Page 1

TYPOGRAPHY - FORMAT - PRINT

THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUDGED A BOOK BY ITS COVER An investigative look at inspiring typography, format and print processes for publications.

Hazel gage


CONTENTS 04 06 08 14 18 22

-

Typography Basics Dalton Maag Demian Conrad Typeface to font Kellerhouse

26 28 30 38 44 48

-

Paper sizes Ultimate Holding Company Spin Is Not Magazine Binding Basics

50 52 58 60 66 70

-

Build Printing methods Because Berg Importance of stock

INTRODUCTION - 3

TYPOGRAPHY

Format

Print

Layout is often the primary though for design application when it comes to publication design. However, there are aspects often overlooked which enhance a design to become something appropriate as a deliverable as well as a nice layout which is engaging. Typography choice is often considered, though we could be more adventurous without typeface choices. Detail are some designer who appreciate letterforms and even though are not necessarily have an application on publications currently, there is no reason why not. Format is a difficult thing to change and can add a substantial cost to a project, but it is one aspect of design which engages the audience to interact with a product is it appear new or tangibly different. Print is an obvious chapter, but so often stock is not considered or the process of production. We get stuck in our ways, when another method would suit the brief more effectively. DIY sections are included to aid any designer in tackling these elements. Considering the smaller details are as important as a good layout.


TYPOGRAPHY - 4


TYPOGRAPHY - 5

TYPOGRAPHY The three showcased designers selected to feature in the typography section are great at communicating for their specific audience and brief. Even though they are not specific publication typeface designers, and each have different approaches to typeface design, they demonstrate how the application of display fonts can be effective throughout different formats and allow any project to become a memorable piece of design. With the DIY sections, you can understand the basics of typography and go on further to create your own font.

DIY - TYPOGRAPHY BASICS Dalton Maag INTERVIEW Demian Conrad DESIGN FEATURE DIY - typeface to FONT Kellerhouse SHOWCASE


TYPOGRAPHY - 6

DALTON MAAG Dalton Maag are a superior design studio offering unique and bespoke fonts to massive corporations alongside existing fonts for purchase. Even though they deal with big names, the creativity is still fresh and inspiring. I had a great opportunity to see Bruno Maag talk at the Manchester ‘Notes to Self 2012’ and admire his passion for perfection.


TYPOGRAPHY - 7


TYPOGRAPHY - 8

Interview - bruno maag March 20th 2012 How would you describe the typography Dalton Maag produces? Most of our work has been for corporate clients and, accordingly, most of our work tends to be quite conservative and traditional. Our work also stems from my firm belief that type and typography is first and foremost about functionality - to convey a thought via the means of written communication. I don’t think that the designers grand self expression has much room in that. Naturally, this has to be taken with a pinch of salt since fonts for display have a different functionality they mean to attract the viewer to themselves, with the message being read once the eye sits on the type. Personally, though, I do think that even in display type there is an inherent call for visual functionality. The letters have to work in harmony to ensure the reader can absorb the message without too much effort. Are there specific values which Dalton Maag as a studio stay true to when pitching for and accepting briefs? Well, the main one is whether the client pays enough or not. If a client is not prepared to pay my fees I am not interested in working with them because they clearly don’t appreciate my skills and knowledge. Also, I would find it difficult to work for a dictator, and maybe the Tory party. Do you have any rituals or customs which you make you more progressive and productive which you try to adhere to when designing? I have to let my work ferment in my head first. It usually takes me a few days of mulling over a brief before I put pencil to paper. I do prefer a quiet work environment, though. As you know, I am inspired by your work, which designers or studios inspire you? In type design, I do like the fonts that Christian Schwartz designed for The Guardian - that is about the only project that created envy. I think Adrian Frutiger is a Guru and Matthew Carter isn’t half bad either. There are a number of young designers which do some great work like Christian, or Kris Sowersby from New Zealand.


01 - KNIGHT FRANK 02 - UBUNTU

TYPOGRAPHY - 9

01

02 In graphic design I am in awe of the work by North Design. Everything they do is good. There is nothing pretentious about it, and it’s because they, too, recognise design as a means to enhance functionality. Is there one piece which continually inspires you, or made you interested in a typographic career? No, for me it all started with my apprenticeship as a typesetter. It was entering a printing office that did it for me, and the world of printing continues to fascinate me. Although we have only just entered the digital universe, I find it a bit bland. For me, it doesn’t engage all the senses, such as physical printing does.


