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C H I E F C O N S TA B L E ’ S ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT

2003-2004 POLICINGWITHVISION SETTINGTHESTANDARD


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Designed and produced for Tayside Police by HB Rutherford & Co. Ltd. www.hbrutherford.com


Table of Contents

TAYSIDE JOINT POLICE BOARD AND FORCE EXECUTIVE .............................................04 FOREWORD........................................................................................................................06

LEAD CONSTABLES............................................................................................................11 SIGN OF A FORCE TO BE RECOGNISED .........................................................................12 BEST VALUE ........................................................................................................................13 PROPERTY SERVICES ..........................................................................................................15 CENTRAL DIVISION ...........................................................................................................16 EASTERN DIVISION ............................................................................................................18 WESTERN DIVISION...........................................................................................................20 HQ CRIME MANAGEMENT................................................................................................22 POLICE FORENSIC SCIENCE LABORATORY, DUNDEE....................................................24 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ........................................................................................25 IDEAS t.y. .............................................................................................................................26 HUMAN RESOURCES AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT ........................................................27 DIVERSITY MATTERS...........................................................................................................28 SPECIAL CONSTABULARY..................................................................................................29 SPECIALIST SUPPORT.........................................................................................................30 FINANCIAL STATISTICS ......................................................................................................33 STATISTICS ..........................................................................................................................34

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

A FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH..................................................................................09


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Tayside Joint Police Board Members CONVENER AND VICE-CONVENERS

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Councillor Colin H Young Convener Perth & Kinross Council

Lord Provost John R Letford JP

Depute Provost Charles D P Farquhar OBE JP DL Vice Convener Dundee City Council

Councillor Ron Scrimgeour Vice Convener Angus Council

Depute Provost Stewart McGlynn

Councillor Ian Mackintosh JP

Councillor Robert G Myles JP

Councillor Jack C Gibb

Baillie Neil I C Powrie JP

Councillor Christina Roberts

Councillor George Regan

Councillor Helen Dick

Councillor Lewis D D Simpson

Councillor Jack Coburn

Councillor H Alan Jack

Councillor David M Scott JP

Councillor James Barrie

Councillor Alexander J Stewart JP


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The Force Executive

Deputy Chief Constable Ian Gordon QPM

Assistant Chief Constable Willie Bald

Director of Corporate Services Doug Cross

Director of Human Resource Services Moira Docherty

Professional Standards Headquarters Division Police Forensic Science Laboratory Wildlife Issues

Central Division Eastern Division Western Division HQ Crime Management Operational Support Force Control Room HQ Road Policing

IT & Communications Legal Services Corporate Property & Support Services Finance

Human Resource Services Staff Development Occupational Health Provider

Convener’s Message The past year has seen Tayside Police leading many initiatives that have greatly improved their service to the communities of Tayside. Some of these are now being adopted nationally and demonstrates the wealth of talent and foresight in the Force. The Chief Constable’s Annual Performance Report, once again, reveals the continuing improvements that Tayside Police has made in many areas of its work. Congratulations to all Police Officers, the Special Constabulary and Support Staff for their achievements in the last year.

Tayside Joint Police Board and Tayside Police will face changes and challenges in the years ahead but I have every confidence that, together, we can continue to make Tayside a safe place to live, work and visit. I would like to thank the Vice-Conveners and the members of the Joint Board for their support, assistance and advice and I look forward to the year ahead.

Councillor Colin Young Convener, Tayside Joint Police Board

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Chief Constable John Vine QPM


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Chief Constable’s Foreword

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“A year ago I stated that Tayside Police was a Force to be reckoned with. It is an assertion that holds as true now as it did then..�

To the First Minister for Scotland, Tayside Joint Police Board, Sheriff Principal for Tayside, Fife and Central Scotland and the Tayside community that we serve, it gives me great pleasure to present my fourth Annual Performance Report as Chief Constable of Tayside Police. It has been a year of tremendous hard work and achievement - a year in which the staff of Tayside Police has displayed great enthusiasm and a determination to deliver a standard of service worthy of recognition. I am proud of their efforts over the last twelve months. Allied to the progress made in previous years, we continue to ensure that Tayside is amongst the safest places to live in the UK. That exemplary commitment and motivation has been reflected in the support of the public, local authorities and partner agencies, as well as the members of the Joint Police Board. A year ago I stated that Tayside Police was a Force to be reckoned with. It is an assertion that holds as true now as it did then. But progress continues apace. Comments and acknowledgement from police forces and other agencies throughout the United Kingdom tell us that the community of Tayside has an aspirational police force that is setting the standards for others to follow. Our work has been co-ordinated and aimed at driving crime down and detection rates up. Without that sharp focus and the support of everyone within the community, we would not have seen the results of the past twelve months. I hope that these results will bring some reassurance to the public, particularly the more vulnerable members of our community. Today, the fear of crime is out of

kilter with the reality of crime. We are exposed to reports of crime incidents far more now than ever before because of the proliferation of media outlets. Alarming headlines, whether about incidents on our doorstep or much farther afield, concern us all and, yes, we must all adopt a certain vigilance to avoid becoming a victim of crime. But to tackle the fear of crime we must view headlines on crime within the context of the entire story. Crime in Tayside is down and detection rates in the area have increased markedly. As individuals we do not run an increased risk of becoming a victim of crime. The overwhelming majority of people in Tayside can live their life without threat or fear. Put simply, there were 774 fewer crimes in Tayside in 2003-2004 than in 2002-2003. At the same time, some 3600 more crimes were solved. There were 12 more serious violent crimes during the year, but such incidents account for a very small proportion of all recorded incidents. Furthermore, in excess of nine out of ten of those crimes were detected. These crimes are few in number and random serious violent incidents are rarer still. Viewed over the longer term, it is encouraging that there were almost 100 fewer serious violent crimes in Tayside last year compared to five years ago. Tackling housebreaking and vehicle crime have been key priorities for Tayside Police. Both are invasive crimes that can leave their victims emotionally devastated. Again the figures are a testament to the hard work and expertise of our officers.


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Chief Constable’s Foreword

That equates to 303 fewer homes being broken into in 2003-2004 and 1500 fewer recorded vehicle crimes. Detection rates are 37.7% (up 11.1%) and 31.9% (up 10.5%) respectively. The small number of recidivists in our community are squarely within our sights. We make no apologies for that, as this tactic has undoubtedly paid dividends in disrupting their behaviour. We are determined that the minority who make others lives a misery are held accountable for their actions. To this end, we continue to work closely with the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service to ensure that rigorous bail conditions are applied and enforced with regard to repeat offenders. Technology and scientific advances ensure that there are fewer hiding places than ever before for those who commit crime. Here in Tayside we have a pragmatic approach to tackling crime based on community engagement and intelligence-led policing. But we also embrace modern developments in information technology and forensic science to equip our staff with the necessary tools to deliver the highest standards of service. The Police Forensic Science Laboratory, Dundee continues to be a leader in its field and is home to the fourth largest DNA database in the world. Its groundbreaking work not only points an unequivocal finger of blame at the offender, it is invaluable in saving hours of police investigative work in eliminating suspects.

During 2003, Tayside Police designed and implemented a new computerised personnel system. Such has been its success, that it has been adopted across Scotland as the model for all Scottish forces. Over the past year, we have been working with Central Scotland Police, Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary and Strathclyde Police to implement SCOPE in the respective forces resulting in all three now having a working version of the system in place. Whilst such advances are of immediate benefit to police staff, they enable a better service delivery to the community as a whole. Tayside Police is a police service for the community. The Tayside Police style, with its emphasis on community policing and the allocation of constables to regular beats is proving to be successful. I am determined that we will continue to make every effort to maximise the role of the uniformed police officer in the community. Community policing is crucial to how we do our business and our success in tackling and, importantly, preventing crime. We cannot afford for our officers to be viewed as outsiders by the public they serve. By allocating constables to regular beats we are aiming to ensure that they are an integral part of that community. Furthermore, we are wholeheartedly committed to an invaluable region-wide programme of community planning with our partner agencies and organisations that underpins our core policing activities. In 2003, Tayside Police introduced the post of Lead Constable which is designed to recognise uniformed beat constables as specialists in their own right. It is a commitment to the officers and the public to retain experienced motivated and highly

valued officers within the community. It is another first for Tayside. Other police forces in the UK are taking notice and many seem set to follow the Tayside trend of appointing Lead Constables. The National Intelligence Model, as well as a robust crime recording strategy, complements our community-led approach perfectly as it helps us to identify our priorities and challenges and then target our resources towards where they are most needed. This approach has assisted us in tackling nuisance crime as well as serious offences. Historically, anti-social behaviour and vandalism have not been treated with the priority they deserve. Times have changed in Tayside and rightly so. We share the Scottish Executive’s commitment to improve people’s quality of life and, in partnership with other agencies, eradicate the menace of wanton destruction and annoyance. As a result of targeted policing and initiatives such as the graffiti database, Tayside has recorded a 4% fall in incidents of vandalism (332 fewer crimes). But given that such offences account for a quarter of all crime in the region, it is an area that will continue to receive attention in the future. Drug abuse and trafficking remains a concern in Tayside, as it does throughout Scotland. While we have made a number of significant arrests within the timeframe of this report, intelligence indicates that heroin use is on the increase once more. Accordingly, we will continue to work along with the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency, other police forces and agencies, with a ruthless determination against those who seek to peddle illicit drugs within our communities.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Housebreaking is down by 21%. Vehicle crime is down by 34%.


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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Chief Constable’s Foreword

As in previous years police staff, have had to both educate road users and enforce legislation in respect driving and road safety. The onerous task of dealing with the aftermath of serious road traffic collisions has also been fulfilled dutifully and professionally on too many occasions. In partnership with our Tayside local authority triumvirate, and the Scottish Executive we introduced the Tayside Safety Camera Partnership in 2003 to assist our efforts in dissuading drivers from speeding and reduce the numbers of people who are killed or injured on our roads. Too many people have been killed as a result of road traffic accidents in Tayside. Figures tell us there was a 5% reduction in the numbers of people killed or seriously injured on our roads and a 30% reduction in child fatalities and serious injuries. All reductions are welcome, but such statistics are always read in the knowledge that lives have been lost and irreversibly changed by the appalling impact of a road accident. Overall I commend the efforts of Tayside Police staff and Special Constables over the past year and the results that their hard work has achieved. 2004-2005 will put many challenges in front of us, with incidents and events of local, national and global significance testing our resolve and our resources to the full. The international threat of terrorism means that no police force can be complacent to events that take place outwith its boundaries, or indeed its country. We must be vigilant, professional and as prepared as possible to ward off any threat to our everyday life.

However, international pressures must not obstruct us in our drive to build on the successes of the last 12 months. Our performance will count for little if it is not sustainable. We have the correct framework in place to ensure that our performance is not only sustainable, but can be improved upon year on year. By managing the present we can sustain the future well being and prosperity of Tayside.


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A Force to be Reckoned With “A ‘Uniform Approach’ to cracking crime in Tayside:

Tayside Police has adopted a policing style that places the emphasis on greater interaction between police officers and the local communities that they serve. This uniform approach, supported by changes to force internal structures and procedures, allows greater community engagement and enhanced visibility which, in turn, impacts on the feeling of safety within the community. Increased focus on intelligence-led foot patrols, through application of the National Intelligence Model (NIM) coupled with an emphasis on a partnership approach to problem-solving, enables the force to best meet the needs of the communities throughout the area.

Recorded crime down 2.5% Tayside Police can best impact on the community’s perception of the level of crime, by being able to report a drop in reported incidents of crime and an increase in detection rates. Recorded crime in Tayside during 2003 to 2004 (April to March) was down 2.5% from 30906 incidents to 30132. The detection of crime in the region for the past twelve months was 55.6%, a considerable improvement on 2002-2003’s recorded detection rate and confirms a longer-term trend of success in this area. A small increase in serious violent crime was reported during the period 2003-2004, with 12 additional incidents made known to police over the course of the previous year. Over the longer term, however, significant reductions have been achieved with almost

100 fewer incidents than the comparable figure five years ago. Detection rates for this crime type further increased by 3.1% yearon-year. The number of drug offences increased from 693 to 796 (up 14.9%) reflecting the focused activity against drug dealers. This effort also helped reduce the availability of drugs which is a key force objective. Results in respect of car crime, housebreaking and vandalism, that normally involve criminal acts against individual members of the community, continue to be encouraging. There were 1127 incidents of domestic housebreaking in 2003-2004, compared with 1430 incidents recorded in 2002-2003. This represents a 21.1% reduction or 303 less houses broken into. Detection rates increased markedly to 37.7% from 26.6% last year.

