 (September 1913). 68.

"The

their

children unconsciously duplicated the

four-footed

friends.

'I

md

repri

hey would

like

movements

dolls,

â&#x20AC;&#x17E;

of 'y

therefore,

permitting these fundamental mo-

tions," p. 231. 69.

"On

buildings ai

the ,irc

basis

la

ol

these canvasses n

in

a

makes the residents wonder,"

and analyses, exchange and on such a scale

locality p.

233.

70.

Fom

little

inventors,

in

forty

locked,

individually

equipped

and

satisfy de-

shops, are planning ahead to anticipate

mand,"

p. 235.


I

Illustrations

for Charles

ance," System, 24 71.

There

is

Weinfeld,

(November

"How

it

a small jewelry store in

I

one of

can watch the people going

prefer to walk in on a

man

Life Insur-

my It

towns which is

I

to

I am going to charge you three per cent, or three hundred dollars a year. At the end of twenty years your payments cease and the bond is

rather than to wait in his office Illustrations for

'I want to tell you something,' said my prospect when I him I bought a certain brand of cigars by the box. 'I own stock in the factory where that cigar is made, and as long as I

am

going

put a ten-thousand dollar bond in your safe

other securities, for which

their officesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

"

up an

want

yours," p. 481. to

told

you patronize me,

"I

well located

for him," p. 477. 72.

73.

among your

use as a place from which to reconnoiter.

and from

Sell

I

1913).

to reciprocate.

You can

write

Them," System, 74.

odd

Edward Mott Woolley, 25 (May 1914).

"Our engineers had

investigated the

'Why

I

Bought of

equipment

mills, ascertained as closely as possible

of thirty

the performance

me

application,' " p. 479.

7<ia loft


machinery

of the

plaints, 75.

"

your

in each, listened to

and made

What!- Buv that life!

I

them

a record of

and

the com-

on will pronounce it myself. handled and my customers know.'

stuff?'

know how

don't

the praise

all," p. 462.

stick to the lines that I've

said to his salesman. 'Not

1

to

I

P- 463. I

i

went ba<k

on the da)

il

to

the

first

pp,

house,

which shipped

>

tnd took advantage ol

w u }

the

1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;65.

71

7<i:i

1

i^lu


of illustration on p. 465 republished, System, 26 (December 1914),

76b. Portion

p. 590.

76b

77

Flopped and cropped

at right.


/

M. Graham, "Meet-

Illustrations for R.

System,

Emergencies,"

ing

(June

25

»9>4)-

They measured some

7;

pping them requirements

space

of the front-

each

of

the

learn

to

off'

trade,"

p. 565.

the vice-president, the

superintendent and the cost

man

took

the operations for the whole job apart.' P- 5''7

To

the surprise

the owner, he

of

found that it cost him fifteen cents handle any bundle," p. 568.

Illustration

ing

Irm

I

in!'

H

foi

m

I

»n

t

lis'

n

South

v

\tii-

in

1

'

1

itin 1

.

ihould in

Lad

ith

to

Vnw

1

i<

',14).

t[l|>.

.

worthwhile p

_•

m

OOO,

79


"The (November

Illustrations for Camillus Phillips,

Life of Trade," System, 28 -f*\

81.

"When

aisles after

Thompson scanned his summoning each of his emJesse

ployees to his lecture

office for a

intended

to

severe curtain

awaken keen

en-

thusiasm, he could discern demureness

on

their faces, but

nothing more," pp.

466-67. 82. "

'Whenever you choose

to give

the authority to act for you,'

Lem

me Bar-

row answered, 'I promise you I'll show results, Mr. Thompson,' " p. 471.

for

Illustrations

tomers'

H.

Carl

Fast,

"Cus-

Wants Versus Buyers' Guesses,"

System, 30 (July 1916).

"The salesman reached

for a pad of and assured her he would have the brand looked up at 83.

specially printed blanks

once," p. 97.

"Each time a coat or suit was asked and none was in stock, the saleswoman recorded the price, color, ma84.

for,

terial,

size

and

form," p. 99.

ÂŁ

Hof

pÂť

m ÂŤ*_ 82

style,

all

in

tabulated


i

83

ri^hl

84


85 a

88a

Illustrations

"Sudden

Clarence

for

Riches,"

L.

Cullen,

Illustrations

Associated

Sunday

Williams,

Magazine, December

29,

Edward Huntington "The People in the

for

M.D.,

Walled City," Associated Sunday Maga-

1912.

zine,

March

23,

1913.

85a. Proof.

85b. "I

would carry him

the great news," p. 86.

"Come

here

what's a Lord!" p. 87. "I

now,"

guess p. 7.

I'll

off his feet

with

88b. "Individually

6.

and have

a

peek at

means

they plan desperate

of escape," p.

8.

89a. Proof.

7.

resign

88a. Proof.

my

job

right

89b.

"The

forger

may condescend

play cards with the sneak, thief," p.

to

8.

90a. Proof.

90b. 91a

p. 8.

"The attendant was

a crack boxer,"


Illustrations

foi

Ml)

Willi. nils.

I

I

dvi n<!

iii

Huntington .:m

I

-

\\>I\\

I

Proof.

Huntington tin Law,"

"Wits Versus

Sunday

20,

.,

gib

slipped

be 'I

llls.lppi

III ll.

p.

into 7.

,

Magazine,

May

His telltale tracks led to the

road."

4,

lib

1l1.it

rty,

Ryan had mad

I

illustrations

Williams.

Edward

for

M.D

I

iociated

Huntington Sunday W.

'Contented with Insanity,"

tizinr.

7

96a,

96b.

was captured in the end by a 11.

most

full 1)7.

desperate characters

the place offered their services," p. p.

rail-

id.

p

Veiling i'.i

j>.

Il<

Proof <^\>

Edward

foi

May

'9'3-

â&#x20AC;˘9>3 91a

Illustrations

Willi. mis. Ml)..

in 11.

p.

Proof.

"Found Mast."

p.

the trusts running the

"The cook was sunn 12.

still

12.

tightly gagged,"


99a

5

£»

103a

""

5 pirg !Or,a

104a

106a


Illustrations

for

"The Insane

at

June

Edward

Huntington Williams, M.D., Sunday Magazine,

104a. Proof.

Play," Associated

22, 1913.

104b.

"He pointed

"The

Ethics of Salesmanship," p. 14.

to the

door and said get out." C.

E.

Brown,

98a. Proof.

"The Negro was furiously slapping the boards in one time while the orchestra played in another," p. 14.

98b.

Illustrations for "Tales from the Road," Associated Sunday Magazine, November 30, 1913.

99a. Proof. 105a. Proof.

"Then Eddy would

99b.

play his only solo," p.

14.

105b. " Stiles.

'Why

didn't you

me who

tell

"Cupid and Competitor,"

you were?'

"

Hinson

E.

p. 13.

100a. Proofs. 106a. Proof.

100b. Illustrations for heading for weekly column. "Tales

from the Road." First appeared in Associated Sunday Magazine, October 26. 1913. and the column ran every other week through the April 19, 1914 issue.

106b. "Hobbling down the street came man." Crosby L. Smith, "Kindness Wins,"

Illustrations Illustrations

for

"Tales from the

Magazine, November

191

2,

Road," Associated Sunday

3.

for

forlorn

looking

"Tales from the Road," Associated Sunday

Magazine, December 1117.

a

p. 14.

14.

1913.

"The old man hurrying back for another pocketful I). W. Fratcher, "Ferber's Transformation," p. 13.

of

earth." 101

a.

Proof.

101b. first

brownstone house to make my Van Meter, "Knife Grinding as a Basis,"

selected an imposing

I

call."

Charles

E.

102a.

II

started

I

turned

the opposite bank, so

for

to the other

London King, "When

side,

would

he;

and

Illustrations for ne,

he would do likewise." William

the Goat Interfered," p. 14.

p.

I.

Hamilton Faulkner,

14.

•"•

foi

ales

I

Novembi

1

16,

"Tales from the

December

Road," Associated Sunday

28, 1913.

109a. Proof.

109b. "I Illustrations

105a

so shell out!"

Proof.

loalj. I

it:

"Eliminating a Competitor."

p. 8.

if

108a. Proof.

108b. "I have to have

from the Road." Associated Sunday

Who

tried

(..inn

IS.

to

side-step the

u k," p.

touch."

R.

F.

W..

The Man

14.

1*^13-

Proof.

103b

Horac<

B I

I

! nothing

ytton Varian,

\

D

more than h

to share her

Samaritan,"

p. 9.

108a

109a


113a

110a. Proof.

nob. "If you stir another step it will be your MacFarland, "A Strange Roommate," p. 15. Illustration

for

111.

"And

Fratcher,

this cost

P.

J.

Road," Associated Sunday

"Tales from the

Magazine, January

last."

11, 1914.

me

thirteen

"Diamonds and Junk,"

hundred p.

dollars!"

David W.

12.

Illustrations for "Tales from the Road," Associated Sunday Magazine, January 25, 1914. 1

12a. Proof.

112b. "The Chinamen all agreed "An Emergency .Sideline," p. 10. 1

1

3a.

113b.

16a

them." Robert James,

Proof.

"My

miles." H. 1

to use

only mishap was that the horse ran away for S.

Hall, "Collecting

on Christmas,"

p.

11.

five


1

From the Road," Magazine, February

111m

uitnl -

17a

Sunday

ed I

would

musket couldn't shoot; but Dela 'em ofl " K u an in

\>.

13.

l

Stil<

I

Midnight

he

ted

I

lin

191

Illustrations \ted

foi

•<<>

I

Road,"

tht

Magazine,

Sunday

l

me

"The

old

man

followed

even

to

give

suggestions."

I

he Leak,"

When

ig

1

to force (

1

"I

i'il).

dealer's

.

I

Could

16b,

1

1

W.

Billing,

the |)rice

I

(

someone was

1

%

n<

'I

."

"A Favor

p g

1

13.

shattered

my way D.

office."

itions for

S.

I

trying

throat." Rob-

lunt for Gold,"

Illustrations foi "Tales from the Road," Man b 82, Med Sunday M 191

knew she had "The Haunted

E.

into the oil

Terry,

"The

p. 13.

un-

11.

I

.1

Terry,

"Tales from

the.

Road,"

Associated Sunday Magazine, April

down m\ \n

H.

10.

p.

.iwoke

whisky

in,

19,

1914. 122.

"I

lot

li-.n

I)

\\

sure," p. 1

p.

E.

Proof.

was afraid to breathe or move ol being dashed to the ground." Fratcher, "Taking Jerry's Mea-

Proof

1

her mother

1).

Haunted Engine,"

11K.

p.