TYPOGRAPHY - 10

01

02

03


01 - UBUNTU 02 - NOKIA 03 - CENTRAL SCHOOL OF SPEECH AND DRAMA

TYPOGRAPHY - 11

With the speed of computers, is there still a place for pen and paper when designing typefaces? To be honest, we work mostly on the computer. Paper and pencil do have their use, at the very beginning, when I start sketching and doodling ideas. It’s quicker than doing that on paper and often by the innate inaccuracy of sketching I discover other things that inform the final design. However, when it comes to start defining the features and concepts, and certainly once we start drawing up the full character set, it’s all done on computer. Do you always design typefaces for a specific client and brief, or do you sometimes create something with no specified starting point? Most of our work answers a client brief, often quite tightly defined. It’s only our own library fonts that begin with less of an idea what we want to do. They sometimes come from doodling around and once I see a shape that is interesting I follow that trail. Depending what comes of it I then define the brief around that. What has the most enjoyable and rewarding project produced by Dalton Maag? The most rewarding was to create a font family for Ubuntu, the open source project. It is great to know that a high quality typeface can now be accessed by millions of people around the world, for free. I admire Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu community, for putting his money where his mouth is, and recognising the value of typography in a wider world. The most enjoyable is what we currently work on - the font family for Nokia. It is a huge learning curve because when the project is finished we will have created about 15 different script systems that cover over 80% of all the languages spoken on this planet, all with one design expression. This will be a first.


TYPOGRAPHY - 12

DIY -

TYPOGRAPHY BASICS


TYPOGRAPHY - 13


TYPOGRAPHY - 14

DEMIAN CONRAD Based in Lausanne, Switzerland, Demian Conrad Design Studio work primarily for the culture sector. Demian Conrad was himself a typographer for 4 years before setting up the studio and since then the studio has developed an interest in research led design and new technologies and printing processes. Currently, Demian Conrad is exploring alternative methods that use traditional printing and new cutting-edge digital printing techniques.


TYPOGRAPHY - 15


TYPOGRAPHY - 16

DIY -

TYPEFACE TO FONT


TYPOGRAPHY - 17


TYPOGRAPHY - 18

DESIGN FEATURE - MERCALIBRO Text from demian conrad Mercalibro is a second hand market that runs once a month in Bellinzona. For the 10th anniversary we created the slogan and the idea “Dieci anni di libri� because we wanted to add values to the old books. It is an annual campaign with F4 street posters and 12 monthly A3 posters. All the communication is based on a huge ornamental typography composition. Client Ondemedia Deliverables Poster F4, poster A3, flyer A5, shopping bag, quality labels, cardboard box installation.

01


01 02 03 04

-

MERCALIBRO MERCALIBRO MERCALIBRO MERCALIBRO

TYPOGRAPHY - 19

02

03

04


TYPOGRAPHY - 20

01

02


01 02 03 04

-

LETTERA 9 LETTERA 9 GABBANI GABBANI

TYPOGRAPHY - 21

03

04


TYPOGRAPHY - 22

KELLERHOUSE Neil Kellerhouse is a remarkable film poster designer. He takes the content of the film and truly tells the story in a still, visual manner. The use of bespoke typography reflects the independent films and the desire to create something worth watching.


TYPOGRAPHY - 23


TYPOGRAPHY - 24

showcase - film posters Text from ballista magazine As we understand it, the challenge to designing a movie poster is overcoming the vernacular Hollywood uses to market their films. The industry relies on a set of conventions, like an explosion or a group of floating heads, to let the movie-going public know what they are going to see. (An action film and buddy comedy, respectively.) Neil Kellerhouse challenges these conventions, and in doing so makes posters that are iconic, rather than rudimentary.

01


01 - The social network 02 - the thin red line 03 - the house of the devil

TYPOGRAPHY - 25

02

03

His posters rely on the content of the film for creative direction. If the film is based on an original story he has a lot more to work with, in comparison to a story that may already be in the cultural zeitgeist, but Neil’s goal is always to ferret out what makes each new film original; what sets it apart.


FORMAT - 26


FORMAT - 27

FORMAT Format plays a massively important part in making a good design great. The attention to detail in a physical format is something that will definitely get noticed by the audience on a conscious level, rather than small typography detail which make an impression, but more likely a subconscious one. Publication format can be a beautiful and distinctive thing. The visual and textural difference of an uncertain format feels new to the audience. It can be more expensive and tricky to achieve new formats, but the designers who follow demonstrate how the thought for format can push a project further. The DIY sections focus on paper sizes, binding options and stock possibilities.

