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CHIEF CONSTABLE’S

T R O P E R E C N A M R O F R E P L A U ANN 2010/2011

Making a Difference


Vision & Values Making a Dierence By: Putting communities at the heart of everything we do Fighting crime, bringing criminals to justice and protecting the vulnerable Showing that we care and delivering a good quality service Working together, respecting each other and doing our best

words of appreciation I recently attended a Bike Safe evening at Tayside Police. The passion and dedication shown by the officers in their contributed efforts to reducing road accidents, not only those involving motorbikes, and enhancing community interaction is commendable and can only reflect favourably on the Force. AH, Dundee.


chief constable’s

annual performance

report

2010/11

contents

04

STANDARDS OF SERVICE

13

POLICING ANGUS

05

CONVENER’S MESSAGE

18

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

06

THE FORCE EXECUTIVE

22

PROVIDING SPECIALIST SUPPORT

07

TAYSIDE JOINT

26

STATISTICS

33

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES 2011-2014

34

STATEMENT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

36

USEFUL CONTACT NUMBERS

08 09

POLICE BOARD

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S FOREWORD

TABLE OF STATUTORY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

10

POLICING DUNDEE

13


Standards of Service

We will be active, visible and approachable in our communities GENERAL STANDARDS

OUR RESPONSE & ENQUIRY

WE AIM TO EXCEED PUBLIC EXPECTATIONS WITH THE LEVEL OF SERVICE WE DELIVER

WE WILL PROVIDE A PROFESSIONAL RESPONSE AND KEEP YOU INFORMED

We will be active, visible and approachable in our communities

We will present a smart and professional image

We will investigate all crimes and offences in accordance with our Investigative Standards

We will provide an update on progress to those reporting crimes or incidents as soon as possible, and in any case, within 28 days of initial contact, advising of the final outcome of an enquiry when it is complete

When an offender has been detected, the investigating officer will decide on the appropriate action proportionate to the circumstances. This may include the provision of advice or warnings, the issuing of fixed penalty notices or the submission of reports to the Procurator Fiscal or to the Reporter to the Children’s Panel

We will share information with other agencies to improve public safety and minimise risk

We will treat everyone according to their needs, maintaining confidentiality where appropriate

FIRST CONTACT WE WILL AIM TO GET IT RIGHT FIRST TIME, EVERY TIME •

We will answer 999 emergency telephone calls within 10 seconds and all other telephone calls within 40 seconds

You will always be dealt with by a named individual who will be courteous and attentive, seek to fully understand your enquiry and explain our response

WE WILL FULLY COMPLETE ENQUIRIES, SUBMIT QUALITY REPORTS TIMEOUSLY AND PRESENT EVIDENCE COMPETENTLY •

The officer reporting will be responsible for preparing and submitting quality reports

If your enquiry requires a specialist response, we will arrange for that to occur and inform you what will happen

We will submit all prosecution reports to the Procurator Fiscal within 28 days of charge

If applicable, we will provide you with a reference number which you may use if you need to contact us again about your enquiry

We will work with other criminal justice partners to support vulnerable victims and witnesses through the legal process

We will acknowledge all correspondence within 2 working days of receipt and at that time will advise you of our proposed actions and when we will write back with a more detailed response

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If you need an officer to call on you, we will inform you what the response will be, indicate when they will be attending and keep you updated of any changes

COMPLETION

If we are unable to provide a full response within the timescale given, we will update you on what action we have taken, the reason for the delay and provide a revised timescale for completion

COMPLAINTS WE WILL DEAL OBJECTIVELY AND SENSITIVELY WITH ANY COMPLAINTS YOU HAVE ABOUT US AND ACTIVELY SEEK A POSITIVE RESOLUTION


THE CONVENER’S

MESSAGE What is not debateable, is the requirement that a body such as Tayside Police must continue to deliver the quality service the citizens of this area have come to expect over the years.

I write this year’s message at a time of great uncertainty as to the future direction of policing in Scotland. Each one of us is well aware of the difficult financial climate in which we live, and the imperative need to curb the ever escalating costs of public services, and, without being too pessimistic, it is unlikely to improve in the immediate short term. Politicians of most parties were, in the run up to the recent Scottish elections, of the belief that potential savings could be delivered with restructuring of forces in Scotland, while still maintaining current standards. Whether they are correct in their beliefs, whether potential savings can be sustained long term, while maintaining standards, or whether the Police Forces were seen to be an “easy hit” is debateable and only time will tell. What does concern me is that merging forces could lead to more control by remote government officials rather than at local elected level as at present. However, what is not debateable, is the requirement that a body such as Tayside Police must continue to deliver the quality service, the citizens of this area have come to expect over the years. Now that the dust has settled on the Scottish elections, and a new government is in place, we await a decision from the minister. Whatever the outcome, it will be up to the present joint board to work with the Chief Constable and the force to deliver on any possible transition while still maintaining day to day business as normal. What cannot be tolerated is any deterioration in service to the people of Tayside. Fortunately, there is a very strong and experienced Executive to lead us through the times ahead, although there have been changes this past year with Gordon Scobbie being appointed as Deputy Chief Constable, following the retiral of Bill Harkins after a lifetime of loyal service to the force. Gordon brings a wealth of experience and new ideas to the force. The most pleasing aspect of the last year is the reduction in reported violent crime

across the force area, with an impressive 85.5% of all reported cases being detected. This can only enhance Tayside's reputation as a safe place to work, live and visit. I have once again been extremely impressed by the dedication and professionalism shown by police officers and police staff, and I believe we, the public, have entrusted our security and protection to a very impressive team here in Tayside. To achieve this Tayside Police have been working closely with local councils and other agencies. Innovative schemes such as the introduction of the Community Engagement Team in Dundee, the Hedzup Racing Project in Angus, and the Friday Night Project in Perthshire have yielded real results in these communities. Of course, we must make sure that this success is built upon and as Convener my aim is to continue to support the force by working closely with the Scottish Government and Council colleagues to provide the Chief Constable with the resources she requires to deliver continuing success. I firmly believe the foundations of good policing are at a local level. A visible police presence at a local level provides real reassurance to residents and an effective deterrent to criminals operating in our communities. By targeting any additional resources where they are most needed we can achieve real and lasting benefits of safer communities for everyone. Finally can I express my appreciation to my fellow board members for their continued support. It is a pleasure to convene a body where all members are of one aim—the continuous improvement of the policing service in Tayside to the satisfaction to the people of the area. Convener Councillor Ian Mackintosh Angus Council

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THE FORCE

EXECUTIVE Tayside Police is managed by an Executive. In charge of the Force Executive is Chief Constable Justine Curran. The Deputy Chief Constable Gordon Scobbie, has responsibility for the following business areas • Professional Standards • Headquarters Division The temporary Assistant Chief Constable, Angela Wilson, has responsibility for operational issues • Central Division • Eastern Division • Western Division • Crime Intelligence Division

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Doug Cross OBE is the Director of Corporate Services and is responsible for • Finance • Personnel and Development • Contracts/Procurement • Legal Services • Estate • Fleet • Executive Support • Safety


Tayside Joint Police Board comprises of 18 councillors appointed from membership of the three local authorities in Tayside, namely Angus Council, Dundee City Council and Perth and Kinross Council. The Board shares responsibility for Tayside Police with Scottish Ministers and the Chief Constable, who is responsible for operational matters.

Convener Councillor Ian Mackintosh Angus Council Vice-Convener Bailie George Regan Dundee City Council

The Board has a number of statutory duties and responsibilities including -

Vice Convener

Setting the budget for Tayside Police and providing the Chief Constable with the resources necessary to police Tayside efficiently and effectively

Perth and Kinross Council

Making arrangements to secure best value and participate in community planning

Examining the manner in which complaints against the police by members of the public are dealt with by the Chief Constable

Appointing the Chief Constable, Deputy Chief Constable and Assistant Chief Constable

Tayside Joint Police Board

The Board shares responsibility for Tayside Police

Councillor Archibald MacLellan

MEMBERS Angus Council Members Councillor Robert G Myles Councillor Mark Salmond Councillor Paul Valentine Councillor Sandy West Dundee City Council Members Councillor David Bowes Councillor Andrew Dawson Councillor Elizabeth Fordyce Councillor Christina Roberts Councillor Mohammed Asif Bailie Helen W Wright Perth and Kinross Council Members Councillor Kenneth Lyall Councillor Peter Mulheron Councillor David M Scott Councillor Lewis D D Simpson Councillor Alexander J Stewart

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THE CHIEF CONSTABLE’S

FOREWORD To the First Minister for Scotland, Tayside Joint Police Board, Sheriff Principal for Tayside, Fife and Central, and the Tayside community we serve, I am delighted to present my second annual performance report as Chief Constable of Tayside Police. In this fast changing world it is never a good idea to spend too much time looking back. However sometimes we need to reflect for a while on what we have done and what we have learned, so that we can further improve out strategies, policies, operational activity and ultimately the quality of service that we provide to you. This report highlights the excellent work that has been done throughout the last year, work that spans a large and diverse spectrum from local antisocial issues to serious and organised crime. I very much hope that the people of Tayside reading this report feel positive about the level of commitment and the quality of policing services that are being delivered by Tayside Police. Not only does the report provide key performance information to help you assess how well we have served you and the community in which you live over the last year, it also sets out to highlight some of the important and innovative work officers are doing throughout the Force area. We promised you that communities would be at the heart of everything we do. To make sure this happens we have invested in a stronger community policing model with locally based officers working with local communities for positive outcomes. Our results speak for themselves. We’ve already been extremely successful in reducing crime and

This report highlights the excellent work that has been done throughout the last year, work that spans a large and diverse spectrum from local anti social issues to serious and organised crime.

