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Flooring: From the subtle to the Flashy i hbaK award winners i welcome Kimberly greenwell

the oFFicial Publication oF the home builders association louisVille, inc.

Volume 26, no.06 june 2011

Meet the Builders

Find out what makes this Homearama unlike any other.

Get up to date www.HBAL.com Register for classes and events and the latest information that’s important to you.


Visit our Showroom at 1601 S. Floyd St., Louisville I-65 South Exit 134 Arthur Street.

Kitche Begin Wi ns Call Tricia th KI... Ne at 635-05 lson 81 M-F 8 :00am – or ANYTIM4:30pm appointm E by ent

www.ki-lumber.com 2 louisville builder • hbal.com


contents

vol. 24, no.06 june 2011

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF LOUISVILLE, INC.

association news 13 First-Ever HBAL Family Picnic 14 Increasing Creative Effectiveness in your Magazine Ad 15 Stephenie Hood Comes Back to HBAL 18 In the News and Underfoot… Flooring Makes an Unmistakable Statement, from Subtle to Flashy 23 13th Annual Kentucky Design & Remodeling Awards Deadline for Registration is June 15 24 Kimberly Greenwell joins HBAL Marketing Team

feature

departments

Meet the Homearama 2011 Builders Featured builders include veteran participants, in addition to builders making their Homearama debuts. Each has planned unique venues designed for a variety of lifestyles and tastes, and all built with energy efficiency and functionality in mind. Read on to discover a behind-the-scenes glance at this year’s Homearama builders and the thought process behind the projects they are planning this year. page 6

Perspective Letter...............................5 Member Meetings............................25 Member News..................................26 Spike List.........................................27 New Members..................................28 Milestone Members.........................28 Honor Roll.......................................29 Calendar of Events...........................30 Flooring: From the subtle to the Flashy i hbaK award winners i welcome Kimberly greenwell

the oFFicial Publication oF the home builders association louisVille, inc.

Volume 26, no.06 june 2011

Meet the Builders

Find out what makes this Homearama unlike any other.

awards

products

HBAL congratulates two members on recent awards

Flooring products from the subtle to the flashy

HBAK Awards

page 13

Flooring page 16

Get up to date www.HBAL.com Register for classes and events and the latest information that’s important to you.

Cover: The brand new fountain located on the 2011 Homearama site in Norton Commons. Homearama 2011 will be June 16-31.

june 2011 3


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perspectiveletter Home Builders Association of Louisville, Inc.

1000 North Hurstbourne Parkway Louisville, KY 40223-4012 (502) 429-6000 FAX (502) 429-6036 Email: newhomes@hbal.com Web Site: www.hbal.com 2011 OFFICERS

Our Social Media Campaigns Need You by Chuck kavanaugh

Billy Doelker President Rob Eberenz, Jr. Vice President Bob Thieneman, Jr. Treasurer Perry Lyons Secretary Stan Logan, Jr. Associate Vice President Charles J. Kavanaugh Executive Vice President BUILDER DIRECTORS Terry Chynoweth Pat Durham Michael Isaac Joe Kroll P. R. Lancaster David Lurding Jeremy McGraw George Miller Michael O’Dea Chris Osborne Rocco Pigneri David Rateau Dave Smith Todd Stengel ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS Bill Bardenwerper Davis Boland Joe Dumstorf David Ernst Dale Hellmann Buddy Kittle Paul Miele David Mikels Teresa Morgan Jeff Ratanapool Tom Raver Joe Simms Derek Smothers

HONORARY Builder DIRECTOR

Clifford Thieneman, Sr.

HONORARY associate DIRECTORs Frank Arnold, Sr. Richard Bean PUBLISHER Charles J. Kavanaugh EDITOR Tara Brinkmoeller Advertising Melissa Mattingly Kimberly Greenwell 502.429.6000 GRAPHIC DESIGN Scott Dudgeon Writers Stacy Smith Rogers HBAL Issues Nancy Miller Product Features HBAL Staff PRINTING United Graphics

Homearama is always an exciting time of year for those of us at the Association. This year is especially exciting as we gear up for the largest single site Homearama event ever and 17 of the 21 homes are already sold (figure current at press time)! Homearama at Norton Commons will offer attendees an experience unlike anything they have ever had before from a Homearama event. The neighborhood offers unique characteristics and the home styles built by this year’s paticipating builders are a great backdrop for the plethora of home products and services on display by our Associate Members.

“When you post on our facebook pages you increase the number of people who are exposed to your message.” Facebook.com/HomearamaLouisville

This year you might also notice that the marketing that we do for Homearama will be unlike what we have done in the past. As social media continues to grow in popularity, we will be launching a couple of different social media campaigns to support our more traditional avenues of marketing the event. This year’s Homearama has the potential, I believe, to not only be the largest showcase of homes, but also some of the largest crowds in the history of the event. We’ve got a great plan put together in order to attract the crowds and bring you business, but we also want (and need) your help! I encourage all of our members to “Like” the Home Builders Association of Louisville and Homearama on facebook. Post pictures of your products being installed, information about what you’re going to display at the event, fun facts about your company or anything else that might be of interest to potential show-goers on our pages. When you post on our facebook pages you increase the number of people who are exposed to your message. Our marketing department kicked-off one of our many campaigns for this event last month. They are posting a “detail of the day” and explain the history or fun facts about unique features that can be found in the architecture of this year’s homes. We strongly encourage our members to help post about special details that you want to call to consumers’ attention. We ask that you not post messages that are trying to sell the product, but merely inform or even entertain those who like our pages. Homearama lasts for 16-days, but your exposure as a participating company in the event can last even longer

through social media and other marketing. Make the most of your participation in the event by spending a little time each day promoting yourself and your contribution to the event on facebook.

“Homearama lasts for 16-days, but your exposure as a participating company in the event can last even longer through social media and other marketing.” As you have heard me say before, one of our top priorities as an Association is to create opportunities for our members to generate business and to connect to consumers. We truly believe that the marketing plan, including social media plans that we have created for Homearama 2011 at Norton Commons will accomplish that. Please join us in this marketing effort and help us to generate the best Homearama attendance ever. Sincerely,

Charles J. Kavanaugh Executive Vice President Home Builders Association of Louisville

HBAL.COM

Visit our Facebook page for more from Chuck Kavanaugh and to give us your feedback. FACEBOOK

june 2011 5


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Mark Your Calendar July 16-31, 2011 Norton Commons

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Participating Sponsors:

By Stacy Smith Rogers, Grace Communications, LLC

Come mid-July, Homearama 2011 Norton Commons will offer an important reminder about the value and excitement surrounding homeownership, especially in the wake of a slowly rebounding economy. What’s perhaps even more significant about the host venue this year is the emphasis on being part of a community of homeowners, where neighbors know neighbors and friends are welcome. Strategically positioned just feet away from each other, 22 home sites will showcase cutting edge designs that are different from any other Homearama to date. Featured builders include veteran participants, in addition to builders making their Homearama debuts. Each has planned unique venues designed for a variety of lifestyles and tastes, and all built with energy efficiency and functionality in mind. Read on to discover a behind-thescenes glance at this year’s Homearama builders and the thought process behind the projects they are planning this year.

man, Jr., explained the company’s thought process on the project, “I think we’re all building more homes based around needs and less around excess. The houses are smaller, but people want them to have the same feel as a larger home, just more functionality. The home we’re building doesn’t have a formal dining room or living room, but it has a beautiful dining area that opens up to the great room, creating a real nice flow to the area,” he explained.

How are Builders Making the Most of the Smaller Homearama Footprints? The tradition of Homearama offers a challenge to builders each year who are eager to live up to the reputation of being a trendsetter for local home building. Last year’s event in Shakes Run left big shoes to fill -- with all but one of the homes sold by show time. This year, builders are filling those shoes with smaller footprints -- in size that is. But they aren’t skimping on thoughtful designs or innovative products. Smaller footprints don’t equal less strategic planning or creativity. In fact, it often takes more planning to build a smaller home. With the downsize in square footage comes the upsize in useful spaces. Most Homearama builders cited functionality as a key design ingredient, perhaps above all others. Flexibility of spaces -- not just the main rooms, but nearly every part of the house -- is what many builders are focusing on. Unlike other Homearamas, builders aren’t constructing rooms for just one occasion anymore. Every room needs to have multiple purposes and be able to “flex” into the occasion as it’s needed, and Norton Commons is the perfect venue to demonstrate that type of flexible building. Leo Thieneman & Sons, LLC, has participated in seven Homearama events, building homes more than twice as big as as the 3,393 square foot Greek Revival two-story in this year’s Homearama. Leo Thiene-

Second-time Homearama builder Stacye Love, Stacye Love Construction, described the challenge of building her clients’ dream home in just 3,693 square feet. “They were interested in a master suite and a sun room on the first floor. Since the lots at Norton Commons are very narrow and the houses are close together, the floor plan they wanted me to design was my biggest challenge to date,” she explained. Love said she wanted to create an ideal floor plan that met her clients’ needs and also created a sense of openness, while connecting the small outdoor living area to the house. “The successful layout of the rooms allows the home to still have the spacial feel of a home on a larger lot. Additionally, the 12-foot ceilings in the main portion of the house and tall windows create the grandeur of a larger home,” she said. Love’s traditional design allows the sunroom in The Madison to walk out onto an outdoor living area terrace with a fire pit and grill.

