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FACULTY OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE Department of Applied Health & Social Care BSc (Hons) Nutrition and Health Student Intake: September 2013Ormskirk Campus

Module Handbook HUG 1120 Introduction to Nutrition, Lifestyle and Culture

Module Leader Hazel Flight flighth@edgehill.ac.uk 01695 650787 Kathleen Mooney kathleen.mooney@edgehill.ac.uk 01695 657024


CONTENTS

Introduction

Page 3

Learning Outcomes

Page 4

Assessment Strategy

Page 5

Assignment Guidance

Page 6

Assessment Submission

Page 7

Turnitin: Interpreting originality reports

Page 9

Confidentiality statement

Page 10

Learning Resources

Page 11

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Appendix A: Instructions for online submission Appendix B: Marking criteria Timetable

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INTRODUCTION

Welcome to module HUG 1120 Introduction to Nutrition, Lifestyle and Culture. On successful completion of all the elements within the module, you will be awarded 30 credits at Level 4. This module will introduce you to nutrition and will encourage you to incorporate the importance of individual lifestyles within the social context. Lifestyle is a broad term that includes nutrition, physical fitness, hygiene, sleep and stress management. A person’s lifestyle is determined by a level of social adjustment, world views, culture and personal choices. It is necessary for you to learn to promote a culture that values and respects the diversity of individual beliefs as well as helping individuals to identify and promote their own health and well- being. Throughout the module I will be your module leader and my contact details are listed on this handbook cover. If you wish to arrange a tutorial outside the timetabled support, please contact me to arrange an appointment. This will ensure that I am available to see you and will prevent a wasted journey for yourself. This module handbook should be read in conjunction with your Programme Handbook provided at the start of the course and available in your BlackBoard area, which details important information regarding confidentiality, academic rules, regulations and support. On behalf of all the staff within the Faculty of Health and Social Care, I would like to offer you a warm welcome, I hope that you enjoy this module and wish you every success.

Hazel Flight Kathleen Mooney Module Leader

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ONLINE SUPPORT FOR LEARNING

To support independent study you will have access to Blackboard 9.1 (Learning Edge). This online area contains links to relevant module materials available on the internet as well as links to electronic journals and books to provide flexible 24/7 access.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of the module you will be able to: 1. Define the term nutrition and explore what makes up a healthy balanced diet. 2. Discuss and be aware of different lifestyles people live within differing social contexts. 3. Explore different cultural needs including religious beliefs. 4. Identify cultural and religious influences on diet.

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ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

Formative Assessment Within this module a range of formal and informal assessment procedures will be employed during the learning process to support you in achieving the learning outcomes and to improve your performance in the summative assessment. This will include a written assignment which will discuss the influence of culture upon nutritional knowledge and food choices. (500 – 750 notional words) Assessment criteria:     

Discussion on how culture may impact on food choices and nutritional knowledge; Evidence of background reading; Presentation and level of literacy including referencing, spelling and grammar; Clear plan for theoretical assignment; Refer to marking criteria.

Summative Assessment The summative assessment for this module will be: A written assignment, which will identify the prevalence of an aspect of nutritional need, within a lifestyle and culture. You will introduce a specific group and give a rationale for the group chosen (eg obesity in children), discussing factors which may increase risk within this group (eg age, lifestyle, socio-economic factors). National and local initiatives, which are in place to aim to reduce/identify the problem within the selected area, also need to be recognised, discussed and analysed. 3500 notional words; This must meet Learning Outcome nos 1, 2, 3 and 4; 100% of the mark.

In order to pass the module, the overall mark must be above 40%.

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ASSIGNMENT GUIDANCE

Assignment guidelines Using academic material to support your answer, outline and explore the determinants of nutrition and food choice within one particular lifestyle/culture in the UK. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse range of influences on the determination of the chosen topic including lifestyle and culture:            

Good evidence and use of supporting academic material. Appropriate conclusion of the major factors that determine the topic area. Structure and organisation. Presentation and level of literacy including referencing, spelling and grammar. Refer to Harvard Referencing system. Refer to marking criteria sheet for level 4. Choose a culture within the UK Introduce the culture you have chosen. Look at the tradition of the culture, beliefs, attitudes, lifestyle etc Address the health implications related to the nutritional intake and requirements of the particular culture. Relate all of the above to a Determinants of Health Model, addressing the determinants of issues addressed. How can nutritional needs be accommodated within the diversity of today’s society.