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currently crime in Tayside is at a ten year low. Housebreaking and vehicle crime have fallen by over 60%, vandalism by over 20%, and we are well ahead of the Scottish average. Achieving these performance figures shows that we are performing well. However, we also wanted to gauge public perception on crime and policing in the area. We surveyed 3600 people throughout Tayside and asked their views on crime and local policing. Encouragingly, 90% agreed that their neighbourhood was a safe place to live. The main issues of concern to residents in their neighbourhoods were dangerous and reckless driving, closely followed by antisocial behaviour. Overall, 91% of respondents believed that Tayside Police was doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job. A great deal of what we do is delivered through partnership working. Partnerships throughout the force are evolving and developing. Some are structured through organisations, including schools and young people’s organisations. Others are more

formal with councils, health boards, agencies in the justice system, politicians and interest groups such as the Chamber of Commerce, banks and industry. These partnerships are thriving and expanding, are delivering measurable improvements in the quality of life in our communities and are becoming firmly embedded in the fabric of our society. All of this has been achieved against a backdrop of economic hardship with significant uncertainty about the future and funding cuts. I am immensely proud of all that we have done. However, I am also committed to making the force better and striving to do more. This will have its challenges with less money available and a policing landscape that looks set to change but, whatever the context, we will continue to be part of communities helping you, protecting you and making a difference. Justine Curran Chief Constable


MARCH 2011

2009/10

2010/11

2010/11

Target

Customer Satisfaction:

RESULT

Target

RESULT

Achieved

First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

91.4%

91.5%

90.7%

NO

First Contact:% of respondents who stated they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

77.0%

78.0%

80.8%

YES

Updating the Public:% of Service Users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry

54.8%

60.0%

61.2%

YES

*Visibility: % of respondents who had seen a police officer patrolling in the past month

74.7%

75.0%

54.4%

NO

Customer experience: Overall satisfaction rating for the customers experience of the service provided by Tayside Police

84.8%

85.0%

82.3%

NO

Groups 1-4 recorded

17997

18700

18095

YES

Groups 1-4 detected

47.0%

46.5%

46.0%

NO

Violent crime recorded

578

610

568

YES

Violent crime detected

85.5%

83.0%

85.5%

YES

Robbery recorded

135

160

158

YES

Robbery detected

69.0%

63.0%

70.5%

YES

Vandalism recorded

5264

5750

5442

YES

Vandalism detected

31.5%

31.0%

32.0%

YES

Domestic Housebreaking recorded

752

775

874

NO

Domestic Housebreaking detected

28.5%

30.0%

29.5%

NO

Sickness Absence: police officers

4.2%

4.5%

4.2%

YES

Sickness Absence: police staff

4.6%

5.0%

4.6%

YES

Response Rate—1330/3600 (37%)

Crime:

Table Of Statutory Performance Indicators

Key Performance Indicators

Resources:

* The difference between the target and the result is due to a change in the questions asked in the customer satisfaction survey.

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Policing Dundee hief Superintendent Gavin Robertson is in charge of policing in Dundee, an area of 24 square miles, but home to a population of 144,000. He and his command team are based at Headquarters in Dundee’s West Bell Street. Superintendent Athol Aitken is Deputy Divisional Commander, Chief Inspector Suzie Mertes is in charge of the south of the city and Chief Inspector Dave Barclay is in charge of the north.

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Detective Chief Inspector Shaun McKillop is in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department, while the division’s Road Policing Unit is led by Inspector Gordon Taylor.

Gavin Robertson Chief Superintendent

Dundee is divided into four separate sections for policing purposes, each in the overall charge of an Inspector. They are – Maryfield /East End covering the City Centre, Maryfield and Stobswell Inspector Stuart Holmes Lochee / West End covering Lochee, Charleston, Menzieshill, and Perth Road area. Inspector David Scott Strathmartine / Coldside, covering Downfield, Ardler, Hilltown, St Mary’s, Kirkton and Fairmuir. Inspector Alan Szwec North East / Broughty Ferry covering Fintry, Whitfield, West Ferry, Broughty Ferry, Barnhill, Mid Craigie and Douglas. Inspector Catriona Chisholm

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words of appreciation I was the misfortunate victim of a sneak thief who stole my handbag. The attending officers were with me in next to no time. They were absolutely wonderful and could not do enough to help me. I have no family in the country to help with these matters so without your officers I don’t know what I would have done. They are a credit to your police force. KS, Dundee.


Here’s how we have been Making a Difference in Dundee; In March 2010, the Community Engagement Team (CET) was deployed to the Linlathen and Mid Craigie areas primarily to address a problem with antisocial behaviour involving youths. Prior to the team’s arrival, a survey of residents was carried out by the Dundee City Council Anti Social Behaviour Team and Tayside Police to seek their views on the main issues of concern. We listened to these views. As a result, the Linlathen Steering Group, a multi-agency group comprising members of all the key partner agencies including the Dundee City Council Anti-social Behaviour Team, Community Wardens, Education Department, Social Work Department, Housing Department, the Choice Project, youth workers, the East End Communities Officer and Tayside Police, was formed to work together to tackle the issues raised by the community and to coordinate activity. The CET, in addition to the local community and beat officers, carried out high profile mobile, cycle and foot patrols engaging with youths, residents and businesses in the area in an effort to identify the small number of youths responsible for behaving in an antisocial manner and generally causing annoyance in the locality. This resulted in a number of youths being issued with police warnings, youth notices, acceptable behaviour contracts or being the subject of reports to the Children’s Reporter and Procurator Fiscal Service. Follow-up visits were also made by Tayside Police, the Dundee City Council antisocial Behaviour Team and housing officers to speak with the parents of the youths to make them aware of their child’s actions, and to warn of the consequences on tenancy

agreements should antisocial behaviour continue. The local youth worker and staff from the Choice Project also carried out focused work with the problematic youths to try and address their behaviour and also to encourage them into diversionary activities. As a result of consulting residents it was also identified that there was an interest amongst residents in setting up a local residents group and this was subsequently arranged by the local housing officer. The local youth worker prepared and distributed leaflets containing details of activities available for youths in the area, and through consultation with the Education Department, term-time evening football was introduced within the grounds of Rowantree Primary School which proved a great success. The group also secured funding for other activities during the school summer holiday period. The CET was then deployed to the Lochee area of Dundee. During the first two weeks, patrols were carried out in this area with a combination of foot patrols, cycle patrols and mobile patrols increasing the police presence in this area. After consultation with the local community it was agreed that the team would give attention to the Lochee High Street area and through Operation Highrise, to Ancrum, Burnside, Adamson and Elders Courts in relation to acquisitive crime and drug related crime. Unwanted visitors and associated anti social behaviour was greatly curtailed and there has been increased confidence from residents in reporting illegal activity and anti social behaviour. The deployment in Lochee resulted in 43 people being arrested with six of these people being charged with being concerned in the supply of controlled drugs. The amount

of drugs recovered was £12,250 of heroin, £380 of Diazepam, £200 of cannabis resin and approx £800 of amphetamine. Other apprehensions were for possession of offensive weapons, disqualified driving, driving without insurance and the theft of motor cars.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN MARYFIELD In December 2010, the Community Task Force was deployed to the Maryfield and Stobswell areas. As a result of this deployment drug enforcement activity was carried out resulting in 37 separate recoveries with a street value of £3,788.70. Of the notable recoveries 201 Mephedrone tablets, 1117 valium tablets and 568 tablets were recovered. A total of 10 cash seizures were made totalling £28,765, 14 drugs warrants were executed and 33 drug cases reported. Warrant activity was also carried out and a total of 28 apprehensions made.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TEAM – TAKING THE TROUBLEMAKERS TO TASK

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Policing Dundee words of appreciation I am taking the opportunity to thank all those who made an important contribution in organising Armed Forces Day. The combination of young people and those mature in partnership with serving soldiers, cadets and volunteers was an extraordinary and moving experience and I thank you most sincerely for the part you played in making it memorable – John Letford, Lord Provost of Dundee. John Letford, Lord Provost of Dundee. An increase in general police activity resulted in a further 18 non drug related cases being submitted, some of which included offensive weapons and robbery. Road policing activity was also carried out resulting in 59 drivers being warned, 18 conditional offers being issued and five vehicles seized.

DENYING CRIMINALS THE USE OF THE ROADS The Road Policing Unit has a specific aim to deny criminals the use of the roads, reduce road casualties and thereby increase safety on the roads and streets within Dundee. To assist in this aim the Unit work very closely with Dundee City Council, road safety practitioners and other enforcement agencies such as the DVLA, VOSA (Vehicle and Operator Services Agency) and HM Customs and Excise. Public consultation tells us that you want us to be visible and to provide reassurance. Patrol officers conduct high profile activity on the road network to reassure the public and to deny criminals the use of the roads in Dundee. This is backed by seasonal campaign activity promoting safer driving and cracking down on those who break the law. The roads passing through Dundee are often used by serious and organised crime groups and the trafficking of drugs. We endeavour to stop these individuals at every opportunity. As well as the routine activity in relation to complaints of speeding, drink driving, motoring offences and disqualified and uninsured drivers, further high profile enforcement activities have been conducted over 2010 in support of both local and national policing initiatives under the banner of `Operation Bandit’ at various sites throughout Dundee. Bandit has been supported by other enforcement agencies and ANPR (Automatic Numberplate Recognition) technology has been used. This continues to be very successful in detecting vehicles that are being used illegally, that are unlicensed or uninsured and for the 12

detection of travelling criminals. In 2010 within Dundee 237 vehicles were seized by the police in relation to uninsured drivers. Vehicles being driven in an antisocial manner have also continued to receive attention over the year with 15 vehicles being seized during 2010. The Anti Parking at Schools initiative was rolled out in 2010 to all primary schools in the city. This followed a successful pilot of the scheme at two schools in 2009. This initiative, promoted and co-ordinated by Dundee City Council, is specifically designed to tackle the issue of drivers parking on the yellow zigzag lines outside primary schools with the aim of reducing the associated risks to the young vulnerable road users in these areas.