“I think we’re all building more homes based around needs and less around excess. The houses are smaller, but people want them to have the same feel as a larger home, just more functionality.” - Leo Thieneman, Jr.

“We don’t have these huge Homearama rooms like before. We’re challenged with making the house live larger than what it really is, so you’ve got to design accordingly.” - David Weis

june 2011 7


2011 Homearama Builders

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ting the plans to fit on tight lots forces you to make sure it’s functional. You’ve got to really think through everything,” he said. P.R. Lancaster, Limestone Builders, Inc., added his perspective, “You don’t have the space to go crazy with the home, so you have to use creativity to provide a type of building and living style that will really stand out.”

For David Weis, Meridian Construction, the Norton Commons venue is host to his fourth Homearama project. The Piazza, Weiss’ Italianate two-story showcases a unique front porch rail, in addition to a mixture of brick, wood and iron within its 3,350 square feet. Weiss elaborated on his goal for adding texture and warmth in his home, while still keeping the interior finishes bright and fresh in hue. “You have to be more sensitive to how you’re handling your finishes when you’re working in smaller spaces. You’ve got to be more creative with your light. We don’t have these huge Homearama rooms like before. We’re challenged with making the house live larger than what it really is, so you’ve got to design accordingly. You can’t have people walking downstairs into a dark hole,” he explained.

“Getting the plans to fit on tight lots forces you to make sure it’s functional. You’ve got to really think through everything.” - Bill Meadows

Bill Meadows, Bill Meadows Construction, LLC has been building in Norton Commons for 10 years. He also lives there. This is his first Homearama, and he says that it’s been hard to know where to stop in regard to adding all the amenities to showcase his spec home, which has been designed for a growing family. He patterned his home off the one he current lives in at Norton Commons, which he said gave him a personal perspective on the functionality of the design. “I added a lot of the things I wish I had in my house. This home has attics in the third floor and above the garage that can be finished in the future so the family can grow into it. There are a lot of spaces that are multifunctional. Get8 louisville builder • hbal.com

Re-Thinking the WOW Factor Every Homearama builder wants to create a WOW factor, but instead of that one extra something, the general consensus is that they are focusing on the total package, with functionality being a major focus, but uniqueness and authenticity running close seconds. While Thieneman said his home is flexible enough to fit a variety of lifestyles, he designed the spec home to meet the needs of a family with older children. The contract he had on it at press time was signed by owners who fit his original ideal buyer. In addition to creating a vintage charm on the exterior, Thieneman said they’ve tried to incorporate authentic elements throughout. “Our goal was to re-create what would normally be found in a vintage home, following the traditional building principles throughout, including plumbing fixtures, lights and inset doors on kitchen cabinets,” he explained. Thieneman also referenced eight-inch wide-planked flooring and open kitchen cabinets as design elements that contribute to the nostalgic appeal of his home, which he hopes will impress Homearama visitors. This is the fifth Homearama for Richard Miles, Landmark Custom Homes/Dogwood Homes of Kentucky. As a former HBAL president, Miles recognizes the important role that Homearama plays within the community, and this year he hopes to WOW visitors to the Bella Casa, a 4,786 square foot home with a master suite on both the first and second floors. He described the thought process behind building the traditional early American two-story. “We wanted to build something a little different than anything else in Norton Commons,” Miles said. The home has a circle front porch and a circle room above the porch, which makes it quite unique to the neighborhood.

“It has been exciting researching the different styles and features. I think as people walk through our home they will get the feel of a 50-year-old home, but will see how we have incorporated many of the more modern features that people expect in a new home today.” - Richard Miles

Miles said that it has been an interesting learning process researching how homes were built a half a century ago. “Our focus over the past few years has been on Craftsman style homes and we had never really focused on capturing how homes were built 50 to 100 years ago. It has been exciting researching the different styles and features. I think as people walk through our home they will get the feel of a 50-year-old home, but will see how we have included many of the more modern features that people expect in a new home today.” Love anticipates that flooring will set the foundation for impressive elements in her home. “The floors in the house are a mix of herringbone travertine and random width hickory sand and stain floors. I am a big believer in the old-fashioned method of sand and stain floors. We use a matte finish with distressed hickory, which adds age and texture to the feel of the home. This detail creates richness and warmth throughout the first floor. The cross-cut herringbone travertine in the sun room and back hall helps to break up the hardwood and add additional interest to


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the home, along with defining the various spaces,” she said. Weiss explained the “smart home” technologies incorporated in his home that he hopes will turn head in this year’s event. “Our house gives homeowners the ability to lock and unlock their doors while they aren’t even home. They can change their thermostats, dim the lights at certain times and more all through a simple app they download to their phones. You can program it a thousand different ways,” he explained. Weiss said that this kind of technology used to break the bank, but not anymore. He’s hoping to highlight not only the energy efficiency of his home, but the “smartness” of it as well.

“I would love for people to walk out of the units, look out at the lovely park and say, ‘I’ve never seen anything like this before, but now that I have, I could see myself living here.’ Hopefully, they will appreciate the uniqueness of my building and embrace the concept.” - P.R. Lancaster

Instead of building a conventional single-family home, Lancaster is showcasing a three-unit building that consists of two, one-bedroom townhomes. “Norton Commons is such a unique building venue with so many types of living arrangements. I wanted to showcase one that is both an old concept but new in contemporary building today. In historic areas of most major cities, as in Louisville, living areas were often combined with work areas. Townhomes would be mixed in among businesses. As time went by, people moved to the suburbs away from business areas and this type of arrangement is now rarely used in new construction. In Norton Commons, where they have moved back to integrating business and living areas, that old concept has been revived. I thought Homearama would be a great opportunity to showcase this concept in contemporary living and feature a different type of Homearama project that has never been offered before,” he said. Lancaster has added apartments under the townhomes. “When you purchase one of the townhomes, it comes with an apartment below it. The apartment could be used for a college age child who wants more privacy, as an in-law suite or as a home office. Or, you might just want to rent it out to help defray the cost of your mortgage. In the past, the creative and unique ideas in Homearama are primarily on the interior. I wanted to show people something new that has more to do with the creative construction and use of the building itself,” Lancaster said. “I would love for people to walk out of the units, look out at the lovely park and say, ‘I’ve never seen anything like this before, but now that I have, I could see myself living here.’ Hopefully, they will appreciate the uniqueness of my building and embrace the concept,” he said.

“The inspiration in designing and building The Athena was to create a distinctive vintage style of home with period touches, coupled with today’s most energy saving features.” - Daryl Hardy

Daryl Hardy, Hardy Builders, LLC, described the style of his home, a classical Greek revival. “It’s a very historic and splendid style that is recognized for its grand architecture. The inspiration in designing and building The Athena was to create a distinctive vintage style of home with period touches, coupled with today’s most energy saving features,”

2011 Homearama Builders

he explained. Hardy said that while this home has formal areas, it also provides its owners with open and comfortable living spaces. In addition, auxiliary areas such as a balcony, a professional office with separate entrance and a beautiful patio and garden area with a fountain offer visitors plenty of unique spaces. For Greg Burrus, Burrus Architecture & Construction, LLC, this is his Homearama debut. His 3,745 square foot home includes a twostory front porch, a brick terrace with a fountain and a screened porch. Burrus highlighted some elements in his home, “Although we have built over 50 homes in Norton Commons, we are using some new elements in the Homearama house, such as 12-foot coffered ceilings on the first floor, and a second floor sleeping porch with operable shutters and screens. The tall ceilings add a lot of visual drama to the living, dining and kitchen areas when coupled with our 10-foot French doors.” Burrus explained why he chose a classical design. “That is a style that appeals to me greatly in the context of a new urbanist neighborhood. Keeping the overall form of the house simple allows me to focus on executing some bold details. It’s on a corner lot, and we have added height to the building via taller ceilings and a tall cornice with exposed rafter tails. The chimney and tall French doors with metal balconies on the side street elevation provide a design look that hasn’t been seen in Norton Commons before,” he said. Dan Smith, Stonelake Homes LLC, is building a traditional Italianate contract home with a modern floor plan that’s custom-designed for his homeowner. While this home is certainly different that the other Homearama homes he’s built, Smith said he’ll continue using his trademark bullnose corners on the drywall. “That’s something simple, but people really notice it. Sometimes it’s those simple things that are noticed,

