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CHIEF CONSTABLE’S

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT

05/06 TWO THOUSAND AND FIVE TO TWO THOUSAND AND SIX


CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

A CHINOOK HELICOPTER WAS USED TO FLY IN PUBLIC ORDER TRAINED OFFICERS AT THE G8 SUMMIT


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TABLE OF CONTENTS TAYSIDE JOINT POLICE BOARD MEMBERS ...............................................................05 FORCE EXECUTIVE .........................................................................................................07 CONVENER’S MESSAGE................................................................................................07 CHIEF CONSTABLE’S FOREWORD...............................................................................08 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS...............................................................................11 G8 – EYES OF THE WORLD ON TAYSIDE .....................................................................12 CENTRAL DIVISION ........................................................................................................20 EASTERN DIVISION ........................................................................................................24 WESTERN DIVISION .......................................................................................................26 HEADQUARTERS DIVISION ...........................................................................................30 HEADQUARTERS CRIME MANAGEMENT ...................................................................32 OPERATIONAL SUPPORT ..............................................................................................36 TAYSIDE POLICE: DEVELOPING AND INNOVATING...................................................38 TAYSIDE POLICE: INVESTING FOR THE FUTURE.......................................................40 PROUD OF OUR STAFF ..................................................................................................42 FINANCIAL INFORMATION............................................................................................44 STATISTICAL INFORMATION .........................................................................................45

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

A GROUP OF CHILDREN FROM CHERNOBYL ENJOYED A DAY OUT AT DIVISIONAL POLICE HEADQUARTERS IN FORFAR


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TAYSIDE JOINT POLICE BOARD MEMBERS CONVENER Councillor Colin Young ...................................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council VICE CONVENER Councillor Ron Scrimgeour............................................................................................................Angus Council VICE CONVENER Depute Provost Charles DP Farquhar OBE JP DL..............................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Ian Mackintosh JP ........................................................................................................Angus Council Councillor Robert Myles JP............................................................................................................Angus Council Depute Provost Stewart McGlynn ..................................................................................................Angus Council Councillor Jack Gibb.......................................................................................................................Angus Council Lord Provost John Letford JP...............................................................................................Dundee City Council Bailie Neil I C Powrie JP.......................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Christina Roberts................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor George Regan......................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Helen Dick JP......................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor James Barrie JP .................................................................................................Dundee City Council Councillor Lewis Simpson .............................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council Councillor David Scott JP...............................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Alexander Stewart JP ..................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Alistair Barr ..................................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council Councillor Ian Miller.......................................................................................................Perth & Kinross Council

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

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OFFICERS ON PATROL IN DUNDEE CITY CENTRE


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THE FORCE EXECUTIVE

Chief Constable John Vine QPM BA MSc FCIPD

Deputy Chief Constable Willie Bald QPM

Assistant Chief Constable Iain MacLeod

Director of Corporate Services Doug Cross FCMA

Director of Human Resource Services Moira Docherty MCIPD

Professional Standards Headquarters Division Police Forensic Science Laboratory

Central Division Eastern Division Western Division HQ Crime Management Operational Support

Finance IT & Communications Legal Services Property & Support Services

Human Resource Services Staff Development Occupational Health

THE CONVENER’S MESSAGE ‘IT COULD BE ARGUED THAT THE MOST REWARDING ASPECT OF THE PAST YEAR HAS BEEN THE CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT IN CRIME REDUCTION OVER THE WHOLE FORCE AREA.’ I doubt if there has ever been a more challenging year in the history of Tayside Police. While the main focus was on the G8 Summit at Gleneagles and T in the Park at Kinross, both occurring in the space of 7 days in July 2005, there were many other occasions when extra effort was required to accommodate special events.

commitment that is clearly evidenced by the performance of last year, the people of Tayside should be greatly reassured that they have a Police Force that always acts in the best interests of its citizens and is constantly seeking new methods of improving the way in which it carries out its duties.

While all these events were policed with the highest degree of professionalism and stretched resources considerably, they did not detract from the everyday policing of our communities and it could be argued that the most rewarding aspect of the past year has been the continual improvement in crime reduction over the whole Force area.

Tayside Joint Police Board is extremely grateful for the manner in which all Police Officers, Special Constables and members of the Support Staff have accepted and met the challenges of the past year, and is proud to continue to support Tayside Police, an organisation that we know is the best Police Force in the best small country in the World.

The year ahead is sure to bring new challenges for everyone in Tayside Police but, with the dedication and

Councillor Colin Young Convener Tayside Joint Police Board

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

CHIEF CONSTABLE JOHN VINE AND FIRST MINISTER JACK McCONNELL

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S FOREWORD TO THE FIRST MINISTER FOR SCOTLAND, TAYSIDE JOINT POLICE BOARD, SHERIFF PRINCIPAL FOR TAYSIDE, FIFE AND CENTRAL AND THE TAYSIDE COMMUNITY WE SERVE, IT GIVES ME GREAT PLEASURE TO PRESENT MY FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT AS CHIEF CONSTABLE OF TAYSIDE POLICE.


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JOHN VINE QPM BA MSc FCIPD CHIEF CONSTABLE

‘IT HAS ALSO BEEN A VERY BUSY YEAR FOR TAYSIDE POLICE OPERATIONALLY. A YEAR THAT HAS SEEN MANY EXCITING CHALLENGES.’

My Annual Report focuses on the achievements and successes of the Force during the last financial year. It has been an extremely busy year for Tayside Police - a year that has seen many exciting challenges and opportunities. Despite the huge task of devising and fulfilling the G8 Summit security operation and at the same time maintaining ‘business as usual’ by policing the communities of Tayside, I am pleased to report that crime has fallen. Every bit of work carried out each day by Tayside Police staff has contributed to an overall crime detection rate for 2005 / 2006 of 57% - an impressive figure given the additional challenges we met. There were 927 reported housebreakings in our Force area last year, a 25% reduction when compared to the previous year. An even more striking contrast is drawn when looking back ten years to the Annual Report of 1995 / 1996. It notes that some 5689 housebreakings were made known to Tayside Police during the time-frame of that report.

We have seen a reduction in the number of people killed or seriously injured on our roads, both adults and children. This is encouraging and officers in our road policing units, together with our road safety officers, will continue to carry out enforcement and awareness activity throughout the next year. Whilst awareness campaigns appear to be working, I am concerned that we still see motorists speeding, not wearing seatbelts and driving whilst under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Tayside Police has been working hard to find out what you want from us and to tackle your priorities, targeting issues such as antisocial behaviour, youth nuisance, vandalism and graffiti – the kind of issues that we know affect your quality of life. Encouragingly the number of reported acts of vandalism has gone down, whilst the detection rate has improved slightly, with the culprits in 31% of all incidents being traced. Reported car crime in Tayside is down by 20%, with over 30% of all incidents being detected. Once again, an impressive result for

Clearly, we have come a long way in preventing and detecting crime. It is testament to the hard work and expertise of Tayside Police staff that this impressive position has been achieved.

the Force.

I have little doubt that this is greatly influenced by the policing style adopted by Tayside Police, with the focus on visible community policing, along with a policy of using intelligence gathering to guide our use of resources.

Penalty Notices for antisocial behaviour for the rest of the

We all agree that one victim of crime is one victim too many and that is why we will concentrate on trying to prevent crime occurring in the first place. The more innovative ways we can find in which to reduce crime and the fear of crime, the better. There has been a slight increase in serious violent crime, but it is important to stress that most reported incidents involve people who are known to each other. That is reflected in the 85% detection rate. Thankfully, the number of stranger crimes is very low.

Tayside Police is an innovative Force and we were delighted to be chosen by the Scottish Executive in 2005 / 2006 to trial Fixed Scottish Police Service. The scheme is already offering an alternative means of dealing with low-level antisocial behaviour and is delivering swift, simple and effective justice, which would also appear to be carrying a deterrent effect. The number of racist crimes reported has increased by 4.4% in the last year, with 84% of incidents detected. The increase in reported crimes is as a result of a heightened awareness in society that all forms of racist behaviour in our communities is unacceptable. Accordingly, members of the public are more confident and willing to report racist incidents. Our work in this important area continues, as does our zero tolerance approach to racist crime.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

‘THE G8 SUMMIT WAS, I AM SURE YOU WILL AGREE, AN EXTREMELY SUCCESSFUL POLICING OPERATION AND ONE, WHICH SHOWED A WORLDWIDE AUDIENCE THE UNRIVALLED PROFESSIONALISM AND DEDICATION OF NOT JUST TAYSIDE POLICE, BUT THE COLLECTIVE BRITISH POLICE SERVICE.’

The number of people caught supplying and in possession of Class A drugs is down on last year, a reflection of the hard work undertaken by the Tayside Police Drugs and Surveillance Unit. They have disrupted the activities of several large illegal drugs operations both within the Tayside area and criminals who travel through our area. By focusing our expertise and making best use of intelligence, we can make drugs less available on our streets, identify and target those people who commit crime to feed their drugs habit. By continuing to recruit the right people and providing them with support and direction I am convinced that the Force will see even more improvements over the next year. This can only be done through effective leadership and, following the retiral of the Deputy Chief Constable Ian Gordon in 2005, there have been changes to the executive team. Assistant Chief Constable Willie Bald was appointed as the new Deputy Chief Constable and Detective Chief Superintendent Iain MacLeod is the new Assistant Chief Constable. Both Willie and Iain have a wealth of policing experience across a range of specialisms that will stand Tayside in good stead. Ensuring public safety and the public’s feeling of safety is paramount and we have done much to achieve this through our focused policing and in association with other agencies and community organisations. We must build upon these solid foundations by working even more closely with all members of the community – the public we serve. We are determined to keep you informed of what we are doing and what we have done for you. Officers have regular contact with local community groups to discuss crime and disorder in their area and what is being done to address it.

The community must have a voice in the way in which we police their neighbourhood and we must be responsive to their wishes and needs. The G8 Summit was, I am sure you will agree, an extremely successful policing operation – one which demonstrated the unrivalled professionalism and dedication of Tayside Police and the British Police Service to a world wide audience. For one week in July 2005 we established a UK Police Force in Scotland, one which was motivated through the collective commitment of those involved and that flourished through the diversity of component parts of eight Scottish Forces and 43 English and Welsh Forces. Different uniforms, different accents, but a common purpose. I never envisaged that an event of this size would be overshadowed by incidents elsewhere. However, what happened on 7 July in London came as an appalling reminder to us all of the continuing challenges we face. This dreadful crime showed us just how the demands on UK policing have changed in recent times. From the way in which I witness Tayside Police officers and staff conduct themselves everyday, I know that the future is in very safe hands. Tayside Police is the best police force in the best small country in the world and I am proud to live and work here.


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TABLE OF STATUTORY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS CATEGORY Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up Serious Violent Crime ~ crimes made known

2004/2005 RESULT

2005/2006 TARGET

2005/2006 RESULT

TARGET ACHIEVED

55.3%

51%

57.5%

YES

675

598

682

NO

Serious Violent Crime ~ % cleared up

88.9%

88%

85%

NO

Domestic Housebreaking ~ crimes made known

1,245

1226

927

YES

Domestic Housebreaking ~ % cleared up

31.7%

32%

28.7%

NO

Drugs: Number of Crimes made known ~

262

200

255

YES

Racist Crime ~ % cleared up

79.7%

88%

84.1%

NO

Car Crime ~ crimes made known

2,816

2732

2238

YES

Car Crime ~ % cleared up

26.9%

25%

30..3%

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ a) Number of people killed/seriously injured

349

341

298

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ b) Number of children killed/seriously injured

42

46

41

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ c) Number of slight casualties

1,063

1138

1035

YES

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers

4.6%

4.7%

4.5%

YES

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - b) Support Staff

4.8%

4.7%

5.3%

NO

Complaints ~ per 100 Employees

11.6

13

14.3

NO

999 Calls

88.9%

90%

90.6%

YES

Reports sent to the Procurator Fiscal within 28 days

63.2%

80%

64.9%

NO

Reports sent to the Children’s Reporter within 10 days

84.2%

80%

84.3%

YES

supply, possession with intent etc. (04/05 Class A only)

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

G8 - EYES OF THE WORLD ON TAYSIDE WHEN PRIME MINISTER TONY BLAIR ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 2004 THAT THE 2005 G8 SUMMIT WOULD BE HELD AT GLENEAGLES HOTEL IN PERTHSHIRE, IT CAME AS NO SURPRISE TO TAYSIDE POLICE CHIEF CONSTABLE JOHN VINE.


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GLENEAGLES HOTEL- THE G8 SUMMIT VENUE

COMMUNITY OFFICER WHITE STOPS TO TALK TO A LOCAL RETAILER

When Prime Minister Tony Blair announced in June 2004 that the 2005 G8 Summit would be held at Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire, it came as no surprise to Tayside Police Chief Constable John Vine.

A five-mile air exclusion zone was placed around the Auchterarder area for the duration of the Summit. The only exception being made to two police helicopters equipped with state-of-the-art technology, including a new secure digital down link system, which was used to relay pictures and video clips to officers on the ground.

The Force had been working on the security project for some six months beforehand, with overall responsibility for the massive security operation that was to take place. Indeed, Mr. Vine was at the 2004 Sea Island Summit to see how the Americans managed the event and to hear Prime Minister Blair make the big announcement. When the leaders of eight of the World’s most powerful nations arrived at Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire to discuss issues from macroeconomic management to relations with developing countries, energy, terrorism and human rights, everything had to run smoothly. First of all, there was the issue of security to consider, having the Presidents and Prime Ministers of France, the US, Germany, Britain, Japan, Italy, Canada and Russia in one place at the same time. As it transpired, the policing operation surrounding the G8 Summit was of a scale not seen before in the UK. For the first time, a UK Police Force was established in Scotland, made up of nearly 11,000 officers – about 5,000 from the eight forces in Scotland and 6,000 from the 43 forces of England and Wales. The three aims were to ensure a secure Summit, to facilitate peaceful protest and to minimise disruption to local people. Planning began 18 months before the Summit with a small core of about 20 Tayside officers. A 10-week public order training programme was held in the Strathclyde area in the months leading up to the summit and 3,500 officers attended. A security fence measuring five and a half miles long and six feet tall, constructed from 10,000 wire mesh panels, was erected around the Gleneagles Hotel and grounds in the days before the eight world leaders arrived. The officers – who had leave cancelled for the two weeks around the Summit – were backed up by a vast array of equipment. More than 2,500 vehicles, including cars, coaches, 4x4s, quad bikes and bicycles, were used. There were 200 dogs, 60 horses, and even an airship fitted with CCTV available for use. CCTV cameras were strategically positioned to give extensive coverage in and around the venue.

In addition to the secure digitally encrypted Airwave communications systems used by officers, 900 mobile phones – on top of those already issued by individual forces – were issued to officers. Over 10,000 meals a day were provided and more than 9,400 beds were booked across Scotland for police officers and staff on duty at the event. G8 IN THE COMMUNITY The community counts – that was the clear message from Tayside Police at the outset of the massive planning operation. The people who live and work in Auchterarder and the surrounding area had to be kept informed and reassured every step along the way. A dedicated team of G8 police liaison officers was established for that very task – producing newsletters, up-dating a specially designed G8 web-site, holding police surgeries, and attending regular community meetings. An innovative way of getting the latest up-dates out to the community was achieved by a special phone messaging system called VIP Speakeasy Informer. The G8 liaison officers would record a voicemail and select the group of people who they wanted to receive the message such as community leaders or representatives of groups such as Neighbourhood Watch. Tayside Police also produced a video and DVD to brief local residents and businesses. Televisions were installed in four local shops to show the five-minute production. The briefing video could also be downloaded from the G8 web-site. The local community would be seeing a massive police presence in the area and, for the first time, the presence of police horses deployed in the area. With this in mind, Tayside Police asked colleagues at Strathclyde’s Mounted Branch to join them on a visit to meet with primary pupils at the Community School of Auchterarder. This gave the children the opportunity to see the horses at close quarters and to provide them with an insight into the type of work that Mounted Branch undertake.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

OVER 6000 POLICE OFFICERS FROM ENGLAND AND WALES ASSISTED WITH THE MASSIVE SECURITY OPERATION AT THE G8 SUMMIT


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THE DUNCAN OF JORDANSTONE STUDENTS VISIT CHIEF CONSTABLE VINE

AN OFFICER KEEPS WATCH AT THE G8 SUMMIT

‘INTELLIGENCE’ LED DESIGN

TAYSIDE POLICE HOST RUSSIAN DELEGATION

A group of Masters of Design students from Duncan of Jordanstone Art College, part of the University of Dundee, helped Tayside Police in the planning stages for the Summit by designing a series of posters highlighting the need for intelligence information. The posters were prominently displayed throughout Tayside Police and across the United Kingdom.

A high-ranking delegation from Russia, the 2006 hosts of the G8 Summit, visited Tayside Police in February 2006 to draw on Tayside Police’s experiences of planning and policing a G8 World Leader’s Summit. The Russian officials joined senior officers for a dinner aboard RRS Discovery in Dundee before a visit to Tayside Police Headquarters in Dundee for a detailed insight into the planning and policing operation. The group then travelled to Gleneagles Hotel to discuss the efforts that went into staging the event and the wider implications and opportunities of hosting a G8 Summit.