PROTECTING VULNERABLE PEOPLE – IMPROVING PUBLIC SAFETY AND MINIMISING RISK

and shared with the appropriate care providers. We continue to review the scope of this work and in 2010 have expanded the scheme to ensure that more vulnerable adults receive the help they require. Analysts employed by Tayside Police provide clear, structured reports to Local Community Planning Partnerships, Community Safety Partnerships and various statutory committees to ensure that all partners work together to identify and deal with community issues. The reports also assist in determining the appropriate resources to deal with a community problem.

INNOVATING IN YOUTH JUSTICE PROCESSES An innovative Restorative Justice Early Intervention Process, which was initiated in Dundee, has now become mainstream across the City and has attracted interest nationally where it has been seen as an example of best practice.

In order to better protect children within Dundee, Tayside Police has been instrumental in establishing a Multi Agency Assessment Team which involves our partners in social work, health and education. The team works together to ensure that all information relevant to the welfare and care of the child is shared and appropriate support is provided.

The process allows for all crime reports for juveniles to be assessed so as the disposal is proportionate to the offence committed and the children’s history of offending and care issues. This complies with our commitment to Getting It Right For Every Child principles for early intervention.

In 2010 Tayside Police in Dundee introduced a risk assessment process to better identify people at significant risk from domestic abuse. This process has allowed for effective sharing of information with other service providers, which assists in identifying better outcomes for victims and families. In addition, officers in Dundee have introduced a risk assessment tool in relation to missing person enquiries, which allows us to more quickly identify those individuals who are at high risk when missing.

A brilliant Community policeman – He has always visited regularly and knew many of the tenants on a first name basis. He always made time for the tenants, many of whom are elderly and also supported various functions that were held within the complex. His concern and care for the whole community in which he worked was obvious in his manner and working practices. He is a credit to Tayside Police.

Tayside Police have worked closely with partners to ensure that information gathered in relation to vulnerable adults is discussed

words of appreciation

Servite Housing Association, Dundee.


Policing Angus hief Superintendent Colin MacKay is in charge of policing in Angus, an area of about 850 square miles covering the towns of Arbroath, Brechin, Montrose, Forfar, Kirriemuir, Monifieth and Carnoustie and a population of approximately 105,000.

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Superintendent Ewen West has day to day responsibility for all operational policing matters, with Chief Inspector Sandra Richard in charge of all support functions. Detective Chief Inspector Ally Reid is in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department, while the division’s Road Policing Unit is led by Inspector Grant Edward.

Colin MacKay Chief Superintendent

Angus is divided into four separate sections for policing purposes, each in the overall charge of an Inspector.

words of appreciation The officer who dealt with me was superb. He listened effectively, he showed an appropriate degree of empathy and understanding, he provided clear, concise and timely information about what he would do and when he would do it, always communicating with me with any new and relevant information. What’s more, he had a keen awareness of the impact of this crime on both us and the person responsible. The values and integrity he has demonstrated do great credit to Tayside Police. MR, Newtyle, Angus.

They are – Section 1 – Forfar, Kirriemuir, Muirhead, Letham and surrounding areas. Inspector Peter McLennan Section 2 – Montrose and Brechin and surrounding area. Inspector Gordon Cryle Section 3 – Arbroath and surrounding area. Inspector Adrian Robertson Section 4 – Carnoustie and Monifieth area. Inspector Fiona Jarrett

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Policing Angus The project has also garnered awards success in 2010, winning an Angus Council Excellence Award for Customer Service and a Scottish Government National Community Safety Award for Equalities and Diversity.

RACING PROJECT STEERS YOUTHS AWAY FROM CRIME The Hedzup racing project was established in 2009 by Ian Pert, an ex-professional motorcycle racer who lives in Angus. Throughout 2010 Hedzup Racing has worked with a group of approximately 20

Here’s how we have been Making a Difference in Angus; A significant antisocial behaviour problem was identified in Hillview housing estate in Brechin, where a group of individuals had, over a period of months subjected the community to intimidation, harassment and threats, racist abuse, housebreaking, the theft and vandalism of property and frequent excessively noisy parties where alcohol and illegal drugs were being abused. Staff from the Joint Services Team, Angus Council Housing Division and Tayside Police formed a local partnership to tackle the complaints of serious and persistent antisocial behaviour in the area and to help improve integration between the migrant population and the authorities to allow them to better communicate their concerns. The project team carried out extensive work in the area in order to gain the confidence of the community and the victims of the ongoing behaviour. This included positive action by police where evidence was available, dedicated foot patrols by community wardens, investigative work by the Community Safety Team and housing officers, and deployment of an overt public space CCTV camera. In what was considered to be a first for Scottish antisocial behaviour investigations, specific support was given to non-British residents in allowing them to record details of incidents in their own native language and providing a member of staff who could speak their language. Work undertaken by this positive action group and the community encouraged victims to come forward and report incidences of antisocial and criminal behaviour. The team also used covert surveillance equipment which captured criminal behaviour. All relevant evidence of criminal 14

acts was handed over to Tayside Police for consideration of proceedings. This resulted in four individuals being arrested. One was sentenced to one year for fire-raising with potential endangerment to life, the second to ten month’s imprisonment for fire-raising with potential endangerment to life and a further forty days for housebreaking. The third individual, who was also subject to an antisocial behaviour order on criminal conviction, was arrested for disorder committed against another household within Hillview and other offences. He was sentenced to five months in prison. Antisocial Behaviour Orders (ASBO) were also granted against two of these individuals for a period of three years, banning one from a certain area within Hillview and the other from entering Hillview altogether. All this work helped to gain the confidence of the local community who had previously given up hope of finding a solution. There is now good interaction between residents of Hillview and council staff which has been consolidated by the creation of a community flat. Outcomes of the project include a marked reduction in vacant properties and a reduction in vandalism and antisocial behaviour complaints which combined have made Hillview a more safe, secure and sustainable community. Tayside Police have also noted a marked reduction in police calls to the area and a general reduction in criminal behaviour.

Talking about the project, ASB Co-ordinator, Ken Johnston said,

young people from the Forfar and Arbroath areas, who were seen as problematic within their school and the wider community, to instil within them a sense of responsibility, commitment and respect. The group worked in Forfar and Arbroath over a ten week period to build and refurbish two 600cc motorcycles which were then raced at East Fortune Race Track near Edinburgh by Ian, with the young people acting as pit crew for the weekend. The majority of the young people were drawn from those currently perceived at risk of exclusion from school or offenders and encouraged them to develop positive outcomes at the end of the course including better school attendance, reduced or a cessation in offending and a reduction in other risk taking behaviour such as under age drinking. The experience for the young people was hugely positive and many have gone on to lead more positive lifestyles. The group have developed a real interest within the project and have asked to develop a new initiative

ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR – PARTNERSHIP IN ACTION

“I am extremely proud of the work undertaken by operational staff and residents in Hillview. This project is an example of how partners working together can achieve real results for a community.”


words of appreciation The Community Liaison Officer’s ability to present lessons to classes and school assemblies was a real strength. I would like to commend his efforts and highlight his aptitude in the role. I cannot stress enough how invaluable a positive and professional Community Liaison Officer has been to our school. DM, Arbroath.

words of appreciation Just a note to say many thanks for all the help your officers gave in finding my missing 6-year-old grandson and for the little talk you had with him afterwards. He says he is very sorry for causing all the worry for everyone and will not go anywhere now without his mum knowing where he is. SM (a very grateful grandma), Carnoustie.

The project was supported by Tayside Police’s Community Safety Unit in Angus and local community liaison officers who attended the project sessions and the final races with a view to breaking down barriers with the young people attending. In addition to this work, the group in Forfar have continued to develop the project with a view to obtaining premises locally which will allow the project to continue as a stand alone and regular resource which can be used by all young people. All of the young people attending the project worked towards achieving bronze or silver Youth Achievement Awards which has

provided them with a basis for ongoing development and potential employment in the future. The Hedzup Project has received a great deal of positive feedback in the past year, and in 2011 the project intends to expand to cover Carnoustie and Brechin High Schools, extending the benefits of the project throughout Angus.

TARGETING DRUG DEALING IN ARBROATH Operation Sermon was launched in January 2010 with the aim of using local officers to obtain a better picture in relation to the misuse and dealing of Class A drugs, particularly heroin within Arbroath and to provide public reassurance by carrying out high visibility patrols. In addition to the local uniform officers, support was provided by the Road Policing Unit, Community Support Team, Crime Management and CID, and from specialist units within Force Headquarters.

The operation continues to target those involved in drugs misuse. It also provides an excellent opportunity for officers to engage with those involved in drugs misuse and to actively encourage them to take the opportunities provided by way of local harm reduction programmes. Officers have seen an improved intelligence picture which has allowed for more informed deployment and caused significant disruption to those involved in the misuse and dealing of heroin. Enforcement work included stop searches of those suspected of carrying drugs and searching their houses and vehicles which saw the recovery of both personal and dealer amounts of heroin, plus smaller quantities of other drugs, and arrests made. Feedback from the community has been positive with local drug abusers openly admitting that they are aware of this concentrated police effort and have seen a reduction in the availability of heroin within the town.

which would allow them to return as peer mentors as well as develop a potential new project in the Forfar area. The young people are actively involved in producing merchandise to support the project and have learnt to canvas local support groups and provide inputs to groups such as Round Table and Rotary to promote the activity of the group.

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Policing Angus

Vehicles being driven in an antisocial manner were a common problem in the Montrose area and generated a significant number of complaints from local residents. In order to tackle the issue local officers visited the problem areas at peak times and distributed leaflets advising drivers of the legislation and their responsibilities. This was followed up with an enforcement phase which resulted in 45 warnings being given to drivers and 16 vehicles being seized.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG PREVENTION OFFICER HELPS REACH OUT TO DIVERSE COMMUNITIES Thanks to Angus Alcohol and Drug Partnership and Angus Youth Justice, the county now has a fully funded police officer dedicated to promoting drug and alcohol awareness and education. To date, the main focus has been on providing support and guidance to primary and secondary school children throughout Angus, dealing primarily with the threat of alcohol and drug misuse to young people. The new drugs and alcohol officer has worked closely with the education department to become integrated into the curriculum for excellence and now has a strong representation across every secondary school in Angus. They have also nurtured partnership working with the Trading Standards Department of Angus Council to target the sale of alcohol to young people and provide guidance to off sales premises.