Preview Party

Get a Sneak Peak at Homearama 2011 at the Preview Party in Norton Commons July 15 ... HBAL Members can catch a sneak preview of the Homearama homes on Friday, July 15 at the Preview Party from 6-8:30 p.m. Tickets are $50.00 per person before June 24th, $75 per person if ordered after June 24th and are available at the HBAL office. Call 429-6000 or email Jessica Embry at jessica@hbal.com to purchase tickets prior to the party because PREVIEW PARTY TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED AT THE EVENT. Early ticket purchases are encouraged since space is limited. sponsored by:

june 2011 9


2011 Homearama Builders

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like using real hardwood flooring,” he said. Smith referenced the porches and second floor balcony as sure head-turners for La Bella Vita. What’s it Like to Build a Homearama Home in Norton Commons? Overwhelming, the builders agree that the purity of architecture, community atmosphere and street landscapes make Norton Commons a uniquely beautiful place to showcase their homes. Along with the intimacy that’s made Norton Commons so popular, comes the challenge of building homes five and six feet apart from each other. Simple planning, such as painting the exterior of a house one day when the builder next door is washing his brick, takes coordination (and neighborly manners). There are a lot of advantages too. Grabbing lunch or a cup of coffee for the work crew is easy considering there are coffee shops and restaurants within walking distance of the job site. Norton Commons offers the conveniences of a mixed-use community and a neighborhood atmosphere that’s contagious, whether you’re a builder, resident or visitor. Weiss commented on the planning behind Norton Commons. “Every square inch of that development was planned. Literally every footstep in Norton Commons has been thought out. The engineering behind that master plan is mind blowing,” he said. Weiss went on to describe the architectural review process. “This is certainly an environment where you have to add another layer to your skill set. You have to bring your A-game for sure,” he added. The variety of lifestyles that Norton Commons attracts makes Homearama 2011 truly unique. Young families, retirees, single parents and individuals make up the demographics of homeowners in this year’s Homearama. Burrus noted the fact that this year’s Homearama brings attention to new urbanism. “The fact that the lots are small like historic neighborhoods and have alleys in the back dictate the style to be different than any other previous Homearama. The developers have invested a great deal of time and expertise in creating an architectural design code that compliments the town plan,” Burrus said.

Thank You to our Sponsors:

Homearama Builders: Daryl Hardy, Hardy Builders, LLC
 228-7702 - hardybuildersky.com

 Greg Burrus, Burrus Architecture & Construction, LLC
 690-3766 - mburrusarc.com 
 Bob Thieneman, Jr., Estate Homes
 491-4645 - rjthieneman.com Richard Miles, Landmark Custom Homes/Dogwood Homes of Kentucky
 231-0441 - dogwoodhomes.com Mike O’dea, Saratoga Homes, Inc. 290-4500 Bill Meadows, Bill Meadows Construction LLC
 639-4562 - billmeadows.com Stacye Love, Stacye Love Construction
 235-5001 - stacyelove.com Kevin Durrett, Durrett Built Homes, Inc.
 253-0933 Leo Thieneman, Leo Thieneman & Sons, LLC
 292-0340 Joe Kroll, Mastercraft Homes
 419-4325 - joekrollbuilder.com Dan Swigart, Mastercraft Homes
 243-8686 - finehomeslouisville.com 
 David Ramage, The Ramage Company, LLC
 418-6467 
 Mark Simpson, Simpson Builders, Inc.
 426-3709 -
simpsonbuilders.net Jeremy McGraw, Provident Homes 238-8200 - providenthomesofky.com

Presented by:

Colin Osborn, Traditional Homes
 228-7164

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Jason Black & David Lutes, Stonecroft Homes
 551-3004 - stonecrofthomes.net

Participating Sponsors:

David Weis, Meridian Construction, LLC 648-1015 - meridianconstructionllc.com Preview Party Sponsor:

Rick Buttorff, The Buttorff Co.
 243-0909 - thebuttorffcompany.com 
 Chris Carey, Chris Carey Builders, Inc.
 292-2300




Developer:

NORTON COMMONS

HBAL.COM

Go to our Facebook page and watch these builders expand on what makes this years Homearama different. FACEBOOK

10 louisville builder • hbal.com

Patrick Lancaster, Limestone Builders, Inc. 
 228-2411 - lancasterbuilthomes.com 
 Dan Smith, Stonelake Homes, LLC
 266-7080 - stonelakehomesllc.com


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www.HBAL.com june 2011 11


HBAL Congratulates Two Members on Recent Awards The 2010 Home Builders Association of Kentucky President Mac Crawford recently selected HBAL’s own Joe Dumstorf and Ellery Esposito for two honorable annual awards. The awards were presented to them during the winter HBAK board meeting that was held in Lexington. Joe Dumstorf, The Trend Company, was honored with the Gilbert E. Kittle Award for Honored Associate of the Year. This award was first presented in 1987 to Gil Kittle. Dumstorf is the 23rd Gilbert Kittle Award recipient. Ellery Esposito, Ellery Esposito Construction, was presented with the Martin Conrad award, which is the Outstanding Life time Achievement Award. The person who is honored with this distinction is recognized for their outstanding contribution and dedication to the professionalism in the housing industry. Ellery is the 31st person to receive the Martin Conrad Award. We are very proud of these members and want to add our gratitude and appreciation for all that each of them does for the advancement of both our local and state associations, as well as the building industry.

HBAK Associate of the Year Joe Dumstorf receiving his plaque from the 2010 HBAK president Mac Crawford.

150’ Affordable Building Designs, Inc. (502) 276-8800 www.affordablebuildingdesigns.com

Engineered Kits Available HBAK Builder of the Year Ellery Esposito receiving his plaque from the 2010 HBAK president Mac Crawford.

12 louisville builder • hbal.com


r First-Eve

HBAL Family Picnic when: June 26th from 1:00 - 5:00 where: E.P. “Tom” Sawyer State Park

Don’t miss the first-ever HBAL Family Picnic on Sunday, June 26 at EP Tom Sawyer State Park from 1:00 – 5:00 pm. We’ll be cooking up some delicious barbeque and all the fixins’ and will offer plenty of refreshments as well. Be comfortable and plan to play – we’ll have access to volleyball courts and horseshoe pits, as well as jumpy houses and face painting for the kids (or the kid in all of us). We will be in Shelter 2 at the park and we will also have a large tent set up with tables so you can eat with friends and family. Tickets for the event are only $10 per person and kids 18 years and under are free. Mark your calendar today and make plans to participate in the firstever HBAL Family Picnic on June 26th. Watch your email for further details and call Robin at 429-6000 to make reservations.

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Increasing Creative Effectiveness in your Magazine Ad Defining your target audience and choosing the “right” magazines to most effectively reach them is just one part of the puzzle. Once you have found the best publications to “speak” with your potential clients, the following provides a couple of tips to get the most out of your ad: • Add URL address to your advertisement. According to research, magazine ads with URLs are more likely to drive readers to advertiser websites across a range of magazine genres. (Affinity’s VISTA Print Effectiveness Rating Service, 2007) • Once you have an advertisement, stick with it and use it in more than one magazine. According to Vista research, magazine ads show immunity to ad wear-out. When studies were conducted over a year’s time, ads did not exhibit any measurable decline in effectiveness. • The impact of your magazine ad will vary somewhat depending on the size, color and position. • Overall, more than 53% of readers recall magazine ads of all sizes and nearly 60% of those consumers act on the ads! (based on two independent source;Vista Norms and Starch Adnorms) • Recall and action taken are higher with multiple pages, spreads, premium positions, and full page ads, (58% and higher) • Smaller ads still have a great recall (just shy of 50%) and consumer action (close to 60% ) New proDuCts BriNgs impressive omy | New yeAr NAtioNAl eCoN e’s tAke oN tHe omist DAviD Crow NAHB CHief eCoN

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What is the Future of Magazine Ads? With the technology we have, no longer is a magazine ad a single medium known as print. With the use of QR codes, your print ad can also be your TV ad, or radio ad. With smart phones on the rise, so is the use of QR codes. With a quick scan, your ad can now exhibit your latest TV commercial, or Radio Commercial, or a Customized video of any length (we do not recommend more than one minute). Why stop there, some magazines are “live” on websites now. When a consumer clicks on your ad in the digital publication it can go to your website, or it can be directed to a video, promotional offer, etc. There are many creative ways to extend the effectiveness of your magazine advertisement. Please call your Marketing Representative, Melissa Mattingly or Kimberly Greenwell, with any questions or comments. And don’t forget, your Home Builders Association produces the publications for Homearama, Tour of Remodeled Homes and the Official Relocation Guide and we take pride in keeping up with the newest trends. All publications are “live” on our website and we can also create QR codes to be placed on your ad.

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14 louisville builder • hbal.com

20

Melissa Mattingly

Senior Account Executive melissa@hbal.com 429-6000, ext. 116

Kimberly Greenwell

Account Executive kimberly@hbal.com 429-6000, ext. 117


Stephenie Hood Comes Back to HBAL

After being away for about two and a half years, Stephenie Hood has found her way back to the Home Builders Association of Louisville. She rejoins our staff as the Director of First Impressions, which was also her former position at the Association. Stephenie left HBAL and worked as an accounting clerk, for which she has formal training. She quickly realized however that she missed the interactions she had with the public and members when working at the Association. “When I heard that my old position was open at the HBA, I jumped at the chance to return,” explained Stephenie. Originally when she joined our staff she was just re-entering the workforce after three years of staying home with her children.