!>

Then

been out." Engine,"

10.

able

1

pre-

,.

Hall,

/

I

Francis,

from the Road," Sunday Magazine, March 8,

hit

I

'3-

P-

Maud

Illustrations lot "Tales

tm

don son

talked and

I'lool

1

120b.

121a.

'Nothing doing

-

1

man

meal."

I

Shoes Shined Free," 1

old

the

>ugh his Stomach," p.

it

yo,

1

"The

117I).

1914

Mj

Proof.

71.

i

1

i).


125a

124a

\**.'

127

126

I

alighted,

,n _ll

-j

linen t«..dv I

di

••

J

I"'

123.

"And

Richard

*!

S.

so the evening Bates,

"Home,

wore away."

Sweet,

Home,"

Illustrations for "Tales

Associated Sunday

from the Road,"

Magazine,

May

24,

,nr

1914.

p. 17.

.. w.

126.

Eugene Clay Ferguson, "A Texas

Adventure,"

from the Road," Magazine, May 10,

p. 12.

"That was the

Illustrations for "Tales

127.

Associated Sunday 1914.

could learn." John A. Burton, Order." p. 12.

124a. Proof.

{Note:

124b.

"Howled

for

something." L. D.

and Matches,"

Coggan Maxfield,

to

start

The

this issue

is

best piece of

illustration

news

on page

13 of

not by Edward Hopper.)

"Baseball

p. 7.

Illustrations for "Tales

from the Road,"

125a. Proof.

Associated Sunday Magazine, June

125b. "There, cursing like a trooper, was

1914.

Dick

"How

Hardhead!" Haddon Prentice, Caught an Outlaw," p. 7.

I

I

"A Lost

128.

"I

tively."

watched the nervous T. H. Bailie, "Brick,"

man p. 13.

21,

fur-


v

130

ready

all

owel]

I

dressed

alighted,

"I

129.

duster,

in

Maxwell. "My

r.

linen

a

big

the

for

show.''

Lucky Day,"

P- >3-

for Charles A. Collman, Keeping Your Wits in Wall Street," iated Sunday Magazine, September

Illustrations

The

financier banished

irate

young hopeful from

"You ought

131.

in

1

Illustrations Hi'

I,-.

(.1.

I'm

1

',

(

.1

â&#x20AC;˘

91

/

" I

tips

it

p.

13.

hotel

wait-

[1

rles

Worth

in

A.

oilman.

(

Wall Stn

Sundc

'

I

'ober

I

p J5

I

Smile

ll'

1

ICj

cordially

B

'

llliistr.itions

/

11.

'<r

mted

/

'3-

P-

"Whai

; '

li

lh<

"Throwi $50

133b.

15.

(oilman,

\

Od

lined

the

16.

'

.

"The

132. 1.

for

p.

have witnessed the

Into Will Sire'

iking

Sund

to

office," p.

iir.

presence,"

his

His

had

been

.1

pennilesi

book

16.

wail

din p

16

him

in

the

fi


'

>

n

Illustrations

Ml

"Making

a Million in

sociated

Sunday

K ,v

i

*

In

^'1 jh

Charles

for

Collman,

A.

Wall

Street," As-

December

Magazine,

20, 1914.

138a. Proof.

-

I

â&#x20AC;˘

"No man

138b.

million," p.

WHII

entitled

is

make a

to

16.

139a. Proof.

him

139b. "Offered

$50,000 a year," p.

"How

Illustration for

A

band:

presidency at

the

16.

My HusDocument,"

Saved

I

Temperance

American Magazine, 76 (August

"When

140.

I

136a

Homesteader,

the

I

realize I

End," chap.

Illustrations for "Trail's

by

what you

think, Philip, of

might be and what you are, no longer love you," p. 67.

1913).

Farmer's

1,

Wife,

April 1915. 141a. Proof.

took four bronchos

141b. "It

my

me,

dog,

crate

cat,

of

haul

to

chickens,

trunk, furniture, stove, water barrel

and

miles

hoof

ten

groceries

across

the

trailed plains," p. 312.

Charles

Collman,

Illustrations

for

"The Wolves

of Wall Street," Associated

A.

Sunday Magazine, November

22,

1914.

142a. Proof.

"My pony

142b.

'went bad' a mile or so

back and we had a mix-up,"

p. 313.

136a. Proof.

136b.

"Mond knew how

stock

on the curb market,"

137.

â&#x20AC;˘39a

"The

young

to

boost

the

directors

frightened at the holdup," p.

were

not

14.

the

Homesteader,

May

1915.

143.

" 'This

simply.

End," chap.

for "Trail's

Illustration

by

p. 14.

is

'She's

my

Farmer's

boy,' said the

2,

Wife,

woman

Miss Douglas from over

yonder,' " p. 343.

End," chap.

Illustration for "Trail's

by

the

June

Homesteader,

Farmer's

3,

Wife,

1915.

144a. Proof.

144b. cuits

"We with

Illustration

by

the

ate

our bacon and cold

bis-

zest," p. 7.

End," chap.

for "Trail's

Homesteader,

Farmer's

4,

Wife,

J uly !9'5145.

may,' 140

"I I

looked up into his eyes, 'You whispered,"

p. 31.


U

1

142a

'43

t L

<,w '

Illustration ii

1

1

|6

he

p

1

|6b

[01 ife,

Roberl I)'" mi"

<

I

1

>1<

Santa

(

laus'

W. &*

'

^'

ii-»

Love Story,"

1916

rtbm

Proof In the if"

rnoon when the Christmas dinner was

foi

1

rid<

settled,

on the new bobsled,"

145 1

|d.i


Illustrations

"Country

Dorothy D. Calhoun,

for

Farmer's

Protection,"

Fire

Wife, January 1917. 147a. Proof.

147b. "Fireplaces should be protected by a screen of fine wire to prevent ignition

| v.

-

by sparks,"

148b.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;was

l

..

p. 168.

148a. Proof.

-M

"Twenty it

years

gone up

Illustration for Elva Cureton, 149a

in

smoke

necessary?" p. 168:

"The Ad-

justment," Farmer's Wile, April 1917.

147a

149a. Proof.

know your

149b. "I

mjA

employers,

and they have no

ders, light.

In to-morrow's issue you will re-

tract

that

report

Pendester's public

and work

that

say is

Mrs.

heartily ap-

proved by her husband,"

p. 259.

Illustrations for Katherine

Henry, "Then

Contentment Reigns," Farmer's

May

^^fK

Saun-

liking for day-

Wife,

1917.

150a. Proof.

150b. P. 291.

....

1

Âť

151a. Proof.

**148a

151b. P. 291.

150a

Illustrations for Katherine Henry, "Daughter Chooses the Farm," Farmer's

Wife, June 1917. 152a. Proof.

152b. "A saddle horse would go far toward keeping her contented with life

on the farm,"

p. 8.

153a. Proof.

153b.

sky

"A

will

period of

day's outing

under the open

offset

the

busier hours

stress

like

haying time. There

must be periods of fun,"

Carmella

Illustrations for

of

a

p. 8.

E. L.

Kenyon,

"Lost Canyon," Farmer's Wife, August 1

9

1

7-

154a. Proof.

154b. " 'Now,' .*

'

next

m 152 a

151a

said the

number on

the

engineer,

program

'the

will be a

thirty-mile hike back to the hotel by the


-7 -

&^2$k

will

known

hiker, Mi. Bill)

.

158a. Proof.

Stebbins,'

p. 51.

You seem anything paired the old dooi

!

!

.i^

be could

I'll

1l1.1t

.1--

well

has

In

about

can

I

up into

do"-

make

this

to

a pair of

I

be stuck.

know

of car.'

Is

there

St

"nv>

&A

^^

quite a bit

Julie

looked

frank gray eyes. 'There

hundred and sixty-three pages it you could! Uncle Henry

buriaJ

Oh, is

Illustrations lioin

1

Donnell

Dorothy

[01

Wheels," pari

in

:

larr

,'

r

harder to start than old Peleg ever

Cal

P' 95-

1

1917. for

Illustration 1

-/.

^ .hi

1

bewildermeni

.in

1

on

evei his

-marry me?'

(

said

Julie crisply.

hi

was

hoi

drowned in a dull tide ol full'-, wh) .mi you evei

I

red

B

'That's why,'" p.

I

-

Dorothy Donnell Calon V\ hi Is," part \ >vember 1917. â&#x20AC;˘<

.

1

2,

11

Proof. <>n

1

159b.

"In

wretched 1

h. his .mil

lung

â&#x20AC;˘

stop,' " p

Ik

Fanru

Pol

waved the blue check Here's ,; " moi eyl I'll drivel I'll study and find oul how to itari and [ulie

houn. "I

p. 123.

the

midst

household

heap of goods, broken

of

a

tattered bedclothes, a .1

woman

wailing baby to hei breast,"

-,.,.,


i-j55

^•i

w 161a

160a

ij&jfesa V

- .-si v •

$8% KJmTZ 164a

^v

165a 163a

Illustration

for

Dorothy Donnell Cal-

houn, "The Legacy on Wheels," part

3,

162b. " 'Before

you judge, please read

these letters,' she concluded," p. 174.

Farmer's Wife, December 1917. Illustrations for Alice

160a. Proof.

160b.

"

'Why!' cried Julie.

was the matter with me!

'I I

know what was home-

1918.

sick,' " p. 147.

Illustration

Our Farm,"

to

Councilman, "Hail

Farmer's

Wife,

March

163a. Proof.

for A. Donnell,

"Father

'n

163b. P. 236.

Mothertown," Farmer's Wife, December

164a. Proof.

1917-

164b. P. 236.

161a. Proof.

lGib. "'There's

some kind of a big if anybody wants to

building out there

make

a try for

it,'

"

p. 151.

Helen

Bennett,

"Mrs.

Illustration

for

the Board," Farmer's Wife,

162a. Proof.

May

"Her Day,"

1918.

165a. Proof.

Mayhew on

January 1918.

Illustration for L. D. Sterns,

Farmer's Wife,

165b. "She

friend

called

and chatted

girl again," p. 287.

on

an

old

school

until she felt like a


THE

Vol 11

PILLAR. OF FLAME -+**" by EDVAUD PILSWOR.TH -«.' '

^^^B

i

- 1." N

167a

Mfefltok"

I*F*

;

»/

'

*rck 19 16

SECRET OF

tp/Te A COMPLETE HOVEL

^

169b

(Caprice

HENRY MNEELY

6y

168a

PARADISE BEND 6y "WILLIAM

A

-

OFAGUN

LIL SON

by

J

He thought mi p,

foi

did I

ALLAN DUNN

to

on

|us»

ii

he

1

purpose

icpecta

me

to

On*

»

/(lien

Pcyno/Jrl

'

Doroth) Donnell Calhoun, "In Farmei Wife Man h igig

suppose

Stephen

6y

1

Illustration

J>art

BUFFALO TENslllr

-~

SANDY BOUB.KL STORY

A

fouk part story

PATTERSON "WHITE

.1

70b

Crooked

frighten me,' she

to fall into his

arms and

'73a

Forgive me. Well, I'm not going to, that's all,'"

1

is8.