DIY - paper sizes ULTIMATE HOLDING COMPANY INTERVIEW SPIN DESIGN FEATURE IS NOT MAGAZINE SHOWCASE DIY - BINDING BASICS


FORMAT - 28

ULTIMATE HOLDING COMPANY Ultimate Holding Company and innovative changemakers, committed to sustainable practices and creative collaboration. I have been lucky enough to gain an internship with UHC, currently working on an exciting project DressCode in which the audience select individual sheets off a huge wall space and the book is bound by a sewing machine. Alot of their projects are community based and this interaction allow new concepts to be drawn for publication design and especially to challenge format.


FORMAT - 29


FORMAT - 30

Interview - jimmy edmondson March 23rd 2012 How would you describe the work UHC produces? There are some similarities between the Art and Design sides of the studio and the work each side produces and though our ways of working are very different. On an elementary level we both communicate to audiences and achieve similar goals. Both sides of the studio often collaborate and employ each other to work on their own projects. I think most of us would use these words to describe the UHC practice; confident, timeless, sustainable, daring, provocative and high quality. The Graphic Design studio produce a vast range of commercial work. All of which attempts to achieve an appropriate approach and tone of voice for the client. The team has been in constant flux for a few years which makes it hard for us to describe the past and present work. Our current team all appreciate modernist design principles and often it is the mixture of modernism with our UHC attitude towards working and our clients requests that determine what our work looks like. Some of our clients are; Greenpeace, Green Party MEP’s (Keith Taylor & Jean Lambert), Platform, Metal (Liverpool based art group), Public Interest Research Centre, Arts Admin and a collection of Artists, Designers, Activists and Campaign Groups. Are there specific values which UHC as a studio stay true to when pitching for and accepting briefs? I used to think a lot about what this process would be like before I started working at UHC. Since being here I’ve realised that it’s more about the type of people that work here. We all are like-minded and approach our work trying to create positive social change, engage in community action and provide sustainable futures. When it comes to choosing what to accept/pitch for it becomes much more personal. As we have a co-operative structure everybody’s input counts. We each give our honest opinions on what to accept and turn away. This is often a problem for us as most clients (and potential clients) understand what sort of work UHC produce and come to us with appropriate briefs.


01 - enclOsure 02 - encLOsure 03 - enclosure

FORMAT - 31

01

02

03


FORMAT - 32

Do you have any rituals or customs which you make you more progressive and productive which you try to adhere to when designing? Currently I think it’s just the classic cups of tea and good organisation. We are currently expanding too fast to cope and are standing on each others toes so it helps to be flexible. We are moving studio soon and there certainly will be one or two of these being implemented within the UHC studio and possibly throughout the building. As you know, I am inspired by your work, which designers or studios inspire you? Absolutely tonnes of studios, some of which are: Josef Muller Brockmann, Paul Rand, Jost Hochuli, Kellerhouse, Lundgren & Lindqvist and many more. I mainly enjoy reading books and learning about many designers and whole disciplines rather than following a few designers. Is there one piece which continually inspires you, or made you interested in a creative career? I’ve been racking my brain but I can’t think of a single piece. When I try to think of one piece it is often a piece of art rather than design. If I had to pick now (which probably wouldn’t be the same tomorrow) I would pick ‘Field’ by Antony Gormley or any of Andy Goldsworthy’s work. I have always felt a strong connection with their works and I think that might have something to do with why I am interested community engagement and sustainability. At what stage in a project do you converse with printers about stock, quantity and ask for quotes? It changes from project to project and is very hard to give a definitive answer. Right from the start of the process (if we know it’s going to be print based) we begin to consider quality and ‘feel’ and obviously this is affected by the budget. I would say sooner rather than later is always better but the design process is organic and will often require you to change your plans.


01 - LIVERPOOL NHS PRIMARY CARE TRUST 02 - A BANK FOR THE FUTURE

FORMAT - 33

01

02 Are you pushed by clients for new approaches to form and format or do you push the clients for more innovative solutions? We’re never particularly pushed in that way by clients other than the Art team employing us to produce graphics for something they have in mind. We once made a light box for the front of a shop which had a red and green light and read two different messages. The colour and message was changed by laser trip wire on top of the box that pigeons would come and change. This was to show how little control we have.