“When I heard that my old position was open at the HBA, I jumped at the chance to return,” - Stephenie Hood

Today Stephenie’s boys are 12, 10 and 8. She has been married to her husband for 15 years and much of her spare time is enjoyed with her children. Recently she moved to Shelby County where Guist Creek runs through her back yard, providing hours of entertainment for her children, and some much needed quiet time inside for her!

june 2011 15


products

flooring: from subTLe to flashy

Reclaimed 8” Hickory

This beautiful ¾” solid reclaimed Hickory wood is hand scraped to give it a distressed look. This hardwood is also available in smooth finishes as well. No matter what, this hickory wood flooring will make a statement in any room and will compliment all design styles. For more information and to see additional samples, visit Carpet Specialists today.

Kane Carpet “Cracked Ice”

Kane Carpet has been a trendsetter in the broadloom industry since 1947. Shown here is “Cracked Ice” in the vintage color. This is a 100% heatset Eurolon, solution dyed product. Eurolon is a proprietary yarn system that uses the most advanced heatset super fine synthetic yarn to create a product that is stain resistant and durable. This is a 12’10” broadloom and is available in fossil and sienna. For more information, visit www.kanecarpet.com, or locally visit The Flooring Gallery.

16 louisville builder • hbal.com


Bamboo

With high sustainability and environmentally sound origins, bamboo floor coverings have become the ideal choice for those looking to adorn their homes or workplaces with the beauty of a hardwood floor or laminate flooring whilst in keeping with increasing environmental issues. Because of this, consumers are increasingly choosing to install a bamboo floor in place of a traditional hardwood one. With the help of recent technological advances, manufacturers are now turning bamboo stalks into high quality ultra smooth flooring on a grand scale in order to meet the fast growing demand for this exceptionally stylish floor covering. Just like some other wooden floors, the processed and machined cane come in short laminated strips, planks or tiles; therefore installation is conducted in much the same way to any other similar type of flooring. It should also be said that, being tough and durable, it will also last many years if both properly installed and cared for. For more information and to see additional samples, visit 21st Century Flooring America today.

Armstrong White Wash – Boardwalk Laminate Wood Look

Today you can have the durability of laminate with the look of hardwood! Best of all, this is a much more affordable option for those with a specific design style in mind, but without the budget to support real wood flooring. This Armstrong laminate product offers their patented “lock and fold” technology, which makes this flooring great for DIY projects. Best of all, this product can be installed in any room of the home, even in high humidity locations. For more information about this product, visit www.Armstrong. com. This product is available at Carpet Specialists as well as other flooring retailers in the Louisville area.

Hard Floor Cleaner

Bona Hard Floor Cleaner is a ready-to-use pH-neutral detergent specifically formulated for cleaning laminate, vinyl, and tile floors. It makes both the everyday cleaning and the cleaning of very dirty floors easy. Compatible with Bona Hard Floor Refresher and many other similar types of maintenance coatings including polishes. Suitable for both residential and commercial use. Visit www.bona.com for details, or visit River City Flooring to purchase a bottle locally.

june 2011 17


18 louisville builder • hbal.com


In the News and Underfoot…

Flooring Makes an Unmistakable Statement,

from Subtle to Flashy By Nancy Miller

Whether classic or snazzy, flooring can pack a design wallop. But knowing the ins and outs of the newest flooring isn’t as easy as one might think because the choices are as exciting as they are varied. That’s why Louisville Builder asked several Louisville flooring pros to talk about the latest flooring technology and hottest designs.

Natalie Goodin, store manager The Flooring Galley A couple of years ago, carpet was 46-48% of the floor covering business; now it’s about 52%. There’s still considerable interest in patterned pieces, not necessarily in colors, but tone-on-tone. It’s the cut in loops and piles that make the pattern The trend in carpet is going back to traditional textures, but the textures are softer and have a cleaner finish to them. The traditional textures aren’t as wiry and have more structure than a frieze. There are still lots of friezes but they aren’t as casual as in the past. The new ones can bridge the gap from formal to transitional. And the new friezes have another wrap of color around the fibers to give them added dimension. Carpet used to be made by staple fiber that buzzed really badly. The industry is now using continuous filament, which means the carpet won’t shed or fuzz as before. They also look more expensive. Although most people veer toward neutrals, they may be willing to use a color carpet in a room they want to set apart. A great addition to some carpets is Magic Fresh. It takes the odors out of the air and purifies them. It’s great for pet or tobacco odors, and even cooking smells. The carpet industry is getting greener, but currently in Kentucky there isn’t a carpet recycler that can get the carpet back to the manufacturer. But it will happen. Shaw Industries’ Anson nylon has recycled content. Other manufacturers have PET, which is made from recycled two liter bottles. Mohawk’s Smart Strand, made with corn sugars, also has a green story to it. Because carpet will need to be replaced every five to ten years, depending on the quality, homeowners may think of hardwood flooring as a long term investment. It’s the way to go if budget permits. Oak is the leader in hardwood because of its affordability. But there is interest in exotics, and bamboo is growing in popularity. Stained bam-

boo and strand bamboo are making news. Strand bamboo doesn’t have a traditional bamboo look. It has more of an exotic hardwood appearance. It is very heavy, hard and pretty durable because it has resins that glue the strands together. With the humidity in the Louisville area, a solid hardwood floor may experience gapping in the winter and overwood in the summer unless the home has a humidifier and dehumidifier on the HVAC system. An engineered floor is probably the best product for our climate. As it absorbs moisture, it pulls against itself and makes a solid floor. The details are being worked out, but the hardwood flooring industry is going to be affected by new regulations and tariffs, meaning the cost of hardwood is going to increase. Laminates keep getting better and better. It isn’t easy to distinguish between hardwood and high quality laminate. And with laminate comes durability. There has been a noise issue with thin laminate products, but the new 10 and 12 mm products deaden the sound so that they are more like a hardwood floor. There’s a huge variety in laminate, including a distressed look, which makes it very appealing. Tile has changed a lot thanks to high definition printers and ink jet technology. The visuals look more like natural stone than ever before. Bigger is better when it comes to tile. The larger the tile is in a space, the larger the space will look. Grout lines between smaller tiles segment your vision and make the space look smaller. The key is to get at least three full pieces in the room. We are selling a ton of luxury vinyl. Once it’s down it’s very hard to discern if it’s real tile or vinyl. And it can be grouted in for an even more authentic look. If someone wants a floor that’s more durable than laminate, I suggest they might want to consider vinyl, perhaps a new vinyl plank. Linoleum has also come a long way. Fiberglass on the back provides greater flexibility. The linoleum can be put down with a releasable adhesive so the floor can be easily taken up in the future. june 2011 19


flooring Amber Hensgen, interior designer Tom Jones, store manager 21st Century Flooring America Jones: Tile and hardwood are the luxury items in today’s market. If you take a snapshot today, 2 ¼”, natural finished red oak has the lion’s share of the market. Maple is also found in many Louisville homes, but it is more susceptible than oak to scratches and dings. There’s a slight increase in the use of exotics such as teak, Australian cypress, and Brazilian cherry. The 2 ¼” boards have the edge, but the trend is changing toward wider boards. It’s possible to buy hardwood and not break the bank as long as you stay with commodity items such as oak, and sometimes a 5/16” product which can be less expensive. People grew up with solid and that’s what they love. They also like solid because of their concern about sanding and refinishing. Habits are hard to change. But because of the fluctuations in humidity, engineered wood could be a better choice. Hensgen: There are a few handscraped engineered wood products. They can be ordered in a plank or square size and in unexpected colors such as creamy beige and a dark gray. It can be fun to mix them together in a great design. Many clients appreciate green certified flooring. Cork is an excellent green option and design choice. It’s very durable and is offered in a variety of finishes. And it comes in plank form or square. Jones: Cork is more expensive than commodity oak floors, but a cork floor is less expensive than exotics. It’s a natural product and is comfortable to walk on. We use it for kitchens more than any other room in the house because that’s where people do a lot of standing. Like any wood product, it is affected by water. Although it’s urethane coated, if water gets under it, the cork will soak it up.