7".

Proof.

1

170b. Illustration

for J.

Allan

Dunn,

"L'il

Son of

ti

Gun,"

Ilh.

167a.

Prool ion

!

I'll

Ii'

.I'll:

'('Ills,

I

p.

I

'

169a

Prool

169b

Illustration

Flame

foi

Henr)

M

Neely,

I

he

Secret

of

p 99

172b. Illustration

Bend," part

P- 3-

'

Illustration

Im

I

homas .Addison, "Too Much Business,"

172a. Proof.

Illustration

'1'"'

Proof.

171I).

P- "33-

.

Prool 168b.

171a.

foi

Edward

I'iKworth.

"I

he

Pillar

of

1,

for

173a.

Proof.

173b,

Illustration foi

p. 164.

William

Patterson

White,

"Paradise-

p. 133.

Stephen Allen Reynolds, "Buffalo Tens,"


^SAl

HYDE STORY OFPATRICK WILLIAM and TERENCE CASEY

A FOUR PART STORY

A

(fy

MAN AND

HIS DEEDS Ay

Donate) Fr a nc it

Cone I is si on

McGrtw

1743

176a

A-j^feri^^

Vol.12

^v-C z? 5

V SHEI>OFTHE

WdNDEMNG FOOT by H/1UL M .M/1IIMS

ETHICS 6y J.FRANK DAVIS

^

!*Â¥

\*K'

1

September 1916

179a

174a. Proof.

Vol.12 /No. 5

.

174b. Illustration for Patrick

and Terence Casey, "The Story

of William Hyde," part 4, p. 170. 175a. Proof.

Frank Davis, "Ethics,"

175b. Illustration for J.

p. 180.

176a. Proof.

Donald Francis McGrew, "A

176b. Illustration for

His Deeds,"

Illustrations lor

THE SECRET

WOLF by

4COMPLCTC MOVIL

Man and

p. 206.

Adventure, 12 (September 1916).

177a. Proof.

177b. Illustration for heading of Contents, p.

S

.

CA

T\

1.

LET O/S 178a. Proof.

178a

178b. Illustration for

S.

Carleton,

"The

Secret Wolf," p.

3.

179a. Proof.

179b. Illustration for Paul H. Harris,

"Shep of the Wandering

Foot," p. 86. 180a. Proof.

180b. Illustration

for

S.

for

W.

B.

H. Hurst, "The Tide-Mating,"

P-94-

THE TIDE-MATING HHUftST by

S

D

181a. Proof.

181b. Illustration

Yellow Horse," 180a

p. 101.

C.

Turtle,

"A Bull Movement

in


MOVEMENT YELLOW HOftSE

A BULL IN

^

by W.C.TOTTLE

,*-.

l

-^^'&-^\ IN THE GDID 181a

OF THE MINOT/1UR

4 FOUR D/10T STORY by F/1RNH4M OlSMOO and /IftTMun GILCHRIST OuODEOR Part II

183a

Tft/IILING

THE JUNGLE M/1N

GtOnCC W/jr»0u1TON LEWIS

by

l82a

SNUFFY /1NbTHEMONSTEft<: v o*TESGLE« |S|.i

182a.

Proof.

182b. Illustration

ton

I

I

George Warbur-

for

railing the

Jungle

M

'*

p. 112.

183a.

Proof. Illustration

and

Vrthui Gilchrisl

Brodeur, "In the

Minotaui

(,n]> of the

pari

2,

p.

123.

Prooi 184b.

Illustration

Glen,

Gates

for

"Snuff) and the Monstl

r.

"

p

P-

1

M

S

ition :

V

TheUNMUDDING OF THE EMMfeE by DOUGL/IS W4TSOM

I

Proof.

I

-d:-^>

Farnham Bishop

for

for

Douglas

i8tia

S

nmuddiri

>-,\

Proof ition

Robert

Pinkerton,

Kathrene and "Guiding Clemen-

fot

\

**

&

;

P 187!).

Illustration Fifi

foi

I

eland

Ward

Fifl

GUIDING CLEMENTINE hy

KflTMfltNt

jnrf

RODUT

P IN K

t

RTON 186a


THEM/IN WHO BUILT

UPFHOM

the net by

FIFTY-FIFTY by LEL/1/N0 W/llio

188a

DECK

*

HEflOES /3LL

by

ARTHUR

A^ ^ ^

<dfe

190a

'AST

D

HENRY f^AKTH. OWYMN

COW5

HOWDE/s SMITH

IS

COW5

Mid-Noveml>ei

1

Issue 1917 Vo/. 15 ATo. 4192a

THE WAVE BOUND (7

3ft*

Complete Novel ly Samuel Alexander Wkvte

fe^^

:

;

THE STRENGTH OF GREGSON hy Robert

191a

J.

Pear^all »93a

188a. Proof.

190b. Illustration

188b. Illustration

for

Gwynn, "The Man

Who

Henry Built

Martel

Up

from

tents

-

l

194b. Illustration for

191b. Illustration for

189a. Proof.

White, "The

Arthur D.

Howden

Smith, "Heroes All," p. 198.

Illustrations for

ber

18, 1917).

190a.

Proof.

Adventure, 15 (Novem-

Samuel Alexander

Wave Bound,"

p.

3.

192b. Illustration Is

Cows,"

for

W.

C.

Tuttle,

p. 56.

193a. Proof.

193b. Illustration for Robert J. Pearsall, of Gregson," p. 67.

"The Strength

Roy

P. Churchill,

String," p. 73.

195a. Proof.

igsb

mustrat on

"A Bearer

192a. Proof.

"Cows

194a. Proof.

"The High

191a- Proof,

the Ace," p. 186.

189b. Illustration for

heading of Con-

for

-

i

f or

Hugh

Pendexter,

of Belts," p. 73.

196a. Proof.

g6b ui ustrat on for Talbot Mundy, "Hira Singh's Tale," part 3, p. 79. ,

i


THE HIGH STRING

*

by Ro V P CKurchill -/

^*j A BEARER OF •94 a

BELTS

by Huoh Pcndextcr

CONTENTS FOR MID NOVEMBER ISSUE 1917 '95a

HIRA SINGH S TALE

\

Jg*.

.

1

CZ /Purpart

*

,

^^^V'v

-

1*

w

i>y

Talbot

siory

Mun4y

*&>* THE BRIDGING OF MALBERT SWAMP ">

by 0am** FrancitDvry #r '973 196a

THE SOURDOUGH TWINS LAST CLEAN UP hy

*'#f /'.Li**

Robert Ruj sell Strand

r

„<%

v^^oj-

THE WISE MAN bv H

I>

1

l'iirv_

Lube

198a •'

197a

Proof.

197b.

Illustration for

Malbi n Swamp,

fames Francis Dwyer, "The Bridging of 101

p

Proof. Illustration foi

Last

I'.mi

Clean-Up

199a

I'roof.

199b

Illustration

p.

1

foi

Rob

Ru

'II

Strang,

"The Sourdough

p

Hapsburg

Liebe,

"The Wise

Man."

16

THE KING o/CARADOS P

loob. p.

123.

Illustration

!•

foi

Vance Palmer, "The King

of Carados,"

C7

Complete Novelette

by

Vance Palmer


DARCY DESERTS Ly Clyde

B HovioK

"id ^

-

Vol.1*

No. 1 >„J3SH!fc.

>

July

1M91S 204a

^

THE LURKING POISON -oy Cap-tain.

George B Rodney

AMife

July lg, 191^ Vo/./tf JVo.

KM

2

/'' <;, *ftej 3

CTjt

% £3

*a

4& *& "i THE SURVIVOR A Grim Lo« Story C?

Complete Novel by Roheri V.Carr

CAMP FIRE

S7ie A Meeting-Place for ^Readers.Wrvters and,

205a

Adventurers

203a

201a. Proof.

201b. Illustration

Illustrations for for

Clyde

B.

Hough,

"Darcy

Derserts,"

P- >57-

Adventure, 18 (July

18,

1918).

Proof 204b. Illustration for heading of Contents, p.

1.

202a. Proof.

205a. Proof.

Captain

202b. Illustration

for

Lurking Poison,"

p. 161.

George

B.

Rodney,

"The 205b. Illustration for Robert V.

Love Story,"

Can, "The Survivor:

A Grim

p. 3.

203a. Proof. 2o(ia.

203b. Illustration

for

"The Camp-Fire: A Meeting-Place

Readers, Writers and Adventurers,"

Proof.

for

206b. Illustration p. 183.

Love,"

p. 76.

for

Harold Titus, "A

Fish

Story

About


'

_^rrrr--^

_r_

A

THE PEARL OF TORRES

FISH STORY ABOUT LOVE

Ly Louis Esson

by Harold Tvtu*

i

206a

X

THE

SKIDI FEED THE EVENING STAR by HuoK Pendexter

ON SHORT ALLOWANCE 4y ES.PUdwell 209a

FOR THE FLAG by Thomas Addison

P-

d four-par* story,

:<-•

-

Sal ft] Er^r^ !

.

^

r

,.i%^

k?

L

i&10S£>

THE TRAIL AT LANDRY by Nev\l

G Hcnshaw

zioa

zioa. Proof.

Proof. ji,-\>.

Illustration

Louis

(or

Esson,

"The

Pearl

ol

Tom

siob. p.

Illustration foi

Illustration

foi

Hugh

Pendextei

I

Skidi

Iced the

211b. Illustration Iry," p.

Proof. •

IO|.

2,

211a. Proof.

Prooj

p.

rhomas Addison, "For the Flag," part

115.

Hon

foi

i

S.

Pladwell,

"On

Shori

Allow..:

1

i»>.

foi

Nevil

G.

Henshaw,

"The

Trail

at


kg

OFF THE COURSE '

HW

/£&

ty Roy P. CKurcKill

A PREVARICATED PARADE

213a

byW.C.Tuttle

THE TWELVE PADLOCKS hy NS

.

'.

''/

H.i'vSk

-

Carroll KMickerter

THE HAUNTING ^^ OF THE LADY SHANNON 214a

ky William Hope Hodoion. t*»-Kti>*S<_

215

A HANDMADE HERO ALIAS JOHN DOE

ky Terry Ra.it\8e^ye

^~ A,Si

SSSL2*-

Ly Hap*turo Liete

&r

217

216

for William Hope Hodgson, "The Lady Shannon," probably Adventure, date

215. Proof of illustration

212a. Proof.

p. 1K4

Haunting unknown.