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS IN KIRRIEMUIR In 2009 and again in 2010, Constable Pam Colvin has been instrumental in organising and running a Youth Volunteering Initiative within Kirriemuir, including a number of youngsters with challenging backgrounds. Pam identified that within her community there was a lack of engagement between the elderly and the local youths which could often lead to expressions of fear and mistrust. There were a number of older people who were unable to take care of their own gardens and Pam arranged for her ‘volunteers’ to tidy up the gardens of local elderly residents. This led to a much improved level of cross generation respect and culminated in the young people being 16

invited to participate in indoor bowling sessions at a local home for the elderly. In addition she has instilled a sense of pride, respect for others and community awareness amongst the local young people, and with her help they have gone on to organise a fundraising event for Guide Dogs for the Blind.

Gary Malone, Manager of Volunteering Centre Angus, added,

“Much of Pam’s work goes well beyond her remit and she is indeed volunteering in her own time, but consistently it pursues respect and togetherness between Tayside Police and Angus communities.”

SHARING INFORMATION AND USING INTELLIGENCE IN ANGUS The Angus Community Safety Partnership and Angus Council recently launched the Arc GIS Project scheme, promoting the sharing of information between key partners in Angus. The project uses the most current mapping technology available to assist the identification of hotspot areas and allow the appropriate targeting of resources to deal with issues of antisocial behaviour. Information held by Tayside Police, Angus Council and Tayside Fire and Rescue is now accessible to the Community Analyst, who is able to use the Arc GIS technology to accurately show where instances of antisocial behaviour are occurring in communities, and help predict where they may occur in the future. This in turn assists the Community Safety Partnership in deploying resources to respond to these problems and attempts to resolve them for those affected by antisocial behaviour in Angus. In 2010, the levels of antisocial behaviour, persons causing annoyance to others and reports of vandalism in Angus fell by 10 % compared to 2009-10. This is in addition to a 32% reduction in youths causing annoyance calls and a 21% reduction in vandalism seen the previous year and signifies a further step forward in our commitment to improving the quality of life for people living in, working in or visiting Angus. In 2010 youth related crime also fell by 37% in Angus, demonstrating that our commitment to tackling this issue is paying significant dividend.

CRACKING DOWN ON ANTISOCIAL DRIVING IN MONTROSE


TOTAL DRY UP - VANDALISM, ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR AND YOUTH CALLS DROP IN ANGUS Like many other areas, Angus has issues regarding young people abusing alcohol and becoming involved in low level crime and antisocial behaviour. In 2007 Tayside Police instigated Operation Dry Up, which involved uniformed police officers undertaking dedicated patrols aimed at seizing alcohol from young people. Thereafter, letters were sent to parents or guardians signposting them in the direction of appropriate support services offering advice and counselling regarding alcohol misuse. Questionnaire and exit surveys were carried out during the Total Dry Up events which indicated that the vast majority of young people who were involved in the initiative were more aware of the harmful and dangerous consequences of their drinking as a result of the intervention. In addition, a number of young people who had previously been involved with support services, but had disengaged were encouraged to re-engage after meeting with support workers. Many parents were grateful for the opportunity to discuss concerns they had regarding their children’s behaviour with one or more of the agencies represented. They stated that had they only received a letter signposting them towards these services they would have been unlikely to take up the offer of help available. In the past year, the dedication to Total Dry Up has certainly contributed to the reduction in young people abusing alcohol in Angus, and reduced the number of vandalism and youth causing nuisance calls received by the Force.

CHILD PROTECTION PROCESS PRAISED

highlighted a number of areas of good practice and the Inspectors were particularly impressed with how Tayside Police reported child concerns, the early screening processes we have in place and the fact that we now identify children in need of help at an earlier stage via processes such as Early Screening Group, Joint Assessment Group, Pre-Birth Resource Allocation Meeting and local multi agency resource teams.

COMMUNITY TASK FORCE From September until the end of November 2010 the Community Task Force were deployed in the Angus towns of Forfar and Kirriemuir. The overall aim of the deployment was by means of partnership working, to target underlying problems of criminality and persistent offenders, in order to reduce crime, the fear of crime and antisocial behaviour. The streets surrounding Viewmount, Forfar had deteriorated over a period of time due to drug use and drug related crime. In the process of tackling this, the Community Task Force carried out an environmental survey, the results of which were passed on to Angus Council. Together with Angus Council, steps were taken to rectify some of the contributing factors such as poor lighting, security and overgrown shrubbery. The police attention and improvements to living conditions drew a resident to state that the attention had "re-awakened a sense of community spirit". While in Angus, the team also returned to areas of previous deployments in Arbroath and Montrose. The successful tactics employed have been continued in all areas by beat officers, as part of a post deployment strategy, to ensure that Angus is a safe and pleasurable place to live and work.

words of appreciation After seven years of anti-social behaviour, thanks to the work of your community liaison officer the problem has gone. She is fair but firm, not taking any sides, and when she says she is going to do something, she keeps her promise. The anti-social behaviour had a huge impact on both my life and health. It’s a wonderful feeling to know that local liaison officers with those qualities are available to us. Thanks again, you have our total respect and trust. LL, Kirriemuir.

words of appreciation I am writing to express our admiration for the work of your community officer. The catalyst for this letter is the amazing work she has undertaken at Webster’s High School through her community volunteering scheme. Under your officer’s direction, they have achieved not only real improvements but more importantly have done much to restore the faith of many residents, particularly older ones, in young people. She is to be greatly commended for all her efforts and is a credit to Tayside Police. JS, Kirriemuir.

Eastern Division Public Protection Unit is at the forefront of using police intelligence to ensure the ongoing protection of young people in Angus. Various systems have been put in place to ensure that all intelligence that is gathered in respect of a person who may feature in a young person's life is properly assessed and shared with partner agencies. In practical terms this means that if officers are in possession of intelligence regarding an adult, and that adult has a child, then we ensure that partner agencies are aware of such intelligence. In January 2011 HMIE visited Angus and carried out an inspection of child protection. Although their formal report has not yet been received initial feedback from the Inspectors has been very positive. They have 17


Policing Perth & Kinross

words of appreciation

hief Superintendent Roddy Ross is in charge of policing in Perth and Kinross, an area of almost 2,200 square miles and a population of 135,000. He is assisted by Superintendent Tony Beveridge, who is responsible for operational policing in the area, and Chief Inspector Andy McCann, who is responsible for all support functions.

C

Detective Chief Inspector Colin Gall is in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department, while Inspector Emma Bowman leads the division’s Road Policing Unit. Perth & Kinross is divided into four separate sections for policing purposes, each in the overall charge of an Inspector. They are –

Roddy Ross Chief Superintendent

Perth Section – Perth City. Inspector Ian Martin East Section – covers Longforgan, Blairgowrie and Rattray and the villages of Alyth, Ardler, Balbeggie, Ballintuim, Bridge of Callay, Burrelton, Caputh, Collace, Coupar Angus, Guildtown, Kettins, Kinrossie, Kirkmichael, Meigle, Spittalfield and Wolfhill. Inspector Ged Fitzpatrick North Section – covers Stanley, Methven, Pitlochry, Aberfeldy, Dunkeld and Birnam. It also includes the smaller villages of Almondbank, Luncarty, Murthly, Ballinluig, Blair Atholl, Kinloch Rannoch and Kenmore. Inspector Stewart Patience South Section – covers Bridge of Earn and Abernethy on the outskirts of Perth and the larger communities of Crieff, Kinross and Auchterarder. Inspector Iain Ward

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With officers of their temperament and interest in the safety of the area’s citizens we in Tayside are very privileged indeed to have such a Police Force looking after us. CW, Perth.


Here’s how we have been Making a Difference in Perth and Kinross; In our strategic priorities we said that we would increase trust and confidence, by exceeding public expectations, reach out to communities, listen to and act on their needs. A community engagement strategy was developed which strives to improve community engagement by developing systematic approaches, appointing identified community police officers for each geographic community throughout Perth and Kinross and the creation of community sergeant posts. Community officers have introduced police surgeries for members of communities. These forums provide the valuable opportunities to hear, first hand, about local concerns and provide advice on personal safety, home security and crime prevention issues. They have also developed a network of key community contacts so that the police are effectively engaged in community life. Community sergeants have been instrumental in managing and focusing the work of community officers in providing effective engagement with their communities. A part of this has been the innovative use of new technology. Officers in the south section have been using social media to enhance local policing and public re-assurance. Officers used Twitter and MyPolice to provide community updates and online

feedback. This has allowed the officers to engage with sections of the community that are traditionally harder to reach and to provide real-time information and advice to the public.

ALCOHOL DIVERSION PILOT – THE FRIDAY NIGHT PROJECT We said we would work with partners towards safer communities reducing crime and the fear of crime, with an emphasis on alcohol related crime and disorder. The Friday Night Project ran from July to December 2010 and operated one Friday per month in both Highland Perthshire and North Muirton. The project was established after recommendations for the Community Safety Partnership’s ‘Real Unit Cost’ conference in 2009 that priority be given to support coordination of youth provision that is directed towards the prevention of community safety problems in local areas. Local agencies had expressed concern about young people becoming involved in antisocial or risk taking behaviour, much of which was alcohol related, and it was decided to launch this pilot to play a role in diverting youths from alcohol. The monthly events consisted of a mixture of music, dance, sports, arts and drama as well as discussion through group work, and the target group was young people between 14 and 18 years old.

The pilot was well supported by young people in each area with healthy attendances at each event. The pilot was seen by local agencies as having had a beneficial impact in terms of harm reduction and effective in promoting a wider debate about alcohol misuse amongst young people.