Suggested topics: 

Low income families - Orthodox Jews - Rastafarian - Vegetarians - Asian - Hinduism - Polish - Chinese - Youth culture - Obesity - African - Sport - Travellers/Gypsy’s - Homeless

You need to make sure that the topic you choose is a defined culture and that you are able to access adequate and appropriate written, peer reviewed articles, books etc, to evidence and support your work. Further guidance will be provided within a specific session within the module.

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ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION

Online Submission Date: 22nd May 2014 Before 12.00 noon Provisional Marks available by: 12th June 2014

Your assignments should be generated electronically and submitted online. Instructions for online submission and the how to view results can be found in Appendix A of this handbook.

Non-submission will result in a fail grade being recorded.

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General Submission Requirements (For written assessments) 

Assignments must be electronically generated and you must keep an electronic copy of your assignment.

Appropriate referencing should take place throughout your assignment, utilising the Harvard Referencing System. Useful information and advice can be obtained via the University’s website at: General Guidance for Academic Skills, including referencing: http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ls/support/academicskills/#intro Full Harvard Referencing Guide: http://www.eshare.edgehill.ac.uk/1133/1/HR_guide_RevisedDec2011.pdf

In-text authors and dates of publication, the work you include in your reference list and any appendices you attach are not included within the word count. Direct quotations from other sources are included within the word limit. Appendices are not marked and for information only.

Assignments are expected to adhere to guidance regarding the recommended wordage and failure to do so may influence the final grade awarded.

You are responsible for stating the word count when submitting your assignment.

The marking criteria being used in this assessment strategy are attached in Appendix B of this handbook.

Confidentiality and academic malpractice regulations apply to all assessments.

Please note if you are unable to submit your assignment due to sickness or other exceptional mitigating circumstances, it will be necessary for you to apply to the Head of Department for an extension or to submit an exceptional circumstances form along with appropriate evidence (e.g. a medical certificate/independent evidence).

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TURNITIN: INTERPRETING ORIGINALITY REPORTS The Originality Report is a report that highlights text in students’ work that has been submitted through Turnitin and then displays matches with the database that have the same or very similar wording. This consists of all quotes and paraphrases that students have included in their work, as well as phrases, which are favourably similar to other sources. Turnitin compares students’ work with text from: • • •

Published books, documents, journals, and articles; Websites, databases, and information repositories; Work submitted to Turnitin.


The report also includes a Similarity Score, which is a percentage, indicating how much of your essay matched other sources in the Turnitin Databases. If you receive a Similarity Score of 30% this means that Turnitin has identified 30% of your work as being similar to existing work stored in the database. There is NO similarity score that the student should aim for as a target. The Originality Report is usually ready in 5-10 minutes post-submission but can take longer when the demand is high.

HOW TO USE THE ORIGINALITY REPORT EFFECTIVELY

Armed with your similarity score and the list of colour-coded web-based links that matches each source highlighted in your text, you can begin direct comparison for in-depth analysis of the use of sources in your work. Features of this analysis should include: 1. 2. 3. 4.

The amount of textual borrowing; The reliance on sources; The accuracy of citations; The effectiveness of paraphrasing.

The main aim of the report is to help guide the student to rewrite their work to the point that they feel confident about the content, as well as improve academic skills to avoid poor academic practice by recognising the various forms of plagiarism.

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CONFIDENTIALITY STATEMENT There should be no reference within your assessed work to any name or identifying information relating to patients/clients or any staff member of any organisation. Inclusion of such information will result in a failed submission. Where it is relevant to state the name of any organisation, the information should be supported by reference to published documents that are available to the general public and form approved official documentation relating to the operation and provision of that organisation. It would be considered relevant to include the name of an organisation when:   

Discussing/debating/analysing published data relating to the performance of that organisation. Discussing/debating/analysing published and approved policy and strategy of that organisation. Discussing/debating/analysing published research/evaluations/audit/opinion, which relates to and names that organisation.