213a. Proof.

216. Proof of illustration for

8i2b. Illustration for

213b. Illustration

W.

C. Tuttle,

"A Prevaricated Parade,"

for

Roy

for

Carroll

P.

Churchill,

"Off

the

Course,"

214a. Proof.

Padlocks,"

p. 176.

Terry Ramsaye, "A Handmade

Hero," probably Adventure, date unknown.

p. 167.

214b. Illustration

of the

K.

Michener,

"The Twelve


T

LEETE PROTESTS

ALONE

CompUia Nor>»UHo y Pu»«ell A Bocji*

ordon don lo lc XU

% 218

219

^^^j£^

THE DANCE

THE GOLDEN GODS

^

CI four pari

liory hy St*pk*n Ckalmtrt

Pari

MISDEAL

111

THE FINISH by HoldaO«&r«

1

^L^

by Ben F Baker

m

FINISH THE FIGHT

rrm^jMM V E~o.xx« P.Lyl.

Jv.

223

217.

Prool

illustration

ol

probabl

Do<

:

ol

Hapsburg Liebe, "Alias unknown.

l"i

;

illustration

(.onion Young,

foi

abl)

Adventun date unknown.

ng

Prool ol

220.

Uone," prob-

illustration

date

Prool ol illustration

the Goldei

known.

G

Russell

foi

/

foi

pari

i,

ably

Proof of illustration for Ben \clvi ntiar, (I, He unknown.

222.

Proof of illustration for Holda Sears, "The Finish," prob-

221.

F.

Baker. "Mis-Deal," prob-

ably Adventure, date unknowi

.

probabl)

of

fohn

V

Boggs,

Leet<

I'ro-

unknown.

Stephen (.halmers, "Tin Dun' probably Adventure, date un-

223. Proof ol illustration foi

Eugene P. Lyle, unknown.

Fight," probably Adventure, date

Jr.,

"Finish the


Ill

225a

Illustration

for

H.

Cartwright,

E.

"The

Office

Boy,"

Wells

Fargo Messenger, 4 (June 1916). 226. Illustrations for

"How

Style Rides the Express," Wells

"The

office

boy

is

a junior clerk," p. 155.

Fargo

Messenger, 4 (April 1916).

Illustrations

224a. Proof.

Wells Fargo Messenger, 5 (January 1917).

224b. "In

New York— the

merchant inspects the

Paris of

latest styles in

America— the Cosmopolis women's suits and gowns,"

227.

for

"When Love

Cromwell

His message would impress

228. "Flowers

225a. Proof.

New

Year's Day," p. 74.

229.

"The Wells Fargo

225b.

"Out

in Cosmopolis, the

p. 118.

just

arrived

customer

is

delighted with her

by express from

New

York,"

"Flowers

/

by

Express,"

He

sends her

flowers by express," p. 73.

p. 117.

gown, which has

Childe,

Commercial

handled the Fargo

'Call

illustration for

Way

/

Fresh and bright on

Card'— An Automatic Signal."

Wells Fargo & Co. Express, Wells

Fargo Messenger, 5 (February 1917), inside front cover.


Eighty Million Packages '•'•

Tin- immcnae for

facilities

traffic

year

IK Kuril" Insl signified

the eonfidenec of shipiiers

meeting individual needs afforded by 1

irgo

expren

11

1

H

discriminating out

coloi

uive 121 ^

job

]

lil.n k

New

\w

ourth

prool

from the Beck

help

solve

'

'

'

coloi pi •

/

irch

1917).

(Color

;ilT.ir.l-

receipt,

thi

character of

iwr 1/

>itr

th<-

shipment,

:»r<-

not

lost

equip

upon the

of transportation

shipping problems?

them?

A

telephone

Why

not

l<-l

WelUt

call to iLs nearest office will

'

I

bring

your assistance a courteous, experienced expressman one who rd in the prompt and tortation of your goods.

io

Vork.

coloi proof.

pi

i

plate

Engraving

service

special cars, special messengers

nt suited to the

228

Hi.-

patns-

service.

The ninny advantages which Mich llu

In

efficient,

Tis

Always Best

to

Have

it

is

Expressed."

S

p •j

231.

1.

1

illustrai

Always I--.

,

!'.'-<

Wells

(March

10

Havi

1

Expi

'

l

1917). inside

from cover.

Commercial

I."

'

Fari°

(i


.ÂŁ<^v

^Vr? 232b

232a

232a. "Suggestions Are Always In Order." tion for Wells Fargo 1917), inside

Co.,

Commercial

illustra-

Wells Fargo Messenger, 5 (June

back cover.

"The Wells Fargo Man Does His

232b. try."

&:

Commercial

illustration for Wells

Bit For

Home and Coun-

Fargo & Co., Wells Fargo

Messenger, 5 (June 1917), back cover. 233. Cover, Wells

Fargo Messenger, 6 (July 1917). (Color

plate,

p. 68.)

Illustration

ÂŁ

He p p t

for

C.

W.

Garrison,

"Safe,

Sure

and Speedy

Service," Wells Fargo Messenger, 6 (September 1917). K 234. " 'Won't

234

you save one?' he asks,"

p. 5.


Illustration for E.

V

Spirit ot the Past,"

l» ells

mbei

Brininstool,

"The

I

1917

235a. Proof.

235b. P. 49. tion

Voui Bo)

foi >i^"' ,"

in-. "

237.

Wells

I

folks

he

compliment!" [01

Wells

sen^i

1

I

am

••

,1111. its

home

icni

Order,

th<

11

ig

'•'

p. 85.

going

'

Hoi 1

-

U

a

other

return the

to

Commercial

.11

\

'/i -

i>.i(k

Mom

Fargo

and now

da)

1

H

I

Wi

v

".'l

illustration 1

i covei


243a

"Good bye and good

luck! Don't worry about the officeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; now!" Commercial illustration for Wells Fargo k Co. Express, Wells Fargo Messenger, 6 (March 1918), back 238.

that's

my

bit,

cover.

Wells Fargo Messenger, 6

239. Cover,

(April

1918).

(Color

plate, p. 69.)

240. "See,

my

ing along?"

/

Thrift Card

"The

First of

is

almost

May

is

filled!

How

U.S.A." Commercial illustration for Wells Fargo

Fargo Messenger 241. Cover, p.

,

(>

(May

1918),

is

Thrift Stamp

&

yours com-

Day

back cover. (Color plate,

The Fxpress Messenger,

1

in the

Co., Wells p. 70.)

(July 1918). (Color plate,

71.)

242a. Proof.

242b. Cover,

The Express Messenger,

1

(December

1918).

(Color plate, p. 72.)

Illustration for "Lightening the 81

(May

Work," Country Gentleman,

20, 1916).

243a. Proof.

243b. P. 1097. 244a


>.

f

•si

«.

sag- ~^%x -

4^ '

-

!

-'•15

243c.

Republished, Country Gentleman, 81 (October

i.j,

1916),

p. 1855.

244c!.

215. Illustration

for

Mrs.

Kirch, n," Country 144a.

244b.

Georg.

Gentleman,

I.

81

Russell.

(June

3,

"My

New Farm

244c Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (January I'

5

_

,

gi6)

246

Fun

1171

S(

27.

Illustration for

When You

1916).

Proof. I'.

Republished,

Country

Gentleman,

82

(November

3,

1917), p. 50.

p

ptembei

the Farm:

What

to

Do

)lM

,

Illustration lli.it

"Good Times on

All Get Together," Country Genf/eman, 81 (Augusi

for

Country 2,

"Good Times on folks

1916), p.

Enjoy,"

the Farm: All Sorts of

Country

Gentleman,

81

1

ig

!'•

246


247a

249a

i

j&*

/

248a

J

<?

ÂŁb -

p

ik

IS

Vi

asm-

IB

Illustration for Margaret Courtney, "The Slave of the Lamp," Country Gentleman, 81 (October 21, 1916).

248a. Proof.

248b. P. 1891.

Illustration for

Gentleman,

8i

Mary H. Talbott, "Save (September

the Tripe," Country

23, 1916).

Illustration for Grace V'iall Gray, "Cut the Cooking Cost," Country Gentleman, 81 (November 4, 1916).

247a. Proof.

249a. Proof.

247b. P. 1740.

249b. P. 1955.

247c. Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (April 21,

1917),

247(1.

p. 25.

249c. Republished,

Country

Gentleman,

81

(November

18,

1916), p. 2027.

p. 33.

Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (August

11,

1917),

-49 ( I- Republished. Country Gentleman, 82 p. 30.

(May

26,

1917),


ft

**^

^

«*-

-

v

*. v

-

-

255a

J

tol^ 2->6a

Illustration-)

Kedzie

Nellie

for

Gentleman,

Girl.

81

Jones,

"Helping

(November

11,

Hind

the

*

1916).

250a. Proof.

250b.

"Help

.r,

Proof.

1

,1.

In

hired

\

plan her clothes,"

1

girl

ff

p. 1987.

*

entitled to her fun," p. 1987.

is

%

s

r

1*

252a. Proof.

252b. "Stand o\er

Illustration

foi

h<

1

till

Prool

--,

r

ib.

it

your way,"

Lw.

p. 1987.

l

(November

18,

^ x

1

Republished

1

HO»»U

1916).

3

Illustration

v

Mar) Kelle\ Dunne, "When Do You Live?"

\leman, 81 253a.

she cooks

Country

How

t'«i

1

Gentleman,

Home

82

(February

24,

r Grew," Country

Gentleman,

(Novembei

v

1

'•••tr

tIjL-jl•»»»tx

Proof. -'Via

•54 b

1

'

a

Republished,

"C7' p

Country

Gentleman,

82

(September

1,

|1

Illustration foi

'eman,

Hi

thi

I

(Decembei

-.

Woman

Sp< ikei

'

ountry

ig

Prool P

published, (ountry Gentleman, 62 (December

1,

ig

P-37260a


Illustration for "Lightening the

82 (February

3,

Work," Country Gentleman,

256a. Proof.

"Our Club

C. Hessler, 1,

Diary," Country

1917).

258a. Proof.

256b. P. 53.

258b. P. 30.

256c. Republished.

Country

Gentleman,

82

(September

1,

1917), p. 31.

Illustration

(September Illustration

Maud

Illustration for

Gentleman, 82 (September

1917).

for

"The Country Gentleman

Gentleman, 82 (March

School,"

for

"Home

Canning,'

Gentleman, 82

Country

15, 1917).