OPERATION FESTIVE HOMESAFE We are dedicated to building safer communities, reducing crime and the fear of crime, in particular violent crime and alcohol related crimes and disorder. The annual Festive Homesafe operation was carried out throughout December 2010 in town centres across all four sections of Perth and Kinross. The objective was to reduce violent crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour while raising the public awareness of knife crime. Community confidence was increased by providing a reassuringly high visibility police presence. The idea was supported and encouraged by the Perth Safer City Centre Forum and Perth and Kinross Community Safety Partnership. Police officers liaised with various partners, including Pubwatch, taxi forums and street pastors to coordinate activity. Taxi marshalls were deployed in Perth city centre at relevant times during key dates over the festive period. Officers carried out high profile foot patrols in the shopping areas including

LISTENING TO COMMUNITY CONCERNS -COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY

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Policing Perth & Kinross

OPERATION TREACLE – PARTNERSHIP WORKING IN PERTH AND KINROSS Officers in Perth teamed up with local partners to take part in Operation Treacle, an initiative aimed at ensuring that the school holiday period through to Halloween and Bonfire Night were enjoyed safely by everyone. Historically, this period has been associated with an increase in certain types of antisocial behaviour, but over the last couple of years specific efforts to address this behaviour have been very successful and in some areas reduced incidents to zero. The partners supporting Operation Treacle wanted to continue this positive trend and worked together to promote safe activities to reduce injuries caused by illegal fires and fireworks, offer advice and reassurance to residents on activities in their locality but also to tackle antisocial behaviour, criminal damage, fly-tipping, illegal bonfires and attacks on fire crews. A range of activities designed to keep young people active and safe were laid on across the area. These include Street Sports for all in Perth, Thrillseekers in Blairgowrie and a number of Halloween parties in youth clubs across the area. During the build up to Halloween and Bonfire Night, police officers

words of appreciation The officers involved in searching for my missing husband were wonderful and I couldn’t have received better care and support at what was an incredibly stressful time. My husband was found and received treatment which saved his life. Without the help of the officers who found him I know that he would not be here with me today. HC, Blairgowire.

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visited local retailers regarding the sale of flour and eggs in order to encourage responsible retailing, and retailers thought to sell fireworks to under-18s or to stock unsafe and illegal fireworks were routinely visited by police officers and community wardens alike. In addition, school liaison officers visited schools in targeted areas to inform pupils about the dangers of misusing fireworks or building dangerous bonfires and the penalties that could result.

PROMOTING ROAD SAFETY IN PERTH AND KINROSS During 2010 the road safety officer has delivered 121 road safety presentations at 79 different schools and nurseries, encompassing 8987 children. This year, Driving Ambition, the young car user information fair again toured eight Perth and Kinross secondary schools. Led by Tayside Police road safety, local businesses and driving agencies again provided staffing and resources for the event.

The road safety officer continues to support the four transition days held in Bells Sports Centre for the Perth secondary schools. These days are organised by the Transition Partnership, which comprises Community Learning, Education and Children’s Services, School Nurses and Youth Services. At the start of each day, a short road safety presentation and demonstration of stopping distance is provided for all pupils and staff. The pupils are then invited to test this information when they have the opportunity to use the brake reaction tester. Legislation on vehicle seizure allows us to promote road safety by reducing the number of vehicles being driven without appropriate documentation or insurance, and offers the police additional, effective means of dealing with low-level, anti-social and nuisance offending involving the use of vehicles. In Perthshire and Kinross, in the last year, there have been 190 vehicle seizures, 11 of which were seized due to anti-social behaviour.

supermarket car parks to provide a reassuring presence and maximise the opportunities for public engagement and the Community Impact Team was also tasked with using the Ferroguard metal detector in partnership with local night clubs and retailers within the St. John’s Shopping Centre to increase the number of searches for knives and other offensive weapons. The feedback from local licensees was particularly encouraging and they were pleased to support the initiative with police officers interacting with their customers in a positive way.


REDUCING THE HARM CAUSED BY DRUGS Our drugs intelligence gets better all the time and here in Perthshire and Kinross we target people who continue to supply illegal drugs in our communities and those who sell it on the streets. More drugs are being intercepted closer to their source prior to them being cut into numerous street deals – this also decreases the threat of unknown cutting agents being consumed by drug users which may contribute to serious health issues. We understand that drugs and drug dealers affect the quality of life of people living in our communities and concerted efforts by the police reap positive results in drug seizures and arrests. Whilst enforcement plays a very important part in the fight against drugs, it cannot succeed as a stand alone activity and non enforcement activities work in tandem. To achieve this, we work with partner agencies and communities to reduce harm and demand and help drug abusers access effective treatment. In turn, this helps communities to feel safer and stronger and potentially results in less crime being committed and police officers being able to concentrate on other important community issues. An example of our harm reduction activities is to take the mobile police office to the city centre of Perth during the night time leisure hours, where officers are then able to engage with clientele enjoying the nightlife

of Perth and to offer advice to anyone concerned about drugs, including the option of referring them to one of our partner agencies for support.

WILDLIFE CRIME Perthshire and Kinross covers a vast rural area and with this comes a wealth of valuable but vulnerable wildlife. Our wildlife must therefore be protected as it is often targeted by criminals who seize opportunities to carry out criminal acts to the detriment of our wildlife and which sometimes impinge on the population of species of conservation concern, for example the freshwater pearl mussel or the white-tailed eagle. Wildlife crimes include activities such as the persecution of rare birds of prey, deer poaching, hare coursing, wild bird egg theft, releasing of non-native species into the wild, taking freshwater pearl mussels, or damaging protected habitats to name but a few. Wildlife crime officers of Tayside Police work in partnership with many agencies such as the Scottish Government, Scottish Natural Heritage and RSPB to combat this type of

criminal activity. Annually various operations are run, for example Operation Lepus which not only targets illegal hare coursing but aims to prevent it occurring, Operation Eagle, a seasonal operation to deter egg thieves from raiding golden eagle nests in north Perthshire, and Operation Easter, a national operation to detect egg thieves and coordinated by Tayside Police. The protection of wildlife is the responsibility of all and policing operations have a significant impact in preventing and detecting such criminal activity as well as bringing offenders to justice.

•

words of appreciation I will never forget how good Tayside Police were to me and my family on what was the worst day of my life. Thanks to the officers for all their help and support. It is great comfort to me to know that we have great police officers like them in Perth. AT, Perth.

Education plays an enormous part in protecting our wildlife and Tayside Police wildlife crime officers have run a wildlife crime project with Tayside primary schools since 1997 that has up to now involved nearly 12,000 pupils. 21


Providing Specialist Support words of appreciation To the two officers who helped me when my car ran out of fuel. It’s angels like you that make Perth a better place. MS, Perth. MS, Perth.

Craig Suttie

Hamish Macpherson

Detective Chief Superintendent

Chief Superintendent

pecialist teams based in Crime Intelligence Division and Headquarters Division provide valuable support and guidance to front line officers across the force area.

S

Detective Chief Superintendent Craig Suttie has responsibility for Crime Intelligence Division. Chief Superintendent Hamish Macpherson has responsibility for Headquarters Division.

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Spotlight on Serious and Organised Crime

Detective Superintendent Semple added, “Funds recovered from criminals will continue to be confiscated under the Proceeds of Crime legislation and that money will then be put to good use through the Scottish Government’s Cash Back for Communities programme, with a number of Tayside groups already having benefited from the scheme.” More than £71,000 of Cashback for Communities money has been invested in YouthLink activities in Dundee in a bid to get young people off the streets and contributing positively to their local community. The investment has formed part of the latest allocation of funds as part of phase one of round four of the CashBack for Communities Youthlink Fund, set up to help support both existing and new diversionary events and activities for young people aged between 10 and 19 years. Other projects that received a share of the funding include the Hot Chocolate Trust, The Shore, The Factory Skatepark, BIKE-IT, Tayside Council on Alcohol, Pure Media UK and Fairbridge in Dundee.

In 2010 Tayside Police has seized in excess of £210,000 cash and taken assets of over £100,000 from criminals. In July 2010, an asset confiscation order totalling £106,000 was granted at Forfar Sheriff Court against a 47 year old man from Perth. In January 2009 he was convicted of producing cannabis with a value in excess of £106,000 in a former church which he owned in Forfar. Following this conviction, Tayside Police Financial Intelligence Unit carried out an investigation into assets which he had accumulated as a result of his illegal drug dealing activities which ultimately resulted in the confiscation order being granted.

‘‘We investigate wherever we can, using traditional law enforcement methods – investigating and arresting criminals and working with prosecutors to put them behind bars. We also use other new and innovative tools and powers to make crime harder to commit. Serious organised criminals are committed to making money from their illicit activities and so recovering criminal assets is a priority for Tayside Police. We achieve results by collaborating closely with the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency and other agencies.’’ Thousands of pounds worth of contracts have been taken away or not awarded to companies believed to be acting as fronts for organised crime gangs. Tayside Police has information sharing protocols in place with the three respective local authorities meaning that information that was previously deemed confidential can now be shared. This is resulting in criminals now having to find less traditional methods to launder their cash.

Projects in the Perth and Kinross area received a share of over £15,000 of Youthlink funding. The Breathe Project and the Strathmore Centre of Youth Development (SCYD) were the two groups in the area to be allocated funds. Two projects in Angus, the Brechin Youth Project and the Tayside Police Hedzup Racing Project received more than £8,700 of Youthlink funding.

Serious and organised crime causes devastating harm to our communities. Members of organised crime groups are ruthless and selfish. They do not care about the misery they bring to people’s lives through violence, crime and addiction – often to those who live in our hardest hit communities.

words of appreciation Writing to say thanks for your help when I broke down on the A912. The policeman who attended was the most helpful, caring, considerate person. He was extremely respectful to a much older person! A really great policeman and a credit to his job. I just had to put pen to paper in my appreciation. JS, Dunkeld.

In three separate cases in November 2010 Tayside Police have seized over £90,000 pounds of cash from persons suspected to be involved in serious and organised crime. Detective Superintendent Willie Semple said building up effective intelligence in Tayside was enabling officers to know where, when and how to strike serious and organised criminals to best effect.

