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SPLASH MOB I LIZARDS FLY! I RAIN GEAR I CLUB OUTINGS: BOOK ’EM

E x p l o r e, E n j o y, a n d P r o t e c t t h e P l a n e t

THE MONSTER IN THE MIST PADDLERS IN THE GREAT BEAR RAINFOREST FIND THERE’S MORE TO FEAR THAN THE CREATURES LURKING BELOW

SEX ED & CO2

How family planning can cool the globe

THE SWAMP MAN

Louisiana’s rot-resistant wetland warrior

$ 3.95 M AY/J U N E 2012

THE MAGA ZINE OF THE SIERR A CLUB


LET IT RAIN Thunderheads above, rapids ahead . . . there’s water in your future. So what do you bring to keep things dry? —Steve Casimiro

It won’t score you any fashion points, but a simple poncho is great for staying dry in a downpour. The Multipurpose Poncho from OUTDOOR PRODUCTS has a generous hood, is made from urethane-coated nylon, and won’t break the bank. $30, rei.com

Most three-season backpacking tents do just fine in moderate rain. But if you’re in a truly wet place—on the Olympic Peninsula, say—choose a more robust shelter, like the Cirque ASL 2 from REI. The 31-square-foot, two-person domicile has a deep, waterproof bathtub floor, panels to cover mesh doors, and vents to fend off internal condensation. $360, rei.com

The first all-weather digital consumer camera by NIKON, the Coolpix AW100 is waterproof and freeze-proof (to 14 degrees Fahrenheit) and can survive drops up to five feet. The gadget also shoots 1080p video, packs a 5X glass lens for ultrasharp images, and has GPS for geotagging photos. A favorite function: the super-slow-motion feature that captures up to 240 frames per second. $380, nikonusa.com

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M AY/ JUNE 2012

PONCHO, MATCHES, E-CASE: LORI EANES; SPECIAL THANKS TO KRISTEN KONG


Instead of buying a separate waterproof phone to take rafting, just make sure to properly protect your everyday smartphone. The eSeries 8 Case from SEALLINE keeps your phone dry while letting you make calls through the transparent cover. You’d be ill advised to ski, cycle, or do anything sporty without slipping your electronics into one. SealLine also makes cases for iPads, maps, and small cameras. $20, cascadedesigns.com When the starter on your stove fails on a damp night, the REI Stormproof Matches come to the rescue, sparking up dinner. They burn until their chemical treatment runs out—even in the heaviest rain—but you can submerge them in water to douse the flame. $6.50 for two 25-match boxes, rei.com

Traveling ultralight is the most liberating way to romp through the backcountry—until a shower rolls through right at dark. Combine the MSR one-pound E-Wing Tarp with hiking poles and the enclosed parachute cord, though, and you’re protected from light rain, wind, and sun. It’s easily configured into a variety of shelter types: pup tent, lean-to, kitchen cover, and others. $170, msrcorp.com

A better name for the waterproof Montana 600 GPS by GARMIN might be “the Amphibian.” It can be loaded with worldwide marine charts (so you’ll never be lost at sea), as well as topos and detailed road maps. But what you might appreciate most is the generous four-inch screen. $550, garmin.com

Plenty of dry bags remain watertight on even the wildest river trip, but most of them trap air—and stay bulky—when buckled shut. The eVac Dry Sack from SEA TO SUMMIT has a base made of a breathable, waterproof material (called eVent) that lets you easily squeeze out air after you’ve rolled the bag’s top. $18 to $35 (depending on size), sea tosummit.com PATAGONIA wetsuits have a secret ingredient: They’re lined with chlorine-free merino wool, so they stay warm while using less rubber. The easy-access R2 Front-Zip Full Suit is designed for water that’s 55 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit; it’ll get you through spring to fall. $525, patagonia.com


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MSR Hubba V5 Tent - $279 This three-season solo tent from MSR, part of their Hubba line, is one awesome structure. A single pole erects the tent and a cross member at the apex expands the interior space, making it downright livable. With a footprint of roughly 24”x84” and head clearance of over 36”, there was plenty of room to change inside. Two triangular gear pockets kept my accoutrements close at hand. A full-coverage rain fly kept me well protected and offered a 36” triangular vestibule for gear that needed to be out of the elements, but not right next to me. Six included stakes lock things down. The whole thing packs down to a manageable 6”x21” tube that fit on top of my rear rack. I think this is a terrific tent for the price. Two- and threeperson versions are also available. Weight: 3lbs. Made in Taiwan. www.cascadedesigns.com –Stephen Haynes REI Igneo Sleeping Bag - $330 I chose the goose-down-filled REI Igneo sleeping bag for its coldweather rating of 19°F and waterproof shell. We were expecting the worst from late-March Appalachia, but lucked out and ended up not testing this bag’s cold/wet limits. I found myself halfway out of the bag one night and semi-covered the next when temps dropped into the 30’s. There’s a convenient zippered, exterior chest pocket (big enough for one hand) for sundry items. The bag isn’t terribly heavy and its 8”x16” tubular stuff sack belies its ability to compress further. Weight: 2lbs. Made in China. www.rei.com –Stephen Haynes REI Stratus Insulated Sleeping Pad - $75 The Stratus Insulated Sleeping Pad from REI is a manually inflated air mattress that has flutes running the length of its body. It took about 15 breaths to get it to full capacity, and the quickclosing cap kept most of my spent breath in its chambers. Its rugged, non-slip nylon top and non-slip polyester bottom keep you from shifting around, while the PrimaLoft insulation keeps the cold off. While I’m not generally a fan of softer pads like this one, I did appreciate the larger outside flutes that keep you centered as advertised. The Stratus packs down to a roughly 10”x5.5” tubular shape with the included stuff sack. Weight: 1.3lbs. Made in Taiwan. www.rei.com –Stephen Haynes