Country 259a. Proof.

31, 1917).

259 b

p

-

-

34-

257a. Proof.

257b. P. 44. 257c. Republished,

Illustration for

Country Gentleman, 82 (April

7,

1917),

257d. Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (April 14,

1917),

Anna M. Johnson, "Home Canning," Country

Gentleman, 82 (October

6,

1917).

p. 40.

260a. Proof.

260b. P. 35.

p. 44.

257c Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (April

21,

1917),

p. 36.

257L Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (April

28,

1917),

12,

1917).

p. 32.

Levington Comfort, "The Black Frock (June

2

12,

1916).

261a. Proof.

257g. Republished,

Country Gentleman, 82 (May

p. 32. 257I1.

Illustrations for Will

Coat," Every Week,

Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (May

19,

1917),

2,

1917),

16,

1917),

p. 32.

257L Republished,

261b.

"

away.

It's

(June

"He

257J. Republished, Country Gentleman, 82 (June

let

figure

black frock get too far last

few days,'

"

263.

made

his

way

to

crouched on the sand and holding the

p. 14.

"The woman screamed. 'God help usâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; did you drink?

Did you drink?' the missionary

p. 32.

that

did not eat the scrap of food: he

the pitiable

wailing child,"

p. 32.

to

kind of been the hub of things the

p. 13.

262.

Country Gentleman, 82

'We don't want

cried," p.

14.

261a

261b


1

C.H o

a

as

fK,

262

:t) |.i

''.'-.

HBP'

1

1

1

foi

1

Do

'

to ^

Whai

Vddington Brua

H.

Ever)

"ii

Ihm.i1

Doubts

Vpril 16, 1917).

ll

Prooi

164b

P.

'

Ink

1917.

Whitney

Museum

nidi's qui

16.

Illustration,

"i

I

1

phim \

I

"I

on illustration American \n

tappet

70.1

1

board,

New

zs

\<>il.

B<

\6

Proof in

net lion \m'Ii the

1

up

visions ol

<>\

possible

mistakes

in

con-

an umbrella," p _'l.

|!>


266a. Illustration, inches.

1917.

Ink on

Whitney Museum

quest of Josephine N.

Hopper

board,

illustration

American

of

Art,

New

22x15

York:

Be-

70.1445.

266b. Proof. 266c.

me

"The minute

I

as to the clothes

Illustrations for

Saturday,' " p.

H< anothi

no |j.

up

a terrible conflict begins within

should wear,"

force,

Collins, "Selling the

you hear about the brickyard?

10.

from

fidgeted

no

p. 17.

one

thing

to

He had

no purpose."

tion,

1

10.

ion

eek,

5

oi

|"i. 9,

I"' I

Hard Ones,"

28, 1917).

he browbeal his derJ

1

!

11

get

James H.

Every Week, 4 (May 267. " Boss, did

I

M

fohn P.

1917), p.

fon< 1

Osl I

very

It closes

down


271

Illustrations for

Every Week, 270. P.

7.

271. P.

8.

Illustration

5

for

Week, 6 (March 272.

"

would

'Mag

Fred C. Kelly, "A Fortune in the Day's Mail, (October 1, 1917).

Bernadine Hilty, "In San Francisco," Every 9,

1918).

darlin',

280. Cover,

when I'm gone,

I

wisht at

night

you

say a little prayer fer me,' " p. 18.

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate, p. 281. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate, p. 273. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

(January

1

282. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

(February

1

275. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock p. 74.)

276. Cover,

The Morse Dry

Dial,

(March

1

1918).

The Morse Dry Dock

for

poster

Dock

Dial,

1

(April

1918).

1918).

Dial,

(January

1919).

2

Hun,

the

inches.

The

1918.

Charles

Gouache on

Rand Penney

Poster exhibited at Gimbels department store,

New

York, with

other entries in the competition of the National Service Secp. 74.)

of the

United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet

Corporation.

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

1

(June-July 1918).

p. 74.)

Reference: Reproduced in

The Morse Dry Dock

283b. Cover,

278b. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

1

(August

1918).

284a. First proof.

p. 75.)

The Morse Dry Dock p. 76.)

The Sun (New

York), August 25,

1918.

(Color plate, p. 77.)

279. Cover,

Smash

9% x 6%

278a. Proof.

(Color plate,

(November

76.)

illustration board,

tion

(Color plate,

1

Collection. (Color plate, p. 77.)

277a. Proof.

277b. Cover,

Dial,

1918).

283a. Study

(Color plate,

(Color plate,

1918).

(Color plate, p. 76.)

(Color plate, p. 74.)

(Color plate,

(October

1

1918).

(Color plate, p. 73.) 274. Cover,

Dial,

76.)

Dial,

1

(September 1918).

284b. Second proof. 284c.

Third proof.

Dial, 2

(February 1919).


299- Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate, p. 300. Cover,

Dial, 3

(November

1920).

Dial, 3

(December

1920).

(February

1921).

(March

1921).

85.)

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate,

p. 85.)

301. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

4

(Color plate, p. 86.) 302. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate,

p. 87.)

303. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

4

Dial, 4 (July 1921). (Color

plate, p. 88.)

304. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial,

(August

1921).

(December

1921).

(February

1922).

4

(Color plate, p. 88.) 305. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

(Color plate,

p. 88.)

306. Cover,

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial, 4

Dial,

5

(Color plate, p. 88.)

Illustrations for

3°7

The Morse Dry Dock

.er,

'

(Color plate, 285. Cover,

Dial,

(March

2

1919).

p. 78.)

The Morse Dry Dock

Dial, 2

(May

1919). (Color

/••

<

plati

'>/<•>

Doc I D

Dry

1

|ul\

1919). (Color

2

p

Cover,

Dry Dock Dial,

The Morst

(Color plate,

p. 81.)

288. (.over.

The Morse Dry

Dock

(September 1919).

2

Dial,

2

(October

1919).

(Coloi plat* 289a.

Proof

M"

The (Color plate,

/

n

'.;

(Color plate,

]>.

ggi

The

((

'

<<ii,r

plate

292. Covei

e

D

D

D

/'

I

Dial,

2

(November

1919)-

Dial,

1

(December

1919).

(January

1920).

p. 81.)

Hi.)

D

Vfoi

D

\

Dial,

2

p

/

Morse Dry Docl Dial

March

\

1920). (Color

plat* /'

plau

p 83.)

plau

p

Ifoi

The Morsi

'/"

/

'

/

p

Dock

Dry

h<><k Dial, g (June

1920). (Color

Dry

Dock

1920). (Color

Dial,

>,

1920).

(Color

-

'

pi 1"

iM.n

/'

1

e

/

Dry Docl

Dial, 3 (July

Dial, 3

(August 1920). (Color

-

'

(Color plat< '

(Coloi plau

/

I

Dry Dock Dial,

3

(September 1920).

1

The

M

p. 85.)

l>

Docl

Dial,

3

(October

1920).

Henry Van Dyke, "The Hearing Ear,"

Magazine, 64 (December 1918).

307. P. 670.

3o8

plate, p. 7g

286.

ner's

Tm going

t()

tanv you

.

in

spite of hel ,

••

_ p 6 2

Scrib-


* S

'

3°9 a

3°9 b

f 310a

310b


S •

i j

r'

:("

;u.i

Illustrations

Temple

for

Scribi

l

Illustration,

inches.

Whiti n

[osephim

.:

1

Bailey,

"The

Emperor's

(.host,"

bruar) 1919).

Conte on illustration board, im ol Vmerican Vrt, New York; Bequest

1918

lopp

70.

1

1 |

(

Illustration,

.

).<-.'

I

lead n>

P

312;!.

p.

I

1

I'Empereurl

<M

1918

Whitney Museum phint N Iopp<

inches ol

tood old \I.k Don. ild-

p

.11

1

ol

on

last!"

p

illustration

American \m

board, 27

New Vori

Bequest

70.14 C'est

1'Empereur!

ll<

returns

to

-too.

107

"For

love,

inademoiselle,

and

truth

and

constai

ti

1

Republished January 1937, Scribm

anniversary

s

fiftieth

1

«*-

-

'•


313b

f.

(4

Ot>0Bf-

3'3a

3>4a

314b


i

315a Illustrations

Margharita Derfelden,

for

Scribner's Magazine, -\

"The Buddha," (August 1923).

313a. Illustration, 1923.

on

paint

\>

\\-

Museum

Whitne)

inches.

\s

Hopper

American

70.1 117

"No amount

made

Selim

to offi

given the coat

of urging could price until he

a

1

;

had

thorough inspection,"

.1

107.

Conte and white

314a. Illustration, 1923

paint on

Nen

\it.

Hoppei

Museum

\'nk. Bequest 70

nd into

in-

ol

1

American

ol

N

fosephini

1

Romanovitch bundled

Vladimii

;i)ii

his

board,

illustration

Whitne)

inches.

P

21%X1Q%

of

Bequest oi Josephine N.

ifork;

313b.

p.

Conte and white

board.

illustration

dilapidated

a

-

;i -,.1.

pain)

Illustration

on

indict

\\ linn'

\n Nns .,1 Mopp' 70 *»

1

<i-,l<

P.

••I'll ,

l

Museum

)

B< qui

.

md

white

15%

11

I

board,

il

.

Vmeri< an

oi • 1

phin»

N

1

212.

Illustration! Placi

ig

illustration

1

[01 thi

muar)

inline,

*m n na

I

Stars,"

m

Re

inn

Scribner's

\

1

Maga-

1

lull

into the illumin ited

costume, advani

wni

p

.•52.

1

d

3'5b


saw***.

318

3*7

3>9a

3'9tÂť


"An

317-

sweeping

was

street," p. 39.

"When

318.

wind

east

through the

could

do

travel,

I

\ou

think?" p. 41.

Illustrations

Eva Moore Adams, Magazine, 76 (De-

for

"Shady," Scribner's

cember

1924).

319a. Illustration, 1924.

Conte and white

paint on

board,

composition

Whitney Museum

inches.

\rt \'< w York; Request Hopper 70.1455.

319b.

me is

" 'I'm afraid,'

of

30

of Josephine N.

she said, looking at

straightly now, 'that Shady's

more than

I

said in dismay, 'she

to surprise you," " p. 631.

321a. Illustration, 1924.

pain I on inches.

cough

just a cough,' " p. 627.

320. " 'Oh, Shady,'

wanted

s

American

illustration

Whitne)

\n Ww York; B< Hoppei 70.1439.

Conte and white

board,

Museum qui

11

ol

1

American [o* phini N

of

'/

jÂŤib

I

hen

I

n .incl

.1

proceeded

to

Âťhed

.ill

o

pc e.

the

holding back (or a year

half," p

320

*fl

321a

321b


322b

//;

322a

Illustrations

for

Kyle

S.