Where the assignment requires reflection or analysis of specific practice/patient/client/service user scenarios, confidentiality must be maintained by the use of pseudonyms. Whilst retaining the essence of the scenario, where necessary some information may be altered to enhance anonymity, e.g., changing the number of siblings/children/place or type of work/accommodation or housing.

For further details relating to both assessment processes and regulations, please refer to your Programme Handbook

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LEARNING RESOURCES Please use the library catalogue to access all your print and e-resources.

*Barasi, M. E. (2003) Human Nutrition Hodder. London: Arnold. *DeLisser, H. and Hark, L. (2009) Achieving Cultural Competency: A Case Based Approach to Training Health Professionals. Oxford: Blackwell. Department of Health (2004) Choosing Health; Making Healthy Choices Easier. London: HMSO. Department of Health (2008) Healthy Weight; Healthy Lives – A Cross Government Strategy for England. London: HMSO. Dietz, W.H. and Gortmaker, S.L. (2001) Preventing Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Annual Review Public Health 22: 237-353. *Eastwood, M. (2003) Principles of Human Nutrition (2nd Edition) Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd. Hark, L. and Dean, D. (2005) Nutrition for Life. Dorling Kindersley. *Kittler, P.G., sucher, K.P. Nahikian-Nelms, M. (2008) Food and Culture. Wadsworth – Cengage *Mahan, LK, Escott-Stump, S (2008) Krause's Food and Nutrition Therapy. Elsevier Saunders More J (2013) Infant, child and adolescent Nutrition – a practical handbook. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Groupl *Thaker A and Barton A (2012) Multicultural handbook of food, nutrition and dietetics. Wiley – Blackwell *Whitney, E,. Whitney, EN , Rolfes, S. R. – (2009) Understanding Nutrition. Wadsworth Cengage

Journals Dietz, W.H., Gortmaker, S.L (2001) Preventing Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Annual Review Public Health 22: 237-353. Websites Department of Health (2004) Five a Day www.dh.gov.uk Department of Health (2008) PSA Targets www.dh.gov.uk Department of Health (2008) Choosing Activities www.dh.gov.uk rces/health/

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Learning Services has a range of journals, databases and e-books to enable you to search for high quality, evidence-based information. A full list of the resources, supporting information and Frequently Asked Questions can be found on the Health and Social Care subject web pages: http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ls/subject/health/ http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ls/subject/social-work/

A discovery service is a single search tool that provides fast and simple access to print and electronic material. Use Discover More to search for print books, eBooks, journals, full-text articles and much more. They search the library catalogue and the majority – although not all – of Edge Hill’s electronic resources. Use the Discover More link in the library catalogue.

Key Online databases and journal collections All resources are available through the health subject web pages or the library catalogue. Learning Services has 19,000 journals available online. Cinahl Cochrane Library –full text Proquest Nursing – full text Internurse – full text Wiley Online Library – full text PsycInfo Social Care Online Anatomy TV InterMid – full text Maternity and Infant Care (MWIC) For multi-disciplinary and more specialist resources, there is more information on the health and social care subject web pages. http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ls/subject/health/ http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ls/subject/social-work/

E-books Edge Hill has a collection of over 80,000 e-books which can be accessed 24/7. Links are in the library catalogue or subject web pages. MyiLibrary Ebrary Ebsco e-books Ovid e-books (Made Incredibly Easy! Series) Royal Marsden Manual OnLine StatRef Midwifery

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APPENDIX A Instructions for Online Submission TURNITIN Ensure front cover sheet is attached and completed prior to submission. Follow the following steps to submit your assignment through Turnitin. 1. Access http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ 2. Login using your username and password 3. Access Learning Edgehill 4. Access the Module Area 5. Access Module Assessment Area 6. Click on Turnitin Drop Box 7. Complete form add Module Code 8. Click on Browse button to locate your assignment that is saved 9. Double click the file name to start load process 10. Select the upload button 11. Confirm content 12. Click submit You will receive an e-mail to your university account to confirm your assignment is submitted. Save a copy. Non-submission will result in a fail grade being recorded. Access and view feedback through Turnitin You will receive an e-mail to your university account informing you that your grade and feedback is available for view. Follow the following steps to view your grade and feedback: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Access http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/ Login using your username and password Access Learning Edgehill Access the Module Area Access Module Assessment Area Access Turnitin Click on your Assignment title View Grade and Feedback Click reply to comment on feedback