FORMAT - 34

We often try to utilise unique, exciting formats that function well however our clients aren’t always the wealthiest and there isn’t always room for experimentation. We don’t go out of our way to be lavish when it’s not necessary, we are firm believers in form follows function (with a bit of beauty in there too). What has the most enjoyable and rewarding project produced by UHC? I can only speak for whilst I have worked here. I think the most fun and rewarding to see produced was an Art piece called Thetford 24 Houred. UHC were invited to produce a work of art for the people of Thetford. Creative Director Jai Redman had the idea of documenting the town over a 24 hour period and producing an experimental, maze-like website housing a vast selection of what we collect. Jai said: “It’s distinct from community art. We’re not making murals in hospitals, it’s about social relationships. Although it’s a physical portrait of people and things, it’s a portrait of the relationship between people and us as outsiders. What do they want to tell us about the place they live?” I played the role of photographer (along with another photographer, a scanner/photographer and a project manager) and spent the whole time running around the town taking photos. I also designed and produce all documents we needed on the day; information brochures, release forms and posters. I had no role in the website production so I have great fun browsing the site and I’m still finding new sections that I hadn’t seen before.

01


01 02 03 04

- A BANK FOR THE FUTURE - ROYAL BANK OF SUSTAINABILITY - ROYAL BANK OF SUSTAINABILITY - A BANK FOR THE FUTURE

FORMAT - 35

02

03

04


FORMAT - 36

DIY -

PAPER SIZES


FORMAT - 37


FORMAT - 38

SPIN Even though Spin are more recently taking on more screen based projects, their past work is still inspiring to me when format comes into the scene. Little details of differing pages sizes are aspects which make a great piece of design work even better.


FORMAT - 39


FORMAT - 40

DIY -

BINDING BASICS


FORMAT - 41


FORMAT - 42

DESIGN FEATURE - Modern times Text from spin ‘Modern Times’ has been designed to create a memorable presentation of this extraordinary artist’s work (Gerhard Richter). mima wanted a solution that would work well at both small and large scales - from invitations held in the hand to banners and posters seen across the street. We created a strong typographic identity and made it the hero giving the show a clear stand-out around the town. By giving the invitation a simple twist we were able to show a sequence of images and to integrate the type without interrupting the artist’s work. Client MIMA Deliverables Invitation, banners, posters.

01


01 02 03 04

-

Modern times Modern times Modern times Modern times

FORMAT - 43

02

03

04


FORMAT - 44

01

02


01 02 03 04

-

Caruso St. John ON THE EDGE OF THE WORLD FS BLAke fs blake

FORMAT - 45

03

04


FORMAT - 46

IS NOT MAGAZINE Pushing the boundaries of editorial design to a more communal level. Challenging the conceptions of regular format and interaction. Not only the format of the magazine is striking, but the choice of colour and typography captures a contemporary and interesting design feature lacking in most communal magazines.


FORMAT - 47


FORMAT - 48

showcase - WALL MAGAZINGES Text froM IS NOT MAGAZINE Is Not is independently published, carries no advertisements and is, among other things, an experiment in publishing real content where people expect to find advertising. It’s a design challenge and a reading experiment; a paper saving device; a bastion of editorial complexity and a grey area for the discerning communal reader. It uses the city as a canvas and brings reading to life. Approach it from any angle; bend down curiously; lean in for a closer look; embark on a treasure hunt to find a story that ends in another location.

01


01 02 03 04

-

ISSUE 1 ISSUE 2 ISSUE 5 ISSUE 6

FORMAT - 49

02

03

04


PRINT - 50


PRINT - 51

PRINT Even though all the images in this publication are of printed deliverables, the designers in the chapter use print to their advantage by exploring the possibilities through method of production. Print is not necessarily about ink, but making a mark.

BUILD INTERVIEW BECAUSE DESIGN FEATURE BERG SHOWCASE


PRINT - 52

BUILD Based in London, Build are a small team of designer who work with big clients. The detail for their printed deliverables is beautiful. Taking into consideration stock and print processes really make their work of high quality and admirable.