Crichton,

"For Sale:

Med

Show,"

322a. Illustration, 1924.

board,

New

30x21%

inches.

Conte and white paint on illustration Whitney Museum of American Art,

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

70.1451.

"The

322b.

were

Scribner's Magazine, 77 (February 1925).

professor spoke kindly

sitting in the

323a. Illustration,

board,

New

21^x30

to

his

entertainers,

shade of the wagon playing cards,"

p.

who 179.

Conte and pencil on illustration Whitney Museum of American Art, Josephine N. Hopper 70.1676.

1924.

inches.

York; Bequest of

-.

323a


n 1

V

323b

323b

wagon at a respectwould come the professor

323b. "Behind the able distance

himseU

in

carriage

Ho-

driv< n

.

two

control ol

thi 1

itati

with

the

glistening

<

marts

driver's

undei

hand,"

pp.

-

madam. mi. ol

in

lively

my

hie thai to

Il

I

am charmed

I

U

mi

to

lli'

-

nabled

distraught mortals,"

to

bring

p.

324


-

frtW?

325a

325b Illustrations for Emerson Low, "The Man Away," Scribner's Magazine, 77 (May 1925).

325a. Illustration,

1925.

Charcoal

on

Who Had

illustration

Been

board,

Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York. Exhibited: Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, Edward Hopper at Kennedy Galleries, May 11â&#x20AC;&#x201D; June 8, 1977 (no. 43).

i6%x27 1/4

inches.

325b. "Looking around, he saw the to notice

â&#x20AC;˘1JP

326. it

326

woman. She pretended not

him, and he kept on counting,"

"The

p. 505.

stranger drew from his suitcase the doll, and gave

to the child," p. 507.


327a

,

pain

on

1

\i'.

New 1

York;

Conte

B<

.nid white

board,

Museum

Whitne)

inches.

Hoppi

illustration

oi

go x 30 Vmerican

[osephini

\

70.14

Don't, don'tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; ihl' "

p.

-,i 1

327b


328b

328a Illustrations for J. Hyatt Downing, "Closed Roads," Scribner's Magazine, 78 (August 1925).

328a. Illustration, 1925.

board,

New

2i%x3o

inches.

Conte and white paint on illustration Whitney Museum of American Art,

don't

Hopper

70.1453.

money on

that coat

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

328b. " 'Son, you're going to lose sell

it

if

you

pretty soon,' " p. 193.

y

329a

3-'9t>


t

33

i

33°

Illustration, 1925.

UK

..ir:

Pi

In

With

him

.

.

.

fust

iIh

the

.iikI

wonderful music

I

on illustration board,

<

strain

heard,"

evei

Danny's

.ill

room was

bare

p.

rich,

)( thai feai

Illustrations foi

wd

maddi

I

II

Scribi

331.

1

"At the piano was

attitude

332. ,

urn.

p.

in

bruar)

man

piled

is

.1

th(

he Distano

tround

the

to

per,

<

.1

listening

the keyboard," p. 163.

bench-mark ii

upon

027).

benl forward as in

governmeni

lei

mosi

the

199

I

1

hands outspread upon

rher< I

.1

with

beal soothingly

p

Downing,

itl

nervousness

filled

1

"... swiftl) the throb ol iiiusk

an

-

28

tion.

myself,

undei jusl

to

thai kill

rock

time,"

11.7

.

fiO 132


A ' .

W^K .

-

--'

--

i

333 333.

" 'Say,

"

Old Timer,' P'

yelled the teamster,

.

.

.

'how far

is

it

334a. Proof.

334 D Cover, La France; An American Magazine, 4 (November 1919). (Color plate, p. 89.)

'"

-

335. Cover,

La France; An American Magazine,

4 (April 1920).

(Color plate, p. 90.)

Illustration

Topics,

1

336. "In the

serve

ice

for

West Burden, "The

McAlpin Shop

cream

sodas,

delectable sweets," p. 337. Cover,

P-9

1

New

Sherry's"

Tavern

(February 1920).

Tavern

and

deft

afternoon

silent little

tea,

Chinese maids

patisserie,

and other

6.

Topics,

(March

1

1920).

(Color

plate,

-)

Illustration for West Burden, "Candies Record Journey Through the Factory Topics, (March 1920).

for the Captious: at

Tiffin,"

A

Tavern

1

338.

"Speaking of sweets: Not

big factory.

Some

339. Cover,

Tavern Topics,

340. Cover,

of

them

of them go out from Tiffin's thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; right on the job," p. 2.

all

stay 1

Tavern

Topics,

Tavern

Topics,

Tavern

Topics,

(June 1920). (Color plate,

p. 92.)

(August

1920).

(Color

plate,

2

(March

1921).

(Color

plate,

4

(April

(Color

plate,

1

P- 93-)

341. Cover, P-

940

342. Cover, P-

336

95)

1923).


1

Illustration for

Donald R. Richberg, "The Struggle (December 1922).

for Pro-

hibition." Survey Graphic, 2 343.

"The room seemed

traditions of a long

to

have the

and honorable

air of carrying

Hotel Management, 6 (July

344. Cover,

on the

service," p. 284.

1924).

(Color plate.

p. 96.)

345. Cover,

Hotel Management, 6 (August 1924). (Color

plate.

p. 96.)

346. Cover.

Hotel Management, 6 (September

1924).

(Color

1924).

(Color

plate, p. 96.)

347. Cover,

Hotel Management,

6

(October

plate, p. 96.)

348. Cover,

Hotel Management, 6 (November

1924).

(Color

Hotel Management, 6 (December

1924).

(Color

(January

1925).

(Color

(February

1925).

(Color

plate, p. 97.)

349. Cover, plate, p. 98.)

350. Cover,

Hotel

Management,

7

plate, p. 99.)

351. Cover,

Hotel Management,

7

plate, p. 100.)

338

,.

(over, Hotel Management,

7

(March

1925). (Color plate.

1925). (Color plate,

p. 101.)

353. Cover,

Hotel Management,

7

(April

Hotel Management,

7

(May

Hotel Management,

7

Hotel Management,

7

p. 102.)

over,

1925).

(Color plate,

p. 103.) 1

p.

1

(June 1925). (Color plate,

104 (

over,

(July

1925).

(Color plate,

p. 105.)

157

Cov(

r,

Hotel Management.

7

(August 1925). (Color plate.

p. 106.)

358. Cover, plate,

|>.

Hotel Management,

(September 1925). (Color

7

107.)

Hotel

Management,

7

(October

1925).

(Color

plate, p. 108.)

over,

Hotel Management,

7

(November

1925).

(Color

7

(December

1925).

(Color

plate, p. 109.)

361. Cover, plate, p. ", 1

1

Hotel Management,

10.)


363

362

.«.

?

%

*^mi^

Z

s\

aP.

,<

365

364

,^>

179^

3J*tf>

367

£•1

368

362. Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

1912-18

363. Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

1912-18

364. Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

1912-18

365. Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

1912-18

366. Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

1912-18

367. Proof, unidentified publication,

C.

1912-18


Gcino out

O'f

bus mess. After /uZ/rthis space will

be occupied

to I k/

E

-

g

-

E R.

372

n i*.

<ÂŁ

I? -â&#x20AC;˘ I

37'

Proof, unidentified publication, if,

370.

unidentified publication,

Proof, unidentified publication,

c.

11)12-18

1

M)i2-i8

c.

1012-18

-,71

Proof, unidi ntified publication,

(.

1912-18

372.

Proof, unidentified publication,

1

H|i2-i8

,7

.

Proof, unidentified publication,

<

i<)i2-i8

373

'l M.


374. Proof,

Palmer

in

possibly

Germany:

unpublished illustration

My Day

at

for

"Frederick

the Front," Everybody's, 32

(January 1915). 375. "

'The salesmen

I've

been raving about have their

ness pasted onto their outsides, like shaving lotion or a

n

pad,' " tearsheet, unidentified publication,

c.

1915-18.

376. Tearsheet, unidentified publication,

c.

1915-18.

377. Tearsheet, unidentified publication,

c.

1915-18.

polite-

bunion


W(

11-1-1,'

tearsheet, ,7'i

he began,

you're really interested.' c.

1915-

possibly

illustration

for

I

assured

c.

that

I

1915-18.

Wells Fargo Messenger,

illustration for Fverybody's,

c.

1920-21.

Proof, possibly illustration for Fverybody's,

c.

1920-21.

Proof, possibl)

him

18.

Proof, possibly illustration for Farmer's Wife, Proof,

382.

If

unidentified publication,

c.

1916-20.

was,'


AT^fcEfftStfTICS

384b

Illustrations for

Melange, 1912, yearbook

of Lafayette College,

Easton, Pennsylvania.

383a. Proof.

383b. "Greetings," p.

7.

384a. Proof.

384b. "Atheletics," p. 199. 385a. Proof.

383^

385b. "Society," p. 245.

386. "Basket

unknown,

c.

Ball,"

proof,

publication

191 1-12.

"Banjo Club," proof, publication unknown, c. 191 1-12.

387.

388. "Grinds,"

known,

GREETINGS

c.

proof,

191 1-12.

publication

un-


S o c x e

-t

y ,85 b

Qm

Grinds >

is?

388


'

MANDOLIN CLUB

39°

389. "Football," proof, publication 390.

unknown,

c.

1911-12.

"Mandolin Club," proof, publication unknown,

c.

1911-

12.

THE DIAL

391.

"The

Dial,

Vol.

IX,"

Brochure for Brigham,

VOL.IX

proof,

New

York,

c.

unknown,

c.

Hopkins Company, Baltimore and

1908 (through Sherman

8:

Bryan,

Inc., advertising

agency). 392. Front cover, silhouettes

and display

393. Inside spread, silhouettes

394.

39

publication

1911-12.

Back

lettering by

and display

cover, decorative border by

Hopper.

lettering by

Hopper.

Hopper.


RIGHAM

OPKINS

Balfi more

NewYork^ HATS

r

teadenhap if ihn htatsc

lhe iccosgnurd

>k

thr

;

Piitow DOuWc =» .Vi-

alvo

Snot

hUl<

md

«ar

.incv.

p.

co

ti«-

pcodurt-A

* Split**

pcpwlu ix-mk

utKrr

iraur

!-jy

™pWc

l«W

for

aJtcnlKati

1W

lo

three

,

:.

SJiUT!:. TlMrwabr>fka(ledJuap-Bit>loior 1909. -ad

[«ra^

talwn

:i

ro(i*iliiv.

