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Hayley Burns Design Portfolio


Curriculum Vitae Hayley Burns

41 Park Lane, Essex Fells, NJ 07021 Qualifications: Architecture, Historic Preservation, Instructional Design • Skilled in architectural design, construction drawings, 3D and hand model making • Historic preservation and material conservation • Ability to produce innovative technology-based teaching and learning products Education: University of Southern California Masters of Architecture, Certificate in Historic Preservation

May 2010

Lehigh University, Pennsylvania Masters of Science, Degree: Instructional Design and Development

January 2005

Lehigh University, Pennsylvania Bachelors of Art, Degree: Architecture; Minor: Graphic Communications High Honors

May 2003

Awards: Timme Traveling Fellowship, USC 2010 – 2011 Endowed traveling fellowship to study architecture and landscape in South America Tau Sigma Delta, USC 2008 – 2010 National collegiate honor society for architecture, awarding high scholastic standing Mayr Foundation Scholarship, USC Merit based award for academic excellence as a graduate student

2009 – 2010

ID WRK 08 09, USC Publication of Selected Student Work displaying the best work from School of Architecture

2008 – 2009

Architecture Research Scholars Grant, USC 2008 – 2010 Merit based award for academic performance prior to and during the academic year Commendation Awards in Architectural Design & Structures, USC Recognition of outstanding work in specific design and structures coursework

2008 – 2009

Graduate Teaching Assistant, USC Direct interaction with faculty, course planning, teaching, student evaluation

2009 – 2010

Phi Beta Kappa, Lehigh University, Beta Chapter

2003 – 2003

Presidential Scholarship, Lehigh University

2003 – 2004


Email: hayleyburns@mac.com Website: www.hayleyburns.com Phone: 973-229-9721 Experience: Michael Maltzan Architecture, Los Angeles, CA January 2010 Part Time Intern • Develop large scale handmade, hand cut model, from 2D and 3D drawings • Model of the Piggyback Yard Conceptual Master Plan site in Los Angeles, scaled 1” = 150’ Opacic Architects, Irvington, NY 2006 – 2008 Junior Architect • Prepared AutoCAD drawings, presentation drawings, and construction documents • Rendered and arranged hand drafted schematic and design development drawing • Document and digitally organize renderings and drawings • Onsite measurement, project management, client interaction, permits, product specification Novartis, East Hanover, NJ 2005 – 2008 Freelance, Instructional Design for Pharmaceutical Sales • Design and develop lessons accessed through online learning management system • Responsible for gathering and creating content narrative • Design detailed storyboards and course instruction according to Instructional Design guidelines Apple Inc., Short Hills, NJ 2004 – 2006 Assistant Store Manager • Management position, store operation, sales leadership, and customer service skills • Mentor for new hires, providing new and ongoing training and support • Awarded Best Of Brand: annual award for excellence in sales and leadership Hillier Group, Newark, NJ Graphic Design/Architecture Intern

Summer 2002

Heintz and Fiore Architects AIA, Short Hills, NJ Architecture Intern

Summer 2001

Technology Proficiency: BIM: AutoCAD 2010 3D Modeling: Rhinoceros 4.0, SketchUp Graphics: Adobe Creative Suite Rendering: VRay Other: Microsoft Office, Processing Language Proficiency: French and German


CONTENT


DESIGN PROJECTS AGGREGATED MATTER PERCEPTUAL TOPOGRAPHIES WESTLAKE GATEWAY MARITIME CENTER

DESIGN STUDIES TEMPO PAVILION THE CITY IN NATURE: PACIFIC PALISADES CONTINUOUS MATTER :GOTHIC THE EDGE: EXPOSITION PARK

BY HAND HAND SKETCHING HAND RENDERING

PROFESSIONAL WORK IRVINGTON RESIDENCE DOBBS FERRY RESIDENCE


AGGREGATED MATTER Algorithmic Mixed-Use Tower . China. Studio Critic: Roland Snooks . Spring 2010

Aggregated Matter explored behavioral design methodology, re-conceptualizing design as the organization of matter. The project began by focusing on the dissolution of normative hierarchies that operate within architectural organization and tectonics. We proposed a non-linear algorithmic design methodology that attempted to displace existing hierarchies through the emergent operation of self-organizing systems.


1800’- 0”

Complex Structures With an understanding of agency and its role in the formation of complex structures, this studio required us to explore and rethink the formation of order from the behavior and intent of the agent and explore this within a framework of the brief for the design of a mixed-use tower.