Car crime dropped by 34.1% from 4440 to 2924, with a substantial increase in detection rates from 21.4% to 31.9%. It is pleasing to report 332 fewer instances of vandalism, a 4% reduction. The 7930 incidents reported in 2003-2004 compares favourably with the 7598 incidents reported the previous year and confirm the ongoing downtrend. Detection rates improved by 8.5%. The reduction in incidence, coupled with improved detection rates, help lessen the inconvenience, anxiety and distress crimes against the individual cause. These excellent results highlight the significant impact the new policing style is having upon crime levels and show the benefit of dedicated staff working closely with partners and local communities.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

A Uniform Approach


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Key Performance Indicators: “A measurement of our success:”

TABLE OF STATUTORY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS CATEGORY

2002/2003

2003/2004

2003/2004

Target

Result

Target

Result

Achieved

42.4%

43%

55.6%

YES

648

597

665

NO

90.4%

91%

92%

YES

Domestic Housebreaking ~ crimes made known

1,430

1,359

1,127

YES

Domestic Housebreaking ~ % cleared up

26.6%

30%

37.7%

YES

Drugs: Number of Seizures

1,455

1,579

1,782

YES

693

707

796

YES

80.4%

82%

84.8%

YES

Car Crime ~ crimes made known

4,440

4,218

2,924

YES

Car Crime ~ % cleared up

21.4%

22%

31.9%

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ a) Number of people killed/seriously injured

340

333

323

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ b) Number of children killed/seriously injured

57

54

40

YES

Roads Policing Unit ~ c) Number of slight casualties

1,202

1,178

1,012

YES

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers

5.3%

5%

4.9%

YES

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Support Staff

5.9%

5%

5.7%

NO

Complaints ~ per 100 Employees

15.2

14

16.2

NO

Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up Serious Violent Crime ~ crimes made known

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Serious Violent Crime ~ % cleared up

Drugs: Number of Crimes made known ~ supply, possession with intent etc. Racist Crime ~ % cleared up

Sustained performance improvement impacted upon the results across the Statutory Performance Indicators and resulted in the detection rate for crime Groups 1 to 5 improving by 13 percentage points on the 2002/2003 result.

The aggressive targeting of a small number of criminals was most successful.

Serious Violent Crime was one of three areas where the Force target was not met. Whilst Serious Violent Crime accounts for only 2% of total recorded crime, Tayside Police takes this kind of crime very seriously indeed and this is reflected in the fact that 92% of the crimes committed were detected.

Trafficking of Drugs in Scotland continues to be given a very high priority. Class ‘A’ drugs in particular are of paramount concern, not only in Tayside but also with the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency and other external partners.

The number of houses broken into in Tayside fell by 21% during 2003/2004 when compared to the previous year.

The Divisions and supporting departments within Tayside Police worked very closely together to combat the activities of groups of travelling criminals.

An improvement in the number of Racist Crimes detected reflects the continuing commitment of Tayside Police to crimes of this nature.

Car Crime was given a high priority across the Force which resulted in 1500 fewer crimes being recorded and an improved detection rate of 31.9% ~ a 10.5 percentage point improvement on the 21.4% recorded at the end of 2002/2003. Overall, a reduction in road casualties throughout Tayside was encouraging. A decrease in the number of days lost through sickness was recorded both for Police Officers and Support Staff. Complaints against all Police staff rose from 15.2 in 2002/2003 to 16.2 in 2003/2004.


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Lead Constables

Lead Constables

Setting the Standard

Tayside Police has introduced the post of Lead Constable.

Lead Constables in Tayside have to be flexible in terms of where they will work within the force area and they will assume responsibility for actively promoting standards of service. The officers themselves have been chosen for a number of different reasons including their track record, their ability to work using their own initiative, and for having a good sickness absence record. They will also be vital to the development of probationary constables, projecting a positive image both inside the organisation and outwardly to the general public. This year the force has appointed 109 Lead Constables with the intention being to introduce more Lead Constable posts over the course of the next two years.

All forces as part of a UK-wide police pay and conditions review, are required to implement a Special Priority Payment Scheme for designated posts, with responsibility for allocation devolved to local forces. There are strict limits on both the overall financial resources that can be allocated under the Scheme and the number of officers who may receive a payment.

Front-line operational officers In an innovative approach, Tayside Police has aligned the scheme with achievement of Force Objectives. The majority of the available finance for the scheme has been directed at front-line, uniformed officers who will perform the role of Lead Constable in each of the three geographical divisions of Tayside Police. The position was created to aid the development of a career path for Constables, and to recognise the valuable job they perform within the community.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“...‘Leading’ the way in Tayside:”


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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Sign of a Force to be recognised

Raising Visibility

New Signs

Tayside Police is at the heart of a drive to raise visibility of the Scottish Police Service and make it easier for members of the public to find police stations.

Tayside Police, along with Fife Constabulary and Strathclyde Police were the first to improve visibility at their premises following a recommendation in a report by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary. All Scottish Forces will in time, follow the lead taken by installing illuminated signs which feature the chequered design of the police hat.

A Uniform Approach The signs will become instantly recognisable and present a uniform approach to letting people know where they can find a police station. Forces across England have already shown interest in the ‘branding’ and details have been sent to 43 Constabularies. The Roads Authority in Scotland has already started using the logo on road signs.


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Best Value

Tayside Police is developing a more holistic approach to Best Value which is designed to demonstrate our effectiveness in fulfilling our commitment to continuous improvement and providing user focused cost effective services. This approach is not limited to Service Reviews and the Force consider it important to capture other evidence of Best Value such as innovation in the development and use of IT systems, effective use of cash limited revenue and capital resources, collaborative arrangements with other forces, partnership arrangements with local authorities and use of innovative schemes such as IDEASty. It is the Force’s intention to capture this ongoing work in each of these areas to present to the Joint Police Board, public and inspecting bodies evidence of how the Force is achieving Best Value, most likely in the format of a Best Value Achievement Report. The priorities for the Force are reflected in the Force Objectives and in 2004/2005 the Force will undertake one or two strategic reviews aligned to these objectives. In addition to annual Policing Plans the Force prepares a strategic plan covering a longer period. The current plan covers a four year period which is due for renewal in 2005. Greater emphasis has been placed on performance management and over a number of years the Force has embraced a performance management culture. This culture is supported by the production of a monthly Performance Profile which is widely circulated to managers and staff throughout the Force. The Performance Profile provides monthly and cumulative performance information, force targets and comparative information for previous years. In addition it provides commentary on the salient messages emanating from the figures.

The performance figures are discussed at the Operational Commanders monthly meetings, Force Executive meetings and performance is a key topic at the Force Management days during which future years’ objectives are discussed. The holistic approach to Best Value adopted by the Force places less emphasis on the number of Service Reviews carried out in the year in favour of fewer strategic reviews which are aligned to the Force Objectives. Terms of reference for reviews therefore will be designed with a view to assisting the Force in meeting its objectives. The terms of reference are agreed by the Best Value Group and then submitted to the Force Executive for approval. On completion of a review, an action plan is produced, incorporating the recommendations, action(s) to be taken, a responsible officer(s) and implementation date(s). Once approved by the members of the Force Executive and Best Value Steering Group, these plans are subsequently

monitored on a regular basis by the Inspection Team, Continuous Improvement Unit and progress updates are provided to elected members. Whilst this demonstrates the extent to which specific actions have been implemented and what they have achieved, they do not identify overall improvements in the service. The introduction of the aforementioned Best Value Annual Achievement Report will seek to bridge this gap, providing evidence of sustainable development. In previous years the Force has published information on its standard of performance in accordance with the guidance issued by the Accounts Commission. The Force welcomes the opportunity to develop its Public Performance Reporting without such constraints and is currently considering a more suitable vehicle for publication of performance and best value information to the public. It is likely that the publication will draw from the Best Value Achievement Report.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Seeking Continuous Improvement”


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Best Value

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

In 2003, a self-assessment process was initiated using the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model in order to further demonstrate our commitment to continuous improvement. Workshops were held within each of the Force’s operational divisions and Headquarters Crime Management. At this time, strengths and areas for improvement were identified by staff and an action plan was subsequently produced relative to each area. These will be monitored for progress by staff from the Force’s Continuous Improvement Unit. In addition, staff working within Headquarters support functions completed a questionnaire and the analysis of these results is almost complete. It will be the responsibility of Heads of Departments to produce an action plan, which seeks to address the areas for improvement identified. The Force has established an internal Inspection Team whose remit is to coordinate and facilitate responses in respect of HMIC Primary and Thematic Inspections, which involves assisting and advising divisions and departments with preparing responses to protocols and the collation of evidence. The team is also responsible for creating and maintaining action plans which are produced in order to document progress of the recommendations made from the inspection process. Progress against recommendations is reported to the Force Executive on a sixmonthly basis and can influence the internal audit and inspection programme. It is this programme that seeks to identify improvements to policy and processes.

This approach to responding to HMIC inspections has been welcomed by senior officers and recognised by HMIC as good practice. It has also been adopted by other Scottish forces. The Force’s decision to have one unit co-ordinating and managing the Force response has provided obvious benefits, namely, a more co-ordinated response, less time spent by individuals responding to protocols and less duplication of effort as evidence and responses are available for reference when responding to future inspections.


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Property Services

Like many of our buildings of a 1970’s vintage, Divisional Headquarters, Perth, required modernisation in order to enable our front line staff to meet our targets in respect of reductions in crime and increases in detection rates. Little had changed in the way the enquiry office and custody area looked since the building opened in 1975 and there was an urgent need to upgrade our cells and house some interview rooms and a doctors room into the same secure area. A design team was put together in August 2002, and work began in August 2003. The new suite comprises a new charge bar and waiting area, two juvenile detention cells, doctors room and shower area, male and female showers, kitchen, two interview rooms, an interview room for visitors or solicitors and a breath testing room. In addition the existing cells have been refurbished and all have had an intercom system installed linked to the public enquiry office area. The whole area is monitored by a new digital CCTV system that allows the staff to view all parts of the custody suite, outside the building and the front foyer. The public enquiry office has been completely refurbished in corporate colours to include an interview room. New equipment, storage and furniture have brought the area into the 21st century and in line with the commitment we made in our Standards of Service - “Police Stations easy to access, welcoming and where you will be dealt with promptly and efficiently”. To complete the project the rear courtyard has been transformed for direct vehicle entry with a security gate and fence erected. This project represents an investment of £500,000 in the front line in the war against crime.

This development followed hard on the heels of a £170,000 investment in a new police station in Broughty Ferry, Dundee. A police station has been in operation in Broughty Ferry for almost 130 years and recognition was made in 2000 that there was a requirement to replace the existing building in order to continue to provide a readily accessible service to the community of Broughty Ferry. The existing police office had been altered and refurbished since 1962 but had now become unsuitable to meet the demands of modern policing. Great emphasis was placed on the need for the new site of a replacement police station to be based at the heart of Broughty Ferry and a suitable site was identified directly opposite the existing office in a building previously occupied by a firm of local solicitors. Refurbishment of the new site was undertaken to provide a spacious police office offering increased security compared to the previous building.

A reception area, interview and meeting facilities, were also incorporated within the new office, thereby providing a better overall working environment which is far more accommodating to members of the general public who call at the police station. Initially £600,000 had been set aside for the building of a brand new police office in Broughty Ferry however the acquisition of a previously occupied suitable building reduced the outlay to £170,000 to carry out the necessary refurbishment works. This allowed finance to be made available to carry out upgrading of facilities at other police offices throughout the Force area, which would not otherwise have been possible. Offices to benefit include Kinross, Blairgowrie and Forfar. This year has seen a total of £1.2m spent on improvements to various police stations leading to improved security and the provision of improved access for the disabled.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“...Providing better facilities”


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Central Division:

“Crime Reduction and Detection in Partnership:”

86.2% 299 222 Crimes of Violence

316

70.3%

296

259

87.5%

347

27.0% 499 489 Car Crime

3620

13.5%

2899

487

16.8%

1847

30.0% 218 726 169 Housebreaking

1235

13.7%

989

224

22.7%

Cleared Up Recorded Cleared Up Cleared Up Recorded

CENTRAL DIVISION

2001/02

Detection Rate

Recorded

2002/03

Detection Rate

2003/04

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Detection Rate

Chief Superintendent Ian Alexander, Divisional Commander

Effective partnerships extend well beyond the bounds of the police service and in recognition of this officers in Central Division have striven to develop positive outcomes from the investment made in working together with individuals and organisations to reduce and detect crime. A flexible use of resources allows officers across the Division to work as a team, supported by specialists in forensics, crime scene management, and technology, in a coordinated approach to problem solving, unconstrained by artificial boundaries. The Division has focused on continuous improvement supported by a raft of performance management information. This is used to drive up standards, identify opportunities to develop staff skills, target repeat offending and make sure that every possible opportunity to detect crime is pursued. Intelligence and the tasking of officers plays a key part in ensuring that crime and anti-social behaviour is tackled quickly and effectively, thereby reducing its impact on the community we serve. The effectiveness of this strategy is well evidenced by: • 1052 less reported incidents of car crime, a 36% reduction, with detections up by over 10%. • Domestic housebreaking decreased by over 26%, 263 less reported incidents, with detections up by over 7.3%. • There were 127 less acts of vandalism with detections up by 11%. DUN.C.A.N. The DUN.C.A.N. (DUNdee Co-ordinated Anticrime Network) is a pioneering initiative in association with our City Centre stakeholder partners including Local Authority departments, retailers, the licensed trade and other statutory and voluntary bodies.