CHIEF CONSTABLE JOINS CONGREGATION AT G8 SERVICE In May 2005 Menzieshill Church in Dundee welcomed Chief Constable John Vine at a special G8 service focusing on world poverty. Sergeant Dave Sutherland, himself an auxiliary Minister at Menzieshill Church and a member of the G8 planning team, assisted the Reverend Harry Brown in taking the service. A SAFE AND SECURE G8 SUMMIT Despite nearly 6000 protesters descending on Auchterarder for the G8 Alternatives march, throughout the duration of the Summit only 99 arrests were made in the area for a variety of public order offences. The vast majority of protesters demonstrated peacefully and it was a hard core group of protesters who disrupted the organised march and breached the agreed route. They were met with the full force of the law – public order trained officers were helicoptered into the area and deployed along a stretch of the outer cordon to bolster security. They were assisted by a team of dog handlers and mounted officers. As a result, a number of these protesters were arrested. In total 18 police officers were injured during the G8 Summit, although none seriously. And, probably as a result of the high police presence in the Tayside area, crime actually fell 9.7 per cent (807 fewer crimes) in April, May and June, compared to the same period the year before. G8 COMMEMORATIVE BADGE CHARITY BOOST Over £6000 raised through the sale of badges that were specially commissioned to commemorate the G8 World Leader’s Summit was donated to the Children’s Hospice Association Scotland.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006


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MOUNTED BRANCH OFFICERS VISIT THE CHILDREN AT THE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF AUCHTERARDER

FROM DUNNING TO DOWNING STREET

A GROUP OF VERY ‘SPECIAL’ SPECIALS

Tayside Police’s G8 Liaison Officer, Constable Fraser White, made a special trip from Dunning to Downing Street in the run up to the G8 Summit. Constable White delivered a special report containing the thoughts and findings of the Dunning Summit, dubbed D8, an event organised by the community to hear first hand from 20 ordinary people from 10 African nations about the issues affecting their countries. Fraser said,

In August 2005 a group of Special Constables from Central Division were presented with a team award in recognition of the excellent service they provided during the G8 Summit. The award was presented by Chief Superintendent Ian Alexander, who said,

‘‘ It was an honour to undertake the journey for the community of Dunning and their guests – to deliver their declaration to No.10. The D8 Summit was a tremendous example of how the issues at the heart of the G8 World Leaders Summit have prompted local people to seriously consider issues affecting people in other parts of the world.’’

G8 PRESS CONFERENCE

‘‘Their support, commitment, dedication and professionalism ensured that the high standard of service delivery was maintained within the Division during a period of unprecedented demand. The Special Constables displayed loyalty and devotion to duty, bringing credit to themselves and to Tayside Police.’’

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

WORLDWIDE PRAISE THE SUCCESSFUL OPERATION BROUGHT PRAISE FROM AROUND THE WORLD

I

wanted to write to thank you and all the officers concerned for the arrangements put in place for the G8 Summit at Gleneagles. I appreciate how much extensive planning and hard work went into this event and I should be grateful if you would pass on my personal thanks to everyone involved. Thank-you. Tony Blair, Prime Minister.

“ “ T

“ “

ayside Police did a great job in preparing for and policing the Summit itself. It was a great week for Scotland on the world stage. The excellent performance of the police fully met all the challenges of the rapidly changing circumstances. You showed that you are both very good at forward planning and at responding to emergency situations. Cathy Jamieson, Minister for Justice, Scottish Executive.

I

n addition to being the single most highly visible meeting of the world’s most powerful leaders, the G8 is a focus for countless thousands of individuals and groups who wish to influence the event. Planning for every possible eventuality, protecting the world leaders, the local community and the demonstrators themselves is a policing problem of rubik cube complexity. I am delighted that your officers met all of these challenges and did so under the acetylene glare of the world’s press. In doing so the image and reputation of Tayside Police is of the highest order.

Ron Scrimgeour, Vice Convener, Tayside Joint Police Board.

A

n event traditionally associated with scenes of major disorder was policed in a manner that upheld the right to a peaceful protest, minimised disruption to local communities and avoided any significant impact on the important work underway at Gleneagles. Perhaps, most impressive of all was the way in which the preparations and commitment of key personnel helped mould police officers from all parts of Great Britain into a single, highly professional and effective unit. You can take pride in the achievement of Tayside Police.

“ T

he Community Councillors of Earn Community Council would like to congratulate Tayside Police for successfully undertaking such a massive policing and public relations exercise in Perthshire during the G8 Summit. This must have been a very challenging and exhausting as well as a professionally rewarding for your Tayside Police Force.

“ “ “

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Charles Clarke, Home Secretary.

M

y role requires me to work alongside many forces across the UK and few, if any, have been as easy and professional to work with as Tayside.

PJ, Metropolitan Police.


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“ “ “ T

“ I

he work ethic and professionalism displayed by personnel from Tayside Police served as an example for other police services that are preparing for major events.

Superintendent Pat Hayes, Ottowa Police Service, Canada.

“ “ “ “ “

A

s a resident of Auchterarder I would just like to send a short note of thanks on how wonderful the police have dealt with the situations throughout the G8 summit at Gleneagles. The conduct and attitude of all of the police has been outstanding and has helped us all feel much more secure through the whole experience. Thank you. HC. Auchterarder.

J

ust a wee note to thank all the police, security and administrators who were involved in the G8 Summit. I was on the march through Auchterarder on the Wednesday and felt very safe and proud to go on my first ever peace march. MG.

write to congratulate you and your officers on the exemplary way the operation to protect the G8 Summit was conducted. It was obvious that the successful planning led to decisive action being taken at critical moments throughout the operation. The restraint and humanity shown by all the officers involved in very difficult circumstances was admired and applauded by all right minded people concerned with our community safety. SM, Dunkeld.

T

hank-you for providing reassurance in terms of security for the Japanese Prime Minister and his delegates during the G8 Summit. Despite all of the challenges you have faced in the run up to the event, your officers have indeed taken all the necessary precautions and executions very professionally. Chief Superintendent Toshiaki Shirai, First Secretary, Embassy of Japan.

“ “ W

e would like to thank you for the superb policing operation in our area in the months leading up to and during the G8 Summit. We also commend the friendly attitude of police officers who were looking after our safety. IM, Auchterarder.

O

ne always received a cheery greeting at the remote road junctions, we missed their presence when they finally left! Thank-you for your vigilance. KJS, Crieff.

“ “ “ A

s a resident of Auchterarder I would like to take the opportunity of thanking all of the police personnel who were in and around the town during the G8. In all cases they were courteous, helpful, and prepared to spend time dispelling rumours.

T

“ “

DHL, Auchterarder.

he residents of the town were most impressed with the courtesy given at all times, and the friendly attitude of all the officers – horses and dogs included! The very minimal disruption caused in the town, and the excellent behaviour of the genuine, sincere protesters was as a result of the firm, fair no nonsense approach taken by the police. Auchterarder and District Rotary Club.

A

s a resident of Auchterarder I feel I must write and thank-you very much indeed for all the police support and safety measures and all your organisation of a safe G8. The police officers involved are a credit to your organisation. LM, Auchterarder.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

CENTRAL DIVISION POLICING THE CITY OF DUNDEE

Policing in any city involves a diverse range of issues including nuisance, disorder, vandalism, drugs misuse, thefts and traffic problems, and Dundee is no exception. Tayside Police work in partnership with Dundee City Council, statutory, voluntary and public bodies to find long term and sustainable solutions to the problems our communities may face. Officers in every policing section in Dundee, along with specialist departments operating across the Force area, aim to provide a high quality service making Dundee a safe place in which to live, work and visit.

COMMUNITY INTELLIGENCE UNIT

WEST BAY NURSING HOME FIRE

The overall strategy of the unit is to share intelligence, produce problem profiles, participate in the co-ordination and tasking of resources, and evaluate and measure the outcomes.

On 11 May 2005 Tayside Police were called to a fire at West Bay Nursing Home in Broughty Ferry. Officers assisted with the evacuation of 40 elderly residents and staff members. The skill and professionalism displayed by the emergency services who attended at the scene ensured that all residents were successfully rescued.

In a bid to tackle antisocial behaviour and improve the flow of community intelligence between Tayside Police and its partners, the Community Intelligence Unit, formed in 2004 and incorporating a link officer seconded from the Dundee City Council Anti Social Behaviour Unit, has made a significant contribution in co-ordinating and tasking the resources of all partners to address identified problems.

During the last year, in conjunction with the unit, Dundee Anti Social Behaviour Team succeeded in obtaining antisocial behaviour orders for three of the areas top 10 offenders. Work is


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DOG HANDLERS REGULARLY USED DUNDEE'S CAIRD HALL AS A SEARCH TRAINING VENUE FOR POLICE DOGS

currently ongoing with partners to develop procedures that will enable the powers for granting anti-social behaviour orders on conviction to be fully utilised. In January 2006 the first antisocial behaviour order against a young person under the age of 16 was granted. The decision to apply for an order against the individual was taken due to the difficulties they were causing in the community, despite the efforts of a number of services that were provided to help them change their antisocial behaviour. Protocols with a number of the larger Housing Associations in Dundee have proved an effective means of sharing information on problem tenants, with several antisocial behaviour orders being granted as a result. Community Wardens now number 28 in Dundee supported by 5 senior Community Safety Wardens and a day Senior Warden who attends daily morning meetings with the Community Intelligence Unit to discuss antisocial problems and determine tasks for the community safety wardens. The wardens have become a valued part of crime prevention and provide assistance to the police to deal with antisocial nuisance on a daily basis. FUTURE FUNDING TO TACKLE ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR IN THE CITY Tayside Police in Central Division have secured future funding to tackle antisocial behaviour through funding from the Scottish Executive. This includes funding for an extra mobile CCTV unit driver, funds to continue the work of the Community Intelligence Unit, and to employ a link officer between the Community

Intelligence Unit and the Dundee Anti Crime Network (DUNCAN) scheme. Funding has also been secured to create a dedicated Police antisocial behaviour hot-spot team that will be operational in the city from April 2006. CHILD’S PLAY THE ROAD SAFETY WAY Primary school pupils in Dundee have been trying out a new play mat designed to promote road safety. The Road Safety Mats have been provided to all primary schools in the city, courtesy of funding provided by Dundee City Council. The mats are a fun way of reinforcing road safety messages to young children and are used in conjunction with the Tayside Police Walkwise pedestrian training scheme, which has seen children who walk to and from school issued with high visibility vests. SAFETAYSIDERS Pupils from schools across Dundee once again learned how to become a SafeTaysider in September 2005 by taking part in a series of special scenarios set up by the emergency services and public utilities. Each scenario was designed to test the reactions of children and to educate them as to what they should do when faced with a number of different situations. The children were met with a number of challenges including fire safety, assisting an injured casualty, water safety, Internet safety, farm and countryside safety, home safety, road safety, and the dangers of taking drugs. SafeTaysiders has been running in Dundee for over 11 years now and has seen thousands of Primary 7 children learn how to deal with potentially dangerous situations.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

COMMUNITY FIRE SAFETY OFFICER SCOTT BRICKNALL AND CONSTABLE COLIN MILNE UNDERTAKE JOINT PATROLS IN THE HILLTOWN

NEW MEASURES TO TACKLE FOOTBALL DISORDER

PROMOTING COMMUNITY SAFETY IN THE HILLTOWN

Tayside Police, Dundee United Football Club, Dundee Football Club and their respective supporters associations formalised an information exchange protocol in October 2005 aimed at tackling those individuals who cause disorder at football fixtures. The protocol allows Tayside Police and the Clubs to exchange information on those arrested and charged for offences related to football disorder. On receipt of the information Clubs may take action against offenders in addition to any criminal proceedings. This can include banning those individuals from attending future matches.

Tayside Police and Tayside Fire Brigade joined forces in the Hilltown area of Dundee as part of a drive to promote and enhance community safety in the area. Constable Colin Milne, the Better Neighbourhood Services funded officer, and Community Fire Safety Support Officer Scott Bricknal, visited the children at Rosebank Primary to talk to the children about starting fires and the consequences of being caught. Both Colin and Scott regularly patrol the Hilltown area identifying potential crime and fire hazards. As part of their community safety programme they have been visiting every school in the area.

TRAVEL SAFE SCHEME In August 2005, following a number of incidents where bus drivers were being subjected to assaults, officers in Dundee issued crime prevention advice and ‘spit kits’ to drivers to allow them to gather immediate evidence should any incident occur. The scheme has already seen an improved detection rate for assaults on public transport and a reduction in the fear of crime experienced by passengers. In further support of this a protocol was also developed to enable access to footage from the CCTV cameras fitted in buses operating in the City was readily available. This has shown significant benefit in assisting with the detection of individuals who commit crime or indulge in antisocial behaviour on the bus network. Similar procedures have been introduced in regard to making effective use of the images captured via the new bus shelters installed within the City.

As part of his ongoing Better Neighbourhood Services Fund work, Constable Colin Milne also distributed free door alarms to all residents who live in sheltered housing accommodation in the Hilltown. BEST BAR NONE In December 2005, Central Division contributed funding towards a Best Bar None scheme being promoted by the highly successful Dundee Anti-Crime Network, otherwise known as DUNCAN. The scheme is designed to encourage the city’s licensed premises to aspire to and achieve even higher standards for their customers in the future and aims to reward and recognise pubs and clubs which go the extra mile to promote social responsibility and customer safety. A main aim of the scheme is to reduce crime and public order offences associated with licensed premises. The scheme is supported by Diagio and co-ordinated by Dundee City Council in association with Tayside Police, Tayside Fire & Rescue and the Scottish Business Crime Centre.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

OFFICERS ON PATROL IN DUNDEE CITY CENTRE

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

AN OFFICER ON PATROL IN BRECHIN STOPS TO CHAT TO A YOUNGER MEMBER OF THE COMMUNITY

EASTERN DIVISION POLICING ANGUS

In an area of just 850 square miles Eastern Division provides an operational policing function across Angus, an area that takes in the towns of Arbroath, Brechin, Carnoustie, Forfar, Kirriemuir, Monifieth, Muirhead and Montrose, and serves a population of about 105,000 people. During the course of the last year officers in Eastern Division have been responding to local needs and cracking down on antisocial behaviour. The Division has also been proactive in working in partnership with other agencies to tackle a number of other community issues. CARS SEIZED UNDER ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR ACT In October 2005 Eastern Division officers became the first in the Force area to announce the seizure of a car, under the Anti Social Behaviour (Scotland) Act, 2004. Within the space of four weeks, a further three cars came to the attention of officers, relating to

acts of antisocial driving, and those vehicles were also seized. To reclaim their vehicles the owners had to provide proof of ownership and pay a fee of £105 plus a £12 storage charge for every 24-hour period the vehicle was stored. All of the vehicles were seized after the drivers failed to take heed of an initial warning and continued to drive irresponsibly causing annoyance in the community. To date, more than 100 vehicles and drivers throughout Angus have been warned under this new legislation. NEW POLICE POSTS IN ANGUS Following ongoing concerns about youths causing annoyance in Monifieth, Tayside Police appointed the town’s first Youth Issues Co-ordinator. In partnership with Monifieth High School, Constable Peter Fugaccia has been working with local youths to address the issues which have seen some of them becoming


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COMMUNITY LIAISON IS AT THE HEART OF POLICING IN ANGUS

involved in antisocial behaviour. The scheme has provided them with alternative ways to spend their time. The scheme has been so successful that it has since been extended to deal with youth issues in the Carnoustie area. OPERATION DRY-UP In September 2005 police officers seized over 600 litres of alcohol from children and young people in Angus as part of Operation Dry-Up. Officers began the operation in May 2005 by distributing letters to licensees reminding them of their responsibilities. This was followed up with regular visits to licensed premises and off-sales outlets. Acting on intelligence, officers also targeted known drinking dens in every town in Angus and seized alcohol being consumed by persons under the age of 18. Tayside Police have since been liaising closely with other agencies such as Angus Drug and Alcohol Action team to help address the issues of young people abusing alcohol. DRIVING AMBITION FOR ANGUS PUPILS Sixth year pupils at Arbroath High School became the latest students to take part in the Driving Ambition Angus programme. As part of the Angus Community Planning Partnership, in conjunction with the Driver Standards Agency and the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency, Tayside Police introduced Driving Ambition Angus. The scheme aims to encourage young drivers to be responsible, safe drivers and consider their own safety, the legal aspects of Road Traffic Legislation, and the safety of others. To date, over 1000 pupils in Angus have taken part in the scheme. CCTV – A CONTINUING SUCCESS IN ANGUS The Angus public CCTV system throughout the last year has continued to assist in tackling crime, street violence, drink drivers and other community concerns such as litter and dog fouling offences. During the last year CCTV operators in Angus have dealt with over 1200 requests from police officers to review tapes of incidents. In over 50% of these requests, information of evidential value has been gathered allowing officers to identify offenders and detect crime.

OFFICERS TAKE SCENIC ROUTE TO SCHOOL Tayside Police’s Schools Liaison Officers are taking the Scenic routes to schools across Angus thanks to Brechin Renault dealer Mackie Motors. The School Liaison officers regularly visit 70 schools across a wide, mostly rural, area from the coastal towns of Arbroath and Montrose to outlying villages in the glens. The sponsored car means that the officers don’t need to draw on operational police cars, leaving those vehicles available for emergency work. PROTECTING CHILDREN IN ANGUS A protocol to protect children whose lives are being affected by parental drug or alcohol abuse was launched in Angus in 2005. This is one of the first such protocols to be adopted in Scotland and is the result of work carried out by Tayside Police, Angus Child Protection Committee, Angus Drug and Alcohol Action Team, NHS Tayside, and Angus Council. The protocol outlines what the role and responsibilities of professional agencies are, how to decide when children or young people need help, what help pregnant women may need and how to improve partnership working. LETHAM POLICE OFFICE - JOINT WORKING Tayside Police and Angus Council have worked closely to develop a joint facility at Letham Police Office. Formerly staffed by a single police officer, the station and adjoining vacant police house has been renovated to provide office facilities for the Divisional Firearms Enquiry Officers, Community Traffic Wardens, two new Community Wardens, and a police services advisor. This new facility, the first such in Scotland, allows police officers, traffic wardens and community wardens to patrol jointly and extends access to the station to the local community outside normal working hours. An excellent example of partnership working, the facility targets the appropriate resources, in line with the National Intelligence Model, to deal with problems of antisocial behaviour and other community based issues anywhere within Angus.