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Providing Specialist Support WORKING TOGETHER TO PREVENT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

to the referrals made through this process. The joint work in this field has resulted in the strengthening of the relationship between VSS and Tayside Police which has led to an improved service for individual victims.

Domestic Abuse is arguably at the core of a national culture within which violence is often, unfortunately, seen by many as a behavioural norm. The impact of domestic abuse on individuals victimised either physically or emotionally, often has irreparable consequences. The need to dominate or control a partner is rarely a one-off event, with reporting indicating that individuals are frequently subjected to numerous incidents before seeking help and support from the police or other support networks.

PROTECTING VULNERABLE COMMUNITY MEMBERS

PROVIDING MAJOR CRIME SUPPORT The Force’s Computer Examination and Technical Support Unit has now moved to new fit for purpose accommodation at Force Headquarters in Dundee. The unit provides Tayside Police with the ability to forensically recover evidence from computer equipment seized during a wide range of police investigations including child abuse, drug dealing, fraud, terrorism and missing people cases. At the start of the year the unit adopted new working practices recommended by ACPOS (Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland). Working with partner agencies, the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service and Scottish Police Services Authority the creation of a new gateway has ensured best use of forensic services to detect and reduce crime, including drug crime. This innovative approach has meant a reduction in the backlog of work that has had a twofold effect on the services afforded. Examinations are now being carried out quicker; reducing the risk to potential victims and ensuring those guilty are brought to court sooner, thereby reducing their potential threat to the public. Members of the unit are also able to be more proactive in their support of their operational colleagues in dealing with all aspects of modern policing, from missing people to murders.

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HELPING VICTIMS OF CRIME For many years the police service and Victim Support Scotland (VSS) have been working together to ensure, as far as possible, that victims of crime are referred to a service where their needs as a victim can be met. Constant liaison between Tayside Police and Victim Support Scotland led to the development and implementation of an automated transfer of victim related data from the Tayside Police crime recording database to the VSS case management system whereby the Tayside Police crime database pulls together on a daily basis the relevant referrals which are emailed directly through a criminal justice secured email address to VSS in Tayside. These are then processed through the VSS case management system which has reduced the referral timescale to three days. The addition of information and contact numbers for Victim Support services in Tayside to the reverse side of the letter sent out by Tayside Police, enables victims to contact the organisation directly. This has culminated in an increase of self referrals to Victim Support as well as a quicker response

The divisional Public Protection Units and Crime Intelligence Division have been working in partnership with the three local authority social work departments, NHS Tayside and ACPOS to ensure that officers are aware of the specific requirements placed upon Tayside Police by the act and that agencies are familiar with the role of the police within the meaning of the act. There have been over 2000 referrals made by the police to the adult protection teams within Social Work since the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 came into force, a figure that demonstrates how often Tayside Police are called to situations that involve adults at risk of harm. As with any new piece of legislation the implementation of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 is a constantly evolving process. Tayside Police is dedicated to working alongside our partner agencies to protect the most vulnerable people in our community and will continue to investigate different training options and improvements to systems to ensure this can happen.

â–ź

Tayside Police has once again fully supported the national White Ribbon campaign, with white ribbons being distributed to every police office in the force area. Twenty lead constables from across the force attended training days to raise awareness of domestic violence and fed back to their probationers and others in their home sections.

The Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 came into effect during September 2008. The Act introduced measures to assist agencies in identifying and protecting those members of the community who are at risk of harm, either from themselves or other people. These measures include requiring councils to make the necessary enquiries and investigations to see if action is needed to stop or prevent harm happening, requiring specific organisations to cooperate with councils and each other about adult protection investigations, the introduction of a range of protection orders including assessment orders, removal orders and banning orders; and a legislative framework for the establishment of local multi-agency Adult Protection Committees across Scotland.


PREVENTING THE THREAT FROM TERRORISM Tayside, like all other areas in the UK, faces a threat from terrorism and violent extremism. A small number of people seek to harm innocent people, create division, hatred and violence and exploit the shared values of people in Tayside. The risk of being a victim of these crimes is low but the impact on people and communities is huge. It is vitally important to raise awareness so that we are better protected. The national PREVENT strategy allows us to focus on preventing terrorism and protecting vulnerable people. It is important to work together to challenge and undermine any ideology that encourages indiscriminate violence or criminal activity.

EMERGENCY PLANS TESTED Tayside Police’s involvement in the multi agency Tayside Strategic Coordinating Group was tested in December 2010 when heavy snow meant many people were unable to continue ‘business as usual’. Some were unable to get to work, some ran out of heating fuel, schools were closed, water pipes froze and then burst and major disruption was experienced throughout the roads network in Tayside. The opening of a rest centre in Perth, by Perth and Kinross Council, for over 600

people stranded on the A90 following closure of the trunk road network surrounding the city, demonstrated the group’s ability to mobilise resources across the participating agencies to support not only the communities of Tayside but those travelling through it. Tayside Police coordinated the arrangements. This included assistance to community meals and alarms services, patient transfers, the transport of a range of key personnel to their places of work and humanitarian assistance to those stuck in snow drifts.

words of appreciation We would just like to express our sincere thanks for the assistance rendered to us when we were involved in a road accident at Inveralmond on Christmas Eve. The officers were kind, helpful and efficient and provided us with help and support. They certainly helped us enjoy what otherwise might have been a very traumatic Christmas. MH, West Sussex.

TALKING TAYSIDE - CONTACT CENTRE AGENT OF THE YEAR Tayside Police is immensely proud of call handler Gill Wilson who won the 2010 Talking Tayside Contact Centre Agent of the Year award. Talking Tayside, which was initiated by Dundee City Council in 2000, is a forum of contact centres and support agencies that play a key role in maintaining and developing an industry that has become a significant source of employment in the Tayside area. In the last year the Force Communications Centre call handlers and dispatchers have handled over 48,000 emergency 999 calls and 250,000 non emergency calls.

words of appreciation The officers demonstrated the highest standards of command, control and compassion in what must inevitably be a routine incident in their line of duty but which is traumatic to a member of the public. They found the time to provide information and reassurance that helped us deal with the aftermath of our road accident. GM, Caithness.

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Statistics Police Annual Statistical Tables 2010-2011 Group 1 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 1 – Crimes of Violence Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Poss of a Firearm w.i. to end. life Abduction Threats Others Table 1

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

Group 2 – Crimes of Indecency Rape Assault with intent to Rape Indecent Assault Lewd & Libidinous Practices Indecent Exposure Others Table 2

Group 3 – Crimes of Dishonesty Theft by Housebreaking etc:Domestic Dwelling Domestic Non-Dwelling Commercial Th. by O.L.P. etc. Th. by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc. Th./Att. Th. Of M.V. (inc. T.A.D.A.) Convicted thief in poss of tools w.i. In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from a Motor Vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others Table 3

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April 2009 to March 2010

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

TAYSIDE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

ANGUS

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

PERTH & KINROSS

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

TAYSIDE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up 20 14 26 12 9 8 13 6 9 6 16 11 38 28 55 29 3 3 4 4 1 1 2 3 1 1 5 1 5 5 11 8 52 29 58 35 32 22 54 48 55 38 42 32 139 89 154 115 45 34 21 15 27 27 31 39 25 15 25 20 97 76 77 74 15 9 23 16 10 11 5 4 4 2 9 6 29 22 37 26 93 88 63 60 18 9 11 8 11 6 8 7 122 103 82 75 228 177 195 142 97 78 116 108 105 68 105 77 430 323 416 327

Group 3 Classification of Crimes and Offences

April 2010 to March 2011

PERTH & KINROSS

Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 7 7 0 0 22 22 25 24 15 14 8 8 13 12 23 23 50 48 56 55 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 99 76 125 97 45 41 61 58 57 52 63 63 201 169 249 218 93 60 104 64 6 6 10 8 36 27 44 39 135 93 158 111 47 50 23 23 57 57 19 20 28 27 16 17 132 134 58 60 1 1 4 4 0 0 2 2 3 3 1 1 4 4 7 7 2 2 13 13 4 4 2 2 10 9 7 6 16 15 22 21 7 3 6 5 4 4 2 1 17 14 7 7 28 21 15 13 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 4 3 3 1 276 218 302 230 134 129 104 99 168 148 162 157 578 495 568 486

Group 2 Classification of Crimes and Offences

ANGUS

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

ANGUS

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

PERTH & KINROSS

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

TAYSIDE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up 500 178 142 171 346 292 20 71 3976 176 33 9 268 70 6252

128 26 38 125 67 125 20 45 2410 59 32 8 157 25 3265

613 202 171 123 420 263 12 113 3749 164 34 18 308 88 6278

155 63 64 39 73 107 12 73 2157 23 33 11 191 20 3021

109 94 75 85 36 64 2 36 1385 83 21 3 91 25 2109

40 26 23 45 6 45 2 28 700 17 21 3 53 6 1015

97 70 100 70 31 79 1 42 1397 70 6 11 127 13 2114

46 25 27 20 13 46 1 28 813 25 6 8 92 14 1164

143 82 121 143 88 95 4 64 1771 161 18 2 170 50 2912

46 23 37 93 21 58 4 48 883 95 18 3 88 18 1435

164 64 213 89 136 119 3 80 1697 101 7 10 178 26 2887

57 10 80 33 34 70 3 66 909 18 7 10 104 22 1423

752 354 338 399 470 451 26 171 7132 420 72 14 529 145 11273

214 75 98 263 94 228 26 121 3993 171 71 14 298 49 5715

874 336 484 282 587 461 16 235 6843 335 47 39 613 127 11279

258 98 171 92 120 223 16 167 3879 66 46 29 387 56 5608


Group 4 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 4 – Crimes of Vandalism, Malicious and Reckless Conduct Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others Table 4

Group 5 Classification of Crimes and Offences

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up 111 27 121 24 2586 730 3010 852 147 74 107 72 2844 831 3238 948

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

ANGUS April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

PERTH & KINROSS April 2009 to March 2010

Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up Known Up 42 21 42 19 45 24 1413 446 1281 500 1265 490 59 45 46 38 48 35 1514 512 1369 557 1358 549