Dundee city centre’s extensive CCTV network, combined with radio link and information sharing, is supported by exclusion notices in an effort to ban persistent criminals from shops. “We are delighted to be working in partnership with Tayside Police and large and small retailers in this initiative. The data sharing protocol with the police is a pioneering venture and I am sure it will have an impact on criminal activity.” Councillor Joe Morrow, Dundee City Council

Central Division is committed to tackling all aspects of anti-social behaviour, which impact on the quality of life. Local officers, focusing on tackling littering by late night revellers in the City Centre, regularly carry out litter initiatives. Aided by CCTV, identified offenders are reported to the Procurator Fiscal. Such initiatives form part of a wider strategy being developed to adopt DUNCAN partnerships in areas concerning the city centre night-time economy. CCTV also has applications for non-criminal incidents. The ‘Little and Lost’ campaign is a new part of the DUNCAN scheme, designed to help youngsters who find themselves lost in Dundee’s city centre. The initiative, with its very distinctive “Duncan’s Here” logo, will encourage retailers to display stickers at till points, educating 8000 of the city’s schoolchildren to look for the logo if they find themselves lost anywhere in Dundee city centre. “The Little and Lost campaign is an important part of the ongoing activities which are aimed at making Dundee city centre a safer place.” Councillor Joe Morrow, Dundee City Council


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Central Division:

Christina Roberts, Local Councillor

Community Intelligence A Community Intelligence Unit is currently being created to provide a focal point for information sharing and intelligence led activity by Central Division and our Dundee City Council partners in order to tackle antisocial behaviour. Co-location with Crime Management Division at Police Headquarters ensures immediate access to intelligence products and relevant information. The Unit will be a powerful tool to aid the Division’s ongoing commitment to address anti-social behaviour exhibited by groups of youths on the streets.

Sergeant Mark Duncan, in the Maryfield section, has co-ordinated a joined up approach with outreach youth workers in the Stobswell and Hilltown areas to deal with youth issues. The approach allowed officers to direct youth workers to the section problem areas where the workers were able to provide advice on drink, drugs and sexual health as well as encouragement to join clubs or take part in diversion activities. This approach satisfies the youth group agendas by promoting safer and sensible behaviours and contributing to reducing the numbers of reported incidents of youths causing annoyance. Operation Safer Travel Operation Safer Travel is a joint initiative designed to make travelling on local buses a safer experience. Increased information sharing and co-operation aims to detect and reduce crime and anti-social behaviour on buses principally by encouraging members of the public to report any incidents they witness. Part of the initiative includes bus drivers issuing cards on which passengers can write the date, time and the number of the bus they were travelling on. The printing of anticrime messages on these tickets is also helping police track down young vandals. Coupled with CCTV, the initiatives are having a degree of success. After a stone was thrown through a bus window, one mother returned her six-year-old son to the scene to tell the surprised driver the latter was responsible. The cost of the window was deducted from the boy’s pocket money. Police also investigated a report of a pupil setting fire to a bus seat. The pupil was charged with the offence and his parents paid for the damage.

“The Operation Safer Travel initiative has proven to be a very successful scheme, enabling us to tackle any problems which may arise on the buses” Phil Smith, Operations Manager, Travel Dundee

Mobile success Central Division continually strives to identify areas where technological advancement can have a real impact on policing objectives. A pilot initiative involving the use of mobile camera phone technology allows officers to photograph individual incidents of graffiti, which can then be e-mailed direct from the scene to a common database. Images can then be cross-referenced with others housed on the database so that a culprit can be charged for what in effect amounts to serial vandalism. Success was highlighted with an individual convicted in relation to over thirty separate acts of vandalism. Brakes applied to phone use In the early hours Monday 1st December 2003 a female motorist in Dundee became the first person in Great Britain to be charged under new legislation concerning the use of hand-held mobile phones whilst driving. Detective Constables Lesslie and Riley spotted the woman shortly after 0200 GMT – just two hours after the ban came into force.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

A Local Solution Engaging with local communities in the MidCraigie, Douglas, Fintry and Whitfield areas revealed concerns regarding the misuse of motorcycles by local youths. Constable Billy Rattray, a local community liaison officer, developed an intelligence-led action plan to target problem areas. Resources drawn from the Road Policing Unit and Patrol Support Group assisted local officers with identification of the offenders, aided by use of mobile CCTV. This ongoing initiative follows a similar, highly successful action plan implemented last year which resulted in 13 people arrested or reported for relevant offences, 8 motorcycles seized and a further 2 stolen motorcycles recovered. “I am delighted that local residents are now recognising that Tayside Police have done a great job with a problem that has distressed them for a long time. The issue of motorbikes was noted at the Happyhillock/Midmill Tenants and Residents Association April 2004 meeting, with members agreeing that there are very few motorbikes around at the moment. Long may it last.”


18

Eastern Division:

“Effective teamwork”

95% 114 120 98 118 Crimes of Violence

108

91.5%

107

91.6%

36.2% 162 448 172 775 Car Crime

233

30.1%

590

29.2%

48.8% 63 129 67 180 Housebreaking

199

59

29.7%

37.2%

Detection Rate Cleared Up Recorded Detection Rate Cleared Up Recorded Detection Rate Cleared Up Recorded

EASTERN DIVISION

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Chief Superintendent Clive Murray, Divisional Commander

Maintaining meaningful contact with the communities in Angus is critical to effective service delivery tailored to meet local demands. Officers have built on positive liaison by regularly attending the range of community group meetings including Community Council meetings and Area Forums. Emphasis has also been placed on maintaining constructive liaison with elected representatives and other community leaders in an effort to learn promptly of problems and concerns in order that a satisfactory policing solution can be developed. “I would like to recognise the support Tayside Police gives to Brechin Community Council by attending our monthly meetings. This allows community councillors to pass on the problems and concerns of the community and receive regular updates on local issues.” Anne Mitchell, Chairperson, Brechin Community Council

In addition to providing core policing responses to some 38,000 incidents attended, activity was prioritised against housebreaking and autocrime, resulting in achieved reductions of 28% and 24% respectively in these crime types. Conscious of the community views expressed about vandalism, prioritised efforts also led to a welcome 9.6% increase in the detection rate. A joint anti-vandalism strategy developed in partnership with Angus Council emphasises the ongoing commitment to tackle this offence. A team effort In March 2003, residents of Graham Crescent, Forfar approached Inspector Suzie Mertes at the Forfar Community Council meeting to express concern regarding anti-

social behaviour of a minority of the residents. Regular monthly meetings followed with residents encouraged to report all incidents of anti-social behaviour and racism to the police to maximise effectiveness of targeted high profile patrolling. “Graham Crescent has been transformed from an anti-social outcast into an acceptable place to live. The turnaround has been down to the commitment and hard work of the residents. This would not have been possible with the unfailing support of the police, the local councillor and the Community Education workers.” Arlene Tait, Chairperson, Graham Crescent and District Residents Association

An Innovative Approach The V.I.P. Speakeasy Informer Application is a pioneering computerised communications system that circulates messages about specific incidents and broadcasts early warning alerts regarding shoplifters, suspicious vehicles, bogus callers, break-ins etc. in the locality. General crime prevention advice can also be circulated via the system, which also enables the local Community Liaison Officer to communicate directly with local residents and businesses whose telephone numbers have been ‘clustered’ so that messages can be widely broadcast or targeted at a specific group. In a recent incident, officers quickly detained the suspect in a robbery following circulation of his description to local filling station employees via the Informer System. In this case the suspect came onto a forecourt shortly after staff had received the police lookout request. “I think it has enhanced the communication between the Police and the Neighbourhood Watch co-ordinators.


19

Not only are we receiving information quickly, but also co-ordinators are notified almost simultaneously. I believe by using this method we can assist the Police by helping them trace people and deter or prevent crime.” Mrs Sylvia O’Connor, Chairperson Brechin Neighbourhood Watch

Active engagement Community Liaison Officers engage with all sections of the community, developing links that ultimately provide an opportunity to tune the policing requirement to the needs of each of the various groups. Constable John Thornton, who recently retired from the service, promoted good citizenship amongst the young and ensuring the vulnerable were given suitable advice. Initiatives included a Crime Prevention seminar, a fireworks sales initiative and an anti drugs fashion show at Monifieth High School. Presentation of high visibility armbands and badges to local schools were part of the very successful ‘be safe be seen’ campaign aimed at making newspaper delivery boys and girls more visible when using the roads. This local road safety effort contributed to the overall divisional performance in this important area, which recorded a 12% reduction in the number of road collision fatalities and serious injuries. Constable Thornton was also congratulated for his work in the ‘Safe as Houses’ initiative, in conjunction with Angus Community Planning partners, involving visiting older, more vulnerable members of the community giving advice regarding home security. “Constable Thornton has carried out over 160 crime prevention surveys specially for Safe as Houses and, through his talks and promotion of the initiative, informed many more people”. Judith Leslie, Angus Care and Repair

A ‘Driving Ambition’ ‘Driving Ambition – Angus’ is a driver awareness programme for sixth year pupils designed to complement enforcement activity against anti-social driving in Angus towns. Organised by School Liaison Officers Constables Robert Christie and Peter Fugaccia, the scheme links in with other work ongoing under the Angus Community Planning Partnership banner and includes participation by local driving instructors. The programme seeks to address complaints about inconsiderate and anti-social driving. Students are made aware of community concerns and are encouraged to learn the importance of adopting a safe and positive driving attitude. “Our senior pupils enjoyed an informative, and in most cases a ‘hands – on’ experience, courtesy of the agencies involved. This was not only a rewarding programme, our pupils were also given an insight into the devastating effects of inconsiderate and careless driving….. A definite to include in your senior school programme.” Margaret Ford – PT Guidance, Monifieth High School

Alert and Effective - After Dark Analysis carried out by divisional crime analysts Jenny Barton and Alison Shepherd indicated an increased threat in specific areas from housebreakers. Traditionally, domestic housebreaking increases when British summer time ends and nights get longer. Detective Inspector Gordon Cryle and a joint operation involving beat officers, road policing officers and Headquarters-based support units tackled the problem in the Carnoustie/Monifieth Section. Prior to ‘clocks changing’ an awareness raising campaign was commenced in the residential areas, Monifieth especially. Public support was

enlisted to report suspicious activity and to pay particular attention to vehicle registration numbers and descriptions of any suspicious persons. The preventative measures were supported by high visibility policing and targeting of known active criminals. Recent assessment indicates that instances of housebreaking had reduced by 25% in comparison to the previous year. Supporting Angus Drugs and Alcohol Action Plan As part of the commitment to delivering on the Angus Drugs and Alcohol Action Plan, a dedicated team of officers was given a specific remit to tackle drug related crime. The intelligence-led operation resulted in 46 warrants being craved and 27 trafficking offences reported to the Procurator Fiscal over a 4 month period. In total, 58 people were arrested and 109 drug cases were recorded. In response to community concerns about under-age drinking, Operation Dry-Up was initiated during the summer. Officers in each of the communities, including Constable Susan Dyker, worked to identify ‘drinking dens’, with the public assisting by telephoning with relevant information. Over 50 gallons of alcohol was confiscated.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Eastern Division:


20

Western Division:

“Policing with the community”

93.8% 106 82.1% 115 Crimes of Violence

140

145

119

82.1%

113

43.1% 271 22.6% 224 Car Crime

991

951

292

30.7%

629

52.9% 144 272 21.3% 67 Housebreaking

315

261

90

34.5%

Cleared Up Recorded Cleared Up Detection Rate Cleared Up Recorded

WESTERN DIVISION

2001/02

Recorded

2002/03

Detection Rate

2003/04

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Detection Rate

Chief Superintendent Bob Main, Divisional Commander

The territory covered by staff working in Western Division is by far the largest of the 3 operational areas of the force. It extends from Invergowrie in the east to Kinloch Rannoch in the west and from Milnathort in the south to the Drumochter Pass in the north. Working with the community in order to identify local solutions to local problems has delivered positive results in the level of recorded and detected crime, for example: • Serious assaults down by over 30% • Car crime down 34% with detections up by 12.4% • Break-ins to motor vehicles down 44% with detection rates up by almost 15% Utilising the principles of the National Intelligence Model, a range of tactics covering both pro-active prevention measures and effective enforcement action has ensured that the Perth and Kinross area remains one of the safest areas in Scotland in which to reside, work or visit.

This resulted in the arrest of two people, the detection of 18 crimes and the recovery of a substantial amount of stolen property. Attention to duty The need for police officers to be continually alert to the activities of the criminal fraternity cannot be overstated. It is imperative therefore that staff respond appropriately to circumstances that give cause for suspicion. In June 2003, Constable David Summers was carrying out an early morning patrol in Jeanfield Road, Perth, in response to a number of thefts reported in the area. Constable Summers observed and approached a well-known active local criminal who subsequently ran off. He was traced shortly after and found to be in possession of property stolen during two sneak-in thefts and a housebreaking to three properties in the area. The male was subsequently charged with 14 crimes of dishonesty.

Local knowledge prevails

Protection of the environment

One of the benefits of the policing style adopted by the force is the level of knowledge and trust that builds up between a community and the local police officer.