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WESTERN DIVISION POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

Situated between the Highlands and Lowlands and set in the midst of some of Scotland’s finest countryside, Perth and Kinross lies at the heart of Scotland. The city of Perth forms the hub of the area and is a major retail and business centre strategically situated on main roads and rail links. Perth can be reached by 90% of the population of Scotland in 90 minutes, making it widely and easily accessible. Western Division is responsible for the effective policing of some 2,000 square miles of land and a population base of some 133,000 people.

these communities are important and local officers attend Community Council meetings whenever they can to engage with the public and learn about their concerns. Listening and learning from them is only the beginning, this information has to be turned into action. Some complaints and concerns can be dealt with at a local level and local Inspectors are expected to take ownership of the problem and resolve it either with their staff or with the assistance of the many specialist departments available to them such as Road Policing and CID.

VISIBILITY AND ACCESSIBILITY

T IN THE PARK

Police officers in Western Division are very much part of the community. Perth and Kinross is known as the Big County and Tayside Police recognises the importance of maintaining a visible presence throughout every corner and community. The views of

Each year Western Division hosts the T in the Park music festival at Balado, Kinross. This is the biggest annual music event in Scotland and is second only to Glastonbury in the UK. This year the event took place immediately after the G8 World Leaders


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OFFICERS PATROL THE CAMPSITE AT T IN THE PARK

Summit. The event is a huge policing challenge where thousands of mostly young people come together to form a community in the middle of a large field in Perthshire. Close working relations between the organisers, Tayside Police, and other partners meant that once again the event passed off without serious incident and only a small number of arrests were made. The fact that T in the Park scooped the award for the best UK Festival in 2005 is testament to the organisation of the event. CRIME MANAGEMENT AND INTELLIGENCE UNIT Sometimes the problem identified is not self-contained and cannot be resolved by the local officer alone. This is where the analysts and managers in the Crime Management and Intelligence Unit can assist. Raw data is gathered and developed into intelligence that helps to target resources at the root causes of crime through a series of meetings that have enabled Western Division to drive crime figures down and detection rates up. These processes mean that if you do commit a crime in Perth and Kinross there is a likelihood that you will be caught as officers in Western Division clear up almost 60% of all recorded crime. This fact and a broad range of preventative measures implemented across the area is helping to reduce crime year on year. ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR The Division’s success in reducing volume crime such as housebreaking and car theft has allowed staff to focus on criminality such as vandalism and antisocial behaviour that has such a negative effect on communities. Applying the same analytical approach to this crime which proved so successful with more serious crime will bring benefits. The Division is working in partnership with the Local Authority Wardens and the intelligence analysts to further develop this approach to identify problems and take positive action. Key to this is the visible patrol strategy that deters antisocial behaviour and provides reassurance to the public.

ALCOHOL Perth is a major centre for shopping and increasingly for nightlife. The city provides the economic heart of the area. Every weekend thousands of people are attracted there to enjoy the shops, bars and nightclubs. Tayside Police have a key role in making sure that they can enjoy themselves safely and in a crime-free environment. The changing nature of the city provides a policing challenge that the Division is responding to by putting more high profile uniform officers on the streets when they need to be there. Alcohol can influence people to behave badly and fuel disorder and ultimately violence. This will never be acceptable in Western Division. LICENSING ACTION PLAN It was clear that if the economic success of the night-time economy was to be sustained that a multi agency response would be required. The Community Safety Partnership organised a seminar and developed the Perth City Centre Licensing Action Plan. The Police contribution was Operation Homesafe. OPERATION HOMESAFE In 2004/5 analysts noticed an increase in serious and violent crime. Operation Homesafe was developed to tackle the problem and provide additional security to people using Perth City Centre. Again the tactic employed was to use analysis of the problem to put uniformed officers where they needed to be - on the streets providing reassurance and enforcing the law and nipping in the bud the low-level disorder that had previously led to more serious incidents later in the evening. The approach involved licensees, taxi operators and representatives from the Licensing Board and, as a result, serious and violent crime in the Division was reduced by 20% in 2005/6. Homesafe has now been adopted across Perth and Kinross and continues to produce positive results.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

OFFICERS PATROL ON BIKES

OFFICER ON PATROL IN PERTH CITY CENTRE

CYCLE PATROLS

and other frauds. This builds on strong existing links between Tayside Police and the business community throughout the area that help to reduce crime.

One solution to meeting the demand for visible policing is the introduction of cycle patrols in Perth. Modern lightweight bicycles are available for Community Crime Officers to use during their patrols. These allow them to cover their beats much more quickly and ‘cycle cops’ have become a feature in the residential areas of Perth. They are popular with the public, environmentally friendly and the officers who use them welcome the opportunity to keep fit whilst they go about their duties. PUB WATCH One of the strands of Operation Homesafe was to increase police visibility in pubs and clubs. Officers across the area now visit all pubs and clubs during their patrols and speak to staff and customers. This has proved extremely popular, leaving licensees feeling supported and the customers feeling safer. As a result a Pub Watch scheme has been launched which allows licensees to communicate with the Police and each other at regular meetings and through a ring-round system. Communication has been further enhanced by the extension of the Radio Link system already used by City Centre retailers. This has allowed information to be exchanged so that badly behaved patrons will be refused admission from all the premises in the scheme. BUSINESS CRIME SEMINARS Western Division is always looking for new ways to share information with other agencies and combine resources to maximise their effect. In May 2005 Perth City Centre Management and Tayside Police hosted a business crime seminar in Perth. Representatives from over 60 local businesses met to hear a series of presentations on preventing credit card

BOGUS CALLERS Part of the purpose of helping partners to reduce their chance of becoming victims of crime is to allow resources to be dedicated to protecting the vulnerable in our community. In 2006 analysts identified bogus callers as a developing trend across Perth and Kinross. In this despicable crime people target the elderly by overcharging for shoddy work or gaining access to their houses on a pretext and stealing from them. Tayside Police in Western Division are mounting a campaign to raise awareness of this type of crime and are using high profile road checks to target those responsible and put them out of business. EXPECTING THE UNEXPECTED Planning, preparation and practice are vital elements of modern policing, but we must also expect the unexpected. Too often, that comes in the form of a tragic incident. We witnessed a reduction in the number of road accidents across the Division this year, but there were still fatalities and serious injuries. Hot summer days also resulted in a number of incidents on our rivers. Indeed, in the space of just two days in July, three young men lost their lives in separate incidents on the rivers Tay, Tummel and Ericht. Just days before Christmas, two men died when the helicopter they were in crashed in rural Perthshire. In every instance the officers involved conducted themselves with the utmost professionalism, putting training and experience into practice, whilst being sensitive at all times to the grief felt by those most affected by these incidents.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

CHIEF INSPECTOR ALISON KENNEDY AND CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT CLIVE MURRAY AT A HEADQUATERS DIVISION TASKING MEETING

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION Headquarters Division is responsible for providing the corporate functions on behalf of the Force and covers operationally focused business areas such as Business Change and Improvement, Performance Management, Executive Support, Project Work, Corporate Communications, and Media and Web development. The last year has seen the introduction of several improvements to the way in which Tayside Police does business, in support of the Force’s overall aims and objectives. CHARTER MARK ACCOLADE Tayside Police has again been accredited with the prestigious Charter Mark Award. Charter Mark is the Government’s national standard for excellence in performance and service delivery. It is a registered certification mark, which is owned by the Cabinet Office and falls within the remit of the Prime Minister’s Office for Public Services Reform.

MEDIA SERVICES In the last year Media Services staff have written and posted many hundreds of press releases and appeals for information on the Force website. Independent website rankings regularly put Tayside Police among the top 10 UK police websites for technical accuracy and accessibility. The site is updated several times a day and the emphasis placed on keeping it accurate and up to date at all times is reflected in the growing numbers of people who are regularly visiting the site. July 2005, when the G8 Summit was taking place in the Force area, saw the number of visitors to the website double. In part this was due to the successful trial by Media Services of video on the website. The G8 Community Information video was made available to view online and this proved extremely popular with members of the public. The department has spent the last year marketing the Force web address. It now features on every press release &


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU CHIEF CONSTABLE JOHN VINE IS INTERVIEWED BY TV JOURNALIST MARTIN GEISSLER FROM ITN

appeal, Force stationery, on the sides of Police vehicles, and it is also mentioned on the regular radio bulletin. The Force magazine ‘Copperplate’ is now produced monthly in both electronic format and in hard copy, giving all members of staff the opportunity to read about what's happening in Force. POLICING AND RACE RELATIONS – PROGRESS IN TAYSIDE An independent review of Policing and Race Relations in Scotland in 2005 found Tayside Police to be making real progress in this important area. The Commission for Racial Equality instructed the organisation Law at Work to carry out the independent review following the BBC Documentary ‘The Secret Policeman’. The report recognised the commitment made by the Force to mainstreaming equality and praised the ongoing efforts to improve recruitment of minority ethnic staff. The report also made special mention of the well-established Lay Advisory Group in Tayside which includes members from a wide variety of backgrounds and highlighted the work undertaken by the Tayside Police Racist Incident Multi Agency Panel that provides support for victims of racial harassment. IDEASty Within Headquarters Division, the IDEASt.y. Suggestion Scheme has been a vehicle for a number of quality improvements for the Force. During the course of the last year an idea to supply head torches to aid officers with house searches has been adopted. This will improve officer safety when attending house searches where they have to search in confined and dark spaces, and allows officers to keep their hands free to climb into loft spaces and enhances their ability to see and deal with suspects. BEST VALUE REVIEWS/INTERNAL REVIEWS Throughout 2005/06 the Force completed Best Value Reviews of Fleet Management and Driver Services. This resulted in improvements made to these important areas of business by increasing efficiency and effectiveness. Within Driver Services line management has improved, there is better co-ordination of travel and reduced travelling costs, guaranteed delivery of mail across the Force and a streamlining of duties carried out by drivers. Within Fleet Management a fully accountable and auditable administration system in respect of maintenance of vehicles has been put into place, a purchase process map is available to Divisional Commanders when considering new vehicles and a review of fuel supply arrangements was carried out to identify future costs. All of these quality improvements have been reported to the Audit Sub Committee of the Tayside Joint Branch Board on a quarterly basis. Internal Reviews were carried out on MEDACS the Police Surgeon Service for the Force. As a result of recommendations

another doctor was employed by MEDACS which has resulted in improved doctor response times and extra resilience to deal with those in custody requiring medical attention. A review of CIGNA the Occupational Health provider has resulted in enhanced awareness of their facilities available to allow officers to receive physiotherapy and access to the Health Information/Advice line and a more streamlined referral process. A review of the Force Data Input Bureau resulted in an upgrade to the computers in that area, improved training for staff and an aide memoir for officers using the service. External consultants were used to review the Force Intranet and the Custody area within Central Division. The Intranet Review has resulted in improved governance of the Intranet and a more easily accessible route for staff looking for guidance and policies. The review of the Custody area has improved staffing during the busy periods and led to improvements surrounding health and safety and security. SERVICE IMPROVEMENT PLANS In January 2005 each Department and Division developed Service Improvement Plans aligned to the Force Objectives as part of the ongoing commitment to continuous improvement. This has resulted in numerous improvements for the Force in relation to reducing crime and anti-social behaviour ensuring that the communities of Tayside are safe and feel safe and achieving our standards of service. FINANCIAL EFFICIENCY Business Change & Improvement Department has been recording business benefits in order to fulfil Tayside Police’s statutory obligation to evidence continuous improvement in terms of financial and efficiency savings that accrue year on year as well as quality improvements. As a result of this work, the Force has exceeded its target set by the Scottish Executive with total cash efficiency savings of £323,000. The Force has also saved £709,000 in non-cash releasing savings. Cash releasing savings have included a number of partnership arrangements for the funding of vehicles and equipment, mutual aid for training, reduction in confidential waste and procurement savings. Non cash releasing savings have been generated from externally funded posts, releasing police officers from the court arena, deployment of presumptive testing and the force wide Fixed Penalty Notices pilot. Other quality improvements have been made throughout the Force which has enhanced service delivery and streamlined processes to make the service more efficient.

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A MEMBER OF IDENTIFICATION BRANCH, PHOTOGRAPHIC SECTION AT WORK

HEADQUARTERS CRIME MANAGEMENT Headquarters Crime Management continues to provide a specialist investigative and enforcement capability throughout the Force area. The Department leads on the development of crime policy across a number of high risk areas, in particular the management of sex offenders, child protection issues and vulnerable victims. VISOR - PROTECTING THE PUBLIC Tayside Police joined Forces from across the UK in 2005 by going live with a new computer system that allows officers to share a wide range of information on the country’s most dangerous and violent sex offenders, helping to stop re-offending and protecting the public. The Violent and Sex Offenders Register, or VISOR as it is commonly known, was built by the Police Information Technology Organisation in partnership with police and probation professionals.

SCENE OF CRIME OFFICERS IN THE SPOTLIGHT In November 2005, a special series of television programmes examining the specialist work carried out by Scenes of Crime Officers, featured officers and staff from Tayside Police Identification Branch. The series, which was shown on BBC 1, focused on the reality of crime scene investigation in Scotland from the technology available, to the specialist techniques used to catch criminals. VIPER – VIRTUAL IDENTITY PARADES Tayside Police introduced virtual video identity parades in 2005. This has helped reduce the stress on victims and witnesses identifying accused persons. VIPER uses a national database of volunteers’ images to compile a video line-up. This means that an identity parade can take place anywhere that is best for victims or witnesses.


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OFFICER INVOLVED IN HOUSE SEARCH

DRUGS FOUND ARE ANALYSED AT THE POLICE FORENSIC SCIENCE LAB IN DUNDEE

CHILD PROTECTION

OPERATION PERDITA

In September 2005 a group of 16 Swedish child protection practitioners made a special trip to Dundee on a study visit to Seymour Lodge, the joint police and social work investigation unit, prior to a three-day conference on child investigative interviewing in Edinburgh. Child Protection Officer, Sergeant Dougie Gray, then made the return trip to Sweden where he met with Queen Silvia of Sweden at the official opening of a specialist child protection unit in Linkopen. During his visit Sergeant Gray gave a lecture about the work undertaken in relation to child protection issues in Scotland.

Operation Perdita was an intelligence led enforcement operation in 2005 targeting mainly heroin abuse. The operation was conducted over a three-week period in 2005. During the operation officers searched 83 houses across the Force area, 50 of these searches producing positive results with 123 offences uncovered and 53 people being reported for prosecution. Of the drugs recovered, heroin accounted for 91%

FORCE INTELLIGENCE BUREAU The Force Intelligence Bureau has provided a number of clear intelligence leads during 2005 which have resulted in the disruption of determined criminals who routinely operate throughout Scotland, crossing Force boundaries.

The operation also provided the opportunity for officers to gather information relating to the extent of use of controlled drugs in the Force area, as well as how they are abused. This took the form of a questionnaire that individuals arrested were asked to complete. Whilst the participation in the study was voluntary, the majority of those asked agreed to take part.

DRUG TRAFFICKING – A SERIOUS CRIME INVESTIGATION Specialist officers in Headquarters Crime Management have been involved in a number of serious crime investigations during 2005. These enquiries require first class teamwork and a variety of investigation techniques to evidence criminal activity and link those involved in such activities. During one operation 19 people were arrested for serious offences relating to the supply of controlled drugs and resulted in financial seizures under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2000. A total of 1kilogram of cocaine worth £60,000, 3.5 kilograms of heroin worth £560,000, and other drugs were recovered. A further operation was based on the supply of multi-kilo quantities of Class A controlled drugs, predominantly diamorphine. The trafficking had taken place across several police areas in Scotland. The subjects involved had established extensive criminal networks throughout the Tayside area, which served to distribute heroin. During the course of the operation, six individuals were arrested and reported for serious offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and 3 kilograms of heroin, with a street value of £500,000, was seized. In another operation, following an early morning raid, officers recovered heroin with an estimated street value of £250,000 from a house in Dundee. The same month, officers acting on information received through the national Crimestoppers ‘Drug Dealers Don’t Care’ campaign, recovered heroin worth £40,000 from another house in Dundee. A WEALTH OF INTELLIGENCE WAS RECEIVED AS A RESULT OF THE DRUG DEALERS DON’T CARE CAMPAIGN

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006 DETECTIVE SUPERINTENDENT JIM CAMERON AND CONSTABLE GILL GRANT DISPLAY THE AFTERDARK POSTERS

Although not a scientific study, the results gave a representation of the extent of drug use and the drugs most commonly abused. The questionnaire results were promulgated to other agencies involved in both harm reduction and drugs education. Detective Inspector Campbell McGregor, said, ‘‘ We have had considerable success in disrupting the trade of heroin and cocaine in Tayside, with some very significant recoveries of both these Class A drugs.” ‘‘ Indeed in the last year, we have recovered heroin with a street value in excess of £1 million – the largest amount ever recovered in Tayside in a 12-month period.” ‘‘ But there can be no pause for reflection. As with all serious crime, our attention must always be upon the drug dealing that remains so far undetected.” ‘‘ Our co-ordinated activities are driven by intelligence and any information that we receive from the public can be invaluable in curtailing those who deal drugs in our communities.” This unit also targets housebreakers, people trafficking and other sensitive enquiries, many of which are unsuitable for conventional policing. HARM REDUCTION The Force Drugs Coordinator continues to have a close working relationship with agencies throughout Tayside that are working within the harm reduction field. Intelligence and contacts are built up giving a picture of current drugs prices, purity, weights and health issues amongst other important information. The arrest referral scheme continues to run very successfully throughout the custody suites in the Force area and is regarded as one of the best run schemes in Scotland, regularly attracting visitors looking for assistance in setting up similar projects. During 2005, 1139 clients were seen and 40% of them were referred into treatment services.