“Cork is more expensive than commodity oak floors, but a cork floor is less expensive than exotics. It’s a natural product and is comfortable to walk on.” - Tom Jones

Hensgen: The mills are constantly introducing a wider range of carpets. I love some of the great new patterns in carpets, including squares, circles and stripes. There’s a reason there are even more friezes than ever. Consumers want their flooring to last. Friezes hold their shape over time and look good over the long haul. I don’t see the concern about it being trendy. Friezes are available in long or short. It depends on the home and the customer’s preference. They’re offered in a wide array of colors. Neutral colors may work better in traditional homes, but more vivid colors may fit well in a contemporary, modern house. Jones: Traditional berbers are waning in popularity. I think they have had their day. Their popularity is being overtaken by friezes. But modern friezes are short shags, not the shags of the ‘70s. They’re better constructed of better materials. And unlike those of the 70s’, they don’t need to be raked! Hensgen: The sky’s the limit for tile. It can be overwhelming because there’s so much from which to choose in sizes, looks and price points. Customers really have to know what they want or they need to trust someone to bounce ideas off. All the manufacturers are getting on board with a plank tile that looks like wood. Also, crushed glass tile is very big the design world. Even though glass tile has been around a long time, there are new tiles that are terrific---smoked glass, clear glass, tiles with flecks in it. And there are inserts to jazz things up. Another way to make a statement with tile is to use darker grout. 20 louisville builder • hbal.com

Jones: You can be very innovative with tile, the most permanent flooring. For someone who wants to make an investment in the home and isn’t concerned with trends, tile is a great option that increases the value of a house more than carpet or vinyl. Buyers treat carpet and vinyl as disposable items but they decorate around hardwood and tile. Laminate is a growing segment of the market because if someone wants a Brazilian cherry look, it isn’t any more expensive in laminate than is an oak in laminate. It’s still a computer image. The reproduction of the image is so good that you’d have to get down on your hands and knees to tell the laminate from the real thing. Another advantage to laminate is that, next to ceramic tile, it’s the most scratch resistant surface. The technology of vinyl has grown by leaps and bounds. Glass back or cushioned back vinyls are very thick and pleasant to walk on. They’re so much more versatile than the old paper or felt back vinyls. The computer generated images are excellent. Customers will be standing on it and say, “I like this hardwood.” They’re really shocked when we tell them it’s vinyl. We never discourage customers from shopping around but we do stress the importance of comparing the bottom line. The costs of installation have to be figured in to the final cost. It’s all about what the customer writes for the final check. Cheap installation is a big marketing tool. But you can bet that, like with any marketing tool, there is enough margin in the material or labor that the company isn’t going to lose money. Donna Mudd, owner Corney Saylor, sales manager Sam Kinnaird’s Flooring and Granite Mudd: Although there’s a lot of talk about green products, flooring decisions generally are based on price. The World Floor Covering Association sends out a quarterly survey. For years they’ve polled to determine if customers are asking about green. The answer is “yes”, but that is followed by the question of whether they’re willing to spend the money for green, and that answer is “no”. Saylor: Customers will go green if they find something they really, really like, but they aren’t buying green just because of a product being environmentally friendly. Mudd: There are some new carpet fibers that aren’t nylon, but the Stainmaster 6.6 nylon is very strong among consumers. Wool is available, but we don’t sell a lot of it because of the price. In terms of finish, the interest in friezes seems to be slowing down. It looks as though we’re going back to original, more uniform textures. They give a little more of a conservative look. With the economy the way it is, people want something that won’t change in style and design. But we’re also doing a lot of pattern pieces. It’s kind of an offshoot of the berber era. Gray, in all shades, is the new neutral. But there are some wonderful, exciting new color combinations such as ginger, soft turquoise, chocolate, sage and cream; red, purple, ginger and gold; blue and lime green; gray and ginger; gray, light gray blue and light beige; gold and black; and black and white. Saylor: Oak remains the predominant wood for Louisville homes. It’s a solid strip market although we’re seeing more engineered, wider widths. We certainly sell some exotic woods but we’re also seeing increased interest in darker, stained woods. Even if it’s oak, it may be stained a different color. Mudd: Wider widths lend themselves to more casual or contemporary décor. Some woods have a gray tone to them that pairs well with stainless steel fixtures and appliances. Light maple and espresso, and sometimes extreme color variations, are often the colors of choice for contemporary homes.


In the past, hardwood could be a problem on the lower level. But it’s now easy to put hardwood below grade and dress up the basement since engineered woods can handle the moisture. Hardwood can be beautiful, but it isn’t always as comfortable and cozy as someone might like. In those situations, area rugs can provide a fabulous accent. There are several styles of accent rugs, each with a unique character. The transitional style has an overall pattern, usually large scale, and works with all types of décor, but tends to have a casual feel. Transitional looks encompass botanical, damask/brocade, Bohemian/gypsy, and natural fibers, such as sisal and sea grass. The sea grass can be trimmed out naturally or with cotton/leather or fabric finishes. The urban style has clean lines in quiet, soft neutral colors such as gray, cream, beige, and black or chocolate. It is noted for a high tech look. Bold patterns in primary colors and current color trends distinguish the contemporary style. And animal prints never go out of style because they are so classic. They’re available in all forms and fashions, both large and small scale. There are traditional animal skin colors and also nontraditional colors like lime green and hot pink. Another great thing about rugs is that they range from 2’ x 3’ to palace size, and can be found in rounds, octagons, scallops and square. Some really neat rugs are reversible, with two sides that coordinate. If one pattern gets, dirty, just flip it over. It’s a great concept. Laminate is a big part of the flooring market. For families with pets and children, and for any homeowner who doesn’t want to worry about much maintenance, laminate may be an ideal floor. It’s amazing what manufacturers are doing with photography. Many laminates do an excellent job of replicating wood or ceramic. Saylor: Much of the buying public perceives laminate to be cheap because the home stores sell so much inexpensive laminate, but laminate actually is priced much the same as hardwood. The new tiles are amazing. If you put some of them against real slate or another natural stone, it’s hard to tell the difference. Mudd: Tile is going larger scale, 18” and 24”. There are also new 12” x 24” and 6” x 24”. We can mix ceramic and porcelain with stone accent pieces to give an upgraded, custom look without spending money on the entire area being stone. Of course, slate, travertine, marble and granite continue to be used with stunning effect. Saylor: Sheet vinyl isn’t used much anymore, but luxury vinyl tile can look very good. Paul Reinhart Allgeier Flooring Hardwood is the flooring of choice for those individuals with allergies. In fact, many allergists strongly recommend hardwood. Of course, no floor is more beautiful than hardwood. The most common wood used in Louisville is still oak although we frequently have requests for Brazilian cherry, tiger wood, walnut, ash and hickory. We’re usually doing ¾” x 2 ¼”, but wider widths and random widths are becoming more and more popular. Part of the attraction of hardwood is that it can be easily customized with inlays, borders and medallions. Another way to create a different look is to lay the wood on the diagonal. Humidity can severely damage hardwood floors. Dehumidification and humidification systems should be installed to maintain the relative humidity between 35 and 55 percent in the home, and the temperature between 65 and 80 degrees. The ease of maintenance is also a major factor when hardwood is selected. A polyurethane finish provides great durability and doesn’t diminish the color of the wood. Unfortunately, some people still use wet solutions, even vinegar and water, to clean their wood floors. We typically recommend Bona because it only requires spraying a mist, then

Homearama 2011 Showcases the Best and Latest in Flooring Design The latest trends in flooring will be showcased in one location this summer. Actually, that one location will have 20 different venues, each with distinctively striking flooring. That’s right. Homearama 2011 will be the place to go to see it all. But we couldn’t resist the chance to give you just a glimpse of what’s to come and what you’ll see… “We’re featuring a vintage look throughout the Greek Revival style house,” says Leo Thieneman, Jr. A great room and dining area are open to the kitchen. The open space and foyer feature 8” wide dark stained, distressed hickory floors. The knots in the wood impart charm and character to the floor. Accent rugs will bring in additional color and texture. Carpet provides a soft luxuriousness to the bedroom floors. In the home built by Burrus Architecture & Construction, Greg Burrus selected Brazilian walnut for much of the space that is defined by an open floor plan. He opted for carpeting for most of the lower level family room, but used an engineered hardwood floor behind the wet bar. One of the home’s bathrooms is travertine and other is ceramic tile. All the tile is large format, and is laid in a brick or stacked pattern. “I chose sanded white oak hardwood for most of the floors because it gives a period feel,” says Bill Meadows, of Bill Meadows Construction, about his company’s Federal style home. Kevin Durrett, of Durrett Built Homes, is using 5” wide random length white oak planks in his traditional, four square Arts and Crafts style Homearama house. They provide continuity between the great room, formal dining room, kitchen and eating area, powder room and foyer. Durrett prefers sand and finish hardwood, and likes the look of no grooves between boards that is common to some prefinished floors. Ceramic tile is used in the bathrooms, except in the powder room which has hardwood. “I used hardwood to flow from the exterior deck into and throughout the first floor. Inside is Armstrong ½” thick, 5” wide oak product. I try to use hardwood wherever there is a significant amount of foot traffic, especially if it is from outside to inside,” says David Ramage, of The Ramage Company. For the bedrooms of the Greek Revival house he built, he chose soft wool carpet with a slight nap because of its durability and ease of cleaning. Porcelain tile was used in all the home’s bathrooms. The master bath floor has a heating element to heat floors up to 99 degrees. Dan Smith, of Stonelake Homes, built his Italianate style Homearama home as a contract house. He is using 5” wide oak boards that will be sanded and finished on site for the living areas and bedrooms. “I like them for their timeless appearance and durability. I think their look is far superior to prefinished floors,” he says.