It is estimated that around 400 pairs of golden eagles and 150 pairs of ospreys exist in Scotland, a substantial proportion of which can be found in Highland Perthshire. Both species are under threat from criminals who visit the area to steal the eggs of these birds, adding to illegal collections that they may have at home.

On the evening of 26 May 2003 a series of thefts and acts of vandalism took place in Aberfeldy. Suspicion fell on a number of local individuals who had been responsible for similar crimes in the area previously. Constable Alan Murray’s local knowledge led to the identification of a number of witnesses and a number of further crimes and offences that, until then, had gone unreported. Constable Murray used his ability, training and experience as the local officer to persuade key individuals to provide him with the necessary evidence.

In the spring of 2003, Sergeant John Watson and Constable Elaine Petrie, stationed at Pitlochry, devised a strategy intended to deter the commission of such crimes. Visiting households near to nest sites, giving advice and guidance to the occupants regarding suspicious persons or vehicles in the area, raised awareness of the problem.


21

This was supplemented through local media exposure and liaison with local hotels, postal workers, countryside rangers and forestry and estate workers. These preventative measures, coupled with numerous vehicle and foot patrols in the most vulnerable areas, raised local awareness that resulted in more information and assistance being received than in previous years. It was reassuring to note that there were no reports of eggs being removed from local nests during the breeding season. “It is highly innovative that police adopt a strategy that not only is intended to frighten off egg thieves but also enlists the co-operation of those living and working in the community to do so as well. Coupled with the “Operation Easter” posters, highly visible in the area, it did not surprise me that 2003 was a year in which no osprey nests in Tayside were robbed.” Uwe Stoneman, Scottish Wildlife Trust, Perth and Kinross

Alternatives for young people The issue of young people and their behaviour within society continues to be the subject of considerable debate. The need for the police service to interact with this particular social group on a basis beyond enforcement action has long been recognised. Following the acclaimed success of the “Thrillseekers” initiative in the Blairgowrie area, local community officers in other parts of the Division were keen to see if the model could be of benefit in their own local areas. Constable Brian Easton, Crieff, sought permission to instigate a programme of diversionary activity in order to not only tackle the immediate problem but provide a longer-term solution.

In January 2004 Constable Easton commenced a 6 month community programme in conjunction with other partner agencies and groups including Crieff High School, Strathearn Recreation Centre and the locally based Logos Christian Centre. The programme is further supported by input from the MacRobert Centre in Stirling together with staff from Perth and Kinross Council’s Education and Children’s Service. To date up to 30 children from the local High School have attended the Friday evening sessions held at the Recreation Centre, taking part in various events such as dance, aerobics, yoga and karaoke. “Over the last year it is clear that the Police have made a concerted effort to tackle the long-standing youth problems in the town and this is a fine example of the preventative approach they are taking with local youngsters. They are to be commended for taking the lead in this approach.” Bob Ferguson, Chairperson, Crieff Community Council

Road Policing The Division is a thoroughfare for many of the arterial routes to the north of Scotland. The Road Policing Unit undertakes high visibility patrols on these routes to reduce road casualties by influencing driver behaviour. A unit dedicated to policing the A9 north of Perth was introduced in 2003 in response to the increasing number of serious and fatal collisions occurring along that stretch of road. The crews liaise with local communities and businesses adjoining the route and tackle concerns that are expressed.

The Road Policing Unit also provides a valuable input to the A9 Safety Group that comprises representatives of Tayside Police, Scottish Executive, BEAR Scotland and Perth & Kinross Council. Through this positive action we have seen a reduction in the number of casualties across this stretch of road. In July 2003, the Colin McRae GHI Forest Stages Rally was held in Perth and Aberfeldy. Inspector Kenneth Brown and Constable Aileen Walker, Road Policing Unit, received the ‘Spirit of the Rally’ trophy, which is generally awarded to a rally crew who best portray the positive image of the event in terms of sportsmanship and assistance to everyone involved including organisers, competitors and spectators. “I would suggest this is a rare occurrence and great credit must be given to the policing tactics on the day whereby the rally organisers chose to make such a presentation. Similarly, I was involved with the rally at both locations and can testify to the excellent working relationship between Tayside Police and Rally personnel.” Provost Bob Scott, Perth and Kinross Council

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Western Division:


22

HQ Crime Management

“Identifying and targeting trends�

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Headquarters Crime Management Headquarters Crime Management is responsible for co-ordinating the Force response to Crime and Community Safety issues. It directs and resources the investigation into cross border and major crime, and provides the policy and procedural framework for the management and investigation of crime across the force area. Intelligence-Led Policing The Force Intelligence Bureau incorporates a number of different disciplines designed to identify and develop targets for operational officers. The Unit investigates a broad spectrum of criminality from terrorism to vehicle crime and road accident investigation by maintaining close links to Divisions and a wide variety of national and international bodies. Tayside Police has invested heavily in new techniques and technology to support analysis, informant handling and financial investigation to ensure that all available intelligence is accurately assessed and disseminated to those who need it. Accurate intelligence assessment identifies priorities and the methods that are most likely to bring success in addressing them. Computer Examination The Computer Examination and Technical Support Unit was created as a full time Unit in April 2003 following Operation Ore, a national operation targeting paedophilia. The Unit carries out forensic examination of seized computer components to retrieve evidence. This can be carried out at very short notice if circumstances dictate. Computers can be examined to provide additional evidence and information in all types of enquiry, including persons suspected

of having indecent images of child abuse, drug dealing, fraud, terrorism offences and missing persons enquiries. Many of the Operation Ore cases have now been through the Court system. Perhaps the most notable case is that of a Tayside man who was found in possession of 403,000 indecent images and 15,000 indecent video clips. This represents the largest volume of material ever recovered in Scotland. Since formation, the Unit has carried out 113 computer examinations. Mobile Telephone Examination The Unit has the capability to carry out examination of mobile telephones and SIM cards for evidential purposes. Since the Unit was created they have received over 200 requests for mobile telephone examination, which has mainly been in relation to drug dealing activity. Other examples are an incident where it was suspected that a motorist had been using his mobile telephone when he crashed his vehicle and died, and a case of Abduction. Recording Equipment The Unit is also responsible for the deployment of recording equipment for use in volume crime or intelligence gathering situations. All Divisions and Departments are encouraged to make use of the equipment and expertise. Targeting proceeds The Financial Intelligence Unit carries out financial investigations aimed at identifying and seizing the assets of criminals involved in drug trafficking and other serious and organised crime. It works closely with the financial sector to identify the proceeds of crime and money laundering activity.


23

There are 11 cases currently pending and involve assets of over £1.5 million. To date, there have been 2 cash seizures totalling £25,975 under the Proceeds of Crime legislation, both of which are still pending. The Unit can also assist in tracing vulnerable or long term Missing Persons through financial intelligence work. Identification Branch (I.B.) Tayside Police Identification Branch provides the first line of forensic support to investigations in the region. This takes the form of scene examination and evidence gathering at crime scenes as well as scene photography and specialist functions. In addition, forensic scientists based within the Branch carry out scientific comparison of footprints, documents, firearms, tool-marks, chemical development and physical fit comparisons on recovered material, services which they undertake on behalf of Tayside, Fife and Central Scotland Police Forces, as well as other government organisations. The Branch provides specialist support at major incident scenes and currently have a well developed Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear (CBRN) Cadre who regularly exercise their response to chemical or biological incidents. Some of the innovative techniques in evidence recovery were devised by the team who practice their skills with colleagues from neighbouring Police forces in a mutual-aid arrangement. With a close working relationship with Dundee’s Abertay University, the Branch supports their forensic courses by offering secondments to students, who can add practical experience to their academic study. During 2004, 4 students will shadow Scenes

of Crime Officers (SOCO’s) attending all incidents and gaining valuable experience in scene management, fingerprint and DNA recovery techniques and evidence recovery and photography. The job is a physically demanding one involving powers of concentration and attention to detail, however the ‘hands on‘ experience they will gain is invaluable. Photography remains the primary recording medium in the IB and the Force is leading the way in the evolution to digital images. Although commercially available for many years the use of digital pictures in legal proceedings in Scotland is still at an early stage. Valid concerns over the possible manipulation of data required to be addressed before digital imaging could resist challenge but now protocols are in place which ensure the integrity of images. Within the next few years the use of digital photography in Scottish criminal cases will become commonplace. The next few years will bring great change to the forensic science services in Scotland. Advances in DNA technology which were unthinkable only a few years ago are now reality and the Branch are adapting procedures and techniques to meet new business requirements. In fingerprint science too, the developments have been significant. A new technique in fingerprint recovery recently revealed fingerprints on adhesive tape from a serious undetected crime almost 20 years ago, indicating that while the future holds much promise, the past has not been overlooked.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

HQ Crime Management


24

Police Forensic Science Laboratory Dundee

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Solutions through science”

Police Forensic Science Laboratory, Dundee

Notable Successes

Based at Police Headquarters, Dundee, the Police Forensic Science Laboratory Dundee (PFSLD) has acquired a reputation for excellence. It provides forensic science services to Tayside, Fife and Central Scotland police forces, and to the local procurators fiscal, and is a supplier to all Scottish Forces through the DNA database.

• Blood pattern interpretation by a forensic biologist at the scene of a fatal stabbing in Dundee greatly assisted the subsequent enquiry. Furthermore, a graphical display of the blood patterns provided a comprehensive and accurate account of what likely occurred at the time of the stabbing and was later corroborated by eye witnesses.

Continued growth

• A thief who talked her way into the house of an elderly male in Perth and stole a sum of money was traced via a profile established from a rim of a cup from which she had drank.

During 2003-4 the Police Forensic Science Laboratory Dundee continued to grow and develop. In addition to retaining accreditation for the existing services, new ground was broken in that the United Kingdom Accreditation Service, a demonstration of high quality, accredited three new services. The new services are: • paint examination using microscopy and FTIR • blood pattern analysis, conducted within the laboratory, on clothing and other items received by the Laboratory to include opinion and interpretation • DNA profiling, paternity testing and body identification The PFSLD continued to play a full part in the Common Police Service Forensic Science Review and, recognising the limitations placed by the existing accommodation, submitted an Outline Business Case to the Scottish Executive for a new build laboratory. Demand for services In terms of demand the Biology Section analysed 13,000 productions, the Chemistry Section 5,000 productions and the DNA Database processed 39,000 criminal justice samples.

• A bottle was smashed through the sunroof of a vehicle in Dundee. The neck of the bottle was recovered from the front seat. Forensic examination established a DNA profile that matched a person when searched against the database. Further work is undertaken relating to the elimination of suspects by the use of DNA, saving significant investigative hours and allowing enquiry officers to focus in other directions.


25

Communications and Information Technology

Strategic Direction

Service Delivery

Virtual Contact Centre

During 2003, a new IS/IT Strategy Group was established under the chairmanship of the Deputy Chief Constable. This team is ensuring that Communications and IT have the capabilities needed to support force objectives, with careful attention being given to setting priorities consistent with the many policing aims and the available resources.

With over 700 desktop users, force customer demand for IT products and services remains high. Alongside this, continuous improvement efforts are committed to maintaining a high level of service quality and providing an ever more responsive service when issues arise.

Tayside Police has a commitment to allow access to services using the latest technology.

Strategies have been developed covering business applications, computer platforms and networks. A force radio strategy is being established with Airwave, the new digital communications system being adopted by Forces throughout the United Kingdom, as the centrepiece. Replacement of legacy equipment with new, fit-for-purpose systems is key in maintaining an effective force Communications and IT infrastructure. All this work translates into an extensive Communications and IT work programme over the short to medium-term.

The Force radio communications system is vital for successful policing. Radio Workshops remain diligent in ensuring that personal radios, vehicle radios and the ground-based network are maintained in good working order. Application Development The SCOPE Human Resources system, initially developed in-house for Tayside Police, is now being deployed to the whole of the Scottish Police Service. Strathclyde Police is already enjoying major business benefits from the new system. The SMART case management system, designed and built in-house, allows the automatic and timely transfer of information to the Procurator Fiscal. This technology solution has brought major benefits to the business processes of the Criminal Justice System. New application development is making extensive use of Open Source technologies, aligning closely with a wider trend towards Open Source across the whole of the Public Sector, predicated on securing Best Value.

The Virtual Contact Centre will be the single point of contact in Tayside for all nonemergency enquiries. Access to improved and fully integrated IT systems will allow the Force to provide a customer-centred approach and empower staff with the tools to ensure local queries can be dealt with at a local level and achieve first call resolution. The project has placed major demands on the team throughout the year. New Voiceover-IP telephony services and improved call logging are now in place and providing real, tangible benefits. New radio switches are being implemented both in the Perth and Dundee Control Rooms, laying the foundations for the Contact Centre going live later in 2004. Airwave Project Airwave is a new digital, mobile radio communications network designed to provide a secure, powerful and flexible communications network. The network offers the potential of greatly enhanced communications system that will allow the Force to deliver a more effective service to the community. Digital voice quality brings increased message clarity and blocks out background noise such as sirens and traffic. Coupled with the introduction of data and image communications, the benefits to core policing are significant. The Airwave system has a ‘ready for service’ date of February 2005. Early preparations are underway to ensure the smooth introduction of this eagerly awaited system into the force.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Application of new ideas:”


26

IDEAS t.y.