DNA EXAMINATION

Needle Exchange is also in place within the three custody suite areas and is run in conjunction with partner agencies. The scheme has been given an overhaul and in 2006, statistics will be provided to the Harm Reduction Centre for future research and direction of clients into treatment services. DRUGS EDUCATION Officers in each division in the Force area deliver talks to primary and secondary schools throughout the school year and, as well as specific drug related talks, opportunities to mention drugs and alcohol issues are raised at every opportunity in citizenship and personal safety talks. OPERATION AFTER DARK In October 2005, to coincide with the changing of the clock and the nights getting darker, Tayside Police once again ran the ‘After Dark’ campaign. This involved high profile policing across all divisions with a view to reducing offence opportunities and detecting offenders. This was achieved by making homeowners aware of home security improvements that they could make to reduce the chances of their home being targeted. It also encouraged them to be good neighbours and report suspicious activity. This has led to a marked reduction in offences in areas that previously suffered from this type of crime and received much positive feedback from the community who were reassured by the police activity. FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE UNIT The Financial Intelligence Unit carries out financial investigations aimed at seizing cash and assets from serious and organised crime groups. Some £109,000 cash and £140,000 asset seizures were made during 2005 and are at various stages in the legal process. The ability to seize cash sums over £5000 is proving to be a particularly effective weapon in the fight against crime. A good example of its use was when two officers stopped a car for a routine check and found over £9000. The occupants, who had


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known drug involvement, were unable to give a satisfactory explanation of their possession of the cash and it was seized and subsequently confiscated by the court. For the second year running, Tayside Police will host a seminar on asset confiscation at Force Headquarters. These events are attended by all Scottish Police Forces, and other agencies including Customs and Excise. SPECIAL BRANCH Special Branch plays a key role in protecting the public from terrorist and other threats. As such, they play a valuable role in promoting public safety and community cohesion. The reality of a terrorist attack became starkly evident in July 2005 when a number of bombs exploded in London. Since then, Tayside Police Special Branch have extended their capability to include a Community Contact Unit, which now operates throughout the Force area. The unit seeks to improve existing community links and has, in many cases, developed new partnerships with our minority ethnic communities. Special Branch Counter Terrorism Security Advisers have worked closely with the Security Service (MI5) throughout 2005 to provide counter terrorism protective security advice to a wide range of stakeholders, including businesses or premises at risk.

OFFICERS RAID A FLAT IN A DRUGS OPERATION

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OPERATIONAL SUPPORT Officers based in the Operational Support Department provide additional support, back-up and specialist expertise to officers across the Force area. This support can be in the form of dog handlers, firearms officers, trained search officers, public order trained officers, accident investigation, or the services of the Tayside Police Search and Rescue Unit. The Force Communications Centre and the Headquarters Road Policing Unit also fall under the Operational Support umbrella. The unit has assisted in many high profile policing operations, enforcement campaigns, and incidents throughout the last year. TAKING THE ROAD SAFETY MESSAGE OUT ON THE ROAD Tayside Police took their seat belt road safety message to the streets of Dundee in November 2005 by way of a hackney cab. The Force took out a one-year deal with Taxi Vision Scotland with the launch of an eye-catching black and yellow cab, which displays a prominent reminder to the public to belt up in the front

and back. Around 1000 people a week who travel in the taxi will also have the opportunity to view the in-cab road safety DVD at the same time. JUNIOR ROAD SAFETY OFFICER SCHEME For the third successive year primary schools in Tayside are electing Junior Road Safety Officers. The national initiative was developed by the Scottish Road Safety Campaign, sponsored by Standard Life Assurance Company, and is supported by Tayside Police and the three Local Authorities. Primary school children become actively involved in road safety measures in the areas local to their homes and schools. Two Junior Road Safety officers are appointed from Primary 6 at participating schools and are responsible for maintaining a road safety notice board, running competitions at their school and giving talks to assemblies or classes on road safety issues. The scheme has been a resounding success with over 200 Junior Road Safety Officers now appointed.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU THE ROAD SAFETY TAXI TAKING THE ‘BELT UP’ MESSAGE OUT ON THE STREETS OF DUNDEE

CONSTABLES LINDSAY WILLIAMS AND NIKKI HARRISON EXERCISE THEIR POLICE DOGS

IN-CAR CHILD SAFETY

EMERGENCY PLANNING EXERCISE

Officers have hosted regular child car seat clinics throughout the last year. The clinics are motivated by a determination to ensure that all child passengers are travelling safely on our roads. Road Safety Officers have been on hand to show members of the public how to fit child car seats correctly and advising on the suitability of seats.

An air crash scenario, designed to test the response of all emergency services, was held at Dundee Airport on 6 November 2005. These exercises are essential in maintaining the readiness of all the services as well as being part of the license requirements for the airport. The air exercise allowed the different agencies involved to test and review their emergency plans.

CRACKING DOWN ON ROAD TAX DODGERS Tayside Police joined forces with the DVLA in May 2005 to run a special operation cracking down on road tax dodgers. The campaign reinforced the message – no tax, no insurance, no conscience – and encouraged members of the public to call the DVLA freephone hotline to report offenders. The DVLA estimates that there are some 11,000 unlicensed vehicles in Tayside, which equates to lost Government revenue of around £1.1 million. The operation saw a number of Tayside motorists learn the hard way why it pays to tax their vehicle. MOBILE PHONE ENFORCEMENT

CONTROL ROOM SKILLS RECOGNISED The Force Contact Centre has introduced a staff skills recognition scheme, a Scottish Qualification Authority personal development award designed to give staff proper recognition for the skills and abilities they have. Accredited through the Scottish Police College, five assessors were trained in November 2005, and there are now a number of Communications Centre staff undertaking the eleven modules needed to attain a full Scottish Vocational Qualification in call handling.

A targeted week long enforcement campaign, cracking down on people who still drive whilst using their mobile phones, took place in the Force area in October 2005. The campaign, which was supported by the Department for Transport, saw a series of radio and television adverts highlighting the consequences of drivers taking their eyes of the road to make a call. FESTIVE ROAD SAFETY CAMPAIGN The month long national festive road safety campaign in Tayside netted 88 drivers for drink driving offences, 282 people were caught not wearing seat belts, and 167 motorists were issued with fixed penalty notices for driving whilst using a mobile phone. A further 427 motorists were caught speeding. SEARCH AND RESCUE UNIT The Tayside Police Search and Rescue Unit has been called out on over 40 occasions during the last year. The 26 officers in the unit have been called upon to search for missing persons, those lost in swimming and canoeing accidents, and to assist a woman who had fallen from the cliffs at Arbroath. However, the majority of the unit’s call-outs have been to search for lost hillwalkers. The largest search operation was for a missing hillwalker in the Glen Lyon area, a search that lasted over three days, in some of the worst weather conditions the team had ever experienced, and over 1600 officer hours were spent searching the area. During 2005 the entire team has recertified for their First Aid certificates and six officers undertook courses on Search Management, Avalanche Awareness and Advanced Winter Training. SEARCH AND RESCUE UNIT ON EXERCISE

37


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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

FIREARMS OFFICERS UNDERTAKE TASER TRAINING AT FORCE HEADQUARTERS

TAYSIDE POLICE - DEVELOPING AND INNOVATING TASER JOINS TAYSIDE ARMOURY

TAYSIDE FIRST FOR FIXED PENALTY NOTICE TRIAL

Tasers were introduced to the Tayside armoury in January 2006. The single shot weapon, which is designed to temporarily incapacitate a subject through the use of an electrical current, is only issued to specially trained firearms officers. Following extensive trials in a number of English Police Forces and significant scientific research, ministerial approval was granted to enable Chief Constables to introduce Tasers.

In April 2005 Tayside Police became the first Force in Scotland to trial the issuing of fixed penalty notices for antisocial behaviour. Since 1 April 2005 officers have had new powers to issue fixed penalty notices for a range of offences committed by offenders aged 16 and over, including being drunk and incapable and breach of the peace. The level of the penalty has been set at ÂŁ40 and once a penalty notice has been issued the recipient must either pay the amount in full or request a court hearing. The trial is already proving successful. It has significantly reduced the amount of time police officers spend completing paper work and attending court, while simultaneously reducing the burden on courts. This has increased the amount of time officers spend policing the streets of Tayside dealing with more serious crime and freeing the courts to deal with more serious offending.

SAFECALL A confidential reporting line has been introduced for the use of all Tayside Police staff to report wrongdoing in the workplace. The line can be used to report everything from a grievance to health and safety issues and corruption. Safecall is a private company staffed by former police officers who provide a 24hour service.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

TESTING THE NEW SECURITY DNA PACKS

SCIENTIST COMPARING SAMPLES

BREAKING NEW GROUND IN SECURITY DNA

Twelve members of staff, from a variety of policing roles, attended a two day certified training course in Level 1 Communication Tactics with Deaf People, hosted by Tayside Association for the Deaf Sound Sense Project, a Scottish charity based in the Wellgate, Dundee.

Leading cash machine system supplier 3Si announced in September 2005 the launch of its security DNA system, a breakthrough in the fight against cash crime. The new Security DNA pack, which was tested and developed by the Police Forensic Science Laboratory in Dundee, has now been rolled out across the Royal Bank of Scotland, Nat West and Ulster Bank banking network in the UK, in a significant step forward to cut crime and protect customers and employees. The new security system uses proven forensic technology to link criminals to the crime scene, stained cash to every single 3Si staining device and stained cash to the original owner. The Security DNA packs will be used to mark cash during a raid or at ATM, pavement or cashin-transit attacks. The new product will also set a new standard or providing irrefutable evidence in court cases. NEW UNIFORM INTRODUCED The Association of Chief Police Officers in Scotland Uniform and Protective Equipment Group has launched a new style of police uniform across Scotland. The new uniform, which was initially trialled by Tayside officers throughout 2005, is designed to be fit for purpose bearing in mind the different weather conditions and types of work that officers are faced with. Officer safety, comfort and visibility were also key factors in establishing a uniform for operational officers in the 21st Century. The most obvious difference between the old uniform and the new, high visibility jackets aside, is that officers are now dressed all in black. For reasons of comfort, operational officers now wear a black T-shirt underneath their body armour and jackets. Officers now wear either a black windproof fleece jacket, or the more traditional high visibility yellow jacket. Operational officers now wear cargo style pants and have patch pockets on the thighs. New body armour to complement the new uniform has also been introduced.

FORCE FIRST FOR FOREIGN OFFICER SECONDMENT Tayside Police played host to two police officers from Germany in March 2006 in a secondment arrangement that provided the visiting officers with a unique insight into Scottish Policing. During their four-week stay they were trained in officer safety and the use of the Force’s radio systems. As well as spending time in specialist departments within the Force, officers Zwetsche and Knauer also undertook beat duties. The secondment opportunity arose when Tayside Police was contacted by the Principal of a Police Academy in Aschersleben, Germany, to request assistance in a professional development programme for German Police Officers. The scheme in place within German Training Authorities is for officers to self-fund a visit to a foreign country and secondment to a local police force. Tayside Police were the only force in Scotland to assist with this project.

DEAF AWARENESS TRAINING A group of Tayside Police officers and support staff were presented with certificates in 2005 for successfully completing a training course in communicating with the deaf. In the course of their daily lives, deaf people are meeting police officers who are unaware of basic skills and tactics for communicating with them. This can lead to frustration and distress on both sides.

OFFICERS ZWETSCHE AND KNAUER WITH CHIEF CONSTABLE VINE

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

TAYSIDE POLICE - INVESTING FOR THE FUTURE AIRWAVE RADIOS INTRODUCED

DVD RECORDING OF INTERVIEWS

A new radio system introduced by Tayside Police in 2005 is already being well received by operational officers. Airwave, a digitally encrypted radio system, offers point to point contact, a text messaging service, complete integration with Communications Centre systems, and enhanced coverage across the Force area. Officers can also use the system to make mobile telephone calls, which means they can spend more time out and about in the community and less time travelling to and from police stations to make calls.

In July 2005 , the Force implemented DVD recording of interviews of suspects/accused as opposed to using videotapes. This move is in keeping with new technological developments, as the equipment to play DVD’s is becoming more widespread than before and courts now have the facilities to play DVD’s.

CENTRALISATION OF CUSTODY CARE AT ARBROATH In early 2006 the new custody suite at Arbroath Police Station was completed. This has included a new public enquiry office, an extension to the existing cell block, and a new charge bar area.

INTRODUCTION OF NEW BODY ARMOUR Officers have been issued with new body armour in April 2006. The armour has a dual protection level, which offers stab and ballistic protection and is lightweight compared to the original body armour.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

41


42

CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

CONSTABLE STEVE KELLY, WINNER OF THE SPAR DUNDEE HALF MARATHON

PROUD OF OUR STAFF MARATHON MAN Constable Steve Kelly, who is based in Dundee, won the Spar Dundee Half Marathon, which was held in the city on Sunday 26 June 2005. Steve finished the run in a time of 1 hour and 19

New Year’s Honours list 2006. Both Deputy Chief Constable Bald and Chief Superintendent Powrie were key figures in the planning operation for the G8 Summit in July 2005. SELFLESS ACTIONS RECOGNISED

minutes, beating nearly 700 other runners. The 35 year old, who was born and brought up in Glasgow, is a former logistics expert

A Tayside Police officer, who put his life at risk to save a woman

in the RAF. It was during his time in the RAF that Steve started

trapped in a van on a railway line, was awarded a Royal Humane

running competitively in both road races and cross-country

Society Testimonial on Parchment. Constable Malcolm Brown, a

events.

member of the Central Division Road Policing Unit, knew that there was a train due on the line and that, if the van was hit, the

QUEEN’S POLICE MEDALS AWARDED

woman would have little chance of surviving. Without delay, he

Deputy Chief Constable Willie Bald and Chief Superintendent

set about rescuing the woman and he managed to prise open the

Brian Powrie were both awarded the Queen’s Police Medal in the

van door just enough for the woman to escape unharmed.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

FRANK BUCHAN WORKS FOR SCOTTISH GAS DURING THE DAY, BUT REGULARLY UNDERTAKES SPECIAL CONSTABLE DUTIES WITH TAYSIDE POLICE IN HIS SPARE TIME

MAKING THE BEST USE OF SPECIAL CONSTABLES

TAYSIDE POLICE PIPE BAND – EUROPEAN SUCCESS

Tayside Police currently has 139 Special Constables who are

Tayside Police Pipe Band came second in a European pipe band

regularly deployed in support of frontline, operational police

competition held in June 2005. The competition, in Banbridge

officers on the streets of Tayside. Every Special Constable who

in Northern Ireland, saw the Tayside team compete against 24

signed up to the new financial reward scheme has undertaken

other bands from throughout Europe.

to work 45 tours of duty, a significant requirement that

COMMUNITY SAFETY DEGREE FOR TAYSIDE SERGEANT

demands considerable commitment from the Specials. Each and every one of them is a credit to the Force.

Sergeant Sandra Williams, who is based in Eastern Division, has completed and passed a MSc in Community Safety through

A SPECIAL CONSTABLE

the University of Leicester. The course was part funded by

Special Constable Vicki Morrison was presented with an award after she rendered first aid to a member of the public who collapsed during the Dundee Half Marathon. Special Constable Morrison provided prompt and effective care and reassurance to the runner who, suffering from dehydration, fell unconscious to the ground and became distressed.

The award was

presented by Chief Superintendent Ian Alexander, Central Division, Divisional Commander. NATIONAL ROLE FOR SENIOR MEDIA OFFICER Sarah Craig, one of the Force’s Senior Media Relations

Tayside Police and Sergeant Williams is the first Tayside officer to hold this qualification. Her dissertation focused on the effectiveness of policing antisocial behaviour in Angus. GAY POLICE ASSOCIATION CO-ORDINATOR In June 2005 Constable Sam McGinnis became the Force Co-Ordinator for the Gay Police Association in Scotland. The GPA in Scotland is part of a UK wide organisation and, through Force Co-Ordinators, aims to ensure equal opportunities for its members as well as provide and effective welfare, support and social networking base that members can make use of as and when they want to.

Officers, has been re-elected as National Secretary of the Association of Police Public Relations Officers. After a year as the Scotland region representative, as the National Secretary of the organisation, Sarah has been an influential figure in developing police media relations.

Recently, Sarah has

worked with the Home Office in London developing the media assessments for senior officers taking part in the Police National Assessment Centre. TOP COP AT SCOTTISH POLICE COLLEGE Constable Gill Grant from Dundee won the prestigious David Gray Memorial Trophy at the Scottish Police College while studying on a Standard Community Safety course. The trophy is awarded to the student who, throughout the course, has consistently demonstrated the highest level of enthusiasm and commitment. The award was presented by Deputy Director of the Scottish Police College, Margaret Barr at a ceremony in June 2005. MARGARET BARR PRESENTS THE TROPHY TO CONSTABLE GRANT

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

CRIME SUPPORT HQ DIVISION

7%

CENTRAL

3%

OPERATIONS

27% 7%

PENSIONS

15% 13% EASTERN

17%

16%

CORPORATE SUPPORT

WESTERN

FINANCIAL INFORMATION HOW POLICING IS FUNDED IN TAYSIDE

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £79.231

within the budget of £79.231 million was 100% grant funding

million for the financial year 2005/2006. After making

provided by the Scottish Executive of £299,000 for specific

adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the

additional Police Officers posts, including ports policing and

budget was in line with the GAE settlement for the force. Most

£119,000 specifically for Airwave Communications System.

of this money comes from central government by way of

The approved budget for 2006/2007 is £81.944 million.

specific police grant paid directly to the Board and from revenue support grant paid to the constituent councils.

The Board also approved a capital investment programme of £2.887 million for 2005/2006. This programme included

Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant

provision to purchase vehicles, laboratory and IT equipment,

earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax.