Reuien who

Jvij-t-

j:i

handle

w Straw

kandW

t'vw

aw

be aid*

apparent

I bi« bw*. THoae who

-teas 4 .bade* not

aiiJ

N» i^-oJ Prxe n.jrarti

thai

haw

*.>» Caterer! (Kr opportunity.

393

192

394

RIGHAM OPKINS Baltimore

ycv+Yor/-

The

Brigham, Hopkins Co.s

Sel s PRESTON

W.

a

t

f

BROCK New

M.

BLATCHLEY

H. C.

n

1

I

York Office

Bo.lon Oil,, r and

New England

E EVEKHART

Chicago Office. Miuouri, lll.oo,.. Mmne.ola, Kaniai. Iowa itnd Mil.

Nebra.ka.

waukec. Wil

CHA!

KHRmiN

\

Honda,

Virginia, Georgia, Ala-

bama. Ten,

v.,,,1,

i

irolina

..,.1

Loyuiana.

ROKIRf D HOPKINS.

<

M, lof.n.

Wol

HOPKINS

Jr

Kentucky. Ohio, Indiana.

Virginia and W..h.n«lon. D.

Cleveland.

New Yo,k

C

Stale and

Penn.yl.ani.

OVER ALL

\«.

A

I

LOUIS

1

fi

f

.in<l

MERTZ v\

«

»IM»

h.ll !

in

alyle,

wrar-fr-tttlinf;

fim«h. lh<-v ilrilini; KhI«

will

in

mulli|4\

Pari, of

iujL<-

rvilh

t

A

<rvl

vout

I

Ark»„„.. Okl.ho of Mini

Teaai and parti

(

.n.H. and V

,

II

GOLDEN

I

s

Wi

Milwauke

)

part, of

III,,,....

esquwle |.«<-»n K f

and

Ohio and Indiana, and

Nine

the »<

in

tni/r.)

J'

ARRELL

1

aroltna,

D STERNS .

in

California. Pennsylvania

Irriey

the North weat

Season

Nineteen-Hundred

LANGDON

S.

New

Brigham, Hopkins Straw1

PER

WAI

II

c

HOPKINS

Philadclpli

North ji

and


MAKERS OF "MODER^KCLOTHES UTICA NEW YOR 396 395

/g&'fcv 395. Proof,

commercial illustration for Brandegee, Kincaid &

Co., Utica,

New

York,

c.

1909-11 (through Sherman

&:

Bryan,

Inc., advertising agency).

396. Proof,

Co., Utica,

commercial illustration for Brandegee, Kincaid &

New

York,

c.

Inc., advertising agency).

397. Proof, Co., Utica, Inc.,

397

1909-11 (through Sherman & Bryan, Publication unknown.

commercial illustration for Brandegee, Kincaid &

New

York,

c.

1909-11 (through Sherman

advertising agency). Publication

unknown.

&:

Bryan,


:

I

Proof, 'omiiicKi.il Co., Inc.,

tit

(

.

New

illustration

'< •

9og

commercial illustration .

advertising

agenq

ii

foi

Brandegee, Kincaid v

(through Sherman & Bryan,

advertising agency). Publication Proof,

Inc.,

n

unknown. iniKftttXituartjS'O

for

Brandegee, Kincaid

(through Sherman

8c

\

Bryan,

Publication unknown.

199

y±rani}t%ttKintaibj!rGo

suuaM


Bran^e^^Kjnrai^^fO. OoHka

400

401


Not the Garter of a

But

tiie

Garter

of F£,AT C£,ASI>

GARTERS y&'-KNEEo-FULL LENGTH

commercial illustration

400. Proof,

for

New

Brandegee, Kincaid & Co., Utica, York,

1910-12

c.

Bryan,

Inc.,

lication

unknown.

jo

1

commercial

Proof,

.

(through

advertising

Brandegee, Kincaid York.

M|i»-i2

1

Bryan,

Inc..

lication

unknown.

Proof,

\n

',

agenq Prool

<

)\\x

i.il

1

the

New

fc

G

ommi

rcia]

Int.,

illustration

Vpparel

Directory,

Sherman

advei

unknown.

•«:

id

Show

Mad 16,

Ijn

for

1909-11

Bryan,

Wearing

8:

Pub-

agency).

Bryan,

ium, I

and Chicago rwo proofs one image smaller; publication

York mi.

for

New

tica,

(through Sherman

Publication

Catalogue

Square ' published

'

rommercial illustration

ough Sherman

vertising

Pub-

illustration

Co

advertising

Brighton Flai Clasp

tising

8c

Sherman k

agency).

unknown.

DRAWERS


^WEARING APPAREL.TEXTIIX FASHION"9"*SHOW MARCH

2"°

1910

CHICAGO

It's

A Colossal be in

fitly

the

Exposition of national scope to housed witkin the spacious Coliseum

never too Lb±e

to Meiuf

GREAT CENTRAL MARKET of America

Intending Exhibitors

should confer with

National

Trade

Show Co.

317RAND+t!NAUSr BUILDING

CHICAGO

404

405

404. Proof,

commercial illustration advertising the Wearing

Apparel, Textile and Fashion Show, Chicago, March 2-9, 1910, organized by the National Trade Show Co., Chicago, and

Sherman & Bryan, unknown.

Inc.,

405. "It's never too Late to tration,

c.

406

Mend,"

1910-12 (through Sherman

agency). Publication

New

Chicago and

unknown.

York. Publication

proof, commercial 8;

Bryan,

illus-

Inc., advertising


!"7

|o6

Prool

commercial

igio-ts (througli She

i

illustration

man

v Hin.ui.

for Inc..

J.

Wener

8c

Co.,

c.

advertising agency).

Publication unknown. I<>7

Proof, commercial illustration,

man v :

111. 111

Bryan,

Proof,

Inc..

(.

1910-12 (through Sher-

advertising agency). Publication

commercial

illustration,

<.

unknown.

1910-12 (through Sher-

v Bryan, Inc., achertising agency). Publication

unknown.


Teilcin^

CKein.ce

at

409

410

%ellz ngr jgips for 409. Proof, commercial illustration,

man &

Bryan,

Inc.,

c.

1910-12 (through Sher-

advertising agency). Publication

unknown.

"Taking a Chance Versus NOT," proof, commercial c. 1911-12 (through Sherman & Bryan, Inc., advertising agency). Publication unknown.

410.

The Standard of America

illustration,

411. "Telling

Tips

Standard

America,"

of

for

The

Advertising 'Sampeck Clothes' proof,

commercial

illustration

for

Samuel W. Peck &: Co., New York, c. 1911-12 (through Sherman & Bryan, Inc., advertising agency). Publication unknown. 412. "Litholin," proof, seven commercial illustrations, 12.

W l>KK VW YORK

SAMIU

413. "Litholin," proof, six commercial illustrations, (

l

Publication

411

c.

igo8-

Publication unknown.

unknown.

c.

1908-12.


LfllErasUP

-BUlEiHfl412

LgBaasiJ [jjnnnC]

-Qozzsni-

LjSiaEnCP

isnaaaa Bpgjfl_

V .(

JlAk

[jjeeisC]

[DlCeisC]

QQsEiaCI


w

"WW ritil

a

t4k

'

IV

Wife,

415

414


Tabi-ic Tasfiions -the.

;

Horse Show

i: 416

l'7

two commercial Publication unknown. Proof,

PI i

;

c.

-,

Proof,

lix

commercial illustrations

1908-12. Publication

|i6.

illustrations,

(.

foi

i<Âťo&-i2.

\

Steak Sauce,

i

unknown.

Proof, four commercial illustrations,

c.

ig

Publication unknown. i,

7

"Fabrw

Fashions

commercial

illustration,

Proof,

commercial

-

ai <

Horw Show,"

the

1908

10

pi

Publication unknown.

illustration,

<

igofi

12.

Publication

unknown

i'*


Hudson (1609)— Fulton unknown.

4ig- Proof, commercial illustration for (1807),

c.

1910-12. Publication

420. "Start c.

Things Agoing," proof, commercial unknown.

illustration,

1910-12. Publication

4»9

START THINGS AGOING 420


i-.;

j2i.

"Rubbei

v Waterprool Collars

cial illustration

lication

for

the Arlington

&:

Cuffs." proof,

Company,

c.

commer-

1910-12. Pub-

unknown.

422. "Variety

Is

The Spio

tration for Fashion Clothes.

m

>l

<

<

Life," proof,

commercial

1911-12. Publication

423. "Ropes, Ladders, Blocks, Scaffolding, Poles," proof, com-

Chesebro

mercial

illustration

York,

1911-12. Publication

c.

for

Whitman

Co.,

New

Inc.,

unknown.

illus-

unknown.

R^rMter^pf <*

COLLARS CUFFS

THE ARLINGTON OOMWN

Variety

\a

THe Spice Of

/> Lif<*

R^BuhsSSB" 1-

>


< :«

426

THE MOST PERFECT TIRE REPAIR EQUIPMENT

IN

THIS

COUNTRY

424. Proof,

commercial illustration for c. 1911-12. Pub-

National Cigar Stands, lication

unknown. commercial illustration for Leather Tire Co., New York,

425. Proof,

Healy c.

1912. Publication

426. Proof,

1912. Publication

Repairs

.11

made under

the

HEALY LEATHER TIRE

HEALY PROCESS,

and

MO WORK

undertaken unlett we guarantee

m«i, b.imi.o 88-90 Oold Street, CO. UPTOWN BRANCH iw Broadway. Nit York Cttjr

it

New York

City

425

unknown.

commercial

illustration,

unknown.

c.


427a. Illustration,

c.

1917-20.

Water-

and wash on composition board, i8x7>4 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art. New York; Bequest of color

Josephine N. Hopper 527b. Proof,

70.1615.

commercial illustration

Knothe Unseen Suspenders, Publication unknown.

c.

for

1917-20.

Worn under the Negligee

Shirt

Kno thc Unseen SUSPENDERS (

WITH PATENTED LOOP END)

427b


.

When}6u Go Over There

Not a Coat Not a Style

A Convertible Coat Collar

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435^

435a. Illustration for Victor Hugo's Les Miserables,

c.

1900-09.

Pen and ink on paper, 8V1G x 6 J/4 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1561.190.

435b. Drawing for illustration for Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, c.

1900-09. Pencil on paper,

of

American

Art,

New

8x5%

inches.

Whitney Museum Hopper

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

70.1565.74.

435c.

Pencil

Drawing for Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, c. 1900-og. on paper, 8x5 inches. Whitney Museum of American

Art; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

70.1563.63.

Drawing for Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, c. 1900-09. Pencil on lined paper, 8x5 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 435c!.

70.1605.63.

435c Drawing for Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, c. 1900-og. Pencil on lined paper, 8x5 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1559.75.