“Encouraging innovation:”

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

2003/04 Ideas Submitted

185

Ideas Adopted

17

Awards - Monetary

8 x £25, 4 x £50

Awards - Letter of Achievements

5

Officer Awards

12

Support Staff Awards

5

IDEAS t.y.

Braille ID Cards

The Force Suggestion Scheme aims to encourage all members of staff to offer innovative ideas to enhance both internal processes and service delivery to the community.

Tayside Police recognises the need to ensure our services are sensitive to the individual needs of all members of the community.

In October 2002, the scheme was revised to encourage greater staff participation, with financial rewards introduced for suggestions of particular note. Inspirational Success

Officers have recently been issued with a Braille ID verification card to assist visually impaired and blind members of our communities. The card will have Tayside Police and a special contact telephone number written in Braille and large print that will assist people who may be visually impaired or blind to call in order to check the credentials of the officers attending.

Over the course of the year: • 185 entries were submitted, an increase of 5.7% from the previous year • 17 ideas were adopted by the force, 12 of which qualified for a financial reward Ideas adopted this year include:

Custody Care A simple ethnic and cultural awareness guidance note will be introduced for use in custody areas should a minority ethnic be arrested and detained. It is anticipated that in the future these information sheets will be held on the new force Intranet. The note will ensure accurate and positive guidance to custody staff in respect of customs and practices of minority ethnic prisoners. Disposable Resuscitator The existing Laerdal Face Shields, issued for undertaking mouth to mouth resuscitation, will be replaced with non-return valve resuscitators. The idea, which was thoroughly researched and costed by the staff member prior to submission, will reduce infection risk while resulting in significant cost savings to the force. The idea is currently being progressed with the issue of the device to officers expected in the near future. IDEAS t.y. continues to build on its initial success and allows the force to harness innovation generated from all areas of the organisation.


27

Human Resources and Staff Development

New Appraisal System

Line Manager Training

In 2003 Tayside Police introduced a new appraisal reporting process with the aims of

In recognition of a need to equip newly promoted supervisors with additional skills and abilities and also to outline the standards expected, not only of themselves but also of the staff they supervise, a modular training course has been devised by the Staff Development Unit.

• Aligning appraisal with Force objectives; • Introducing a common format for all members of staff; • Reducing the bureaucratic burden on supervisors. The revised procedures were successful in achieving these aims and the process has been implemented and refined during 2004. Quite literally a ‘paperless’ appraisal system, all reports are raised and managed by SCOPE, our Human Resources database. Appraisals are completed electronically between the member of staff and the supervisor. The system initiates email reminders and creates a log which provides fail-safe tracking, ensuring that all reports are managed and accounted for. Feedback from staff has been very positive, indicating a significant improvement on previous procedures and overall a more worthwhile system. The enhanced productivity, a direct result of the new system, Is resulting in an estimated 250 working days saved throughout the Force.

Phase one of this training for Sergeants has been delivered and included section responsibilities, emergency planning, operational incidents, crime prevention and detection. Phase two includes an examination of shift briefing, absence management, dealing with complaints against the police, investigation of crime, the National Intelligence Model and a tabletop exercise in relation to Missing Persons. Custody Care Training Following completion of a Best Value Review of Custody Care, training in prisoner care has been reassessed and a new training programme agreed. A series of one day training courses took place during November 2003 and consisted of three courses being run each day, on a 24 hour basis (early, late and nightshift) with Public Enquiry Staff and custody officers attending. Occupational Health In September 2003, the Force appointed CIGNA Healthcare as an external provider for occupational health services. Employees have access to an on-site occupational health nurse, occupational health physicians and also a support network of nurses at CIGNA headquarters in Greenock.

The service allows us to fast-track support for specific types of illness and ensure staff are offered appropriate care and advice as soon as possible, enabling staff to resume full fitness at an early stage and having a positive impact in relation to sickness absence. CIGNA will also be undertaking health promotion activities which was launched with ‘Fit for Life’ events in each of the Divisions. Staff seeking health and fitness information can again access the CIGNA helpline, which is staffed by qualified personnel. Northern Police Convalescent Home As part of an ongoing commitment to reduce the amount of working days lost through sickness absence, use is made of the Northern Police Convalescent Home located at Auchterarder, Perthshire. The aim of the home, funded almost entirely from serving officers, is to provide rest, convalescence and rehabilitation to ill or injured Police Officers. During 2003 forty-six Tayside Police officers attended at the home, of which nineteen attended on a residential basis with the remainder on a day-care basis. Gender Issues Within Tayside Police, a Women’s Development Forum has been established to take forward the Gender Agenda locally. The forum has developed an information leaflet for staff and is planning to hold a series of open evenings as networking opportunities for women. Further activities are planned for the future.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Training and Career Development:”


28

Diversity Matters

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Commitment to equality”

Commitment to equality

R.I.M.A.P.

Tayside Police is committed to the principle of mainstreaming equality in all aspects of employment and service delivery. The assessment and consultation processes currently used help to establish equality at the heart of all new strategies/policies and related guidance. Well established partnerships and networks with other Scottish police forces, local authorities, NHS Trust, and other emergency services are used to allow effective sharing of information and best practice.

Tayside Police is one of a number of agencies represented on Racist Incident Multi Agency Panels (RIMAP), which are designed to tackle racist incidents occuring in Divisions.

Lay Advisory Group The Tayside Police Lay Advisory Group has a broad membership that includes representations from black and minority ethnic (BME) organisations and communities, police officers and support staff. Membership has broadened over the last year and now includes members from the international student population from the area’s two universities, enabling consultation with a wider age range. This internal / external partnership provides valuable input and currently helps to influence the development, delivery and monitoring of Force policies, practices and procedures, and allows for a person-centred approach to service provision. In February 2004, members of the Lay Advisory Group, the Convener and Vice Conveners of the Tayside Joint Police Board and representatives from the various faith communities of Tayside were invited to visit the Force Mortuary to identify areas for improvement. This initiative has resulted in a number of recommendations being made which will be considered for adoption.

RIMAP’s aim is to improve the effectiveness of inter-agency working to support victims of racism and to improve the monitoring and analysis of racist incidents in the city. It also provides a platform for a multi-agency approach towards such areas as proactive support for individuals within the local community who have experienced racist crime.


29

Special Constables

Special Constabulary

Pilot Scheme Implemented

Tayside Police acknowledges the high value of service provided by Special Constables who give up their personal time to work alongside full time colleagues.

It is essential that we acknowledge the personal commitment of the Special Constable.

Welcome Volunteers During the past year, communities throughout Tayside have been well served by the commitment and enthusiasm of Special Constables providing invaluable support to regular officers by assisting with the general policing of events including the Dunhill Golf Tournament and local Highland Games in Angus. In addition to augmenting regular officers at weekends, assisting to deal with anti-social behaviour and routine policing duties, during frequent sittings of the High Court in Forfar a number of Special Constable have taken on a Court policing role. This released regular officers to concentrate on dealing with core operational matters in the various communities.

Tayside Police is implementing a pilot scheme, run in conjunction with Grampian Police and the Scottish Executive, whereby Special Constables will be provided with a financial reward in recognition of their services to the scheme. The scheme will consist of 45 tours of duty per year each consisting of a period of at least 4 hours. This will include 30 tours covering peak demand times and specific tours, linked with tackling anti-social behaviour hotspots and other proactive work, coupled with a number of training sessions and tours covering other times such as policing major public events and attending court A Special Constable who carries out these duties will be entitled to a financial reward at the end of the year.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Rewarding dedication:�


30

Specialist Support

“Support through partnership:”

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Tayside Safety Camera Partnership The Tayside Safety Camera Partnership (TSCP) brings together Angus, Dundee City and Perth and Kinross Councils, the Scottish Executive and Tayside Police with the goal of making the roads in Tayside safer for everyone by encouraging and educating motorists to drive within permitted speed limits. Supported by NHS Tayside, the Scottish Ambulance Service and Tayside Fire Brigade, TSCP aims to encourage motorists to drive within permitted speed limits through information and education and the use of safety cameras situated in areas where there is a proven incidence of collisions and excessive speed. "It is an admirable example of joint working and for an excellent purpose. Making the roads safer for everyone is a goal we all must share and not just as representatives of local government, the emergency services, the NHS and the Scottish Executive but as a society and as a community.” Cllr Colin Young, Convener, Tayside Joint Police Board

Tayside Police Road Safety Unit Tayside Police is committed to reducing road casualties through effective partnership working. “I’ll be Des” The “I’ll be Des” campaign is supported with resources from the English-based based Portman Group, who are working with as many partners as possible to highlight the dangers of drinking and driving. The “I’ll be Des” campaign in Central and Western Divisions brings together a wide variety of pubs and clubs to encourage one member of a group to become the

‘des’ignated driver for the evening. The groups receive one free soft drink for every 3 or 4 alcoholic drinks purchased. The Eastern Division “I’ll be Des” campaign was launched in November and was led by the Licensing Officer in partnership with Angus Council. Child in-car safety The road safety unit has produced a folder specifically designed to be a one-stop reference guide for people who carry children in their vehicles. The folder, joint funded by Tayside Police, Angus Council, Dundee City Council and Perth & Kinross Council, will be available to attendees at antenatal or parentcraft classes and covers all aspects of the safe carriage of children in motor vehicles. Child car seat checking clinics held over the course of the previous year revealed that 79% of child car seats checked were incorrectly fitted, it was agreed that child car safety would again be a priority this year. Three clinics were held in March with further clinics planned during ‘Child Safety Week’ in June. “Rachel Ewing, Road Safety Officer for Perth and Kinross, is an integral part of our 'Talking Babies' group. Her talk is always very informative, is very well received and stimulates much discussion amongst the parents.” Margaret Cammidge, Whitefriars Surgery, Perth

Speed Indicator Display Signs Children from Primary Schools have had the opportunity to witness first hand how these signs can influence the behaviour of motorists. The signs, funded by the respective local councils, record the speed of the traffic at the site and this information can


31

Specialist Support

later be downloaded and used by classes in the school in a variety of ways. It is hoped that by educating the pupils of the school they, in turn, will influence their parents who drive them to school to reduce their speed and alleviate congestion around the entrances.

Dog Handlers Turn Car Designers

Tayside Police Search and Rescue Unit

The Dog Section has recently purchased new Skoda Octavia estate cars, which incorporate innovative purpose-built kennels. Force dog-handlers provided significant input into the design and fitting out of the vehicles.

A short presentation at the roadside is given on how important it is to cross roads safely, how difficult it is to judge speeds and how vital it is that you wear something bright to become more visible to drivers.

This has resulted in a vastly improved travelling environment for the dogs, which impacts positively in terms of efficiency.

The unit is deployed where specialised skills are required in situations such as searches in mountainous terrain. Unit personnel numbers twenty-nine officers, the latest recruit being Constable Blair Wilkie, who completed her initial training period in May 2003.

“SID is a friendly alternative to speed enforcement and a useful tool to educate school children. In addition to engineering traffic calming measures, our partnership approach is to educate as well as enforce speed limits with the overall aim to make the Dundee's roads a safer place for all.” Niall Gardiner, Roads Department, Dundee City Council

Tayside Police Dog Section Tayside Police drug dogs played a vital role in the ‘Safer Scotland’ anti-drugs campaign leading to drugs with a street value in excess of £100,000 recovered in addition to a substantial amount of money. Considerable disruption has been caused to the 57 individuals who were charged with a total of 131 drug-related offences. In addition to seizures under the ‘Safer Scotland’ campaign, a further £47,752 of drugs were seized, including a single drug seizure of £29,510.

Scottish Regional Dog Trials Tayside Police had two entrants in the latest Scottish Regional Dog Trials held in Fife. The competition sees the handler put their dog through a variety of tasks and disciplines – including agility, obedience, tracking, searching and criminal work. Claiming third place was Constable Lindsey Williams and Zeta (a German Shepherd bitch). Seventh was Constable Steve Ritchie with new recruit Max (also a German Shepherd) – a fine result given that Max only qualified as a police dog some two weeks prior to the competition. Their achievement places Zeta in the top one per cent of all dogs in the UK. It also offers deserved recognition to Lindsey’s abilities as a dog handler. Lindsey has only been with the dog section for two years and has already qualified Police Dog Excellent.