ANGUS April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up 34 15 198 72 1151 392 5264 1666 40 34 254 154 1225 441 5716 1892

PERTH & KINROSS April 2009 to March 2010

TAYSIDE

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2009 to March 2010

Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Known Up Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time 127 127 91 91 34 34 39 38 52 53 49 50 213 214 Escape and Rescue 9 9 1 1 7 7 6 6 15 15 3 3 31 31 Resisting Arrest & Obstruct. Constable 142 139 123 123 110 110 86 86 151 150 116 116 403 399 General Attempts to Pervert 37 34 33 28 22 20 21 20 32 30 19 20 91 84 Providing False Information (incl. Sex Offences) 2 2 1 4 0 0 3 3 0 0 1 1 2 2 Bail ~ Fail to keep Conditions 405 387 464 446 172 173 208 205 224 211 219 219 801 771 Offensive Weapons etc 155 146 240 223 79 75 69 68 65 64 87 82 299 285 Drugs ~ Supply, Possession w.i. etc 251 251 170 172 135 135 98 99 173 175 122 128 559 561 Drugs ~ Possession 1112 1099 991 986 435 433 372 372 655 654 616 623 2202 2186 Drugs ~ Others 26 24 35 32 8 8 6 6 34 34 11 11 68 66 Others 58 57 62 59 16 15 19 19 19 16 11 11 93 88 Table 5 2324 2275 2211 2165 1018 1010 927 922 1420 1402 1254 1264 4762 4687

Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 5 – Other Crimes Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 TOTALS

DUNDEE April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up 276 218 302 230 228 177 195 142 6252 3265 6278 3021 2844 831 3238 948 2324 2275 2211 2165 11924 6766 12224 6506

ANGUS April 2009 to March 2010

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up 134 129 104 99 97 78 116 108 2109 1015 2114 1164 1514 512 1369 557 1018 1010 927 922 4872 2744 4630 2850

PERTH & KINROSS April 2009 to March 2010 Made Cleared Known Up 168 148 105 68 2912 1435 1358 549 1420 1402 5963 3602

April 2010 to March 2011

Made Cleared Known Up 197 58 5442 1744 193 144 5832 1946

TAYSIDE

Group 5 – Other Crimes

Group 1 to 5

April 2010 to March 2011

April 2010 to March 2011 Made Cleared Known Up 179 179 10 10 325 325 73 68 5 8 891 870 396 373 390 399 1979 1981 52 49 92 89 4392 4351

TAYSIDE April 2009 to March 2010

Made Cleared Made Cleared Known Up Known Up 162 157 578 495 105 77 430 323 2887 1423 11273 5715 1225 441 5716 1892 1254 1264 4762 4687 5633 3362 22759 13112

April 2010 to March 2011 Made Cleared Known Up 568 486 416 327 11279 5608 5832 1946 4392 4351 22487 12718

27


Statistics Complaints about the Police 2010-11 2009/10

Complaints and Allegations by Member of Staff

2009/10

2010/11

ON-DUTY

2009/10

2010/11

TOTAL

TOTAL

ON-DUTY OFF-DUTY OFF-DUTY -

-

-

446

2. Number of Quality of Service ALLEGATIONS against the Force

-

-

-

-

-

-

3. Number of complaint ALLEGATIONS against POLICE OFFICERS received during the year

544

473

34

21

578

494

4. Number of complaint ALLEGATIONS against POLICE STAFF received during the year

28

40

7

2

35

42

5. Number of complaint ALLEGATIONS against SPECIAL CONSTABLES received during the year

17

6

4

2

21

8

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

11

26

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

4

12

3. Unsubstantiated by available evidence

0

4

21

9

37

3

9

7

0

0

8

6

104

23

Assault

TOTAL 2009/10

TOTAL 2010/11

3

1

Other - Criminal

2

0

Corrupt Practice

2

0

Discriminatory Behaviour

2

1

Unlawful / Unnecessary Arrest or Detention

0

2. Abandoned due to non co-operation of complainer

Neglect of Duty

1. Withdrawn by complainer

Excessive Force

Other – Non Criminal

Irregularity in Procedure

Oppressive Conduct/Harrasment

-

Traffic Irregularity or offence

-

Incivility

1. Number of complaint CASES against a MEMBER OF THE POLICE FORCE

Breakdown of ON-DUTY Complaint Allegations Disposed of

4. Resolved by explanation to complainer

2

6

49

58

87

5

17

6

1

0

5

19

255

278

5. Leading to No Proceedings by PF

40

33

1

4

10

6

2

15

6

0

17

0

134

174

6. Leading to criminal proceedings

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

9

0

10

0

7. Leading to criminal conviction

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

8

0

9

0

8. Resulting in advice

0

0

9

23

8

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

43

19

9. Resulting in misconduct procedures

1

0

0

10

4

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

18

9

TOTAL

44

45

82

107

150

14

31

28

9

1

50

27

588

541

Misconduct Cases/Disposals 2009/10 2010/11 Cases Recorded Cases Recorded

2009/10

2010/11

Cases Disposed

Cases Disposed

37

36

2009/10

2010/11

TOTAL

TOTAL

1. Number of cases where misconduct allegations/matters were taken to a misconduct hearing

3

4

2. Number of cases disposed by warning in terms of regulation 5(2)

4

4

3. Number of cases disposed by warning in terms of regulation 5(3)

5

9

4. Number of cases disposed by warning in terms of regulation 6(6)

5

4

5. Number of cases involving resignation prior to completion of enquiry

2

2

6. Number of cases – counselled

17

7

7. Number of cases where no action taken

4

3

8. Number of unsubstantiated cases

15

6

9. Other

1

2

56

41

Conduct Cases

34

40

Disposal of conduct allegations

TOTAL

28

2010/11


Authorisation of officers and issue of firearms As at 31 March 2011 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users (excludes CS and Taser)

68

Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued

89

Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes

16

Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year

18

Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals

0

Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police (destruction of crazed animals)

0

Racist Crime Reports

Crimes Reported

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned

2009/2010

2010/2011

2009/2010

2009/2010

Dundee

184

171

142

125

Angus

50

57

42

46

Perth & Kinross

90

99

75

86

Total

324

327

259

257

Breakdown of Types of Crimes

Crimes Reported 2009/2010

2010/2011

Abuse/Breach of the Peace

266

264

Vandalism

12

14

Assault

42

44

Others Total

Table of comparison ~ Road Collisions and Casualties

4

5

324

327

2009/2010

2010/2011

Increase/Decrease

% Change

1369

1172

-197

-14.4%

6

5

-1

-16.7%

Dundee Total collisions People killed People seriously injured

62

42

-20

-32.3%

People slightly injured

266

198

-68

-25.6%

Overall total ~ killed and injured

334

245

-89

-26.6%

1050

971

-79

-7.5% 40.0%

Angus Total collisions People killed

5

7

2

People seriously injured

57

53

-4

-7.0%

People slightly injured

224

192

-32

-14.3%

Overall total ~ killed and injured

286

252

-34

-11.9%

-11.8%

Perth & Kinross Total collisions

1642

1449

-193

People killed

12

22

10

83.3%

People seriously injured

107

83

-24

-22.4%

People slightly injured

402

324

-78

-19.4%

Overall total ~ killed and injured

521

429

-92

-17.7%

-11.5%

Tayside Total collisions

4061

3592

-469

People killed

23

34

11

47.8%

People seriously injured

226

178

-48

-21.2%

People slightly injured

892

714

-178

-20.0%

Overall total ~ killed and injured

1141

926

-215

-18.8%

29


Statistics Table of road users killed and injured Killed

Injured 2009/2010 2010/2011

2009/2010

Totals 2010/2011

2009/2010

2010/2011

Pedestrians

4

5

84

76

88

81

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

28

19

28

19

Dundee

Motor Cyclists

1

0

25

13

26

13

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

0

0

0

Drivers

1

0

118

80

119

80

Passengers

0

0

72

52

72

52

Horse Riders

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pillions (Pedal Cycle)

0

0

1

0

1

0

Motobility Scooter Riders

0

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

6

5

328

240

334

245

Pedestrians

0

1

41

28

41

29

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

12

4

12

4

Motor Cyclists

1

1

20

24

21

25

Motor Cycle Passengers

1

0

1

3

2

3

Drivers

1

4

140

121

141

125

Passengers

2

1

67

64

69

65

Horse Riders

0

0

0

1

0

1

Pillions (Pedal Cycle)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Motobility Scooter Riders

0

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

5

7

281

245

286

252

Pedestrians

3

3

31

36

34

39

Pedal Cyclists

0

1

23

13

23

14

Angus

Perth & Kinross

Motor Cyclists

2

3

33

36

35

39

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

3

2

3

2

Drivers

6

11

264

210

270

221

Passengers

1

4

154

108

155

112

Horse Riders

0

0

1

0

1

0

Pillions (Pedal Cycle)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Motobility Scooter Riders

0

0

0

2

0

2

Totals

12

22

509

407

521

429

7

9

156

140

163

149

Pedal Cyclists

0

1

63

36

63

37

Motor Cyclists

4

4

78

73

82

77

Motor Cycle Passengers

1

0

4

5

5

5

Drivers

8

15

522

411

530

426

Passengers

3

5

293

224

296

229

Horse Rider

0

0

1

1

1

1

Tayside Pedestrians

30

Pillion (Pedal Cycle)

0

0

1

0

1

0

Motobility Scooter Rider

0

0

0

2

0

2

Totals

23

34

1118

892

1141

926


EQUALITY & DIVERSITY MONITORING WORKFORCE PROFILE AT 31 MARCH 2011 The workforce profile at 31 March 2011 for the following protected characteristics are as follows: Gender - Police Officers

Male 72.4%

Religion or Belief - Police Officers

Christian Religions 49.4% Other Religions 1.2% Choose Not to Disclose 11.8%

Female 27.6%

Gender - Police Staff

Religion or Belief - Police Staff

Christian Religions 44.9% Other Religions 2.3% Choose Not to Disclose 7.5%

Male 35% Female 65%

No Religion or Belief 27.6% Unknown 10%

No Religion or Belief 26% Unknown 19.3%

Age - Police Officers

16-24 4.3%

45-54 25%

25-34 29.6%

55-64 0.9%

35-44 40.2%

65+ 0.0%

Age - Police Staff

16-24 2.9%

45-54 33.8%

25-34 15.1%

55-64 21.8%

35-44 25.4%

65+ 1.0%

Religion or Belief The category of Other Religions includes staff who have classified their religion as one of the following: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam/Muslim, Judaism/Jewish, Sikhism and any Other religion. The category of Christian Religions includes staff who have classified their religion as one of the following: Church of Scotland, Other Christian and Roman Catholic. All of the categories used have been taken from the 2001 Census for Scotland.