Airwave Communications System and to carry out building

These however form only a small part of the budget. Included

work throughout the force area.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

STATISTICAL INFORMATION THE MEASUREMENT OF OUR SUCCESS

45


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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

POLICE RANK PROFILE DESIGNATION

ESTABLISHMENT

Chief Constable

1

Deputy Chief Constable

1

Assistant Chief Constable

1

Superintendent

13

Chief Inspector

16

Inspector

45

Sergeant

151

Constable

896

TOTAL

1124

Support Staff

625

Special Constables

159

NOTES 1. The above Police total does not include 24 officers on Central Service 2. The above Police total does not include 7 externally funded posts 3. All Totals are expressed in Full Time Equivalents with the exception of Special Constables. STATISTICAL INFORMATION – CRIME GROUPS TABLE 1 Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Group 1 – Non Sex Cr. Of Violence or Imp.

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05-

Violence against the Person

Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06

Murder

2

3

2

3

1

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

3

5

3

5

Attempted Murder

47

41

47

39

12

9

12

9

23

13

23

13

82

63

82

61

Culpable Homicide

0

2

0

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

2

Serious Assault

117

147

102

123

41

45

37

41

65

55

55

51

223

247

194

215

Robbery (incl attempts)

110

107

75

48

10

7

9

5

45

20

35

14

165

134

119

67

Child Cruelty/Neglect

39

37

39

37

24

19

24

20

12

8

12

8

75

64

75

65

Others

47

37

44

35

10

15

9

13

14

9

14

9

71

61

67

57

TABLE 1

362

374

309

287

99

97

93

90

159

105

139

95

620

576

541

472

Violent Crime has reduced by 44 crimes. That is 44 fewer victims than last year. Some areas do however cause concern. Serious assaults are up, but this rise is almost matched by the reduction in attempted murders. This may imply that assaults are less severe than previous, but there are still too many of them. As reported in previous years, most victims and assailants are known to each other. This clearly does not make the crime any more acceptable but the public should take some reassurance that attacks by strangers are extremely rare. The most significant factor in violent crime is alcohol consumption, often to excess, and the association with the night time economy. Police are working proactively with Licensees to reduce the incidence of these crimes. This has been particularly successful in Western Division and can be attributed in part to Operation Homesafe which ran during the summer months and over the festive period. This type of Police activity will continue. TABLE 2 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 2 - Crimes Involving Indecency

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06

Rape

30

43

36

46

13

22

10

23

11

25

11

24

54

90

57

93

Assault with intent to Rape

5

8

5

8

2

4

2

3

3

4

3

4

10

16

10

15

Indecent Assault

51

68

39

59

26

22

24

18

25

38

21

33

102

128

84

110

Lewd and Libidinous Practices

97

107

116

116

55

29

60

34

37

42

41

45

189

178

217

195

Indecent Exposure

15

19

10

9

7

12

3

12

10

8

7

5

32

39

20

26

Others

30

51

32

52

6

8

8

10

9

13

9

11

45

72

49

73

TABLE 2

228

296

238

290

109

97

107

100

95

130

92

122

432

523

437

512

Crimes involving Indecency have increased (91) but almost 98 % of these crimes are detected and reports submitted to the Procurator Fiscal. Crimes of rape give the greatest concern and reductions in other crimes of indecency are over-shadowed by the increase in Rape. As is the case with other forms of serious crime, the assailant is often known to the victim.


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

TABLE 3 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 3 - Crimes Involving Dishonesty

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Dwelling

920

662

248

150

113

110

52

61

212

155

95

55

1,245

927

395

266

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Non-Dwelling 299

219

70

55

79

122

27

53

110

74

31

21

488

415

128

129

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Commercial

287

286

85

74

126

95

33

37

164

150

73

73

577

531

191

184

Theft by O.L.P. etc.

255

342

110

176

64

103

21

60

231

138

146

45

550

583

277

281

1,144

696

188

100

100

101

26

39

168

141

42

41

1,412

938

256

180

Theft/Att Theft of M.V. (inc TADA)

506

522

200

189

169

123

107

69

170

181

78

104

845

826

385

362

Sec 57/Vagrancy Act etc.

128

139

129

132

33

34

30

28

57

64

57

55

218

237

216

215

4,488

4236

2,187

2333

1,390

1546

677

841

2,205

2066

1,061

1032

8,083

7848

3,925

4206

Theft from Motor Vehicle

273

245

34

51

111

122

33

49

175

107

49

36

559

474

116

136

Reset

58

63

57

63

14

18

14

18

37

29

37

30

109

110

108

111

Embezzlement

8

11

8

8

4

5

3

3

3

8

1

7

15

24

12

18

637

507

580

468

191

167

159

140

265

267

227

220

1,093

941

966

828

157

129

111

92

37

20

30

13

76

40

53

24

270

189

194

129

Theft by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc.

Theft

Fraud Others TABLE 3

9,160 8057 4,007 3891 2,431 2566 1,212 1411 3,873 3420 1,950 1743 15,464 14043 7,169 7045

1421 less crimes of dishonesty. The biggest reductions are seen in Domestic Housebreakings, where 318 less people have had their houses broken into. This reduction is due to a combination of factors including target hardening (making premises, by design, more difficult to break in to), crime prevention advice, intelligence led targeting of criminals, and working closely with the Procurator Fiscal. Similarly, 474 less cars have been broken into. In terms of impact, that represents many people who have not been traumatised by their property being violated. Detection rates have remained fairly consistent. TABLE 4 Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Group 4 - Fireraising, Malicious and

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05-

Reckless Conduct

Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06

Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others TABLE 4

174

137

80

57

56

65

27

36

76

95

36

55

306

297

143

148

3,715

3491

1,040

949

2,009

1784

596

632

2,280

2311

784

775

8,004

7586

2,420

2356

107

107

77

79

42

55

49

74

198

236

152

181

3,996 3735 1,197 1085 2,107 1904

34

47

657

715

2,405 2480

41

55

861

885

8,508 8119 2,715 2685

Vandalism is down. Several hundred crimes have been prevented. This is good news but we can still do better in terms of catching the persons responsible. The continued prioritisation of anti social behaviour will assist in maintaining this downward trend, along with the establishment of a Police Anti Social Behaviour Team, which will target and investigate these crimes, and work in close partnership with other agencies. TABLE 5 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 5 - Other Crimes

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06

Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time

184

163

184

163

73

80

73

80

74

56

74

66

331

299

331

Escape and Rescue

24

23

24

23

20

33

20

33

37

41

37

41

81

97

81

97

Resisting Arrest & Obstructing Constable

193

207

191

210

130

138

130

138

176

213

176

213

499

558

497

561

General Attempts to Pervert

49

83

48

81

55

47

54

47

79

39

79

38

183

169

181

166

Sex Offenders

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,292

832

1,290

848

90

177

90

177

279

317

275

314

1,661

1326

1,655

1339

*Offensive Weapons etc

182

186

181

184

62

74

62

74

115

75

115

75

359

335

358

333

Drugs – Supply, Possession w.i. etc.

282

297

285

301

177

176

177

178

356

279

351

283

815

752

813

762

1,259

1275

1,264

1277

433

497

432

494

916

772

914

773

2,608

2544

2,610

2544

Bail – Fail to keep Conditions

Drugs – Possession

309

Drugs - Others

6

10

6

10

7

5

7

5

7

12

7

12

20

27

20

27

Others

60

55

59

53

25

10

25

10

19

19

18

19

104

84

102

82

TABLE 5

3,531 3131 3,532 3150 1,072 1237 1,070 1236 2,058 1823 2,046 1834 6,661 6191 6,648 6220

The number of persons charged with supplying controlled drugs, or possession of controlled drugs with the intent of supplying, has fallen. It is assessed that this does not necessarily reflect the availability of Drugs, such as heroin & cocaine, in the Tayside communities. Drugs enforcement work, including the arrest of dealers will continue to be a priority. In the past year there have been increased levels of cash seizures, where the monies recovered are undoubtedly the proceeds of drugs dealing. We will continue to attack the finances of Drugs traffickers because this is where it hurts most.

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CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

TABLE 6: GROUPS 1 – 5 TOTALS Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made

Cases with

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases With

Cases Made

Cases with

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Known

Persons Traced

Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05- Apr04- Apr05Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Mar05 Mar06 Group 1

362

374

309

287

99

97

93

90

159

105

139

95

620

576

541

472

Group 2

228

296

238

290

109

97

107

100

95

130

92

122

432

523

437

512

Group 3

9,160

8057

4,007

3891

2,431

2566

1,212

1411

3,873

3420

1,950

Group 4

3,996

3735

1,197

1085

2,107

1904

657

715

2,405

2480

Group 5

3,531

3131

3,532

3150

1,072

1237

1,070

1236

2,058

TOTALS

17,277 15,593 9,283

8703

5,818

5901

3,139

3552

8,590

1743 15,464 14043 7,169

7045

861

885

8,508

8119

2,715

2685

1823

2,046

1834

6,661

6191

6,648

6220

7958

5,088

4679 31,685 29,452 17,510 16934

COMPLAINTS AGAINST THE POLICE – NUMBERS AND DISPOSAL TABLE 7 – COMPLAINTS AGAINST THE POLICE – NUMBERS AND DISPOSAL

2004/2005

2005/2006

Number of complaint cases received during the year

232

291

Number of complaint cases outstanding from the previous year

48

52

Total number of complaint cases to be processed

280

343

COMPLAINT ALLEGATIONS DISPOSED OF DURING THE YEAR AS FOLLOWS: Withdrawn by complainer

6

6

Abandoned due to non co-operation of the complainer

35

8

Found to be unsubstantiated

16

24

Resolved by explanation to the complainer

125

157

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to ‘No Proceedings’ decision

152

140

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to criminal proceedings

4

0

Resulting in action in terms of misconduct regulations

8

2

Resulting in Corrective Advice

7

2

353

339

Reporting to and pending the decision of the Procurator Fiscal

6

14

Still under enquiry by the Investigating Officer

30

21

Pending Court proceedings

0

1

Pending Disciplinary Proceedings

0

0

Otherwise Pending

14

26

TOTAL NUMBER OF COMPLAINT CASES OUTSTANDING AS AT 31ST MARCH AS FOLLOWS:

TOTAL Hours spent in the investigation of complaints

50

62

1,705.5

2,615

TABLE 7 The figure for 2005/06 of 291 saw an increase of 25% from 232 in 2004/05. The number of allegations disposed of this year decreased from 353 to 339. Of these 339 allegations, 57% were either resolved by explanation, withdrawn, unsubstantiated or abandoned. 41% were reported to the Area Procurator Fiscal, none of which have led to criminal proceedings. The number of hours spent in the investigation of complaints increased considerably from 1705.5 in 2004/05, to 2,615 in 2005/06. This was not only indicative of the type of enquiries being undertaken but was also due to the new recording system. This system allows the accurate calculation of the total time spent on all enquiries including time spent on Preliminary enquiries.


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TABLE 8: SICKNESS - NUMBER OF WORKING DAYS LOST 2004/2005 Support Police 5,872 855 Central 2,849 425 Eastern 2,745 689 Western 553 5,266 Headquarters 12,019 7,235 TOTAL 4.60% 4.84% Percentage

2005/2006 Police 5955 2135 2967 813 11,870 4.5%

Support 1027 542 871 5768 8,208 5.3%

This is the sixth consecutive year in which a reduction in working days lost has been reported for police officers and represents a 2.29% improvement since 2001 / 2002. Whilst the number of working days lost has increased slightly for support staff has been attributable to a small number of staff experiencing serious long-term illness. It should however be noted that the Force achieved an improvement on attendance levels for support staff each year from 2001/2002 – 2004/2005.

TABLE 9: AUTHORISATION OF OFFICERS AND ISSUE OF FIREARMS - As at 31 March 2006 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users

59

Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued

5

Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes

10

Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year

8

Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals

0

Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police

0

TABLE 10: RACIST INCIDENTS REPORTS

Central Eastern Western TOTAL

Incidents Reported 2005/2006 2004/2005 221 242 43 69 69 95 333 406

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned 2004/2005 2005/2006 163 187 34 64 63 75 260 326

BREAKDOWN OF TYPES OF INCIDENTS Abuse/Br. of the Peace Vandalism Assault Others TOTAL

2004/2005 274 6 39 14 333

2005/2006 326 31 42 7 406

The rise in the number of reported racist incidents across the Force area is without doubt down to there being a heightened awareness in society about the unacceptability of all forms of racist behaviour within the community. Our work in this important area continues and Tayside Police will continue to adopt a zero tolerance approach to Racist Crime. RACIST INCIDENTS IN CENTRAL DIVISION During the year there were 242 racist incidents reported to the police in Dundee, which was a 9.5% increase from the previous year. Of these reported incidents 77% resulted in the perpetrator being identified and action taken. In a number of other instances the alleged perpetrator was traced but there was insufficient evidence to substantiate any charges against them. The majority of incidents (80%) involved the victims being verbally abused whilst some 10% of reported racist incidents involve assault. Whilst the majority of victims are still from the visible minority ethnic community more instances of individuals being abused because of their country of origin are being reported. Whilst it is recognised that many racist incidents still go unreported members of Dundee RIMAP (Racist Incident Multi Agency Panel) have worked hard within their respective organisations to promote racial awareness and ensure victims of racist crime are supported.

RACIST INCIDENTS IN EASTERN DIVISION It is acknowledged the rise in racist incidents in Angus is due to raised awareness by members of the public who are actively encouraged to report such matters, and who are now more confident and more inclined to report matters to the Police. This is welcomed and it is anticipated it will continue for the foreseeable future as the profile of the problem is raised and more cases are highlighted in the national press and media. The Angus Racist Incident Multi Agency Panel (RIMAP) has embarked on a local programme of raised awareness. For example, it came to our attention that the Angus Chinese Community is not inclined to report racist incidents. As such, members of that community were invited to attend a liason function at DHQ Forfar to raise awarenesss and develop good working relationships. This was a successful event and will be followed up by a half-day awareness raising seminar in June 2006. RACIST INCIDENTS IN WESTERN DIVISION There has been a slight increase in the reporting of racist crime in Western Division. Every allegation is thoroughly investigated and it is likely that perpitrators will be caught (officers clear up 8 out of every 10 crimes reported in Western Division). However, there is a role for all members of the community to play. Those who live in Tayside should celebrate the diverse nature of our communities. We should all make it wholly unacceptable when someone abuses another person simply because they perceive them to be different. We should all insist that every person in our area is shown a basic human respect and for those that choose not to do this then the full force of the law will come to bear.

49


50

CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

TABLE 11 – TABLE OF COMPARISONS – ROAD COLLISIONS AND CASUALTIES 2004/2005

2005/2006

Increase/Decrease

% Change

Total Collisions

1715

1533

-182

-10.6%

Persons Killed

1

7

6

600.0% -16.2%

CENTRAL DIVISION – DUNDEE DISTRICT

Persons Seriously Injured

74

62

-12

Persons Slightly Injured

317

286

-31

-9.8%

OVERALL TOTAL – KILLED AND INJURED

392

355

-37

-9.4%

Total Collisions

1324

1250

-74

-5.6%

Persons Killed

15

7

-8

-53.3%

Persons Seriously Injured

113

75

-38

-33.6%

Persons Slightly Injured

332

348

16

4.8%

OVERALL TOTAL – KILLED AND INJURED

460

430

-30

-6.5%

Total Collisions

1787

1697

-90

-5.0%

Persons Killed

17

13

-4

-23.5%

Persons Seriously Injured

129

135

6

4.7%

Persons Slightly Injured

414

401

-13

-3.1%

OVERALL TOTAL – KILLED AND INJURED

560

549

-11

-2.0%

Total Collisions

4826

4480

-346

-7.2%

Persons Killed

33

27

-6

-18.2% -13.9%

EASTERN DIVISION – ANGUS DISTRICT

WESTERN DIVISION – PERTH & KINROSS

TAYSIDE

Persons Seriously Injured

316

272

-44

Persons Slightly Injured

1063

1035

-28

-2.6%

OVERALL TOTAL – KILLED AND INJURED

1412

1334

-78

-5.5%

TABLE 11 TABLE OF COMPARISONS There has been reduction (7.2%) in the total number of collisions and a reduction (5.5%) in the total number of persons killed and injured from the previous year. However, tragically, 27 persons lost their lives on Tayside roads as compared with 33 persons in the previous year. Each of the three Divisions showed decreases in the number of collisions and in the overall number of persons injured. Within Central Division there was a significant increase in the number of persons killed which was a marked change from several preceding years. Whilst these collisions were unconnected by location and contributory factor, three of these involved elderly pedestrians. All other casualty classes reduced. Whilst Eastern Division showed a small increase in the number of persons slightly injured and Western Division showed a small increase in the number of persons seriously injured, these require to be set against overall reductions in all other casualty categories. Each of these Divisions saw marked reductions in the number of fatalities Tayside Police continues to work in close liaison with local authorities and the Scottish Executive to examine and analyse collision history to consider possible engineering solutions. Education and encouragement alongwith targeted enforcement activities seek to influence road user behaviour and attitudes, thereby enhancing road safety awareness. By comparison with previous years, 2005/6 has seen the lowest number of collisions (4480) and the lowest number of injury collisions (987) across the force area since 1990. The force is therefore maintaining the overall trend to achieve the National Targets set for casualty reduction by 2010.