Over the course of the last year Search and Rescue personnel were called-out a total of nineteen occasions, increasingly as a result of persons reporting themselves lost on Tayside’s hills and mountains by means of mobile telephones. Helicopters supplied through the Rescue Co-ordination Centre were called out to six such incidents to assist in the evacuation of casualties or the movement of search personnel. “I write to thank all the people involved in helping me get back to ‘civilisation’….Alpha Section was friendly, helpful and extremely professional and I am very grateful for their efforts….” Richard Coe, Bucks

Ten individuals sustained injuries that required evacuation for medical attention. Sadly, there were two fatalities during 2003. One related to a medical condition on a hillside, whilst the other was a tragic fall of an eleven-year-old boy down a 60ft gorge at the Falls of Bruar in Perthshire. “My own very grateful thanks for your kindness when I had my accident. I had my leg in plaster for 6 weeks but I still managed my holiday with my son in Toronto.…” Mrs Ann Lough, Berwickshire

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Seeking to make a difference:”


32

Specialist Support

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

“Overcoming all obstacles”

New Vehicle

Investment in training

A new, custom-built Vauxhall Movano motor van, part-financed by a donation from the Order of St John, will enhance operations within the region. The vehicle has full communication facilities, including a satellite telephone and a generator for self-sufficiency. Laptop computers and printers are a standard part of the base vehicle’s equipment, used by personnel in planning and executing search operations. The vehicle can carry a driver and 8 passengers and is used as a high profile base vehicle for co-ordinating search and rescue operations.

The nature of the tasks undertaken by the Unit demands a commitment to regular skill updates. Practical training is supplemented by formal courses in a variety of fields such as Search Management, Winter Skills and Health and Safety.

“Thank you for your response and being there in a time of crisis, especially on the other side of the world….” Fairlie Sampson, Tauondi College, Australia

The Unit continues to train with the Tayside Mountain Rescue Team twice a year. Tayside Police are also represented on the Tayside Mountain Rescue Association board, which is hosted at Forfar Police office. Unit personnel conducted training with a Ministry of Defence helicopter on two occasions during the last year. During one incident on An Stuc, after the successful location of a missing person, the helicopter crew from HMS Gannet, at Prestwick, was invited to join the Unit at a nearby hotel for breakfast. Landing in the only space available, the grounds of the local primary school, local schoolchildren were afforded the opportunity for an unusual lesson.


33

Financial Information:

“How policing is funded in Tayside:”

Tayside Joint Police Board approved a net budget of £73.885 million for the financial year 2004/2005. After making adjustments for non-Grant Aided Expenditure (GAE) items the budget is in line with GAE settlement for the force. Funding comes from a combination of specific police grant which is paid by Central Government directly to the Board and requisitions made on the constituent councils. The charge to the constituent councils is met mainly from Revenue Support Grant Certain categories of costs within the budget are non-grant earning and these costs are met in full from the council tax. These however form only a small part of the budget. Included within the budget of £73.885 million is 100% grant funding provided by the Scottish Executive of £66,000 for the specific purpose of Port policing and £119,000 specifically for the Airwave Communications System.

6%

7%

22%

20% 13% 16%

16%

The indicative figure for 2005/2006 is £75.370 million. The Board has approved a capital investment programme of £2.703 million for 2004/2005. This programme includes provision to purchase vehicles, laboratory and IT equipment, Airwave Communications System and to carry out building work throughout the force area.

Central

Eastern

Western

Pensions

Operations

Crime Support

Corporate Development

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Funding


34

Statistics Table 1 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 1 – Non Sex Cr. Of Violence or Imp. Violence against the Person

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Murder

6

2

6

2

1

0

1

0

2

1

2

1

9

3

9

3

Attempted Murder

30

44

31

43

15

18

15

18

23

18

22

18

68

80

68

79

Culpable Homicide

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

2

0

2

0

2

2

2

2

Serious Assault

95

103

88

80

55

44

49

43

52

36

41

33

202

183

178

156

Robbery (incl attempts)

84

98

49

67

13

20

11

16

33

32

18

28

130

150

78

111

Child Cruelty/Neglect

52

53

52

62

12

18

12

17

18

12

18

12

82

83

82

91

Others

29

47

33

45

11

18

10

18

15

14

16

14

55

79

59

77

Table 1

296

347

259

299

107

120

98

114

145

113

119

106

548

580

476

519

Table 2 Classification of Crimes and Offences

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Group 2– Crimes Involving Indecency

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Rape

43

32

47

42

29

25

32

23

16

10

18

10

88

67

97

Assault with intent to Rape

5

6

5

6

6

5

7

5

1

8

1

8

12

19

13

75 19

Indecent Assault

43

61

32

52

18

24

13

25

25

25

17

27

86

110

62

104

Lewd and Libidinous Practices

98

105

100

119

102

58

109

66

29

50

31

55

229

213

240

240

Indecent Exposure

22

16

13

9

9

5

6

9

14

12

7

12

45

33

26

30

Others

9

27

9

24

16

12

14

10

19

14

19

16

44

53

42

50

Table 2

220

247

206

252

180

129

181

138

104

119

93

128

504

495

480

518

Table 3 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 3– Crimes Involving Dishonesty

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Dwelling

989

726

224

218

180

129

67

63

261

272

90

144

1,430

1,127

381

425

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Domestic Non-Dwelling

466

268

79

56

95

95

36

48

128

102

15

33

689

465

130

137

Th. HB, w.i. & att – Commercial

565

294

131

95

194

128

84

40

274

192

67

76

1,033

614

282

211

Theft by O.L.P. etc.

249

319

95

202

67

71

21

21

143

155

46

64

459

545

162

287

Theft by O.L.P. to a Motor Vehicle etc.

1,557

958

216

175

193

101

40

25

411

229

127

103

2,161

1,288

383

303

Theft/Att Theft of M.V. (inc TADA)

935

619

233

246

201

203

93

105

318

237

136

119

1,454

1,059

462

470

Sec 57/Vagrancy Act etc.

89

116

89

113

30

24

30

22

59

71

59

72

178

211

178

207

Theft

4,195

4,005

1,684

2,023

1,532

1,347

609

564

2,310

2,112

836

1,030

8,037

7,464

3,129

3,617

Theft from Motor Vehicle

407

270

38

78

196

144

39

32

222

163

29

49

825

577

106

159

Reset

64

66

64

67

8

14

8

14

21

34

21

34

93

114

93

115

Embezzlement

11

7

12

6

2

1

1

1

11

1

8

3

24

9

21

10

Fraud

362

507

331

431

145

146

132

156

276

271

227

232

783

924

690

819

207

273

Others

77

163

75

158

62

47

62

37

68

63

63

45

Table 3

9,966

8,318

3,271

3,868

2,905

2,450

1,222

1,128

4,502

3,902

1,724

2,004

17,373 14,670

200

240

6,217

7,000


35

Statistics Table 4 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 4– Fireraising, Malicious and Reckless Conduct

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Fireraising

129

222

34

70

87

49

34

19

53

56

15

10

269

327

83

99

Malicious Damage/Vandalism

2,193

3,718

3,591

665

1,037

2,100

1,926

442

589

2,112

2,081

507

567

7,930

7,598

1,614

Others

88

120

47

89

38

46

32

42

22

28

18

24

148

194

97

155

Table 4

3,935

3,933

746

1,196

2,225

2,021

508

650

2,187

2,165

540

601

8,347

8,119

1,794

2,447

Table 5

Group 5– Other Crimes

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Public Mischief/Wasting Police Time

113

151

115

153

50

46

49

46

70

54

70

54

233

251

234

253

Escape and Rescue

15

22

17

22

10

7

10

7

31

35

31

35

56

64

58

64

Resisting Arrest & Obstructing Constable

179

239

178

239

102

88

102

88

103

127

103

127

384

454

383

454

General Attempts to Pervert

43

99

43

99

25

48

25

47

42

53

42

52

110

200

110

198

Sex Offenders

0

1

0

1

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

4

0

4

315

1,477

315

1,479

41

239

42

239

96

144

96

144

452

1,860

453

1,862

*Offensive Weapons etc

145

168

144

168

52

35

53

34

72

57

72

57

269

260

269

259

Drugs – Supply, Possession w.i. etc.

244

251

243

253

95

143

95

145

339

379

336

379

678

773

674

777

Drugs – Possession

931

1,149

930

1,151

371

424

372

426

589

722

587

720

1,891

2,295

1,889

2,297 24

Bail – Fail to keep Conditions

Drugs - Others

9

11

8

12

2

6

2

6

4

6

4

6

15

23

14

Others

19

70

17

69

14

5

13

4

13

9

13

8

46

84

43

81

Table 5

2,013

3,638

2,010

3,646

762

1,043

763

1,044

1,359

1,587

1,354

1,583

4,134

6,268

4,127

6,273

Groups 1 – 5 TOTALS Classification of Crimes and Offences

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Group 1

296

347

259

299

107

120

98

114

145

113

119

106

548

580

476

519

Group 2

220

247

206

252

180

129

181

138

104

119

93

128

504

495

480

518

Group 3

9,966

8,318

3,271

3,868

2,905

2,450

1,222

1,128

4,502

3,902

1,724

2,004

17,373 14,670

6,217

7,000

Group 4

3,935

3,933

746

1,196

2,225

2,021

508

650

2,187

2,165

540

601

8,347

8,119

1,794

2,447

Group 5

2,013

3,638

2,010

3,646

762

1,043

763

1,044

1,359

1,587

1,354

1,583

4,134

6,268

4,127

6,273

TOTALS

16,430 16,483

6,492

9,261

6,179

5,763

2,772

3,074

8,297

7,886

3,830

4,422

30,906 30,132 13,094 16,757

At the end of a year of sustained performance improvement, the Force is delighted to record a reduction of 2.5% (774 fewer crimes) in overall reported crime compared to 2002/03. We are particularly pleased at significant reductions in some of the key target crime categories covered below. Of equal significance is the Force performance in crime detection where a solved rate of 55.6% has been achieved against last year’s 42.4%. The Force target was 43% and this outturn exceeds that by more than 12 percentage points. Some 3600 more crimes were detected in 2003/04 than in the previous year. These headline results reflect the second year of improvement in both recorded crime levels and the number of crimes detected by the Force. They provide evidence that the Force’s commitment to the Tayside Policing Style, the National Intelligence Model and Partnership Working through Community Planning is beginning to work through into safer communities across Angus, Dundee and Perth and Kinross. A great deal still requires to be done but it is very pleasing to see such tangible results from the efforts of all our staff. Violent Crime Although there was a 5.8% increase in the number of crimes recorded in this category, the detection rate rose by 2.6 percentage points to 89.5%. Central and Eastern Divisions recorded rises in the numbers of violent crimes but there was a 22.1% drop in Western Division. Whilst any increase in this category is disappointing and is of great concern to the Force, it should be remembered that crimes of this nature are still small in number accounting for just 1.9% of recorded crime. The incidences of entirely random crimes in this group are rare and, thankfully, violent crimes are not everyday occurrences in most communities within the Tayside Police area.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Classification of Crimes and Offences


36

Statistics Domestic Housebreaking Domestic Housebreaking is a key priority for the Force, as it is perhaps one of the most distressing of crimes for the victims. Across the Force, Domestic Housebreaking showed a welcome reduction of 21% with 303 fewer homes broken into. Reductions of 26% were recorded in Central Division (City of Dundee) and 28% in Eastern Division (Angus). Western Division (Perth & Kinross), which was targeted during the year by groups of criminals from the West of Scotland, recorded a slight increase of 4% on 2002/2003. The Force’s strategy of aggressively targeting the relatively small number of criminals who break into homes was seen to reap real dividends in preventing, disrupting and detecting this category of crime. The detection rate in this category rose from 26.6% last year to 37.7% exceeding the target set of 30%. Every Division recorded marked improvements with Western Division, in particular, reaching 52.9% with more than one in two crimes being detected. This included a number of those incidents involving the travelling criminals mentioned. Vehicle Crime The other priority area within acquisitive crime is the range of offences associated with vehicles. Concerted effort has continued to produce real success with a reduction of 34% on 2002/03, some 1500 fewer recorded crimes. Improvements across the Force area saw 1052 (36%) fewer crimes in Central Division, 142 (24%) in Eastern Division and 322 (34%) in Western Division. The detection rate across the Force was 31.9% exceeding the Target of 22% and a significant improvement on last year’s performance of 21.4%. Vandalism Vandalism has continued to receive an increasing priority acknowledging the level of public concern. Although often relatively minor, these incidents can create misery for the victims and their impact over a period of time can significantly effect the quality of life for families in particular communities and areas. It is therefore pleasing to see a fall of 4% in recorded vandalism, or 332 fewer crimes, continuing last year’s trend with three Divisions of the Force recorded reductions. The number of recorded crimes for Vandalism accounted for some 25% of all crimes recorded in the Force area demonstrating the impact of this senseless behaviour on communities everywhere. It will continue to receive a great deal of attention from us and in our work with partners. The level of attention now given to Vandalism by the Force is perhaps demonstrated by us once again significantly improving the detection rate. The detection rate for 2003/2004 was 28.9%, up more than 8 percentage points on last year. Over the year there were a number of successes in detecting individuals responsible for widespread spray painting of buildings and other wanton damage to property. The Force has been both innovative and determined to make inroads into detecting this very difficult crime category and has seen some real progress being achieved. Drugs The abuse of and trafficking in illegal drugs remains a major concern across the Force area as it does in the rest of Scotland. Work, specifically against those who traffic in Class “A” substances (Heroin, Cocaine etc) remains a high priority for the Force and its partners in the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency and other law enforcement agencies. A significant number of high profile arrests have been made over the year as a result of that work. There continues to be real concern about the availability of drugs in communities and in particular some signs that Heroin use is once again on the increase.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

In 2003/04 the number of reported offences in the Force area for Supplying Drugs etc rose by 14.9% from 693 to 796 reflecting the level of policing activity. Table 6 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 6– Other Offences Betting, Gaming and Lotteries

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Petty Assault

2,048

2,166

1,904

2,047

1,189

1,272

1,143

1,221

945

1,055

909

1,004

4,182

4,493

3,956

4,272

Breach iof the Peace

3,071

3,259

3,024

3,210

1,644

1,617

1,624

1,551

1,406

1,728

1,388

1,689

6,121

6,604

6,036

6,450

Racially Agg. Harassment/Conduct

156

286

122

252

36

58

31

54

38

108

32

102

230

289

185

245

False Calls and Bomb Hoaxes

18

44

12

32

17

12

9

10

25

17

12

15

60

73

33

57

Brokers

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Children and Young Persons Act

6

11

6

11

4

1

4

1

2

0

2

0

12

12

12

12

Cruelty to Animals (except Dogs)

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

3

2

4

2

4

4

8

4

8

Offences involving Animals and Birds

2

1

2

1

2

6

2

6

22

5

17

3

26

12

21

10

Dogs Act and Orders

57

52

57

52

31

34

31

34

23

29

23

29

111

115

111

115

Explosives and Firearms

24

34

24

34

23

19

23

19

31

15

31

15

78

68

78

68

Fishery Laws

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

10

Game Laws

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

7

2

7

2

8

3

8

3

Deer (S) Act Offences

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 885

Liquor Laws - Drunkenness

484

682

484

682

72

64

72

64

147

139

147

139

703

885

703

Liquor Laws - Licensees

6

10

6

10

7

8

7

8

4

2

4

2

17

20

17

20

Liquor Laws – Other Offences

18

36

18

36

12

16

12

16

11

13

11

13

41

65

41

65

Civic Govt. (S) Act and Similar Provs.