PRINT - 53


PRINT - 54

Interview - MICHAEL PLACE APRIL 24th 2012 How would you describe the work Build produces? Considered. Crafted. Are there specific values which Build as a studio stay true to when pitching for and accepting briefs? Each project is assessed individually. Does it interest us? Does it take us in a direction we want to go? Does it pay fairly? Do you have any rituals or customs which you make you more progressive and productive which you try to adhere to when designing? Music is on all the time. I hate silence. Close any non-productive/distracting software. Get in early.

01


01 02 03 04

-

T & CAKE pure pure pure

PRINT - 55

02

03

04


PRINT - 56

As you know, I am inspired by your work, which designers or studios inspire you? Thank you. Mavericks inspire me, Vaughan Oliver, Malcolm Garrett, Barney Bubbles, 8vo, The Designers Republic etc. There are too many designers doing ‘tasteful’ design, bores the shit out of me. Is there one piece which continually inspires you, or made you interested in a creative career? My art school teacher who said to me one day “Have you ever heard of graphic design?”. At what stage in a project do you converse with printers about stock, quantity and ask for quotes? After the idea has formed and made more solid. Are you pushed by clients for new approaches to form and format or do you push the clients for more innovative solutions? Depends on the client, we always push forward, some clients resist.

01


01 02 03 04

-

generation press TIMOTHY SACCENTI TIMOTHY SACCENTI generation press

PRINT - 57

02

03

04


PRINT - 58

BECAUSE Using print methods to the best possible outcomes, Because make simple and effective concepts and designs shine with suitable print processes. By the use of foil in some projects and lo-fi methods in others give them a great understanding of the audience and how they want to communicate, not just through design but the whole feel of a piece.


PRINT - 59


PRINT - 60

DESIGN FEATURE - GOOD FOR NOTHING Text from BECAUSE Good for Nothing was founded by The Pipeline Project to give time, money and energy to do stuff that supports people trying to make positive impact and change happen. A lo-fi identity was created and worked across a range of different outputs from a wordpress blog to hand stamped membership packs. Client The Pipeline Project

01

02


01 02 03 04 05

-

GOOD FOR NOTHING GOOD FOR NOTHING GOOD FOR NOTHING GOOD FOR NOTHING GOOD FOR NOTHING

PRINT - 61

03

04

05


PRINT - 62

01

02


01 02 03 04

-

eclectic eclectic-mix Favourites favourites

PRINT - 63

03

04


PRINT - 64

BERG Berg uses print to add quality to their branding projects in particular. Through attaching a print process to a brand it can become recognisable through another form and adds more detail and professionalism. Using white ink, stamps or alternative printing methods, the brand becomes stronger.


PRINT - 65


PRINT - 66

showcase - branding Text froM berg We collaborated with UK clothing retailer Urban Outfitters to put on an exhibition and launch event to mark the first birthday of our online store Editions of 100, a collection of original limited editions prints curated by BERG. During the exhibition we will be showing a selection of Editions of 100 prints. In addition the exhibition also features a number of large format printed MDF panels and QR code reference panels allowing instore purchase of prints from the website. We have also created a custom Editions of 100 table featuring all the prints available. These lo-fi techniques and materials work well with the raw and utilitarian Urban Outfitters store environment.

01


01 02 03 04

-

little black book editions of 100 editions of 100 all my friends

PRINT - 67

02

03

04


ANNEX - 68

designers Because Loz Ives www.becausestudio.co.uk hello@becausestudio.co.uk

Demian Conrad www.demianconrad.com contact@demianconrad.com Is Not Magazine www.isnotmagazine.org

Berg Daniel Freytag www.bergstudio.co.uk daniel@bergstudio.co.uk

Kellerhouse Neil Kellerhouse www.kellerhouse.com neil@kellerhouse.com

Build Michael Place www.wearebuild.com michael@wearebuild.com

Spin Sam Stevenson www.spin.co.uk samstevenson@spin.co.uk

Dalton Maag Bruno Maag www.daltonmaag.com bruno@daltonmaag.com

Ultimate Holding Company Jimmy Edmondson www.uhc.org.uk jimmy@uhc.org.uk


ANNEX - 69

ANNEX All this research has been collected over my 3 years studying Graphic Design at Leeds College of Art. Thank you to all contributors and those who have inspired.

TYPEFACES DIN Regular DIN Light RBNo2 Light


TYPOGRAPHY - FORMAT - PRINT

Because Berg Build Dalton Maag Demian Conrad Is Not Magazine Kellerhouse Spin Ultimate Holding ComPany

dc low-res  

dc low-res

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you