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TABLE 12 – TABLE OF ROAD USERS KILLED AND INJURED Killed 2005/2006 2004/2005 CENTRAL DIVISION – DUNDEE DISTRICT 1 3 Pedestrians 0 0 Pedal Cyclists 0 0 Motor Cyclists 0 0 Motor Cycle Passengers 0 3 Drivers 0 1 Passengers 1 7 TOTALS

Injured

Totals

2004/2005

2005/2006

2004/2005

2005/2006

115 23 18 0 134 101 391

103 21 20 0 128 76 348

116 23 18 0 134 101 392

106 21 20 0 131 77 355

EASTERN DIVISION – ANGUS DISTRICT Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers TOTALS

1 1 1 1 8 3 15

1 1 1 0 3 1 7

46 28 15 1 228 127 445

36 17 17 1 214 138 423

47 29 16 2 236 130 460

37 18 18 1 217 139 430

WESTERN DIVISION – PERTH & KINROSS Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists

2 0 3

1 1 5

49 18 29

45 19 47

51 18 32

46 20 52

Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers TOTALS

0 6 6 17

0 6 0 13

3 270 174 543

9 254 162 536

3 276 180 560

9 260 162 549

TAYSIDE Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers Passengers TOTALS

4 1 4 1 14 9 33

5 2 6 0 12 2 27

210 69 62 4 632 402 1379

184 57 84 10 596 376 1307

214 70 66 5 646 411 1412

189 59 90 10 608 378 1334

TABLE 12 THE NUMBER OF ROAD USERS KILLED AND INJURED Regrettably there have been increases in the number of pedestrians, pedal cyclists and motor cyclists killed, alongwith increases in the number of motor cyclists and motor cycle passengers injured. It is however encouraging to note that across the force there have been reductions in all other categories of road users injured. During the year there was 1 collision in Western Division involving a passenger carrying vehicle which resulted in multiple casualties with 6 serious injuries and 14 slight injuries. There was also another collision which resulted in a total of 8 casualties with 5 serious injuries. Set against last years figures, which did show a significant reduction, there has been an increase in the number of motor cycle related casualties, particularly in Western Division. Recreational motor cycling continues to expand and the roads within Western Division are extremely popular. Educational and enforcement activities are carried out in conjunction with our neighbouring forces to influence rider behaviour and to encourage riders and their passengers to use our roads in safety. The "Bikesafe" inititiative continues to be supported by Tayside Police and themotor cyclists from the Road Policing Unit engage with riders to enhance their overall awareness and hazard perception. Each participant undertakes an on road assessment of their abilities with the aim of improving their general riding skills. Every encouragement is given to riders to seek advanced training to furtherdevelop their skills. Tayside Police Road Safety Officers, in conjunction with other personnel, are continuously engaged with local authorities, schools and the National Health Service Tayside to provide education, training and publicity to a wide range of road users. Road Safety Education continues to be delivered as children progress from infancy through to secondary school to enhance their awareness as they gain greater independence from their parents and unsupervised access to the roads. This includes the provision of advice and guidance to new parents in respect of in car child safety and the importance of having appropriate and correctly fitted child safety restraints. Childrens Traffic Club Scotland resources are provided to all pre school educators to assist in the delivery of road safety education and parents receive further information when their children progress from nursery to primary school. Pupils in Primary 1, 2 and 3 participate in the "Walkwise" pedestrian training programme which aims to provide the vital road safety educational message in a manner which is fun for the children to be involved in, thereby re-inforcing the learning process. Road Safety Officers, assisted by trained volunteers work within schools to deliver the Tayside Police Cycle Training Scheme for Primary 7 pupils, This provides practical "on road" training for the pupils at an important stage in their own development. Extensive use is made of the Road Safety Scotland resource " Streetsense" which incorporate specific road safety issues into lessons. Several plays with a road safety theme are also delivered to children and these alongwith the encouragement of parents, reinforce the various road safety messages the children learn in the classroom In February 2006 the new interactive teaching resource "Crash Magnets" was delivered to every school and college in the force area. This active learning package is directed at pre/young drivers in the 15/18 year age group and is intended to influence their attitude and behaviour and encourage safe road practices prior to commencing their driving career. The ageing process brings changes that can affect, to various degrees, eyesight, hearing, mobility and reaction time which can develop almost unnoticed. These issues are publicised by roadshows and the "Urban Roadeo" play which is directed at the over 50 age group to increase their awareness.

51


CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

TABLE 13 – FATAL COLLISION PATTERN ~ 1990-2004/05 Number of Fatal Collisions:

60 50

53 44

40

36 34

30

40 40

36 25 26

20

31 29 29

30 29 27 22

10

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

1991

1990

0

Number of Fatal Casualties:

80 70

70

60 50

51

40

42

30

45

50

45

38

36 34 25 28

20

37 30

33 27

25

10 2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

1991

1990

0

TABLE 14 – COLLISION PATTERN ~ 1990-2004/05 Number of Collisions:

2000

1500

1569

1488

1388 1368 1369

1267

1335

1249 1283 1227

1000

1145

1208 1150 994 1047 987

500

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

1991

1990

0

Number of Casualties:

8000 7000 6000

6883 6773 6574 6517 6390

6110 5933 5948 5857 5890 5859

5000

5232 5261

4714 4826

4000

4480

3000 2000 1000 2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1994

1995/96

1993

1992

1991

0 1990

52


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU

HOW POLICING IS FUNDED IN TAYSIDE: BREAKDOWN OF 2006/2007 DEVOLVED BUDGET: Central Division Eastern Division Western Division SUB-TOTAL

£’000 “18,107” “10,727” “13,268” “42,102”

22.10 13.09 16.19 51

Crime Management HQ Division Operational Support SUB-TOTAL

“5,372” “2,193” “5,548” “55,215”

6.56 2.68 6.77 67

Pensions SUB-TOTAL

“12,626” “67,841”

15.41 83

Corporate Support (Balance) TOTAL Approved net revenue budget

“14,103” “81,944” “81,944”

17.21 100 100%

CRIME SUPPORT: Crime Management (Summary) Forensic Lab DNA Lab Records & Stats Data Input Bureau TOTAL

4867 301 -359 175 388 5372

OPERATIONS: Operational Co-Ordinator Force Control Room Airwave HQ RPU TOTAL

1353 3186 536 473 5548

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £81.944 million for the financial year 2006/2007. After making adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the budget was in line with the GAE settlement for the force. Most of this money comes from central government by way of specific police grant paid directly to the Board and from revenue support grant paid to the constituent councils. Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax. These however form only a small part of the budget. Included within the budget of £81.944 million is 100% grant funding provided by the Scottish Executive of £306,000 for specific additional Police Officers posts, including ports policing. The indicative GAE figure for 2007/2008 is £ 83.034 million. The Board has approved a capital investment programme of £2.801 million for 2006/2007. This programme includes provision to purchase vehicles, IT equipment, Airwave Communications System and to carry out building work throughout the force area.

53


54

CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2006

G8 STRATEGIC CONTROL ROOM, FORCE HEADQUARTERS, DUNDEE


TAYSIDE POLICE - HERE FOR YOU


CONTACT INFORMATION Please visit our website at: www.tayside.police.uk If you wish to make any comment about this Annual Performance Report, or require further information, please contact the Head of Headquarters Division by any of the following methods. By writing to:

Headquarters Division, Tayside Police, PO Box 59, West Bell Street, Dundee DD1 9JU

By Telephoning:

(01382) 596802

E-mail:

mail@tayside.pnn.police.uk

Textphone:

(01382) 204500

If you require information on the contents of this document in a community language or large print, please tel: (01382) 596742


Tayside Police Annual Statistical Tables 2005-2006 Group 1 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 1 – Non Sex Cr. Of Violence or Imp. Violence against the Person Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Others Table 1

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

2 47 0 117 110 39 47 362

3 41 2 147 107 37 37 374

2 47 0 102 75 39 44 309

3 39 2 123 48 37 35 287

1 12 1 41 10 24 10 99

2 9 0 45 7 19 15 97

1 12 1 37 9 24 9 93

2 9 0 41 5 20 13 90

0 23 0 65 45 12 14 159

0 13 0 55 20 8 9 105

0 23 0 55 35 12 14 139

0 13 0 51 14 8 9 95

3 82 1 223 165 75 71 620

5 63 2 247 134 64 61 576

3 82 1 194 119 75 67 541

5 61 2 215 67 65 57 472

Violent Crime has reduced by 44 crimes. That is 44 fewer victims than last year. Some areas do however cause concern. Serious assaults are up, but this rise is almost matched by the reduction in attempted murders. This may imply that assaults are less severe than previous, but there are still too many of them. As reported in previous years, most victims and assailants are known to each other. This clearly does not make the crime any more acceptable but the public should take some reassurance that attacks by strangers are extremely rare. The most significant factor in violent crime is alcohol consumption, often to excess, and the association with the night time economy. Police are working proactively with Licensees to reduce the incidence of these crimes. This has been particularly successful in Western Division and can be attributed in part to Operation Homesafe which ran during the summer months and over the festive period. This type of Police activity will continue

Group 2 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 2– Crimes Involving Indecency Rape Assault with intent to Rape Indecent Assault Lewd and Libidinous Practices Indecent Exposure Others Table 2

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

30 5 51 97 15 30 228

43 8 68 107 19 51 296

36 5 39 116 10 32 238

46 8 59 116 9 52 290

13 2 26 55 7 6 109

22 4 22 29 12 8 97

10 2 24 60 3 8 107

23 3 18 34 12 10 100

11 3 25 37 10 9 95

25 4 38 42 8 13 130

11 3 21 41 7 9 92

24 4 33 45 5 11 122

54 10 102 189 32 45 432

90 16 128 178 39 72 523

57 10 84 217 20 49 437

93 15 110 195 26 73 512

Crimes involving Indecency have increased (91) but almost 98 % of these crimes are detected and reports submitted to the Procurator Fiscal. Crimes of rape give the greatest concern and reductions in other crimes of indecency are over-shadowed by the increase in Rape. As is the case with other forms of serious crime, the assailant is often known to the victim.


Group 3 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 3– Crimes Involving Dishonesty Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Dwelling Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Non-Dwelling Th. HB, w.i. & att – Commercial Theft by O.L.P. etc. Theft by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc. Theft/Att Theft of M.V. (inc TADA) Sec 57/Vagrancy Act etc. Theft Theft from Motor Vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others Table 3

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

920 299 287 255 1,144 506 128 4,488 273 58 8 637 157 9,160

662 219 286 342 696 522 139 4236 245 63 11 507 129 8057

248 70 85 110 188 200 129 2,187 34 57 8 580 111 4,007

150 55 74 176 100 189 132 2333 51 63 8 468 92 3891

113 79 126 64 100 169 33 1,390 111 14 4 191 37 2,431

110 122 95 103 101 123 34 1546 122 18 5 167 20 2566

52 27 33 21 26 107 30 677 33 14 3 159 30 1,212

61 53 37 60 39 69 28 841 49 18 3 140 13 1411

212 110 164 231 168 170 57 2,205 175 37 3 265 76 3,873

155 74 150 138 141 181 64 2066 107 29 8 267 40 3420

95 31 73 146 42 78 57 1,061 49 37 1 227 53 1,950

55 21 73 45 41 104 55 1032 36 30 7 220 24 1743

1,245 488 577 550 1,412 845 218 8,083 559 109 15 1,093 270 15,464

927 415 531 583 938 826 237 7848 474 110 24 941 189 14043

395 128 191 277 256 385 216 3,925 116 108 12 966 194 7,169

266 129 184 281 180 362 215 4206 136 111 18 828 129 7045

1421 less crimes of dishonesty. The biggest reductions are seen in Domestic Housebreakings, where 318 less people have had their houses broken into. This reduction is due to a combination of factors including target hardening (making premises, by design, more difficult to break in to), crime prevention advice, intelligence led targeting of criminals, and working closely with the Procurator Fiscal. Similarly, 474 less cars have been broken into. In terms of impact, that represents many people who have not been traumatised by their property being violated. Detection rates have remained fairly consistent

Group 4 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 4– Fireraising, Malicious and Reckless Conduct Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others Table 4

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

174 3,715 107 3,996

137 3491 107 3735

80 1,040 77 1,197

57 949 79 1085

56 2,009 42 2,107

65 1784 55 1904

27 596 34 657

36 632 47 715

76 2,280 49 2,405

95 2311 74 2480

36 784 41 861

55 775 55 885

306 8,004 198 8,508

297 7586 236 8119

143 2,420 152 2,715

148 2356 181 2685

Vandalism is down. Several hundred crimes have been prevented. This is good news but we can still do better in terms of catching the persons responsible. The continued prioritisation of anti social behaviour will assist in maintaining this downward trend, along with the establishment of a Police Anti Social Behaviour Team, which will target and investigate these crimes, and work in close partnership with other agencies.


Group 5 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 5– Other Crimes Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time Escape and Rescue Resisting Arrest & Obstructing Constable General Attempts to Pervert Sex Offenders Bail – Fail to keep Conditions *Offensive Weapons etc Drugs – Supply, Possession w.i. etc. Drugs – Possession Drugs - Others Others Table 5

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

184 24 193 49 0 1,292 182 282 1,259 6 60 3,531

163 23 207 83 0 832 186 297 1275 10 55 3131

184 24 191 48 0 1,290 181 285 1,264 6 59 3,532

163 23 210 81 0 848 184 301 1277 10 53 3150

73 20 130 55 0 90 62 177 433 7 25 1,072

80 33 138 47 0 177 74 176 497 5 10 1237

73 20 130 54 0 90 62 177 432 7 25 1,070

80 33 138 47 0 177 74 178 494 5 10 1236

74 37 176 79 0 279 115 356 916 7 19 2,058

56 41 213 39 0 317 75 279 772 12 19 1823

74 37 176 79 0 275 115 351 914 7 18 2,046

66 41 213 38 0 314 75 283 773 12 19 1834

331 81 499 183 0 1,661 359 815 2,608 20 104 6,661

299 97 558 169 0 1326 335 752 2544 27 83 6191

331 81 497 181 0 1,655 358 813 2,610 20 102 6,648

309 97 561 166 0 1339 333 762 2544 27 81 6219

The number of persons charged with supplying controlled drugs, or possession of controlled drugs with the intent of supplying, has fallen. It is assessed that this does not necessarily reflect the availability of Drugs, such as heroin & cocaine, in the Tayside communities. Drugs enforcement work, including the arrest of dealers will continue to be a priority. In the past year there have been increased levels of cash seizures, where the monies recovered are undoubtedly the proceeds of drugs dealing. We will continue to attack the finances of Drugs traffickers because this is where it hurts most.

Groups 1 – 5 Totals CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Group 1

362

374

309

287

99

97

93

90

159

105

139

95

620

576

541

472

Group 2

228

296

238

290

109

97

107

100

95

130

92

122

432

523

437

512

Group 3

9,160

8057

4,007

3891

2,431

2566

1,212

1411

3,873

3420

1,950

1743

15,464

14043

7,169

7045

Group 4

3,996

3735

1,197

1085

2,107

1904

657

715

2,405

2480

861

885

8,508

8119

2,715

2685

Group 5

3,531

3131

3,532

3150

1,072

1237

1,070

1236

2,058

1823

2,046

1834

6,661

6191

6,648

6220

TOTALS

17,277

15,593

9,283

8703

5,818

5901

3,139

3552

8,590

7958

5,088

4679

31,685

29452

17,510

16934


Group 6 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 6– Other Offences Betting, Gaming and Lotteries Petty Assault Breach iof the Peace Racially Agg. Harassment/Conduct False Calls and Bomb Hoaxes Brokers Children and Young Persons Act Cruelty to Animals (except Dogs) Offences involving Animals and Birds Dogs Act and Orders Explosives and Firearms Fishery Laws Game Laws Deer (S) Act Offences Liquor Laws - Drunkenness Liquor Laws - Licensees Liquor Laws – Other Offences Civic Govt. (S) Act and Similar Provs. Public Health Bicycle Offences Obstruction on Roads and Bridges Trespass Acts, etc Other Group 6 Offences Table 6

Cases Made Known Apr 04Mar 05

0 2,089 2,752 212 18 0 5 0 1 40 29 0 0 0 555 0 31 14 181 59 5 2 691 6,684

Apr 05Mar 06

0 2,151 3,243 197 5 0 2 0 1 29 27 0 0 0 714 10 46 33 150 41 11 2 753 7,415

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

0 1,614 2,752 161 14 0 5 0 0 40 29 0 0 0 555 0 31 14 177 59 5 2 691 6,149

0 1,625 3,243 165 5 0 2 0 1 29 27 0 0 0 714 10 46 33 150 41 11 2 753 6,857

0 991 1,341 40 9 0 4 1 7 31 21 0 9 0 85 4 15 2 58 45 2 11 178 2,854

0 1,109 1,585 61 1 0 8 1 2 41 13 2 2 0 124 13 34 2 42 35 2 21 311 3,409

0 846 1,341 31 6 0 4 1 7 31 21 0 9 0 85 4 15 2 58 45 2 11 178 2,697

0 1,012 1,585 54 1 0 8 1 1 41 13 2 2 0 124 13 34 2 42 35 2 21 311 3,304

1 1,227 1,719 68 33 1 1 1 5 30 32 5 4 0 244 36 38 6 50 10 5 10 235 3,761

0 1,281 2,022 76 3 0 2 3 1 36 29 1 4 0 295 9 20 10 34 3 2 3 265 4,099

1 1,027 1,719 63 32 1 1 1 5 30 32 5 4 0 244 36 38 6 48 10 5 10 235 3,553

0 1,060 2,022 62 3 0 2 3 1 36 29 1 4 0 295 9 20 10 34 3 2 3 265 3,864

1 4,307 5,812 320 60 1 10 2 13 101 82 5 13 0 884 40 84 22 289 114 12 23 1,104 13,299

0 4,541 6,850 334 9 0 12 4 4 106 69 3 6 0 1,133 32 100 45 226 79 15 26 1,329 14,923

1 3,487 5,812 255 52 1 10 2 12 101 82 5 13 0 884 40 84 22 283 114 12 23 1,104 12,399

0 3,697 6,850 281 9 0 12 4 3 106 69 3 6 0 1,133 32 100 45 226 79 15 26 1,329 14,025

Group 7 CENTRAL Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 7– Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles Dangerous and Careless Driving Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 4 Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 5 *Vehicle Excise Act Offences *Speeding in Built-up Areas *Speeding outwith Built-up Areas *Other Motor Vehicle Offences Table 7 *Including Conditional Offers

Cases Made Known

CENTRAL Cases with Persons Traced

EASTERN Cases Made Known

EASTERN Cases with Persons Traced

WESTERN Cases Made Known

WESTERN Cases with Persons Traced

FORCE Cases Made Known

FORCE Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

Apr 04Mar 05

Apr 05Mar 06

381 31 280 517 6,809 593 8,130 16,741

359 35 286 671 4,687 478 7,760 14,276

381 31 280 517 6,809 593 8,130 16,741

359 35 286 671 4,687 478 7,760 14,276

373 23 186 209 442 4,587 4,001 9,821

406 37 213 320 436 4,407 5,222 11,041

373 23 186 209 442 4,587 4,001 9,821

406 37 213 320 436 4,407 5,222 11,041

365 26 209 299 1,074 8,924 7,043 17,940

299 23 230 262 856 11,515 5,814 18,999

364 26 209 299 1,074 8,924 7,041 17,937

299 23 230 262 856 11,515 5,814 18,999

1,119 80 675 1,025 8,325 14,104 19,174 44,502

1,064 95 729 1253 5,979 16,400 18,796 44,316

1,118 80 675 1,025 8,325 14,104 19,172 44,499

1,064 95 729 1253 5,979 16,400 18,796 44,316


Complaints Against the Police – Numbers and Disposal 2004/2005 232

2005/2006 291

48

52

280

343

6

6

Abandoned due to non co-operation of the complainer

35

8

Found to be unsubstantiated

16

24

Resolved by explanation to the complainer

125

157

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to ‘No Proceedings’ decision Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to criminal proceedings Resulting in action in terms of misconduct regulations Resulting in Corrective Advice

152 4 8 7

140 0 2 2

353

339

6 30 0 0 14

14 21 1 0 26

50

62

1,705.5

2,615

Number of complaint cases received during the year Number of complaint cases outstanding from the previous year Total number of complaint cases to be processed Complaint allegations disposed of during the year as follows: Withdrawn by complainer

Total Number of complaint cases outstanding as at 31st March as follows: Reporting to and pending the decision of the Procurator Fiscal Still under enquiry by the Investigating Officer Pending Court proceedings Pending Disciplinary Proceedings Otherwise Pending Total Hours spent in the investigation of complaints The figure for 2005/06 of 291 saw an increase of 25% from 232 in 2004/05.