KELTY Gunnison 1.1 Tent - $170 Two lightweight aluminum poles made set-up and break-down of this three-season, one-person tent quick and easy. Generously-sized mesh panels and a vent in the fly kept air flowing and condensation to a minimum. The poles and fly attached easily to a Jake’s Foot corner anchor system, which consists of a tab for the fly, a socket for the pole, and attachment points for the footprint and stakes. With a floor dimension of 90”x29” and a tall 39” interior, I could sit upright inside. The vestibule was sufficient to store stinky gear outside and keep the elements at bay. In all, it’s a well-thought-out and easy-to-use tent at a great price. Weight 3.9lbs. (without footprint or stakes). Made in China. www.kelty.com –Jon Pratt SIERRA DESIGNS Utopia 15 Sleeping Bag - $180 Tested to ensure an accurate temperature rating, Sierra Designs’ Utopia 15 Degree sleeping bag was very comfortable at 20ºF. Elastic material in the construction allowed the bag to conform well to my nighttime repositioning, and my wiggling toes welcomed the ergonomically designed foot box. It was comfortable, very breathable, and packed relatively small, especially for a synthetic fill bag—it fit into a rear pannier with space for a pair of shoes plus odds and ends. Overall, recommended. Weight 3.7lbs. Made in China. www.sierradesigns.com –Jon Pratt KELTY Recluse Pad - $85 Definitely the coolest feature of this pad is the integrated hand pump. Just close the exhaust value, open the intake value, and practice your C.P.R. compressions—a huge plus if you find yourself gasping for air at high elevations. Within a short time, you’ve got a fully inflated, 2.5” thick pad to rest your weary bones on. The lengthwise baffles felt a little strange when I rolled from side to side during the night; however, using these instead of widthwise ones decreases the material needed for construction and reduces waste. Also, the outside baffles are slightly taller than the inner group, limiting the chance you’ll roll off the pad. Comfort in an 11”x6” bag. PVC-free. Weight: 1.9lbs. Made in China. www.kelty.com –Jon Pratt

BicycleTimesMag.com June/July 2012

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GEAR // CAMPING

LESS IS MORE CAMP IN ONE BAG

1 Why bring tent poles when you’ve got paddles? You can string up the NRS Ultralight Wing Shelter with the sticks you’ve already got, off a tree, or even across your boats. ($160, nrsweb.com) 2 With synthetic insulation that provides neardowny warmth even when wet, and with a svelte weight under 3 pounds, Mountain Hardware’s Ultralamina 15 is the right sleep-sack for your next fast-and-light paddling adventure. ($205, mountainhardwear.com) 3 The new Therm-A-Rest NeoAir All Season packs up smaller than a half-eaten loaf of bread and lets you sleep on air even when you’re on the rocks. ($140, cascadedesigns.com)

4 Go ahead and bring a couple extra pairs of socks—maybe even some fresh underwear. They’ll fit, if you pack ‘em in Granite Gear eVent Sil Compression Drysacks. These 100 percent waterproof bags are cut in a slightly blocky pattern for easy nesting in the boat. ($30-$38, granitegear.com) 5 The MSR WhisperLite Internationale runs anywhere on almost anything, and unlike the rest of your kit (and you), it’s easy to keep clean in the field. Whether burning white gas, unleaded, or kerosene, count on the Internationale to deliver a hot cup of whatever gets your motor running. ($90, cascadedesigns.com) 6 The GSI Halulite MicroDualist is everything you need to prepare a backcountry meal for two: a pot for boiling water, two bowls,

two cups (including sippy-cup lids), and a pair of collapsible sporks. The welded stuff sack also doubles as a washbasin. ($53, gsioutdoors.com) 7 If you’re not into giardia and other gastrointestinal ailments, you’re going to want a water filter. The Katadyn Pocket comes with a reusable ceramic filter that easily removes for riverside scrub-downs, plus a 20-year warranty. ($350, katadyn.com) 8 Once you’re ready to get back on the water, put everything in the Watershed Animas Drybag. It’ll keep your stuff drier than a saltine cracker for years to come, and it incorporates removable backpack straps and a waist belt for the portage trail. ($120, drybags.com) –Dave Costello

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Cascade Designs, Part One  

Part one of Cascade Designs' PR report

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