ONE HUNDRED FIFTEENTH FLOOR PLATE

1500’- 0” NINETY-EIGHTH FLOOR PLATE

SKY LOBBY: 92ND FLOOR

EIGHTY-THIRD FLOOR PLATE

1000’- 0” SIXTY-SIXTH SIXTY-SIXTHFLOOR FLOOR PLATE PLATE

SKY LOBBY: 67TH FLOOR

FIFTY-SECOND FLOOR PLATE

SKY LOBBY: 46TH FLOOR

500’- 0” THIRTY-THIRD FLOOR PLATE

EIGHTEENTH FLOOR PLATE

0’- 0” FIRST FLOOR PLATE


kVec circleloc = kVec.clone(vel); circleloc.normalize(); // Normalize to get heading circleloc.scale(wanderD); // Multiply by distance circleloc.plus(pos); // Make it relative to boid’s location kVec circleOffSet = new kVec(wanderR*cos(wandertheta) *sin(wanderphi),wanderR*sin(wandertheta)*sin(wanderphi), wanderR*cos(wanderphi) ); circleOffSet.plus(circleloc); return steer(circleOffSet); // Steer towards it } kVec steer(kVec target){ target.minus(pos); float distance = target.length(); if (distance > 0){ // calculate a vector target.normalize(); target.scale(maxVel); target.minus(vel); target.limit(maxForce);

}

}else{ // return a blank vector target = new kVec(PI,PI,PI); } return target;

kVec cohesion (ArrayList pop, float rangeOfVis) { kVec sum = new kVec(0,0,0); int count = 0; for (int i = 0 ; i < pop.size(); i++) { if((pos.y >-175) && (pos.y <70)){ depositAgent other = (depositAgent) pop.get(i); float dist = pos.distance(other.pos); if ((dist > 0) && (dist < rangeOfVis)) { sum.plus(other.pos); count++; } } } if (count > 0) { sum.scale(1/(float)count); return steer(sum); } return sum; } kVec separation(ArrayList pop, float rangeOfVis){ kVec sum = new kVec(); float count = 0; for(int i= 0; i<pop.size(); i++){ depositAgent other = (depositAgent) pop.get(i); float distance = pos.distance(other.pos); if( (distance < rangeOfVis) && (distance > 0) ){ kVec sepVec = kVec.clone(pos); sepVec.minus(other.pos); sepVec.normalize(); sepVec.scale(1/distance); sum.plus(sepVec); count++; } } if(count > 0){ sum.scale(1/(float)count); sum.limit(maxForce); } return sum;

} kVec align(ArrayList deposAgent){ float rangeOfVis = 5; kVec sum = new kVec(); // kVec(0,0,0) int count = 0;

for(int i = 0; i < deposAgent.size(); i++){ lineAgent other = (lineAgent) deposAgent.get(i); float distance = pos.distance(other.pos); if( (distance < rangeOfVis) && (distance > 0) ){ sum.plus(other.vec); count++; // count = count + 1 } } if(count < 5){ sum.scale(1); } return sum;

} void borders(){

The design methodologies explored in the studio drew heavily from the field of Swarm Intelligence in developing agent based design strategies. We developed our own methodology, embedding intent at a local scale and enabling the selforganization of intention within a system of swarm intelligence.


The design methodologies explored in the studio drew heavily from the field of Swarm Intelligence in developing agent based design strategies. We developed our own methodology, embedding intent at a local scale and enabling the selforganization of intention within a system of swarm intelligence. We explored how normative tectonic hierarchies can be dissolved and re-imagined within a systemic non-linear logic. Where it is the local interaction of the monad which gives rise to global complex order, rather than a design process operating on sequentially decreasing scales.


The premise of the studio rejected modernist tectonics (including mass standardization) and contemporary parametric component assemblies (mass customization). Instead we looked for an alternative organization of matter that draws from an understanding of micro-structures such as those found in butterfly wings; where color and pattern are determined through the organization of matter as a geometrical configuration rather than through chemical attributes such as pigmentation.


PERCEPTUAL TOPOGRAPHIES High Desert Museum & Research Facilities . Joshua Tree National Park Studio Critic: John Enright . Fall 2009

SITE PLAN


The site, on the edge of Joshua Tree National Park and the city Twenty-Nine Palms, is a gateway from the city to nature. This project emphasized the path taken between the two areas, allowing the visitor to traverse through the land and then to rise above it and reflect back upon it. Movement and relationship with the land was paramount in this project, and is emphasized by the layout of museum, living and research spaces. The facility was placed in a natural depression in the land, making the path natural in it’s placement, but unnatural in it’s sharp void in the land. Michael Heizer’s Double Negative served as inspiration for making sculpture out of void space, consisting more of what was than what currently is.


Movement & Paths: Two Paths Through the Land. The sequence of movement begins outside, approaching and viewing Joshua Tree National Park. The path moves underground, through the street, then above the ground to the museum. The path is then guided by three framed apertures, providing different views of the landscape. The path leads to the picturesque, the edge and the planimetric.


2 Notions There are two notions about the Joshua Tree Landscape that create a delicate relationship with the land. 1st Notion: A Cut Into The Earth. The cut transforms the earth into a street. Program is placed on either side of the street. 2nd Notion: An Instrument Above the Land. An elevated structure that holds the museum and creates view and understanding the landscape in novel ways.