The number of allegations disposed of this year decreased from 353 to 339. Of these 339 allegations, 57% were either resolved by explanation, withdrawn, unsubstantiated or abandoned. 41% were reported to the Area Procurator Fiscal, none of which have led to criminal proceedings. The number of hours spent in the investigation of complaints increased considerably from 1705.5 in 2004/05, to 2,615 in 2005/06. This was not only indicative of the type of enquiries being undertaken but was also due to the new recording system. This system allows the accurate calculation of the total time spent on all enquiries including time spent on Preliminary enquiries.


Sickness – days lost Number of Working Days lost

Central Eastern Western Headquarters

2004/2005 Police Support 5,872 855 2,849 425 2,745 689 553 5,266

2005/2006 Police Support 5955 1027 2135 542 2967 871 813 5768

Total Percentage

12,019 4.60%

11870 4.5%

7,235 4.84%

8208 5.3%

This is the sixth consecutive year in which a reduction in working days lost has been reported for police officers and represents a 2.29% improvement since 2001/2002. Whilst the number of working days lost has increased slightly for support staff this has been atttributable to a small number of staff experiencing serious long term illness. It should be noted that the Force achieved an improvement in attendance levels for support staff each year from 2001/02 to 2004/05.

Authorisation of Officers and Issue of Firearms As at 31 March 2006 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police

59 5 10 8 0 0


Racist Incident reports

Central Eastern Western Total

Incidents Reported 2004/2005 2005/2006 221 242 43 69 69 95 333 406

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned 2004/2005 2005/2006 163 187 34 64 63 75 260 326

Breakdown of Types of Incidents

Abuse/Br. of the Peace Vandalism Assault Others Total

2004/2005 274 6 39 14 333

2005/2006 326 31 42 7 406

The rise in the number of reported racist incidents across the Force area is without doubt down to there being a heightened awareness in society about the unacceptability fo all forms of racist behaviour within the community. Our work in this important area continues and Tayside Police will contionue to adopt a zero tolerance approach to Racist Crime. RACIST INCIDENTS IN CENTRAL DIVISION During the year there were 242 racist incidents reported to the police in Dundee which was a 9.5% increase from the previous year. Of these reported incidents 77% resulted in the perpetrator being identified and action taken. In a number of other instances the alleged perpetrator was traced but there was insufficient evidence to substantiate any charges against them. The majority of incidents(80%)involve the victims being verbally abused whilst some 10% of reported racist incidents involve assault. Whilst the majority of victims are still from the visible minority ethnic community more instances of individuals being abused because of their country of origin are being reported. This is no doubt down to there being a heightened awareness in society about the unacceptability of all forms of racist behaviour within the community. Whilst it is recognised that many racist incidents still go unreported members of Dundee RIMAP(Racist Incident Multi Agency Panel) have worked hard within their respective organisations to promote racial awareness and ensure victims of racist crime are supported RACIST INCIDENTS IN EASTERN DIVISION It is acknowledged the rise in racist incidents in Angus is due to raised awareness by members of the public who are actively encouraged to report such matters, and who are now more confident and more inclined to report matters to the Police. This is welcomed and it is anticipated it will continue for the foreseeable future as the profile of the problem is raised and more cases are highlighted in the national press and media. In a local context the Angus Racist Incident Multi Agency Panel (RIMAP) has embarked on a local programme of raised awareness. For example - it has been identified the Angus Chinese Community is not inclined to report racist incidents and members of that community were invited to attend a liason function at DHQ Forfar to raise awarenesss and develop good working relationships. This was a succesful event and will be followed up by a half day awareness raising seminar in June 2006. Our work in this important area continues and Tayside Police will continue to adopt a zero tolerance approach to Racist Crime. RACIST INCIDENTS IN WESTERN DIVISION We have seen a slight increase in the reporting of racist crime in Western Division. Whilst this is concerning it may well be that people are more confident in raising these matters. Every allegation is thoroughly investigated and it is likely that perpitrators will be caught (we clear up 8 out of every 10 crimes reported). But there is a role for every person to play, we should celebrate the diverse nature of our communities. We should all make it wholly unacceptable when someone abuses another person simply because they perceive them to be different. We should all insist that every person in our area is shown a basic human respect and for those that choose not to do this then the full force of the law should come to bear.


Table of Comparisons – Road Collisions and Casualties 2004/2005

2005/2006

Increase/ Decrease

% Change

1715 1 74 317 392

1533 7 62 286 355

-182 6 -12 -31 -37

-10.6% 600.0% -16.2% -9.8% -9.4%

1324 15 113 332 460

1250 7 75 348 430

-74 -8 -38 16 -30

-5.6% -53.3% -33.6% 4.8% -6.5%

1787 17 129 414 560

1697 13 135 401 549

-90 -4 6 -13 -11

-5.0% -23.5% 4.7% -3.1% -2.0%

4826 33 316 1063 1412

4480 27 272 1035 1334

-346 -6 -44 -28 -78

-7.2% -18.2% -13.9% -2.6% -5.5%

Central Division – Dundee District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

Eastern Division – Angus District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

Tayside Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

There has been reduction (7.2%) in the total number of collisions and a reduction (5.5%) in the total number of persons killed and injured from the previous year. However, tragically, 27 persons lost their lives on Tayside roads as compared with 33 persons in the previous year. Each of the three Divisions showed decreases in the number of collisions and in the overall number of persons injured. Within Central Division there was a significant increase in the number of persons killed which was a marked change from several preceding years. Whilst these collisions were unconnected by location and contributory factor, three of these involved elderly pedestrians. All other casualty classes reduced. Whilst Eastern Division showed a small increase in the number of persons slightly injured and Western Division showed a small increase in the number of persons seriously injured, these require to be set against overall reductions in all other casualty categories. Each of these Divisions saw marked reductions in the number of fatalities Tayside Police continues to work in close liaison with local authorities and the Scottish Executive to examine and analyse collision history to consider possible engineering solutions. Education and encouragement alongwith targeted enforcement activities seek to influence road user behaviour and attitudes, thereby enhancing road safety awareness. By comparison with previous years, 2005/6 has seen the lowest number of collisions (4480) and the lowest number of injury collisions (987) across the force area since 1990. The force is therefore maintaining the overall trend to achieve the National Targets set for casualty reduction by 2010.


Table of Road Users Killed and Injured Killed 2004/2005

Injured 2005/2006

2004/2005

Totals

2005/2006

2004/2005

2005/2006

Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists

1 0

3 0

115 23

103 21

116 23

106 21

Motor Cyclists

0

0

18

20

18

20

Motor Cycle Passengers Drivers

0 0

0 3

0 134

0 128

0 134

0 131

Passengers

Totals

0 1

1 7

101 391

76 348

101 392

77 355

Eastern Division – Angus District Pedestrians

1

1

46

36

47

37

Pedal Cyclists

1

1

28

17

29

18

Motor Cyclists

1

1

15

17

16

18

Motor Cycle Passengers

1

0

1

1

2

1

Drivers

8

3

228

214

236

217

Passengers

3

1

127

138

130

139

15

7

445

423

460

430

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Pedestrians

2

1

49

45

51

46

Pedal Cyclists

0

1

18

19

18

20

Motor Cyclists

3

5

29

47

32

52

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

3

9

3

9

Drivers

6

6

270

254

276

260

Passengers

6

0

174

162

180

162

17

13

543

536

560

549

Pedestrians

4

5

210

184

214

189

Pedal Cyclists

1

2

69

57

70

59

Motor Cyclists

4

6

62

84

66

90

Motor Cycle Passengers

1

0

4

10

5

10

14

12

632

596

646

608

9

2

402

376

411

378

33

27

1379

1307

1412

1334

Totals

Totals Tayside

Drivers Passengers

Totals


Table of Road Users Killed and Injured (contd.) Regrettably there have been increases in the number of pedestrians, pedal cyclists and motor cyclists killed, alongwith increases in the number of motor cyclists and motor cycle passengers injured. It is however encouraging to note that across the force there have been reductions in all other categories of road users injured. During the year there was 1 collision in Western Division involving a passenger carrying vehicle which resulted in multiple casualties with 6 serious injuries and 14 slight injuries. There was also another collision which resulted in a total of 8 casualties with 5 serious injuries. Set against last years figures, which did show a significant reduction, there has been an increase in the number of motor cycle related casualties, particularly in Western Division. Recreational motor cycling continues to expand and the roads within Western Division are extremely popular. Educational and enforcement activities are carried out in conjunction with our neighbouring forces to influence rider behaviour and to encourage riders and their passengers to use our roads in safety. The "Bikesafe" inititiative continues to be supported by Tayside Police and the motor cyclists from the Road Policing Unit engage with riders to enhance their overall awareness and hazard perception. Each participant undertakes an on road assessment of their abilities with the aim of improving their general riding skills. Every encouragement is given to riders to seek advanced training to further develop their skills. Tayside Police Road Safety Officers, in conjunction with other personnel, are continuously engaged with local authorities, schools and the National Health Service Tayside to provide education, training and publicity to a wide range of road users. Road Safety Education continues to be delivered as children progress from infancy through to secondary school to enhance their awareness as they gain greater independence from their parents and unsupervised access to the roads. This includes the provision of advice and guidance to new parents in respect of in car child safety and the importance of having appropriate and correctly fitted child safety restraints. Childrens Traffic Club Scotland resources are provided to all pre school educators to assist in the delivery of road safety education and parents receive further information when their children progress from nursery to primary school. Pupils in Primary 1, 2 and 3 participate in the "Walkwise" pedestrian training programme which aims to provide the vital road safety educational message in a manner which is fun for the children to be involved in, thereby re-inforcing the learning process. Road Safety Officers, assisted by trained volunteers work within schools to deliver the Tayside Police Cycle Training Scheme for Primary 7 pupils, This provides practical "on road" training for the pupils at an important stage in their own development. Extensive use is made of the Road Safety Scotland resource " Streetsense" which incorporate specific road safety issues into lessons. Several plays with a road safety theme are also delivered to children and these alongwith the encouragement of parents, reinforce the various road safety messages the children learn in the classroom In February 2006 the new interactive teaching resource "Crash Magnets" was delivered to every school and college in the force area. This active learning package is directed at pre/young drivers in the 15/18 year age group and is intended to influence their attitude and behaviour and encourage safe road practices prior to commencing their driving career. The ageing process brings changes that can affect, to various degrees, eyesight, hearing, mobility and reaction time which can develop almost unnoticed. These issues are publicised by roadshows and the "Urban Roadeo" play which is directed at the over 50 age group to increase their awareness.


Fatal Collision Pattern ~ 1990 – 2004/2005 Num ber of Fatal Collisions 60 50 40 30 53 44

20

40 36

40 36

34

31 25

26

1996/ 97

1997/ 98

29

30

29

29

27

22

10 0 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995/ 96

1998/ 99

1999/ 00

2000/ 01

2001/ 02

2002/ 03

2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006

Num ber of Fatal Casualties

80 70 60 50 40 70

30 51 42

20

45

50

45

38

36 25

10

34

28

37 30

33 27

25

0 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995/ 96

1996/ 97

1997/ 98

1998/ 99

1999/ 00

2000/ 01

2001/ 02

2002/ 03

2003/ 04

2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006


Collision Pattern 1990 – 2004/05

Num ber of Collisions

8000

7000

6000

5000

4000

6883

6773

6574

6517

3000

6390

6111

5933

5948

5857

5890

5859 5232

5261

4714

4826

4480

2000

1000

0 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995/ 96

1996/ 97

1997/ 98

1998/ 99

1249

1283

1999/ 00

2000/ 01

2001/ 02

2002/ 03

2003/ 2004

2004/ 2005

2005/ 2006

Num ber of Injury Collisions 1800

1600

1400

1200

1000

800

1569

1488

1388

1368

1369

600

1267

1335

1221

1146

1208

1157 994

1047

987

400

200

0 1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995/ 96

1996/ 97

1997/ 98

1998/ 99

1999/ 00

2000/ 01

2001/ 02

2002/ 03

2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006


Table of Road Users Killed and Injured Killed

Injured

Under 16

16 and Over

Under 16

16 and Over

Pedestrians

0

3

50

53

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

9

12

Motor Cyclists Motor Cycle Passengers

0 0

0 0

0 0

20 0

Central Division – Dundee District

Drivers

0

3

0

128

Passengers

0

1

12

64

Totals

0

7

71

277

0 0

1 1

16 8

20 9

Eastern Division – Angus District Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists Motor Cyclists

0

1

0

17

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

1

Drivers

0

3

0

214

Passengers

0

1

28

110

Totals

0

7

52

371

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Pedestrians Pedal Cyclists

0 1

1 0

24 11

21 8

Motor Cyclists

0

5

0

47

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

2

7

Drivers

0

6

0

254

Passengers

0

0

31

131

Totals

1

12

68

468

Pedestrians

0

5

90

94

Pedal Cyclists

1

1

28

29

Motor Cyclists

0

6

0

84

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

2

8

Drivers

0

12

0

596

Passengers

0

2

71

305

Totals

1

26

191

1116

Tayside


Misuse of Drugs

Drug Heroin Cocaine MDMA (Ecstasy) LSD Psilocybin Amphetamine Powder Tablets Cannabis Resin Herbal Plants Pharmaceuticals Morphine MST Temazepam Dihydrocodeine Steroids Viagra Temgesic Dipipanone Diazepam Nitrazepam Detromoramide Distigesic Codeine Zopiclone Unknown Methadone Linctus Methadone Tablets Total Seizures

Seizures 05 – 06 04 – 05 380 265 191 106 108 138 4 4 4

Weight 04 – 05 7,699.986 grams 2,611.716 grams 3,461.2 tabs 26 tabs 23.203 grams

05 – 06 7784 871 10310 73

134 2

107 5

2,812.482 grams 36

956 6565

28,125 108

14,396 19,686

1,269 163 16

1294 124 26

56,562.296 grams 2,720.274 grams 122 plants

168,563 692 141

161,768 7780 21,350

482,089 1978 24,657

19 4 21 40 3 1 4 2 105 20 1 1 1 1 9 5 1 2339

7 7 7 32 Nil Nil Nil Nil 147 Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil

23.1 703.5 tabs 112 28.2 grams 108 648.51 tabs 1136 1,717.5 tabs Nil 44 tabs Nil 1 tab Nil 174 Nil 20 61,732 21,031.13 Nil 459.077 Nil 1 Nil 32.5 Nil 6 Nil 82 capsules Nil 338.5 409mls 468 mls 1 tab Total Value Detected drugs offences

3,517 4,709 649 859 88 8 435 100 21,031 459 5 16 3 82 169 94 5 £1,704.492 04-05 05-06

6 3857 108 568 Nil Nil Nil Nil 61,732 Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil

2439

Approx. Value (£) 05 – 06 04 – 05 1,299,956 1,285.897 52,261 156,703 30,930 10,384 219 78 70

1,992,443 3,443 3,323


Misuse of Drugs (contd.) The number of detected drugs offences recorded during 2005 – 2006 showed a slight decrease from 3,443 the previous year to 3,323. The street value of drugs recovered has increased from £1,704,492. the previous year to £1,992,443 In line with the National and Force priorities to target Class A drug dealers, Tayside Police Drugs and Surveillance Branch have had another successful year. The value of realisable criminal assets identified and reported to Crown Office for restraint in the past year was £1,226,067. The value of cash seized under the Proceeds of Crime Act in Tayside over the past year was £34,518. Cash seizures cause significant disruption to organised crime groups operating within and outwith the region. The focus of Tayside Police Drugs / Surveillance Branch operations continues to be geared towards the Class A Drugs of Heroin and Cocaine. A number of protracted operations have been undertaken resulting in substantial seizures of Heroin. Two Organised Crime Groups operating in Dundee have been dismantled. One of the operations led to over 30 persons being arrested and convicted with prison sentences of over 88 years being handed down so far. The use of the Class A drug Heroin continues to be common throughout the Tayside Region. There has been a significant rise in seizures of the drug from 265 to 380 over the past year; with just over 7.75 kilos of the drug being recovered this is the highest figure ever recorded for Tayside. The Class A drug Cocaine remains one of the most popular drugs of choice linked with social and so called recreational abuse. As with Heroin there has been an increase in seizures from 106 last year to 191 this year. Intelligence continues to indicate that there is little abuse of Crack Cocaine in the Region. Ecstasy seizures have again dropped this year. This is in line with intelligence on a National basis that the decline is directly linked to the popularity and availability of Cocaine. Intelligence also indicates that Ecstasy manufacturers have to come up with new logos in an effort to compete for a share in the market. Although seizures are down the recoveries of the drug in the past year have increased significantly. This is due to several large seizures one of which was 5,000 tablets. Amphetamine seizures have also dropped. Although the drug remains popular the availability of Cocaine and its relatively low street value has undoubtedly contributed towards this. Cannabis Resin / Cannabis still remains the most popular drug of choice. The trend of house based Cannabis Hydroponics Cultivations continues as it proves to be of better quality than the Resin. Organised Crime Groups have also entered into this market and a large Hydroponics ‘Factory’ was detected and disrupted at a rural location within Tayside. The recoveries of Cannabis Resin has shown a significant increase from the previous year, this is again down to several large seizures one of which was 100 kilos of the drug. The illegal use of prescription drugs continues to be evident across the region. The most popular drug of choice being Diazepam. Opiate users commonly abuse this. Forensic examination of many of the recoveries of Diazepam tablets has found them to be counterfeit or a mixture of other drugs with some Diazepam present. Packaging recovered also indicates the drugs are made abroad and would not be prescribed in this country Tayside Drugs / Surveillance Branch continues to work closely with its partners in the other Scottish Forces and the SCDEA. Close working relationships were also formed during cross border operations with the National Crime Squad who are now part of SOCA. These relationships will continue, and along with our partners in policing we will continue to stem the flow of illegal drugs into Tayside to protect our communities.