0

20

0

20

4

0

4

0

2

5

2

5

6

25

6

25

Public Health

159

204

155

201

35

37

34

36

46

30

40

30

240

271

229

267

Bicycle Offences

25

60

25

60

20

52

20

52

3

13

3

13

48

125

48

125

Obstruction on Roads and Bridges

8

5

8

5

8

3

8

3

2

5

2

5

18

13

18

13

Trespass Acts, etc

2

1

2

1

5

3

5

3

5

2

5

2

12

6

12

6

Other Group 6 Offences

446

620

446

620

128

157

128

157

80

122

80

122

654

899

654

899

Table 6

6,531

7,492

6,296

7,275

3,239

3,374

3,159

3,250

2,801

3,294

2,717

3,194

12,571 13,997 12,172 13,556

This group shows an overall increase in reported crime of 11.3% and an increase of 11.4% in the overall number of detections. The majority of the increase can be attributed to increases in two particular categories, namely petty assault and breach of the peace. These are crimes that are recognised as causing concern in our communities and are attracting increased police attention which has resulted in both an increase in crimes recorded and a corresponding increase in the overall detection rate.


37

Statistics One category that continues to rise is that of racially aggravated harassment/conduct. Increased reporting of such offences is a positive step and may reflect an increased confidence in reporting and investigation procedures by victims of these hideous crimes. Of the 289 offences reported there was an 84.8% detection rate and this is an area in which Tayside Police strive to achieve continual improvement.

Table 7 Classification of Crimes and Offences Group 7– Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles

CENTRAL

CENTRAL

EASTERN

EASTERN

WESTERN

WESTERN

FORCE

FORCE

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Cases Made Known

Cases with Persons Traced

Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03- Apr 02- Apr 03Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04 Mar 03 Mar 04

Dangerous and Careless Driving

350

332

349

330

340

366

340

366

314

395

314

395

1,004

1,093

1,003

Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 4

71

57

71

57

16

23

16

23

23

16

23

16

110

96

110

1,091 96

Road Traffic Act 1988, Section 5

293

334

293

334

177

210

177

210

250

247

250

247

720

791

720

791

*Vehicle Excise Act Offences

1,139

1135

1,139

1,135

271

359

271

359

487

489

485

488

1,897

1,983

1,895

1,982

*Speeding in Built-up Areas

1,437

3439

1,437

3,439

1,471

857

1,471

857

1,368

1,031

1,368

1,031

4,276

5,327

4,276

5,327

*Speeding outwith Built-up Areas

144

266

144

266

3,046

4,808

3,046

4,808

5,525

12,395

5,525

12,395

8,715

17,469

8,715

17,469

Other Motor Vehicle Offences

6,584

7812

6,582

7,808

3,293

3,849

3,293

3,849

4,974

5,765

4,974

5,765

14,851 17,426 14,849 17,422

Table 7

10,018 13,375 10,015 13,369

8,614

10,472

8,614

10,472 12,941 20,338 12,939 20,337 31,573 44,185 31,568 44,178

*Including Conditional Offers

There was a significant increase in the number of reported offences over the previous year of some 40%. However, it must be noted that this arose primarily as a result of the major increase in the number of persons detected speeding both in and outwith built up areas. The increase of 9,805 offences to 22,796 from the previous year’s total of 12,991 was an increase of 75.5%. A major factor in the increase was due to the work undertaken by the Tayside Safety Camera Parnership. This road safety initiative was launched on 17 July 2004 and invoved Angus, Dundee City and Perth and Kinross Councils, the Scottish Executive and Tayside Police working together. The Partnership was set up to inform drivers and riders of the dangers of excessive speeds with the aim of reducing casualties on our roads. The Partnership operates with a combination of fixed site and mobile safety cameras deployed to locations/routes where there is an history of personal injury collisions and where speed surveys indicate that vehicles are being driven or ridden at excessive speeds. The Partnership publicises the locations where auto detection work is being in carried out, in advance. Regrettably, it is apparent that a considerable number of motorist are choosing to ignore the road safety message and are continuing to drive in excess of the relevant speed limits. Tayside Safety Camera Partnership supported by Tayside Fire Brigade, The Scottish Ambulance Service and National Health Service Tayside will continue to promote the aims of the Scheme in the forthcoming year by encouraging drivers and riders to observe speed limits and alter driving behaviour with a view to influencing the number of persons injured on our roads. It is encouraging to note that there has been a slight reduction in the number of persons reported for driving whilst unfit through drink or drugs (Section 4 offences). However, it is disappointing that there has been an overall increase of approximately 9.9% in the number of persons detected driving over the prescribed limit (Section 5 offences). National and local campaigns continue to warn motorists of the dangers of drink/drugs driving. However, it remains apparent that there continues to be a minority of people who make the conscious decision to drive in such circumstances placing themselves and all other innocent road users in considerable danger. These persons have no place on our roads and Tayside Police will continue to use all forms of intelligence to target those involved in this totally unacceptable behaviour.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

The results in this table continue to reflect the proactive and intelligence led approach adopted by Tayside Police in targeting the main contributory factors involved in injury collisions.


38

Statistics Table 8 – Complaints against the police – numbers and disposal

2002/2003

2003/2004

Number of complaint cases received during the year

287

312

Number of complaint cases outstanding from the previous year

78

58

Total number of complaint cases to be processed

365

370

Withdrawn by complainer

28

13

Abandoned due to non co-operation of the complainer

16

8

Found to be unsubstantiated

35

17

Resolved by explanation to the complainer

140

175

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to ‘No Proceedings’ decision

139

182

Complaint allegations disposed of during the year as follows:

Reported to the Procurator Fiscal and leading to criminal proceedings

1

7

Resulting in action in terms of misconduct regulations

5

2

Resulting in Corrective Advice Total

30

8

394

412

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Number of complaint cases outstanding as at 31st March as follows: Reporting to and pending the decision of the Procurator Fiscal

22

10

Still under enquiry by the Investigating Officer

50

37

Pending Court proceedings

1

2

Pending Disciplinary Proceedings

0

0

Otherwise Pending

5

2

78

51

2,782

2,948

Total Hours spent in the investigation of complaints The figure for 2002/03 of 287 showed a decrease on the previous year of 18% from 348 which included the recording of minor complaints and service delivery issues. Whilst there was no change to the recording procedures, the figure for 2003/04 of 312 saw an increase of 8%.

Accordingly the number of allegations contained within complaints continued to increase from 394 to 412. Of these 412 allegations, 52% were either resolved by explanation, withdrawn, unsubstantiated or abandoned. 48% were reported to the Area Procurator Fiscal which resulted in 7 cases leading to criminal proceedings and only 2% of the total allegations involving misconduct issues were found to be substantiated.

Table 9 – Establishment Police Designation

Support Staff Establishment

Designation

Establishment

Chief Constable

1

Clerical Administrative & Professional

457

Deputy Chief Constable

1

Technical

123

Assistant Chief Constable

1

Domestic

0

Superintendent

14

Cleaners

55

Chief Inspector

19

Traffic Wardens

11

Inspector

54

Sergeant

162

Constable

915

Total

1167

Total

646

Special Constables

108


39

Statistics Table 10 – Sickness – days lost Number of Working Days lost 2002/2003

2003/2004

Police

Support

Police

Support

Central

6110

1293

6059

888

Eastern

3380

412

2760

666

Western

3529

1456

2667

1245

Headquarters

874

5028

1057

5334

Total

13,893

8189

12,543

8133

Percentage

5.30%

5.93%

4.86%

5.72%

The figures show a continuing improvement for the number of working days lost due to sickness absence and this downward trend is very positive. This trend is most marked for police officers whereby a reduction of 1,350 days has been achieved, almost 10% of last year’s total. Approximately 60% of absence is due to long term absence and is accounted for by 8% of officers, Support staff working days lost has reduced with an improvement of 3.5% in the percentage of working days lost from available working days. As with police officers, 60% of working days lost was attributable to long term serious illness experienced by 10% of staff. To achieve these improvements, a number of support mechanisms have been put in place including the availability of a flexible working hours scheme for support staff, an increase in the use and availability of parttime and variable working and adjustments to patterns of work. These support mechanisms have also been augmented with the support of our Occupational Health Provider, CIGNA in conjunction with Human Resource and line management intervention.

As at 31 March 2004 Number of officers authorised by Chief Constable as firearms users

53

Number of operations against persons known or believed to be armed in which firearms were issued

1

Number of occasions on which firearms were issued for protection purposes

7

Number of persons who received specific armed protection during the year

7

Number of times firearms were issued to destroy crazed animals

0

Number of incidents where firearms were discharged by the police

0

This department forms part of the Patrol Support Group and was formerly known as Tactical Support. This deprtment provides Tayside Police with the resources and capabilities to resolve incidents where intervention may be required by police officers trained in the use of firearms. Regular specialist training is provided in both weapon firing and tactical deployments to counter threats posed as a result of armed crime, VIP protection and dangerous animals. The training provided fully complies with the guidance published in the ACPO/ACPOS Manual of Guidance on Police Use of Firearms. Patrol Support (Firearms) can also offer highly trained ‘method of entry’ officers to perform dynamic and rapid entry to premises to assist in both firearm and search operations. All officers who perform duties are volunteers and based throughout the entire Force area. Their performance as authorised firearms officers is constantly assessed in all areas of training by nationally qualified instructors to ensure that the high standard demanded is maintained. Through constant revision of tactics deployed, equipment provided, procedures undertaken and training offered, Patrol Support (Firearms) ensure that they can provide an effective and proportionate response to any request for their specialist assistance.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Table 11 – Authorisation of officers and issue of firearms


40

Statistics Table 12 – Racist Incident reports

Central Eastern Western Total

Incidents Reported 2002/2003 2003/2004 172 194 39 69 43 42 254 305

Number of cases where persons apprehended, reported or warned 2002/2003 2003/2004 124 152 33 57 34 35 191 244

Breakdown of Types of Incidents

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Abuse/Br. of the Peace Vandalism Assault Others Total

2002/2003 206 21 22 5 254

2003/2004 261 13 26 5 305

Racist Incidents rose by 51 this year to a total of 305; this is a matter for concern. Further analysis of the ethnicity of victims reveals that an increase is apparent in only two categories: Asian ~ up from 143 to 163 an increase of 19 White European ~ up from 40 to 88 an increase of 48. The increase in complaints by White Europeans is surprising and deserves further analysis. It is not possible to comment fully on this rise before the analysis is complete. Despite this increase, this category of crime is relatively rare in Tayside. It is generally spontaneous in nature, often associated with alcohol and there are few premeditated acts. The Force Working Group on diversity remains active and is chaired by the Deputy Chief Constable. This group maintains a close scrutiny of reported racial incidents. Racist incidents are reported daily to the Tasking and Co-ordinating Group. This highlights the priority that the Force places on the effective investigation of this type of crime.