Save a copy of the assignment and store on the Z Drive Contact the Module Lead to report problems encountered with submitting the assignment through Turnitin and viewing your feedback. Please note that guides to submit work through Turnitin are available at: http://www.eshare.edgehill.ac.uk/883/ 13


APPENDIX B Assignment Marking Criteria: Academic Level 4 Weighting Descriptor

Grade 90-100%

(Pass)

80-89%

(Pass)

70-79%

(Pass)

60-69% (Pass)

50-59% (Pass)

40-49% (Pass)

Relevant knowledge and understanding

75% Application of theory to practice

Level of analysis

Level of investigation and use of supporting evidence

(If relevant) Thorough explicit knowledge and understanding of the topic.

Demonstrates a clear ability to apply understanding to practice.

Evidence of ability to analyse.

Extensive evidence/ references used effectively and cited. Draws from a wide range of relevant sources to support discussion.

Demonstrates depth of knowledge and understanding and the ability to accurately use terminology.

Demonstrates a clear ability to apply understanding to practice.

Largely demonstrates ability to analyse.

Evidence/references used effectively and cited. Draws from a range of relevant sources to support discussion.

Demonstrates some depth of knowledge and understanding and the ability to accurately use terminology.

Demonstrates a clear understanding of links between theory and practice.

Largely demonstrates ability to analyse.

Evidence/references used effectively and cited. Utilises relevant material to support discussion.

Demonstrates knowledge and understanding and the developing ability to accurately use terminology.

Demonstrates an emerging understanding of links between theory and practice.

Emerging evidence of analysis.

Evidence/references used effectively to support discussion and cited.

Emerging knowledge and understanding and the developing ability to accurately use terminology.

Provides relevant examples of links between theory and practice.

Descriptive with some evidence of discussion.

Demonstrates a developing ability to use evidence/ references effectively.

Some indications of a limited ability to identify appropriate ideas, concepts and principles. Meets the assessment outcomes at threshold level.

Broadly links theory and practice.

Largely descriptive with little evidence of discussion.

Broad evidence of reading/investigation. Some use of references and sources cited.

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25% Structure presentation and grammar

Excellent structure standard of presentation. Relevant and grammatically sound. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines. Well-structured and high standard of presentation. Relevant and grammatically sound. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines. Well-structured and high standard of presentation. Relevant and grammatically sound. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines. Clearly structured and presented, relevant and grammatically sound. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines. Well structured /presented and, on the whole grammatically sound. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines. Generally satisfactory standard of structure/ presentation, some grammatical inaccuracies/errors. Presented in accordance with assignment guidelines.


Assignment Marking Criteria: Academic Level 4 continued ‌ Weighting Descriptor

Grade 30-39% (Fail)

20-29% (Fail) 10-19% (Fail) 1-9% (Fail)

0

Relevant knowledge and understanding

75% Application of theory to practice

Level of investigation and use of supporting evidence

Provides limited examples of links between theory and practice.

Generally descriptive and no evidence of discussion.

Limited evidence of reading/ investigation. Incomplete use of references. Most sources not cited.

Unsatisfactory structure /presentation, spelling and grammatical errors.

Provides limited examples of links between theory and practice.

Descriptive and irrelevant discussion.

Provides no examples of links between theory and practice.

Descriptive and no evidence of discussion.

Insufficient reading/ investigation. Incomplete use of references. Most sources not cited. Lacks evidence of reading/ investigation. Incomplete use of references. Most sources not cited. No supporting evidence.

Unsatisfactory structure /presentation, spelling and grammatical errors. Poorly structured and presented, numerous spelling and grammatical errors.

(If relevant) Signs of emerging knowledge and understanding. Unable to always select or apply them appropriately. Assessment Outcomes not met. Insufficient knowledge and understanding. Some factual errors. Assessment Outcomes not met. Insufficient knowledge and understanding. Several factual errors. Assessment Outcomes not met.