Table of Statutory Performance Indicators Category Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up Serious Violent Crime ~ crimes made known Serious Violent Crime ~ % cleared up Domestic Housebreaking ~ crimes made known Domestic Housebreaking ~ % cleared up Drugs: Number of Crimes made known ~ supply, possession with intent etc.04/05 Class A only) Racist Crime ~ % cleared up Car Crime ~ crimes made known Car Crime ~ % cleared up Roads Policing Unit ~ a) Number of people killed/seriously injured Roads Policing Unit ~ b) Number of children killed/seriously injured Roads Policing Unit ~ c) Number of slight casualties Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - b) Support Staff Complaints ~ per 100 Employees 999 Calls Reports sent to Procurator Fiscal within 28 days Reports sent to The Children’s Reporter within 10 days

2004/2005 Result 55.3% 675 88.9% 1,245 31.7% 262

2005/2006 Target 51% 598 88% 1226 32% 200

2005/2006 Result 57.5% 682 85% 927 28.7% 255

79.7% 2,816 26.9% 349 42 1,063 4.6% 4.8% 11.6 88.9% 63.2% 84.2%

88% 2732 25 341 46 1138 4.7% 4.7% 13 90% 80% 80%

84.1% 2238 30.3% 299 42 1033 4.5% 5.3% 14.3 90.6% 64.9% 84.3%

Target Achieved YES NO NO YES NO YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO YES NO YES


Ethnic Origin Profile (as at 31 March 2006) Census 2001 Ethnic Origin White Scottish White English White Welsh White Irish Other White British Other White Background Total White Mixed Total Mixed Indian Total Indian Pakistani Total Pakistani Bangladeshi Other Asian Background Total Bangladeshi/Other Asian Background Chinese Total Chinese Black Caribbean Black African Other Black Background Total Black Other Ethnic Background Total Other Ethnic Background Unknown TOTAL

Tayside Total Workforce Population Scottish Population % % of total population % 1504 73.83 88.09 104 5.11 9 0.44 7 0.34 0.98 61 2.99 7.38 15 0.74 1.54 1700 83.46 98.07 97.99 5 0.25 0.23 0.25 5 0.25 0.23 0.25 5 0.25 0.32 0.30 5 0.25 0.32 0.30 6 0.29 0.51 0.63 6 0.29 0.51 0.63 0 0.00 0.04 2 0.10 0.12 2 0.10 0.21 0.16 1 0.05 0.32 0.32 1 0.05 0.32 0.32 1 0.05 0.04 0 0.00 0.10 0 0.00 0.02 1 0.05 0.15 0.16 0 0.00 0.19 0 0.00 0.19 0.19 317 15.56 2037 100.00 100.00 100.00


Ethnic Origin Profile (as at 31 March 2006) (contd.)

Total workforce includes Police Officers, Special Constables and Support Staff. 317 (15.5%) members of staff have been classified as Unknown as they have chosen not to disclose their ethnic origin, which means that the data on the workforce is based upon those members of staff who have provided this information.

Notes for Tayside Population The data for the three council areas which are Perth & Kinross, Dundee City and Angus have been summarised and are comparable with the Workforce Population and the Scottish Population in the summary total. The summarised ethnic categories include the categories in the 2001 Census.

Notes for Scottish Population The data on White English and White Welsh has been collected by Tayside Police and presented in the above table. Under the information on the Census 2001 for the Scottish Population, the data on White English and White Welsh has been included under the category of Other White British.


Police Rank Profile (as at 31 March 2006) MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

TOTAL

%

FEMALE

%

MALE

%

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

Chief Constable

1

0.08

0

0.00

1

100.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Deputy Chief Constable Assistant Chief Constable

1

0.08

0

0.00

1

100.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

1

0.08

0

0.00

1

100.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Chief Superintendent

6

0.51

0

0.00

6

100.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Superintendent

9

0.76

2

22.22

7

77.78

0

0.00

0

0.00

Chief Inspector

19

1.61

4

21.05

15

78.95

0

0.00

0

0.00

Inspector

53

4.50

5

9.43

48

90.57

0

0.00

0

0.00

RANK

%

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

0

%

Sergeant

159

13.51

13

8.18

146

91.82

0

0.00

Constable

928

78.84

255

27.48

673

72.52

5

0.54

1

0.11

4

0.00 0.43

TOTALS

1177

100.00

279

23.70

898

76.30

5

0.42

1

0.08

4

0.34

Promoted Posts

249

100.00

24

9.64

225

90.36

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

Officers working PartTime

39

100.00

38

97.44

1

2.56

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

Special Constables

158

100.00

50

31.65

108

68.35

6

3.80

1

0.63

5

3.16


Police Rank Profile (as at 31 March 2006) (contd.)

The above figures include: 1 Temporary Superintendent (Male) 1 Temporary Chief Inspector (Male) 3 Temporary Inspectors (Male) 1 Temporary Sergeant (Female) Since March 2005, the number of minority ethnic police officers remains unchanged at 5 (0.42%), with 1 female and 4 male officers. Since March 2005, the total number of female officers has increased by 16 to 279 (23.7%), whilst the total number of male officers has decreased by 23 to 898 (76.3%). The number of promoted posts held by women has increased by 1 to 24 (9.6%), whilst the number of promoted posts held by men decreased by 15 to 225 (90.4%). There are currently 39 (3.3%) police officers within the force who work on a part-time basis. Since March 2005, the number of minority ethnic special constables has increased by 2 to 6 (3.8%), with 1 female special constable and 5 male special constables. Since March 2005, the total number of special constables has increased by 36 to 158. The total number of female special constables has increased by 21 to 50 (31.7%), whilst the total number of male special constables has increased by 15 to 108 (68.4%).


Support Staff Profile (as at 31 March 2006) FEMALE MINORITY

GRADE Chief Officers (CO) Professional (PO) Technical (TE) Administrative (AP) Clerical (GS) Other TOTALS

TOTAL 3 63 69 262 221 84

FEMALE 1 31 32 191 146 59

% 33.33 49.21 46.38 72.90 66.06 70.24

MALE 2 32 37 71 75 25

% 66.67 50.79 53.62 27.10 33.94 29.76

ETHNIC

702

460

65.53

242

34.47

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

0 1 0 2 1 0

% 0.00 1.59 0.00 0.76 0.45 0.00

0 0 1 0 1 0

% 0.00 0.00 1.45 0.00 0.45 0.00

4

0.57

2

0.28

Since March 2005, the number of minority ethnic support staff has increased by 2 to 6 (0.9%), with 4 females and 2 males. Since March 2005 the ratio of female and male support staff remains unchanged with 65% female support staff and 35% male support staff. A total of 25.5% of support staff work on a job-share or part-time basis.


Police Promotions (April 2005 to March 2006)

RANK Constable to Sergeant Constable to Temporary Sergeant Temporary Sergeant to Sergeant Sergeant to Inspector Sergeant to Temporary Inspector Temporary Inspector to Inspector Inspector to Chief Inspector Inspector to Temporary Chief Inspector Temporary Chief Inspector to Chief Inspector Chief Inspector to Superintendent Superintendent to Chief Superintendent Temporary Chief Superintendent to Chief Superintendent Chief Superintendent to Temporary ACC Chief Superintendent to ACC ACC to DCC TOTALS

TOTAL 11 1 2 2 3 2 0 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 30

FEMALE % MALE % 1 9.09 10 90.91 1 100.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 100.00 0 0.00 2 100.00 0 0.00 3 100.00 1 50.00 1 50.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 1 50.00 1 50.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 0 0.00 1 0.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 0 0.00 1 100.00 4

13.33

26

86.67

TOTAL FEMALE MALE MINORITY MINORITY MINORITY ETHNIC % ETHNIC % ETHNIC

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

% 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Between April 2005 and March 2006, 30 police officers were promoted, 4 female officers (13.3%) and 26 male officers (86.7%). There were no minority ethnic officers who were eligible for promotion during this period. Officers who are interested in promotion and who meet the criteria, must make a formal application and go through an assessment process to check competence for the next rank.


Support Staff Promotions (April 2005 to March 2006)

%

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

MALE MINORITY ETHNIC

%

TOTAL

FEMALE

%

MALE

%

TOTAL MINORITY ETHNIC

Sub-Total

0 0

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

PO Grades P04 PO2 PO1-PO2 Sub-Total

1 1 1 3

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

1 1 1 3

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

TE Grades TE1 Sub-Total

1 1

0 0

0.00 0.00

1 1

100.00 100.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

0 0

0.00 0.00

AP Grades AP3 Temporary AP3 AP2-AP3 AP2 AP1 Temporary AP1 GS3-AP1 Sub-Total

1 1 1 2 2 7 1 15

1 1 1 2 2 7 1 15

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

GS Grades GS3 Temporary GS3 Sub-Total

2 1 3

2 1 3

100.00 100.00 100.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

TOTALS

22

18

81.82

4

18.18

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

GRADE Chief Officers Grades


Support Staff Promotions (April 2005 to March 2006) (contd.) Between April 2005 and March 2006, 22 Support Staff were promoted, 18 females (81.8%) and 4 males (18.2%). 9 Support Staff (40.9%) were promoted on a temporary basis during this period. No minority ethnic support staff were promoted into higher graded posts during this period. Support Staff can apply for a higher graded advertised post within the organisation. This involves going through the same recruitment and selection process as any other applicant who does not currently work for Tayside Police.


Police Leavers (April 2005 to March 2006) REASON FOR LEAVING

DEATH IN SERVICE DISMISSALS RESIGNATIONS RETIRALS TRANSFERS TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

0 0 16 39 3 58

0 0 4 1 1 6

% MALE

0.00 0.00 25.00 2.56 33.33 10.34

0 0 12 38 2 52

FEMALE MINORITY

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0.00 0.00 75.00 97.44 66.67 89.66

0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0 1 0 1

0.00 0.00 0.00 2.56 0.00 1.72

%

FEMALE MINORITY

Support Staff Leavers (April 2005 to March 2006) REASON FOR LEAVING

DISMISSALS END OF TEMPORARY CONTRACT RESIGNATIONS RETIRALS TRANSFERS TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

MALE

1

1

100.00

0

19 54 11 1 86

12 33 10 0 56

63.16 61.11 90.91 0.00 65.12

7 21 1 1 30

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

36.84 38.89 9.09 100.00 34.88

0 0 0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0 1 0 0 1

0.00 1.85 0.00 0.00 1.16

%

FEMALE MINORITY

Special Constable Leavers (April 2005 to March 2006) REASON FOR LEAVING

APPOINTED TO REGULARS RESIGNATIONS TOTALS

% TOTAL

FEMALE

2 10 12

0 3 3

MALE 0.00 30.00 25.00

2 7 9

100.00 70.00 75.00

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

%

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00

0 0 0

0.00 0.00 0.00


Police, Support Staff and Special Constable Leavers (April 2005 to March 2006) (contd.) Between April 2005 to March 2006, a total of 58 police officers left the force (6 females, 52 males). 1 minority ethnic male retired from the force. Between April 2005 to March 2006, a total of 86 support staff left the force (56 females, 30 males). 1 minority ethnic male resigned from the force. Between April 2005 to March 2006, a total of 12 special constables left the force (3 females, 9 males). 2 male Special Constables joined the force as Police Officers during this period.


Recruitment (From April 2005 to March 2006) FEMALE MINORITY

POLICE OFFICER Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL 355 50

FEMALE 112 21

% 31.55 42.00

MALE 243 29

% 68.45 58.00

SPECIAL CONSTABLE Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL 98 49

FEMALE 43 25

% 43.88 51.02

MALE 55 24

% 56.12 48.98

MALE MINORITY

ETHNIC

%

ETHNIC

4 0

3.57 0.00

5 1

FEMALE MINORITY ETHNIC

0 0

MALE MINORITY

% 0.00 0.00

FEMALE MINORITY

SUPPORT STAFF Application Forms Received Recruited

TOTAL 3237 113

FEMALE 2069 76

% 63.92 67.26

MALE 1163 37

% 35.93 32.74

ETHNIC

60 1

% 2.06 3.45

ETHNIC

4 2

% 7.27 8.33

MALE MINORITY

% 2.90 1.32

ETHNIC

63 2

FEMALE

% 5.42 5.41

GJIS

53 1.00

% 2.56 1.32


Recruitment (From April 2005 to March 2006) (contd.)

Tayside Police is currently undertaking a full review of recruitment. The outcome of this review is due to be published in June 2006. The recommendations arising from the review will assist in marketing Tayside Police as an employer of choice and ensure it effectively reflects the communities which it serves. Over the past year partnerships have been developed with Careers Scotland, Dundee College as well as continuing to enhance partnerships already established with Jobcentreplus and the Employment Disability Unit.

Police Probationers Interest in joining Tayside Police remains extremely high, with receipt of 355 applications from 31.6% females and 68.4% males. 2.5% of applications received were from minority ethnic applicants. Of those applicants who were successful in joining the force, 42% of new recruits during the period April 2005 - March 2006 were female and 2% of new recruits were from a minority ethnic background. Due to the comprehensive nature of the police officer recruitment process, the length of time taken to complete the process from receipt of application to commencement of probation can be significant and therefore the application may not necessarily have been received during this reporting period but may have been initiated during the period April 2004 - March 2005.

Special Constables 98 applications were received from applicants expressing an interest in joining Tayside Police as a Special Constable. 43.9% of applications were from females and 56.1% were from males. 4.1% of applications were received from applicants from minority ethnic backgrounds. Of those applicants who were successful in joining the force, 51% of those joining as a Special Constable during the period April 2005 -March 2006 were female and 4.1% of new Special Constables were from a minority ethnic background.

Support Staff Of the 3237 applications received between April 2005 and March 2006, 113 individuals were recruited. 3 minority ethnic applicants were recruited during this time. A small number of the applications received for posts advertised are still awaiting appointment. The Recruitment Team are currently looking at ways to increase applications from minority ethnic applicants and applicants with disabilities. Out of the large number of applications received, 5 applicants did not specify their gender and 13 applicants chose not to specify their ethnic origin on the Equal Opportunities Monitoring form.


How Policing is Funded in Tayside BREAKDOWN OF 2006/2007 DEVOLVED BUDGET: Central Division Eastern Division Western Division SUB-TOTAL

£’000 “18,107” “10,727” “13,268” “42,102”

22.10 13.09 16.19 51

Crime Management HQ Division Operational Support SUB-TOTAL

“5,372” “2,193” “5,548” “55,215”

6.56 2.68 6.77 67

Pensions SUB-TOTAL

“12,626” “67,841”

15.41 83

Corporate Support (Balance) TOTAL Approved net revenue budget

“14,103” “81,944” “81,944”

17.21 100 100%

CRIME SUPPORT: Crime Management (Summary) Forensic Lab DNA Lab Records & Stats Data Input Bureau TOTAL

4867 301 -359 175 388 5372

OPERATIONS: Operational Co-Ordinator Force Control Room Airwave HQ RPU TOTAL

1353 3186 536 473 5548

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £81.944 million for the financial year 2006/2007. After making adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the budget was in line with the GAE settlement for the force. Most of this money comes from central government by way of specific police grant paid directly to the Board and from revenue support grant paid to the constituent councils. Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax. These however form only a small part of the budget. Included within the budget of £81.944 million is 100% grant funding provided by the Scottish Executive of £306,000 for specific additional Police Officers posts, including ports policing. The indicative GAE figure for 2007/2008 is £ 83.034 million. The Board has approved a capital investment programme of £2.801 million for 2006/2007. This programme includes provision to purchase vehicles, IT equipment, Airwave Communications System and to carry out building work throughout the force area.

annualreport2005-2006  

05/06 TWOTHOUSAND AND FIVE TO TWO THOUSAND AND SIX CHIEF CONSTABLE’S WWW.TAYSIDE.POLICE.UK CHIEF CONSTABLES ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2005/2...