435c


137

Valjean from Victoi 1

I

,

inches, Collection ol

Hugo's Les Mise'rables,

Kenned)

Galleries, Inc.,

c.

New

1900-09. Ink on paper,

York.

[Thr Duel], 1900 10. fnk .iihI white painl on illustration board, 8i%xis% Whitney Museum ol American \n. New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hoppei 70.1363.

437.

inches.

if

AN VAi ILMi

(


SA\4\GES IN HASTE

438 438. [Stevedores

2i%xi3 %G J

Unloading Ship], c. 1900-10. Ink and wash on illustration board, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of

inches.

Josephine N. Hopper

70.1341.

1900-10. Ink and white paint on illustration board, c. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1359. 439. Savages

20x14%

BY A.CAUSTIC PENN 439

in

inches.

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inches. -.I

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[House with People], 1906/07 or 1909. Gouache on illus20x15 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1344. 444-

tration board,

445. Illustration for Victor Hugo's

Terrible,

1906/07

ig%uxi4 )4 ;

inches.

or

Whitney Museum

Hopper

York; Bequest of Josephine N. p.

book of poems

UAnnie

Watercolor and ink on paper,

1909.

of

American

Art,

New

70.1350. (Color plate,

113.)

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Edward Hopper: Selections from the Hopper Bequest, September 10-October 25, 1971 (no. 52). Downtown Branch, Whitney Museum of American Art, Edward Hopper: Paintings, Prints, Exhibited:

Drawings, July 11-August 446.

15,

L'Annee Terrible: At

1974.

the Barricades,

2i%xi4 1 Vic

Watercolor and ink on paper, 444

Museum Hopper

of

American

Art,

New

1906/07 or 1909. inches.

Whitney

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

70.1337. (Color plate, p. 114.)

Exhibited: Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Edward Hopper: Selections from the Hopper Bequest, September 10-October 25, 1971 (no. 53). Downtown Branch, Whitney Museum of American Art, Edward Hopper: Paintings, Prints, Drawings, July 11-August 15, 1974. Edward Hopper, traveling exhibition organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art,

September 1974-December

1976.

Lloyd Goodrich, Edward Hopper Harry N. Abrams, 1971), p. 23. Reference:

(New York:

L'Annee Terrible: On the Rooftops, 1906/07 or 1909. 2i%xi4% inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N.

447.

Watercolor and ink on paper,

Hopper

70.1338. (Color plate, p. 115.)

Exhibited: Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Edward Hopper: Selections from the Hopper Bequest, Septem-

Downtown Branch, Whitney American Art, Edward Hopper: Paintings, Prints, Drawings, July 11-August 15, 1974. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, The Whitney Studio Club and America?! Art 1900-1932, May 22-September 3, 1975. ber 10-October 25, 1971 (no. 54).

Museum

of

Reference: Lloyd Goodrich, Edward Hopper Harry N. Abrams, 1971), p. 22.

(New York:


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453-

and

[Men Seated at Cafe ink on illustration

Museum

Table], 1906/07 or 1909. Watercolor

board,

New

of American Art,

Hopper

2i%xi4

inches.

Whitney

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

70.1348. (Color plate, p. 119.)

and Whitney Museum

454. [Couple near Poplars], 1906/07 or 1909. Watercolor

ink on illustration board, of

American

Art,

New

21%

x

14%

inches.

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

70.1365. (Color plate, p. 120.) 455. [Waiter

and

Diners],

ink on illustration board,

American

Art,

New

1906/07 or 1909. Watercolor and

14%

x 22 inches.

Whitney Museum of Hopper

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

455

70.1443. 456.

[On the Deck], 1906/07 or

illustration

American

board, Art,

New

14^x22

1909.

inches.

Watercolor and ink on

Whitney

Museum

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

of

Hopper

70.1444. (Color plate, p. 121.) 457. [Along the River], 1906/07 or 1909. Watercolor

on paper, lz^xig

inches. Frye Art

Museum,

and ink Wash-

Seattle,

ington.

457


158

The

458.

Port,

1906 07 01

Whitney Museum 70-1S5 1

New

Art,

V>ik:

Hoppei

Houses,

c.

Whitney Museum

ol

li\

70.1347. (Coloi plate,

Museum

Exhibited: Whitney

inches.

10. Watercolor and ml on paper, zi 1 %o> American Art, \i w \<<\l. Bequesi oi Josephin<

1906

122.)

p.

American

ol

\n.

New

York,

from the llnppri Bequest, September n> Octobei Hopper, traveling exhibition organized l>\ the Whitney tions

mbei 197

Refereno

texl

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in

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Whitney Museum

inches.

I

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lis

85,

1976.

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Ink and watercolor on paper,

1909.

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125.)

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paper,


464

464. [Group of Figures and Automobile], c. 1906-14. Ink and wash on illustration board, 2i%xi4% inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper 465.

70.1371.

[Cowboy],

c.

1906-14. Ink

and wash on

illustration board,

)l6Xi5 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1356. 2i

4C5

1:

New


4(50

Ink and wash on illus1906 [. [Jumping on a Tram], Museum ol American Whitney inches. 15 tration board, 18% An New Vork; Bequest ol fosephine N. Hopper 70.1441 <..

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Holdup],

c.

1

1906-14. Ink .nul wash on illustration board,

,

15

indi.s.

Vork; Bequesl

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Whitney

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inches.

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Hopper

70.1366.

color on illustration

:

board

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illection

of

Mr. and Mrs. Frank

Ron. \.

tion board.

11

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1

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Watercolor and ink on

inches. Collection of

Anne

E.

illustra-

Bach.


474

47i-

19%

[Man

at Riverfront], 1907.

x i4 i:)i6 inches.

York; Bequest of Josephine N. p.

Watercolor and ink on paper,

Whitney Museum

American

of

Hopper

Art,

New

70.1364. (Color plate,

126.)

472. [Marching Bag-Pipers].

board, 19% x

New

14^6

inches.

1907.

Watercolor on illustration

Whitney Museum

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

American

of

Art,

70.1377. (Color

plate, p. 127.)

473. Nilrnberg, inches.

of Josephine N.

jtyiirtibtrirj 473

c.

1907.

Whitney Museum

Hopper

Ink on illustration board, of

American

70.1367.

Art,

New

22x15%

York; Becjuest


175

an illustiation for 474- [Two Men in the I'yicuns], possibly \ge 4lpes et Pyrinies (1890), c. 1907-10. \ uioi Hugo's En Vo

Watercoloi on illustration board, 18% ..!

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board,

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and ink on illustraWhitney Museum ol .American

inches.

fosephine N.

ol

In Introduction to illustration

70.1358.

n ntroduchon

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inches. Collection

\V. [tricolor

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1907

board, 2s

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70.1442.

1907-10. Ink and watercoloi inches.

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Whitney Museum fosephine N.

ol

Hopper


47>

Burgher], c. 1907-10. Ink and watercolor 477. [Beer-Drinking on illustration board, l^xf/g inches. Whitney Museum of

American 70.161

Art,

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

New

1.

Watercolor on

Woman with Child], c. 1907-10. board, i6%xi2^ inches. Kennedy

478. [Peasant illustration

New

477

Galleries, Inc.,

York.

Exhibited: at

Hopper

Kennedy

Kennedy

Galleries, Inc.,

Galleries,

May 11-June

New 8,

York,

Edward Hopper

1977 (no.

8).


V

Watercolor on

Brich-l illustration

Imerican 7" ''"

board,

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With the Refugees,

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Galleries, Inc.,

Poster exhibited at 482.

Hopper

Whitney Museum

c.

of

Watercolor on illustration board, 10% x

York. Study for a poster for the American

The Penguin

[Milkmaid and Cow],

inches.

483.

1919.

c.

New

Club, 8 East Fifteenth Street,

1915-20.

American

Gouache on Art,

New

New

illustration

7

Red

inches.

Cross.

York.

board,

i4%cxg%

York; Betjuest of Josephine N.

70.1610.

[Workmen

with Picks],

ig i: }iflxi4% inches.

c.

Josephine N. Hopper

and pencil on illustration board, American Art, New York; Bequest of

1916-18. Watercolor

Whitney Museum

of

70.1375. (Color plate, p. 128.)


p.,

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illustration board, i-j'Via

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Vmerican

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ink on paper, 18%

York; Bequest ol fosephine N. Hoppei a

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on illustration board, 26% Bequi fosej

New Vork

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70.1440. 11 !,,

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inches.

Hoppei


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487

487. [Troops on the March],

c.

ican Art,

New

Wash and conte on Whitney Museum of Amer-

1916-25.

illustration board, 20 x 30 inches.

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

70.1454.

[Man Blowing Smoke Rings], c. 1917-20. Watercolor and ink on illustration board, 18V2X 14*946 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York: Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 70.1376. (Color plate, p. 130.) 488.

489. [A

489

Couple Dancing],

c.

1917-20.

board, 20 x 15 inches. Whitney

Museum

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

Hopper

Wash on of

illustration

American

70.1384.

Art, New-


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inches. Whitney on illustration b American \u. Nem Noik. Bequesi ol fosephin* N

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illustration board,

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i9%xi4V8

inches.

c.

1917-20.

illustration

American

Man

board, Art,

New

in

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ig%xi2%

of

Hopper

York; Bequest of Josephine N. 493. [Standing

Wash on

Whitney Museum

Dress],

inches.

York; Bequest of

illustration board,

American

Art,

New

70.1387. c. 1917-20. Wash on Whitney Museum of Josephine N. Hopper

492

493


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496. Illustration for Charles Dickens's

Hopper

70.1566.144.

and Oliver Twist from Charles 497. Studies for Fagan Dickens's Oliver Twist (1838), c. 1899. Pencil on paper, 9% x 6 indies.

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c.

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Pen and ink on paper. American Art. New York:

1900.

of

70.1562.82.

Edgar Allen Poe's The Raven (1845), c 1900-06. Ink on paper. 4 » 3 1 * inches. Whitney Museum of American Art. New York: Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper

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Whitney Museum of American Josephine N. Hopper 70.1565.51.

inches.

York; Bequest of

Art,

505. Study for Gavroche from Victor Hugo's Les Miserables (1862),

c.

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1900-09. Pencil on paper, of

American Art,

New

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inches.

Whitney

York; Bequest of Josephine N.

70.1560.112.

Don Quixote and Sancho Panza from Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605), 1906/07 or 1909. Pencil on paper, g% x 6 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Bequest of Josephine N. Hopper 506. Studies for

70.1560.1 10.

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cover desicn: antonima kkass cover art: Edward Hopper, cover for Hotel Management, September 1924. Private colle< lion.

Edward Hopper as Illustrator  
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