25% Structure presentation and grammar

Level of analysis

Insufficient knowledge Provides no Purely and understanding. examples of links Descriptive Many factual errors. between theory and illogical Use of irrelevant and practice. claims. material. Assessment Outcomes not met. Late submissions without relevant permission. Evidence of academic malpractice as defined by Institutional Policy. Major breach of confidentiality. Evidence of unsafe/harmful or discriminatory practice or presentation of misinformation. Failure to generate assignment electronically.

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No logical structure, incomplete sentences, incomprehensible content.


TIMETABLE Week Date 1 03/10/13

Time 1-4pm

2

10/10/13

1-3

Session Introduction to module : Ground rules, marking criteria, Intro to Blackboard, Group work, Assessment Intro to nutrition. What is Nutrition?

3

17/10/13

3-4 1-3

4

24/10/13

5

31/10/13

6

Tutor Hazel Flight

Venue B101

Hazel Flight

B101

Workshop / seminar - Why do we need to eat? Introduction to the digestive system.

Hazel Flight

B101

3-4 1-3

Formative assessment work Defining a balanced diet.

Hazel Flight

B101

3-4

Workshop / seminar - How does nutrition affect our health? Reading Week

07/11/13

1-3

Influences on eating habits.

Hazel Flight

B101

7

14/11/13

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar What is meant by culture and a multi-cultural society with relation to nutrition?

Hazel Flight

B101

8

21/11/13

3-4 1-3

Tutorials Cultures and nutrition

Hazel Flight

B101

28/11/13

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar How do religious / cultural and gender issues affect our food choice?

Hazel Flight

B101

3-4

Workshop / seminar

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Week Date 10 05/12/13

Time 1-3

Session Micro nutrients

Tutor Hazel Flight

Venue B101

11

12/12/13

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Macro nutrients

Hazel Flight

B101

12

19/12/13

3-4 1-4

Workshop / seminar Formative assessment work / presentations.

Hazel Flight

B101

13

23/12/13

HOLIDAY

14

30/12/13

HOLIDAY

15

02/01/14

1-3

Tutor directed study

Hazel Flight

B101

16

09/01/14

3-4 1-2

Assignment guidelines

Hazel Flight

B101

17

16/01/14

2-4 1-3

Tutorials Lifestyles – society today in relation to nutrition Social contexts, dietary patterns, economy

Hazel Flight

B101

23/01/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar – Searching the literature Analysis of dietary intake – why is assessment necessary/

Hazel Flight

B101

3-4

Workshop / seminar - Webbs model of food choice.

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17


Week Date 19 30/01/13

Time 1-3 3-4

Session NDNS – National diet and nutrition surveys Workshop / seminar – Determinants of health

Tutor Hazel Flight

Venue B101

20

1-3

Introduction to vegetarianism

Hazel Flight

B101

3-4

Workshop / tutorials

13/02/14

1-3

Introduction to malnutrition

20/02/14

3-4 1-3

Evaluation of module Introduction to exercise and nutrition

Hazel Flight

B101

27/02/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Food initiatives – government policies and initiatives

Hazel Flight

B101

24

06/03/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Deficiencies and Supplements

Hazel Flight

B101

25

13/03/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Role of nutritionist and dietician

Hazel Flight

B101

26

20/03/14

3-4 1-4

Workshop / seminar Personal tutor contact time

27

27/03/14

Assignment support HOLIDAY

28

03/04/14

HOLIDAY

21

22

23

06/02/14

B101

B101

18


Week Date 29 10/04/14

Time 1-3

Session Nutrition in cultures

Tutor Hazel Flight

Venue B101

30

17/04/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Regional and Cultural differences in nutrition

Hazel Flight

B101

31

24/04/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar Education and nutrition within lifestyles

Hazel Flight

B101

32

01/05/14

3-4 1-3

Workshop / seminar TBC

Hazel Flight

B101

33

08/05/14

3-4 1-4

Student led seminar / group presentations (formative)

Hazel Flight

B101

34

15/05/14

1-4

Tutorials

Hazel Flight

B101

35

22/05/14

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION on line – Before 12pm

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