june 2011 21


flooring cleaning, totally eliminating the need for water based product. Green living is really hitting the wood flooring industry. Most of the wood floors we’ve been doing are from reclaimed wood, such as that from barns or fence posts. After the floor is installed, we apply a water based finish. Bamboo is getting a lot of attention in green flooring because bamboo grows more quickly than other trees. However, it should be noted that it is not yet listed as a hardwood according to the National Wood Flooring Association. The most important thing for builders and remodelers to keep in mind is to use the right product for a specific application. Greg Turner, sales manager Carpet Specialists Trade magazines and television shows tout ceramic tile, but in Kentucky the first choice in flooring is hardwood. There are wonderful handscraped, distressed hardwoods that impart such character to a room. Wide boards are the big thing, whether in a contemporary or a traditional home. We just finished a 6” wide hickory floor in one house and an 8” wide hickory floor in another house. They were both stunning. When selecting hardwood, it’s important to understand the grades of wood. At the bottom of the tier is cabin grade. Following that are number two common and number one common. At the top is the grade known as select and better. It has a very clean look without worm holes, knot holes or mineral streaking. Helping customers choose flooring is dependent on understanding their lifestyles. Some floors are not made for a lot of traffic and abuse

and would not be suitable for certain people or families. Too often I talk to people who mistakenly chose a “dining room table on the floor”, a finish that is pristine and perfect. And they wonder why the floor shows so many scratches. I wish they had not been led in the wrong direction. There doesn’t seem to be as much interest in exotic woods as in previous years. Hickory can be an interesting choice but it can become too busy. It depends on the grade of the wood. Five or six years ago in Louisville, prefinished floors were 30-40% of the hardwood business. Now they are 80 - 90%. Patterned carpets, as long as they’re soft, are very important in design today. The pattern can be in a changing color or in a tone-on-tone design. Patterns work well on stairs as well as in individual rooms. It’s amazing how carpeting can make the stairs the showcase of the house. Patterns are particularly good for foyers, spaces in which wallpaper used to provide more color and pattern. Patterned carpets with a black background really pop and give that wow factor. Patterns must be used judiciously or they can take over. If a carpet is very busy, the eye is drawn to it. So, if there are many beautiful objects in the room, it’s best to use a carpet that isn’t too busy. Twenty to twenty five percent of customers ask about green products, whether hard surface or carpet. Bamboo is something everyone understands, but cork is a great green product for all rooms of the home, including those on the lower level. It’s one of the greenest of all products. It has been in the Library of Congress for more than 100 years and in the Mayo Clinic for more than 60 years. That’s durability!

The Flooring Gallery can make you more profitable using brand name products, with the latest fashions and styles. Call today to see how! Hardwood / Ceramic / Laminate / Carpet / Vinyl / Cork / Bamboo / Draperies / Blinds Louisville

Louisville

Clarksville

Madison

103 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy.

2208 Plantside Dr.

955 E. Lewis & Clark Pkwy.

305 East Clifty Dr.

502-426-2463

502-964-3301

812-282-0461

812-273-4666

theflooringgallery.com 22 louisville builder • hbal.com


13th Annual Kentucky Design & Remodeling Awards Deadline for Registration is June 15

Sponsored by the HBAK, the Kentucky Design and Remodeling Awards recognizes the incredible talents of builders across the Commonwealth. The awards contest is open to all builder and remodelor members in good standing of the HBAK. According to HBAK Director of Member Services Lora Werner, the benefits to receiving an award amount to much more than bragging rights. “Winning a state award is a great public relations tool for your company,” she said. Werner noted that registration should be completed by June 15. “After receiving your registration and entry fee, we will mail you a binder with six page protectors in which you will place your entry. Your binder must be received for judging at the HBAK by Friday, August 15, 2011,” she added. Projects entered in the contest must have been completed after January 1, 2010. Participants may enter more than one project in one or more categories. However, each project must be registered as a separate entry. Each builder submitting an entry must secure the written permission of the project’s owner (homeowner). A $75 non-refundable fee must be paid for each entry. For more information, visit hbak.com or email lora@hbak.com.

Categories for the Contest: REMODELING • Kitchen remodel • Bath remodel

• Addition: family rooms, sun rooms, addition to kitchen, bath, garages and any structural addition to the existing house

• General remodel/renovation: partial or whole house renovation, alterations to existing structures (without substantially adding to existing footprint) • Basement Finishes: converting raw basement space to finished living space A first place award will be given in each category and will be based on best use of space, creativity, difficulty and best use of materials. NEW HOME DESIGN • Under 2000 square feet • 2000-3000 square feet • Over 3000 square feet

• Multifamily development First and second places will be awarded in each New Home Design category. Entries will be judged on functionality, creativity and innovative design. For more information on the awards guidelines, visit hbak.com. june 2011 23


Kimberly Greenwell joins HBAL Marketing Team Kimberly Greenwell recently contracted with the Home Builders Association of Louisville (HBAL) as an Account Executive and will sell the Association publications, sponsorships and other advertising for the association. Greenwell will continue to operate KAG Media Consulting while working with HBAL. “We are excited to add Kimberly to our marketing team,” exclaimed Chuck Kavanaugh, HBAL Executive Vice President. “She brings 14 years of experience and expertise, as well as outstanding contacts beyond our traditional membership which is one of the advantages to bringing her on board,” he added.

“She brings 14 years of experience and expertise, as well as outstanding contacts beyond our traditional membership which is one of the advantages to bringing her on board,” - Chuck Kavanaugh

Greenwell, a native of Bardstown, KY, moved to Louisville after attending Eastern Kentucky University. She has worked for Landmark Newspapers and spent seven years in broadcast sales with WAVE 3 TV. More recently she has served as an Interactive Media Consultant and today operates her own business, KAG Media Consulting.

Your central source for knowledge and the latest trends in home products. With 35 years of experience, Ethington Building Supply knows what a builder needs to stay competitive and stand out.

Our knowledgeable sales staff makes business painless and efficient. Hometown pricing delivered to Louisville. 1848 MIDLAND TRAIL, SHELBYVILLE, KY BEHIND THORTON’S www.ethingtonbuildingsupply.com

502-633-5539 • 800-540-5611 24 louisville builder • hbal.com


membermeetings Sales & Marketing Council

bullitt county Council

Left to right: SMC Chairman Pat Durham, Jeff Ratanapool, Leah Ritter, Chris Demuth and Katie Golden all of Century Mortgage Company.

The April Sales & Marketing Council Meeting was a great meeting that featured “Secrets of the Superstars.” Chairman Pat Durham, of Durham Built Homes, hosted the meeting that featured local realtors, builders and mortgage bankers who shared their secrets of success. The meeting included the following speakers and topics:

Date: 4/13/2011 Place: Jim Beam Distillery Attendance: 50 Sponsor: Century Mortgage Company Speakers: Jim Beam Noe

Brenda Doll of Keller Williams “Success through Education”

Highlights of talk: Mr. Noe talked about Jim Beam Distillery and its past, present and future. The group then participated in a tour of the facility and had the option to do a tasting at the gift shop. The group took a guided Heritage Tour of the historic T. Jeremiah Beam home where three generations of Beam distillers lived overlooking the scenic landscape and towering rack houses. They then stepped inside the Stillhouse Exhibit featuring authentic 1800’s copper still, believed to be one of the oldest in America. The group then went inside their oldest rack house, Warehouse D, built by Jim Beam after Prohibition. That rack house was Kentucky’s finest bourbon aging in 20,000 oak barrels. From there the group sampled one of Jim Beam’s Small Batch Bourbons in their tasting room. Those in attendance were able to commemorate their visit with a purchase of a variety of Jim Beam merchandise—including apparel and bourbon candy—at the gift shop.

Buddy Kittle of Forcht Bank “Success through Business Planning” Mike Farrar of Rick Robey/Mike Farrar Team of ReMax Associates “Success through Networking & Corporate Relationships” Ron & Martha Wolford of Wolford Built Homes “Success through Special Events Planning” Patti Bradford Roth of Dogwood Homes “Success through Support Staff & Customer Service” John Stough of Kentucky Select Realty “Success through Previous Customers & Relationship Building” The April meeting was sponsored by Century Mortgage Company. Our next meeting is: May 3, 2011 Contact Nicole Bouchard for more info: nicole@hbal.com

Specializing in: New Construction • Renovations • Replacing Damaged Boards Lacing in New Areas • Installing Custom Borders and Medallions Dust Containment Systems Free Estimates (References Upon Request) • Fully Insured To learn more about all of the HBAL Councils & Committees vist www.hbal.com/site/join-hbal/committees-and-councils.html

451-8454 or 802-6061 • judym@bluegrass.net HBAL.COM

june 2011 25


membernews

River City Foundations win “2011 Overall Grand Project of the Year” River City Foundations located in Louisville, KY @ 13120 Aiken Road has just been awarded from CFA (Concrete Foundations Association) the “ 2011 Overall Project of the Year” for a project done in Louisville, KY. River City Foundations has been in business since 1999, and have proudly been a member of the Home Builders Association since 1999, member of Kentucky Ready Mixed Concrete Association, Lincoln Trail Home Builders Association and a member of CFA. We were also part of the team that participated in the 2010 Extreme Makeover project and currently is beginning the project for the 2011 Kosair Hospital House in Norton Commons. All members of our team are very proud of this and ALL projects. This particular project consists of an approximate 28,000 square foot home. Our total years for our footer pour was 181.5 and the total yards for our wall pour was 426.5 yards. The wall height ranged from 2”-4” up to 24’ - 0” (12’ walkout basement). We will be accepting our award and recognition at the CFA Summer Conference Meeting held August 3-6, 2011 in Wintergreen, VA. Bo Harrison River City Foundations FDI 7 1-2 x 2-187 Ad Final.pdf 1 5/12/2011 11:13:39 AM

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26 louisville builder • hbal.com

Playhouse recipient Addie Childers with her parents Jill & Dustin.