Table 13 – Table of comparisons – Road Collisions and Casualties 2002/2003 Central Division – Dundee District Total Collisions 1920 Persons Killed 3 Persons Seriously Injured 75 Persons Slightly Injured 389 Overall total – Killed and Injured 467

2003/2004

Increase/Decrease

% Change

1572 2 55 294 351

-348 -1 -20 -95 -116

-18.1% -33.3% -26.7% -24.4% -24.8%

Eastern Division – Angus District Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1417 6 92 388 486

1219 8 78 246 332

-198 2 -14 -142 -154

-14.0% 33.3% -15.2% -36.6% -31.7%

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

1924 16 148 425 589

1923 27 153 472 652

-1 11 5 47 63

-0.1% 68.8% 3.4% 11.1% 10.7%

Tayside Total Collisions Persons Killed Persons Seriously Injured Persons Slightly Injured Overall total – Killed and Injured

5261 25 315 1202 1542

4714 37 286 1012 1335

-547 12 -29 -190 -207

-10.4% 48.0% -9.2% -15.8% -13.4%

Regretably and tragically, the number of persons killed on our roads during the year 2003/2004 increased from the previous year’s total which, in itself, had shown a substantial reduction from the preceding year. Unfortunately, several collisions resulted in double fatalities and one resulted in a triple fatality. Western Division, in particular, suffered from an increase in all categories from the preceding year. There is an ongoing liaison with the local authorities and the Scottish Executive to analyse and identify the causes of collisions and, where possible, to determine possible engineering solutions. Education and targeted enforcement continue to attempt to influence driver behaviour and reduce the incidence of injury collisions on the roads. On a positive note, it is encouraging that there has been a significant reduction in the total number of collisions and in the number of persons injured across Tayside Police as a whole. With the exception of fatalities, this general pattern continued the progress of the Force towards achieving the National Targets set for casualty reduction by 2010.


41

Statistics Table 14 – Table of road users killed and injured Killed 2002/2003

Injured

Totals

2003/2004

2002/2003

2003/2004

2002/2003

2003/2004

0

108

84

110

84

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

26

24

26

24

Motor Cyclists

0

0

15

19

15

19

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

2

0

2

0

Drivers

1

2

193

132

194

134

Passengers

0

0

120

90

120

90

Totals

3

2

464

349

467

351

Pedestrians

0

0

61

33

61

33

Pedal Cyclists

1

1

14

14

15

15

Motor Cyclists

0

0

24

18

24

18

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

3

1

3

1

Drivers

5

3

240

180

245

183

Passengers

0

4

138

78

138

82

Totals

6

8

480

324

486

332

42

Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians

2

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Pedestrians

1

1

66

41

67

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

17

11

17

11

Motor Cyclists

3

3

43

45

46

48

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

3

4

3

5

Drivers

8

13

298

332

306

345

Passengers

4

9

146

192

150

201

Totals

16

27

573

625

589

652

Pedestrians

3

1

235

158

238

159

Pedal Cyclists

1

1

57

49

58

50

Motor Cyclists

3

3

82

82

85

85

Tayside

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

8

5

8

6

Drivers

14

18

731

644

745

662

Passengers

4

13

404

360

408

373

Totals

25

37

1517

1298

1542

1335

Whilst there was a reduction of 3 motor cycle passengers injured from the preceding year, it is recognised that for the third year running, the number of motor cyclists and passengers killed and injured has remained at an excessive level. There continues to be a general increase in the numbers of persons attracted to recreational motor cycling and this involves persons with a wide range of skills and experience. Targeted enforcement work continues within Tayside Police and in joint operations with our neighbouring forces to encourage the safer use of motor cycles and deal with those who choose to use high powered machines inappropriately, risking serious injury to themselves and others. The Bikesafe initiative is operated by motor cyclists from within the Tayside Police Road Policing Unit to improve rider awareness and provide an assessment of rider skills. Tayside Police Road Safety Officers in association with the local authorities undertake a range of initiatives to educate children and parents in respect of road safety issues. It is encouraging that there has been an overall reduction in the number of casualties across the Force area.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Eastern Division – Angus District


42

Statistics

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Table 15 – Fatal Collision Pattern 1990 – 2003/2004

Table 16 – Collision Pattern 1990 – 2003/2004


43

Statistics Table 17 – Table of road users killed and injured Killed Under 16

Injured 16 and Over

Under 16

16 and Over

Central Division – Dundee District Pedestrians

0

0

37

47

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

11

13

Motor Cyclists

0

0

2

17

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

0

Drivers

0

2

0

132

Passengers

0

0

18

72

Totals

0

2

68

281

Pedestrians

0

0

11

22

Pedal Cyclists

0

1

7

7

Motor Cyclists

0

0

0

18

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

0

0

1

Drivers

0

3

0

180

Passengers

0

4

16

62

Totals

0

8

34

290

24

Western Division – Perth & Kinross Pedestrians

0

1

17

Pedal Cyclists

0

0

1

10

Motor Cyclists

0

3

0

45

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

2

2

Drivers

0

13

0

332

Passengers

1

8

29

163

Totals

1

26

49

576

Tayside Pedestrians

0

1

65

93

Pedal Cyclists

0

1

19

30

Motor Cyclists

0

3

2

80

Motor Cycle Passengers

0

1

2

3

Drivers

0

18

0

644

Passengers

1

12

63

297

Totals

1

36

151

1147

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Eastern Division – Angus District


44

Statistics Table 18 - Misuse of Drugs Seizures Drug

02 – 03

Heroin

Weight 03 – 04

137

02 – 03

Approx. Value (£) 03 – 04

02 – 03

03 – 04

223

5950.76 grams

4048.21grams

952,161

647,713

Cocaine

96

95

2689.65 grams

3702.03 grams

161,379

222,122

MDMA (Ecstasy)

174

148

2921.34

10,070 tabs

14,605

52,711

LSD

0

1

0

4

0

12

Psilocybin

0

1

0

1.902 grams

0

10

Powder

138

107

12,612.34 grams

8074.18 grams

126,123

80,742

Tablets

2

1

2

1

10

5

1100

1400

60,019.67 grams

163,473.1 grams

300,098

817,366

Herbal

76

79

3114.65 grams

5775.87 grams

15,573

28,879

Plants

16

31

174 plants

1629 plants

30,450

285,075

14

10

87 tabs

49 tabs

696

490

1

0

0.832 grams

0

21

0

Temazepam

24

13

269 tabs

748 tabs

269

748

Dihydrocodeine

1,180

Amphetamine

Cannabis Resin

Pharmaceuticals Morphine

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Ketamine Powder

34

33

655 tabs

2359 tabs

327

Steroids

4

5

67 tab/amp

96 doses

91

96

Viagra

4

5

118 tabs

90 tabs

944

720

Dipipanone

1

6

7 tabs

49 tabs

56

392

113

69

10,044 tabs

2188 tabs

10,044

2,188

Methylphenidate

5

0

22 tabs

0

11

0

Lormetazepam

1

0

8 tabs

0

8

0

Methandieone

6

0

1,002 tabs

0

704

0

Ephidrene

1

0

976 tabs

0

4880

0

Diazepam

Nitrazepam Sub Total Methadone Linctus Morphine Liquid Detected drugs offences

1

16

5 tabs

321

5

321

209

157

13,260 tabs/amp 0.832 grams powder

5801.248

18056

6,135

14

14

958.15 mls

2083.1 mls

191.63

416.62

1

2

20ml

90 mls

10

450

Total Value

£1,618,657

2,141,636

02-03

2,577

03-04

3,091

The number of detected drugs offences recorded during 2003-2004 showed a marked increase from 2,577 the previous year to 3,091. The street value of drugs recovered has also risen significantly from £1,618,657 the previous year to £2,141,636. This is mainly due to several large seizures of Cocaine, Ecstasy, Cannabis Resin and Cannabis. In line with the National and Force Strategic Tasking and Co-ordinating Group’s Control Strategies of targeting Class A drug dealers, Tayside Drugs and Surveillance branch have had another successful year. The implementation of the Proceeds of Crime Act has also assisted disrupting the activities of the dealers with recent cash seizures of £14,000 and £12,000. As in previous years, the Tayside Drugs/Surveillance Branch has focused on Class A drug dealers. A number of lengthy operations were undertaken. One such operation resulted in the arrest of 28 individuals from Liverpool, Manchester, Glasgow and the Perth and Dundee areas of Tayside. It seriously disrupted a major organised crime group bringing drugs into Tayside and resulted in large seizures of Heroin, Cocaine, Ecstasy and Cannabis Resin. The use of the Class A drug Heroin is widespread throuhout the Tayside Region, seizures of the drug have almost doubled in the past year which is a worrying trend. Due to several major seizures in the past two years, some dealers are prepared to travel on a more regular basis for smaller amounts and conceal these packages internally to avoid detection. The Class A drug Cocaine has shown a year on year increase across the region. Although seizures of the drug have remained similar, the amount recovered has increased dramatically. During one intelligence led operation, one kilo of Cocaine and one kilo of Heroin were recovered. This was the largest ever seizure of the two drugs combined in the Tayside area. Ecstasy also continues to be abused across the region; seizures are slightly down but, again, the amount recovered has increased significantly. Amphetamine seizures and the amounts recovered have dropped. Although the drug remains popular the availability of Cocaine and Ecstasy, along with their street prices dropping, may play a factor in this. Cannabis Resin/Cannabis still remains the most popular drug of choice and multi kilo amounts are still being recovered in consignments along with Class A drugs. There has also been a sharp increase in the amount of house based Cannabis Hydroponics Cultivations producing dealer quantities. This is possibly due to poor quality Resin or the downgrading of the drug from Class B to C. The illegal use of prescription drugs is also widespread across the region. In many of the recoveries surrounding Diazepam, forensic examination of the tablets has found them to be counterfeit or a mixture of other drugs with some Diazepam present. Packaging recovered also indicates that the drugs are made abroad and would not be prescribed in this country. In the past year the Tayside Drugs/Surveillance Branch has built on its established links with the SDEA and other force Drugs/Surveillance Units. It has also forged new links with the National Crime Squad of England and Wales ensuring that every opportunity is taken to arrest or disrupt individuals not only supplying drugs in Tayside but also those who orchestrate their delivery to our communities.


45

Statistics Category Crimes (Groups 1 to 5) % cleared up Serious Violent Crime ~ crimes made known

2002/2003 Result

2003/2004 Target

2003/2004 Result

42.4%

43%

55.6%

648

597

665

Serious Violent Crime ~ % cleared up

90.4%

91%

92%

Domestic Housebreaking ~ crimes made known

1,430

1,359

1,127

Domestic Housebreaking ~ % cleared up

26.6%

30%

37.7%

Drugs: Number of Seizures

1,455

1,579

1,782

Drugs: Number of Crimes made known ~ supply, possession with intent etc.

693

707

796

80.4%

82%

84.8%

Car Crime ~ crimes made known

4,440

4,218

2,924

Car Crime ~ % cleared up

21.4%

22%

31.9%

340

333

323

Racist Crime ~ % cleared up

Roads Policing Unit ~ a) Number of people killed/seriously injured Roads Policing Unit ~ b) Number of children killed/seriously injured

57

54

40

1,202

1,178

1,012

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Police Officers

5.3%

5%

4.9%

Sickness Absence ~ % working time lost - a) Support Staff

5.9%

5%

5.7%

Complaints ~ per 100 Employees

15.2

14

16.2

Roads Policing Unit ~ c) Number of slight casualties

Sustained performance improvement impacted upon the results across the Statutory Performance Indicators and resulted in the detection rate for crime Groups 1 to 5 improving by 13 percentage points on the 2002/2003 result. Serious Violent Crime was one of three areas where the Force target was not met. Whilst Serious Violent Crime accounts for only 2% of total recorded crime, Tayside Police takes this kind of crime very seriously indeed and this is reflected in the fact that 92% of the crimes committed were detected. The number of houses broken into in Tayside fell by 21% during 2003/2004 when compared to the previous year. The aggressive targeting of a small number of criminals was most successful. The Divisions and supporting departments within Tayside Police worked very closely together to combat the activities of groups of travelling criminals. Trafficking of Drugs in Scotland continues to be given a very high priority. Class ‘A’ drugs in particular are of paramount concern, not only in Tayside but also with the Scottish Drug Enforcement Agency and other external partners. An improvement in the number of Racist Crimes detected reflects the continuing commitment of Tayside Police to crimes of this nature. Car Crime was given a high priority across the Force which resulted in 1500 fewer crimes being recorded and an improved detection rate of 31.9% ~ a 10.5 percentage point improvement on the 21.4% recorded at the end of 2002/2003. Overall, a reduction in road casualties throughout Tayside was encouraging. A decrease in the number of days lost through sickness was recorded both for Police Officers and Support Staff. Complaints against all Police staff rose from 15.2 in 2002/2003 to 16.2 in 2003/2004.

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

Table of Statutory Performance Indicators


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

46


ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004

47


Contact Information Please visit our website at: www.tayside.police.uk If you wish to make any comment about this Annual Performance Report, or require further information, please contact the Head of Headquarters Division by any of the following methods. By writing to: Headquarters Division, Tayside Police, PO Box 59, West Bell Street, Dundee DD1 9JU By Telephoning: (01382) 596802 E-mail: mail@tayside.pnn.police.uk Textphone: (01382) 204500 If you require a copy of this document in a community language or large print, please telephone: (01382) 596742

annualreport2003-2004  

CHIEF CONSTABLE’S POLICINGWITHVISION SETTINGTHESTANDARD ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT 2004 Designed and produced for T...

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