Ethnic Origin The category of Minority Ethnic on the chart below, includes staff who have self-classified their ethnic origin in one of the following categories: Bangladeshi, Black African, Black Caribbean, Chinese, Indian, Mixed, Other Asian Background, Other Black Background, Other Ethnic Background, Pakistani. The ethnic origin categories used are taken from the 2001 Census for Scotland. Ethnic Origin - Police Officers

Disability - Police Officers

Sexual Orientation - Police Officers

White 94.1%

Choose Not to Disclose 3.5%

No 84.7%

Unknown 10.2%

Heterosexual 82.2%

Choose Not to Disclose 6.1%

Minority Ethnic 1.2%

Unknown 1.2%

Choose Not to Disclose 3.9%

Yes 1.2%

Gay/Lesbian/ Bisexual 1.7%

Unknown 10%

Ethnic Origin - Police Staff

Disability - Police Staff

Sexual Orientation - Police Staff

White 95.4%

Choose Not to Disclose 1.3%

No 75.9%

Unknown 20.5%

Heterosexual 75.6%

Choose Not to Disclose 4.2%

Minority Ethnic 1%

Unknown 2.3%

Choose Not to Disclose 1.8%

Yes 1.8%

Gay/Lesbian/ Bisexual 0.5%

Unknown 19.7%

The unknown category includes members of the work force who have either left the section blank or who have not completed the form 31


Statistics Police Officer Rank Profile (As At 31 March 2011) Rank Chief Constable Deputy Chief Constable Assistant Chief Constable Chief Superintendent Superintendent Chief Inspector Inspector Sergeant Constable TOTALS Special Constables

Total 1 1 2 5 11 21 55 166 993 1255 172

% 1 0 1 0 0 5 10 30 300 347 59

Female 100.0 0.00 50.0 0.00 0.00 23.8 18.2 18.1 30.2 27.6 34.3

% 0 1 1 5 11 16 45 136 693 908 113

Male 0.00 100.0 50.0 0.00 100.0 76.2 81.8 81.9 69.8 72.4 65.7

COMMENTS: The above figures include officers who are on central service/secondment, whose posts are externally funded and those who are on career breaks. The above figures also include the following temporary promotions 2 Temporary Assistant Chief Constables (1 Female, 1 Male) 1 Temporary Superintendent (Male) 1 Temporary Chief Inspector (Male) 3 Temporary Inspectors (Male) 9 Temporary Sergeants (4 Female, 5 Male)

Number Of Working Days Lost Total Police Staff Strength

Police Staff

Total Police Officer Strength

Police Officers

2010/2011 Total Police Staff Strength

Police Staff

Total Police Officer Strength

2009/2010

Police Officers

Rank

Central 4272 453 910 85 3748 467 737 87 Eastern 2128 265 515 66 3211 272 612 64 Western 2740 305 965 78 2757 317 854 71 Headquarters 108 10 1594 118 87 10 1348 120 FIID 193 45 750 68 120 43 822 70 Operational Support 529 0 1046 0 0 0 0 0 HQ Division 212 81 392 169 390 76 1628 167 HQ Crime 153 47 48 30 311 49 287 34 Total 10335 1206 6220 614 10624 1234 6289 613 Percentage 4.15% 4.60% 4.19% 4.62% Please note that on 1st December 2009, Force restructuring resulted in the formation of 2 new Divisions, i.e. HQ Division and HQ Crime Division and the disbanding of Operational Support Division

Health and Safety Accidents to Police Staff Violent incidents to Police Officers resulting in lost time Total number of incidents resulting in lost time Total number of days lost Incidents reported to the Health & Safety Executive

2009/2010 25 11 36 1098 24

2010/2011 19 10 28 424 21

11 7 32 12 252 80 8 88 49 539

9 6 40 9 241 99 16 84 57 561

Causation factors: Road traffic collisions Manual handling Slips, trips, falls Training ~ in-house and at the Scottish Police College Exposure to violence Assaults Injuries caused by sharp objects Injuries during arrests Others Total Areas of Noteworthy Attention in 2010-2011: Lowest number of accidents to Police Staff in over 10 years Lowest number of accidents resulting in lost time in over 10 years Lowest number of days lost on record Lowest training injuries on record Lowest number of injuries during arrests on record

32


OBJECTIVES: 1. TO PROTECT THE PUBLIC FROM HARM BY WORKING WITH PARTNERS. A threat and risk assessment is conducted every three years, reviewed annually, to identify potential threats to Tayside communities. Four ‘very high’ and two ‘high’ priority areas have been assessed as the greatest risk. These are: • Anti-Social Behaviour Focusing on all manner of local nuisance causing alarm and distress to the community. • Public Protection Protecting the most vulnerable in our society. • Serious and Organised Crime Targeting criminals who actively conduct their criminality in a coordinated fashion. • Terrorism The threat to the UK from international terrorism remains severe and intelligence will continue to be monitored and assessed. • Roads Policing / Road Safety Improving road safety, addressing anti-social use of roads and disrupting criminal use of the road network. • Firearms Targeting the irresponsible use of firearms, particularly air weapons.

Tayside Police Community Priorities 2011 – 2014

Public Safety And Public Reassurance

The prevalence of drugs and alcohol misuse will continue as a focus. This is a key contributor towards crime and anti-social behaviour. 2. TO REASSURE THE PUBLIC BY DELIVERING A LOCAL POLICING SERVICE THAT IS TRUE TO OUR VISION AND VALUES AND UPHOLDS OUR STANDARDS OF SERVICE. 3. TO DELIVER OUR COMMUNITY PRIORITIES WHILST PLANNING FOR, MANAGING AND REALISING THE REQUIRED SPENDING CUTS AND RECOGNISING THE IMPACT OF AUSTERITY MEASURES ON THE PUBLIC.

33


Statement of Corporate Governance

The force has strengthened its commitment to corporate governance I provide the following statement in support of the Board’s Local Code of Corporate Governance which reflects my responsibility for the development, implementation and management of the Code. The Chief Internal Auditor is required independently to review our corporate governance arrangements and provide a report and opinion on these each year to the Board. The force discharges the principles of the Code across its divisions and departments under each of the following five dimensions:

Focussing the meeting structure and remit of committees on service delivery and achieving outcomes

Enhanced scrutiny and governance in relation to Information Systems and Information Technology used by the force

Conducting a comprehensive review of organisational efficiency and cost-effective delivery of service in light of financial austerity measures

Implementing recommendations from the Best Value Review of Operational Policing.

Developing and implementing a risk management strategy, policy and guidance and enhancing the governance arrangements around risk management

Community Focus

Service Delivery Arrangements

Structure and Process

Risk Management and Internal Controls

Over the coming year, the following will be progressed:

Standards of Conduct

Implementation of organisational restructuring plans to promote effective delivery of service within a reduced cost base

Enhancing our Community Policing strategy through integrated resource management and redesign of operational beats based on analysis of crime, socioeconomic deprivation and demographics within our communities

Improving quality of service and management of demand through the scheduling of appointments at a convenient time and remote public assistance and guidance by telephone from police officers where appropriate

Extending membership of the Risk Management and Information Assurance Management Sub Groups to the Chief Internal Auditor

The force has strengthened its commitment to corporate governance this year by: •

Incorporating the views of diverse communities within the force’s strategic priorities

Promoting public safety and public reassurance by engaging in a public consultation and feedback process in advance of publishing our Community Priorities 2011 – 2014

34

Leveraging emerging technology through online distribution of information and use of social media to promote community engagement, safety and confidence in policing Testing our commitment to delivery of shared objectives such as community safety and well being and partnership working through undertaking a survey of those organisations and agencies, with which the Force collaborates Reviewing high risk areas of policing to ensure that the force is equipped to deal with the challenges they present

Giving due consideration to the work which will be carried out in 2011/12, I am satisfied that our corporate governance arrangements are operating effectively. Justine Curran Chief Constable


35


CHIEF CONSTABLE’S

T R O P E R E C N A M R O F R E P L A U ANN 2010/2011 Tayside Police Headquarters PO Box 59, West Bell Street, Dundee DD1 9JU Fax: 01382 200449 E-mail: mail@tayside.pnn.police.uk

www.tayside.police.uk 0300 111 2222 To report an incident or crime in a non-emergency situation, or for any other enquiry, call

0300 111 2222

IN AN EMERGENCY CALL

999

Textphone: Helpline for users who are deaf or speech impaired

01382 204500

Firearms Administration At Force HQ in Dundee

01382 596858

Drugs Hotline To provide information about drugs-related incidents or activities in your area

01382 201444

Recruitment

01382 596212

Freedom of Information E-mail: information@tayside.pnn.police.uk

01382 596169

Crimestoppers To provide anonymous information concerning any crime or incidents in your area, call the independent charity Crimestoppers on

0800 555 111

If you require a copy of this document in a community language or large print, please telephone 01382 591735, fax 01382 596739, or e-mail mail@tayside.pnn.police.uk Follow us on

Twitter@TaysidePolice youtube.com/taysidepolice facebook

Making a Dierence

annualreport2010-2011  

2010/2011 CHIEF CONSTABLE’S Making a Difference By: - Putting communities at the heart of everything we do Fighting crime, bringing criminals...

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