Building Industry Chairitable Foundation starts first project as 501c3 The Building Industry Charitable Foundation (BICF) has started their first project as a 501c3 foundation. They will be building a playhouse for a special needs child that was chosen by Kosair Charities. The playhouse is generously being funded by Kosair Charities and will be built by YouthBuild Louisville students and mentored by Registered Builder Member, Rob Eberenz, Jr. The decorating will be fulfilled by Liz at Home. When the playhouse is completed, it will be displayed at Homearama in Norton Commons in an effort to bring awareness not only to the building industry’s generosity, but also to Kosair Charities and YouthBuild Louisville. After Homearama, the playhouse will be moved to the child’s house. BICF really appreciates the partnerships with Kosair Charities and YouthBuild Louisville and the mentoring from Rob Eberenz, Jr. For more information about the BICF, or if you would like to volunteer to participate on the committee or make a tax deductible donation, please contact Robin Durham (robin@hbal.com) or Jan Andrew (jan@hbal.com) or you may call them at 429-6000. To submit your news email Tara Brinkmoeller at Tara@hbal.com.


spikelist

All-Time Big Spike 1500d John Miranda, Pinnacle Properties of Louisville ...........1534 Grand Spike 1000d Ellery Esposito, Ellery Esposito Construction, Inc. .......1057 Statesman 500d Richard S. Buttorff, The Buttorff Company .....................993 Joe Pusateri, Elite Homes, Inc. ........................................990 Stanley G. Logan, Jr., Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance, Inc. ........................885 Robert Welch, Welch Builders, Inc. .................................842 Keith Eberenz, Keith Eberenz, Builder ...........................793 James R. Skaggs, Omikron Construction Co. ..................784 Robert A. Peterson, Jr., Robert A. Peterson, Jr., Co. Inc. .. 739 Michael L. Montgomery, MONTCO Builders, Inc. .......739 Bill Reisert, Reisert Insurance Agency ............................658 Ben Peter, Peter Built Homes...........................................647 Robert L. Eberenz, Jr., Robert L. Eberenz Jr., Builder, LLC........................631 E. Allen Schuler, ASB, Inc. ..............................................612 Glen E. Stuckel, Glen E. Stuckel Builder, Inc. ................541 Winston Church, Winston & Company Benefits-retired.526 Robert H. Marrett, CMB Development Co. ...................508 400d Richard Eberenz, Richard Eberenz, Builder ....................446 Fred R. Dallenbach, Dallenbach Builders, Inc. ................442 A. Thomas Sturgeon, Sturgeon & Associates Inc. ............418 Rusty Wessel, Wessel Insurance Agency, Inc. ..................403 Michael S. Griffin, Stonelake Homes, Inc. ......................400 Super Spike 250d Clete Reinhart, Reinhart Construction Co. .....................398 Stan Humphrey, Stan Humphrey Construction...............380 Richard Bean, B B & T, retired.........................................367 Dale Hellmann, Prudential Heating and Air...................361 Carl Baker, Sterling Development Corp. .........................345 Bill Edelen, West-Edelen Development Corporation .....309 Donald K. Petty, Jr., Petty Company, Inc. ........................303 Richard Miles, Dogwood Homes of Kentucky.................300 Pat Thieneman-Seitz, Thieneman-Seitz Builder ..............266 J. Robert Westerman, J. Robert Westerman Builder ........253 Trophy - 200 Clifford Thieneman, Clifford Thieneman Co. Inc. ...........248 Michael “Rocky” Pusateri, Elite Homes...........................242 Roger Bright, Bright Properties ......................................220 Roger Plamp, Plamp-Keen Agency, Inc. .........................215 Greg Esposito, Greg Esposito Contractor. ......................213 Leo Thieneman, Leo Thieneman Co., Inc. .......................206 Steve Church, Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance.................205 Royal Spike - 150 Steve Deneen, Steve Deneen, Builder .............................194 Teresa Morgan, ERA Kepple Keene Realtors..................192 William (Bill) Wilkinson, Wilkinson Builders, Inc..........187 Lafe McGary, LA Construction ......................................180 Dave Smith, Blacksmith Homes .....................................179 Bob Thieneman Jr., Bob Thieneman Jr., Builder ..............172 John F. Pohlman, John F. Pohlman Builder, Inc. ..............167 Robert L. Eberenz, Sr., Robert L. Eberenz, Inc. ..............154 Red Spike - 100d Tom Raver, Fireplace Distributors....................................144 Billy Doelker, Key Homes................................................132 Sherrie Kruse, First Capital Bank.....................................130

Jack Band, Jack Band Builder, Inc. ...................................127 Jerry Blacketer, The Blacketer Co......................................121 John Rueff, Brecher Co.....................................................102 Bruce Rademaker, Thoroughbred Associates, Inc. ...........102 Robert D. Ford, R. Ford Construction Co., Inc. ..............100 75d Sidney J. Anderson, S.J. Anderson Builder, Inc. .................98 Mike Isaac, Isaac Contracting & Design ...........................94 Charline Neal, Primerica Financial Services......................90 Scott Yates, Paragon Homes ..............................................88 Terrance O’Rourke, O’Rourke & Associates .....................87 Shawn Corrigan, Corrigan Electric....................................86 Joey Rippy, Rippy Construction ........................................86 Amos Martin, Amos Martin Builder ................................83 Allen Blacketer, The Blacketer Co. ....................................80 Pat Durham, Pat Durham Bldr, Inc. ..................................80 J.D. Nichols, NTS Corporation .........................................78 Jesse Francis, Francis & Company......................................78 W. Bryant Brown, Brown & Carpenter Co., Inc. ..............77 Ron Wolford, Ron Wolford Builder, Inc. ...........................75 Green Spike - 50d Carol Daugherty Epley, Daugherty Insurance Agency ......73 David Lurding, Lurding Homes........................................72 Jeff Thompson, Jeda Homes................................................72 Ray McDonald, McDonald Development Corporation ....68 Perry D. Lyons, Perry D. Lyons Builder.............................67 Mike Jones, Canfield Development....................................66 Ron Hartman, Ernst Concrete. .........................................65 Vic Koestel, General Shale.................................................63 Mark Aschbacher, Lincoln Insurance.................................63 John Thomas, River City Wholesale...................................59 Joe Dumstorf, Trend Companies of Kentucky....................57 Michael O’Dea, Saratoga Homes, Inc. ..............................56 Christopher J. Knopf, Pinnacle Properties of Louisville ....55 Ron Colyer, Colyer Construction.......................................55 Frank Arnold, Prudential Heating & Air Conditioning ...54 James Pope, Nicklies Development....................................54 Life Spike - 25d Ken Block, Hyland, Block & Hyland, Inc. ........................48 David Monsour, Monsour Builders....................................47 Chris Mackey, Kentucky Farm Bureau...............................46 Louis Hagan-retired, Central Bank ...................................46 Jim Travis, Jim D. Travis, Builder ......................................45 Jeremy Esposito, Ellery Esposito Construction..................45 Ken Thieneman, Ken Thieneman Builder...........................41 Chris Osborne, DeVille Homes.........................................40 Penny Love, Design Innovations, Inc.................................39 Deepa Kamat, Granite America.........................................38 Greg Schrenger, Schrenger Construction ..........................38 Chris Palmer, Academy Mortgage Corporation.................36 Woody Hamilton, Semonin Realtors ................................35 Phillip Wayne Leigh, Phillip Leigh, Inc.............................35 Jason Black, Stonecroft Homes...........................................35 Mike Effinger, Effinger Construction.................................34 Rocco Pigneri, Ball Homes.................................................34 Chris Cundiff, Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance...................34 Frank Taylor, L&T Properties............................................33 Dave French, EON-US......................................................33 Sandra Povey, BB&T..........................................................32 Mike Hall, K-I Lumber & Building Materials .................32 Phil Fackler-Fackler Homes...............................................30 Mike Sanders, Mike Sanders Builders................................30 Ben Tyler, Ben Tyler Building & Remodeling ...................30 Renotta Henson, Victory Home Builder ...........................30

Ben Peerce Swindler, Ben Peerce Swindler, Builder ..........29 David Bright, Bright Built Homes.....................................28 Roger Hack, MRC Construction.......................................27 Mark Church, Pinnacle Properties.....................................27 David Rateau, Rateau Construction ..................................27 Brendan Kavanaugh, Logan Lavell Hunt Insurance..........27 David Mikels, Graber’s Insealators.....................................27 Paul Miele, K-I Lumber & Building Materials..................26 Vince Kimbel, Kimbel Construction..................................25 Douglas Amlung, Amlung Construction Company............25 Spike - 6d David Ernst, RJ Thieneman Realty Group.........................24 Terry Hagerman, Terry Hagerman Builder........................24 Carolyn Miller, Sure Linc Services.....................................24 Todd Hemmer, Lee Brick & Block ...................................23 Dan Anthony, Boral Brick..................................................23 Ron Fonk, Woodfield Homes.............................................23 James French, J & L Construction.....................................21 Dan Smith, Stonelake Homes ...........................................21 Larry Link, Bonnycastle Appliance &TV..........................20 Lindsay Raidt, Chenoweth Construction...........................19 Delbert Mulhall, Delbert Mulhall & Sons, Inc. ................19 Derek Smothers, Sonne Steel.............................................19 Peter Cooper, Ansac, Inc.....................................................17 Kari Vogedes, Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance....................17 Brad Lehmann, Lehmann Homes.....................................17 Joe Kroll, Joe Kroll Builder.................................................16 Mike Judah, Judah Real Estate ..........................................16 Andrew Holden, Commonwealth Bank & Trust...............15 Barry Buffat, Barry Buffat Builder......................................14 Kerrin Hester Jr., Hester Construction ..............................13 Davis Boland, Boland Maloney Lumber.............................13 Chris Fuelling, Fuelling Built Homes.................................13 Clay Jones, The Jones Group..............................................13 Dennis Montana, Lawn Care Co., Inc. ..............................13 David Smith, BB&T..........................................................12 Gary McDonald, Gary McDonald, Inc..............................11 Scott Church, Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance....................11 David Weis, Meridian Construction...................................10 Stuart Fleischaker, Stonecroft Homes................................10 James Robertson, Bond Electric.........................................10 Lisa Lynn Knight- Lisa Lynn Designs...............................10 Mike Pfeifer, Pfeifer Construction.....................................10 Bob Duggins, Robert Duggins Builder, Inc........................10 Terry Chynoweth, T & T Chynoweth, Inc...........................9 Amy Miranda, CBRE/Louisville.........................................9 Steve Purdy, Prudential Heating & Air................................9 Scott McGraw, Hinton McGraw Builders Developers........9 R.L. Lanham, R.L. Home Services......................................8 Dan Pellissier, Faulkner Real Estate.....................................9 Mike Danzinger, SB Home Renovations.............................8 John Lannert, Mass Mutual Financial..................................8 David Richardson, David Richardson Builder......................8 Donald Wirtzberger, Sierra Design & Construction............8 Brad DeVries, Semonin Realtors..........................................7 John Hollenbach, Hollenbach-Oakley.................................7 Drew Dixon, Bob Hook Chevrolet......................................7 James Duke Greene, Cimarron Construction, Co................7 Becca Sanders, BB&T..........................................................6 Chris DeMuth, Century Mortgage......................................6 Deborah Bilitski, Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs..........................6 Floyd Chelf, Chelf Insurance Agency..................................6

june 2011 27


newmembers Associates Approved 4/11 A & R Contracting, Inc. Samuel Myers Type of Business: General Contractor Sponsor: Bob Thieneman, Jr. The Insurance Office, Inc. Tony Ruble Type of Business: Independent Agency Sponsor: Deepa Kamat Owen County Machine & Tool Alan Guyan Type of Business: Machine Shop Sponsor: Derek Smothers

Wingham Paving Kent Wingham Type of Business: Paving Contractor Sponsor: Jeremy Esposito

Servpro of Oldham/Shelby County Tim Styrlander Type of Business: Fire & Water cleanup and restoration Sponsor: Jesse Francis

Omni Graphics Jim Hahn Type of Business: Printing & Copying Sponsor: John Miranda

Fiducial Business Centers Shawn Paul Type of Business: Bookkeeping Services Sponsor: P.R. Lancaster

Scovil Real Estate Stewart Scovil Type of Business: Commercial Development Sponsor: John Miranda

Affordable Building Designs, Inc. Patrick Stoehr Type of Business: Steel Trusses, post frame buildings Sponsor: John Thomas

Edwin C. Jackson Plumbing, Inc. Steve Jackson Type of Business: Plumbing-New & Repairs Sponsor: Rob Eberenz, Jr.

InJect-IT Foam/Green Tech Industries Kathy DeGraaff Type of Business: Insulation Company Sponsor: Davis Boland

Capstone Realty, Inc. Hal Heiner Type of Business: Commercial Real Estate Sponsor: Bob Marrett

Affiliate Approved 3/11 John Stough Kentucky Select Properties Sponsor: Pat Durham Steve Dobbs Keller Williams Louisville East Sponsor: Brenda Doll Krista Wilson Milestone Realty Consultants Sponsor: Becky Locknane

membermilestone

Congratulations to these Milestone Members: These members have reached a milestone mark in their membership with their renewal in April. 20 Years Culligan Water Systems-Scott Pankonin Fusting & Dugan Insurance, LLC-Stephen Dugan Sam Kinnard’s Flooring Outlet, Inc.-Jim Mudd Charles Martin, Jr.-Builder & Remodelor 15 Years Buddy Cox- Registered Builder Downey Trenching, Inc.-Mark Downey 10 Years Lawn Cure, Inc.-Paul Decker David Richardson-Registered Builder Matt Ridge-Registered Remodelor 5 Years Affordable Truss, Inc.-J. W. Nalley Bonded Builders Warranty Group, Doug Wenzel Bowles Electrostatic Painting, Inc.-David Smith Brian Bentley Construction, Inc., - Brian Bentley Just 4 you, LLC-Tom Lutz L & M Tile, Inc.-Greg Mattingly Jeremy McGraw-Associate Builder/Remodelor J.J. Moran Construction Company-John Moran Linda Parker-Registered Builder Stevens Electrical/B & S Contracting-Barry Stevens Thomas Waller-Associate Builder/Remodelor Turner & Denner, Inc.-James Denner Twin Mac Services, Inc.-Jerry McClellan 28 louisville builder • hbal.com

LLC


honorroll

As of May 1, 2011

Builders: Dominion Homes

Blacketer Company Deville Homes Associates:

Cunningham Door & Window

Pro-Build

A&G Drywall, Inc

Fifth Third Bank

Republic Bank

Allied Aluminum

Frost Brown Todd, LLC

R.J. Thieneman Realty Group

Bardenwerper, Talbott & Roberts

K-I Lumber & Building Materials

Sam Kinnaird’s Flooring

Boland Maloney Lumber

L & N Federal Credit Union

Screens of Kentucky

Bonnycastle Appliance & TV

Logan Lavelle Hunt Insurance

Sonne Steel

Boral Bricks

Louis E. Hobbs Construction Co. Inc.

Surburban Steel

Century Mortgage

McDonald Marble & Stone Inc.

The Trend Companies of Kentucky

Chenoweth Appliances

MetLife Home Loans

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage

Corrigan Electric and Home Systems

Paragon Management Group

VanZandt, Emrich, & Cary

A special thanks to all Honor Roll Members! For more information on how you can be listed on the HBAL Honor Roll, please call Melissa at 429-6000. MA_8.5X5.5Ads_2011

1/6/11

3:50 PM

Page 1

National Association of Home Builders

Put your membership to work now. Money-saving discounts that benefit your business, your employees, and your family

www.nahb.org/MA

june 2011 29


advertiserindex

calendarofevents

June 1

Affordable Building Designs.......................... 12

Land Development Meeting 10:00 a.m., HBAL

Back Alley Ornamental Iron......................... 28

1

Building Industry Charitable Foundation Committee Meeting 1:00 p.m., HBAL

Bobcat Enterprises........................................ 13

8

New Member Orientation 9:00 a.m., HBAL

Boland Maloney........................................... ibc

14

New Member Orientation 9:00 a.m., HBAL

22

Registered Builder Committee 10:00 a.m., HBAL

Bonnycastle Appliance & TV.........................obc Century Mortgage Company......................... 11 Ethington Building Supply, Inc. ................... 24

23-24

HBAK Board Meeting Covington, KY

26

General Membership – Family Picnic 1 p.m. - 5 p.m., Tom Sawyer

Fireplace Distributors, Inc. ........................... 26

29

Executive Committee 1:00 p.m., HBAL

Flooring Gallery........................................... 22

29

Board of Directors 3:00 p.m., HBAL

July 4 6

Duggins Co., Inc........................................... 30

Gary R. Garrity Tile Company..................... 28 K-I Lumber & Building Materials................ifc Landscape Lighting Co., Inc.......................... 24

Independence Day Office Closed

Logan Lavelle............................................... 13

Land Development Meeting 10:00 a.m., HBAL

Meeks Hardwood Flooring, Inc..................... 25

6

Building Industry Charitable Foundation Committee 1:00 p.m., HBAL

Middleton Reutlinger..................................... 4

15

Homearama Preview Party Night 6:30 - 9:30 p.m., Norton Commons

Rjay Distributing........................................... 4

Homearama Begins

Sam Kinnaird’s Flooring Outlet, Inc. ........... 15

16 29

Executive Committee 11:30 a.m., HBAL

Custom Mail Boxes • Street Signs Cluster Box Units • Condos • Multi-Units

DON DUGGINS | GREG DUGGINS 1116 Ulrich Avenue Louisville, KY 40219

30 louisville builder • hbal.com

502-966-5774 FAX 502-966-5462 email: sales@dugginsco.com www.dugginsco.com


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june 2011 31



Louisville Builder June2011