FIRST LEVEL 0’

WAY STATION +52’

MUSEUM LEVEL +36’

SECOND FLOOR +15’

FIRST LEVEL 0’


WESTLAKE GATEWAY Mixed Used Development & Transit Station . Los Angeles Studio Critic: Graeme Morland . Fall 2008


Currently the site is an open concrete plaza, residing over the MacArthur Park Metro Station, in the Westlake district of Los Angeles. The site, beginning to undergo gentrification, is predominately Latin with strong cultural influences and commerce. This project required a mixed-use development to accommodate different types of housing; SRO, studio, 1, 2 and, 3 bedroom housing. In addition the project required retail and commercial space, while enhancing the entrance to the underground metro station and pedestrian circulation.


Circulation P Ground Fl


Plan loor

2nd Floor

7th Floor

The solution to this project was to invite the public realm onto the property and allow them to interact with the building. With this project there would not be a stark difference between public and private space. By including a permanent outdoor market, it encouraged the public to traverse the entire site and increase commercial business. In addition, housing was arranged to provide views of the neighboring MacArthur Park and Downtown Los Angeles skyline. The housing also provided residents a view of the public space, making the space a safer area, especially at night.


2 Bedroom

1 Bedroom

Studio/Elderly

Solar Panels

SRO


MARITIME CENTER Maritime Museum and Learning Center . Los Angeles Studio Critic: Roger Sherwood . Spring 2009

The Maritime Museum is the perfection of an epicenter. It is where 6th Street ends and the port begins. It was once the only connection between two lands, divided by the port. Currently, there is no longer a connection and instead a lonely and isolated waterfront. This project attempts to provide that connection between the land and water. The spaces are not objects but part of the landscape. There is a wrapping of space, from interior to exterior, landscape to enclosure. The property is integrative with little delineation between these spaces.


The town of San Pedro is encouraged to once again experience the waterfront, walk along the landscape or engage in it, and experience the Maritime Museum as it was once meant to be seen, from all sides. The site reinforces the epicenter, guiding the path and journey to the Museum. The buildings and landscape are formed by a delineation of the grid, spilling from the grid work of streets. The shapes and forms determine their interior spaces. The landscape shapes your view of the Museum.


TEMPO PAVILION Gestalt Based Design & Advanced Rhino . University of Southern California Studio Critic: Jeffery Kim . Spring 2010


Through investigation of the Gestalt Theory principles, this pavilion expands upon the idea of closure. Closure is accomplished by providing a combination of vertical and horizontal elements that allow the viewer understand the overall form of the pavilion, without actually creating a surface to define the form.


The part to whole relationship starts with the intersection of surfaces, that by their arrangement of parts create an entire structure that can be read as a whole surface or individual shapes. The patterns of continuous lines and edges define an overall tempo that is orchestrated both through the arrangement and repetition of elements in opposing directions by interpenetrations. This assemblage allows for the viewer to perceive moments of visual openness and closure as one progresses through and around the pavilion. These moments of simultaneity, interpenetration, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;transparencyâ&#x20AC;? are the fundamental concerns in the research and design of the pavilion.


THE CITY IN NATURE: PACIFIC PALISADES Mapping Urban Landscape: Los Angeles . Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles Studio Critic: Rachel Berney . Spring 2009

This mapping study attempted to discover the built fabric and natural systems of neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The Pacific Palisades is a unique district of landscape and land use. The proximity of the district to the sea and mountains makes it highly desirable. The topography creates insurmountable edges, defining parkland, residential and native landscapes. These drastic changes in elevation provide startling views of the Pacific Ocean from nearly every residence. This district is highly desired and therefore, built up, with very little available land to build upon. Yet, with little land available to developed, the Pacific Palisades is strikingly different by providing ample parkland and native land for its residents to enjoy.


AREA OF STUDY

THE BUILT FABRIC

LANDSCAPE LAND USE

TOPOGRAPHY (20’ CONTOURS)


void draw(){ background(255);{ println(frameCount); } for(int i = 0; i < trails.size(); i++){ kTrail t = (kTrail) trails.get(i); t.render(); } for(int i = 0; i < upTrails.size(); i++){ upkTrail t = (upkTrail) upTrails.get(i); t.render(); } for(int i = 0; i < emitPopStruc.size(); i++){ emmitterStruc a = (emmitterStruc) emitPopStruc.get(i); a.emitStruc(); } for(int i = 0; i < emitPopUp.size(); i++){ emmitterUp aDesign = (emmitterUp) emitPopUp.get(i); Behavioral Methodology . Swarm Techniques a.emitUp(); Studio Critic: Roland Snooks . Spring 2010 } for(int i = 0; i < population.size(); i++){ kAgent a = (kAgent) population.get(i); a.update(); a.render(); }

CONTINUOUS MATTER: GOTHIC

}

for(int i = 0; i < upPop.size(); i++){ upAgent a = (upAgent) upPop.get(i); a.update(); a.render(); a.split(); a.borders(); } for(int i = 0; i <splitUpAgent.size(); i++){ upAgent a = (upAgent) splitUpAgent.get(i); a.render(); a.update(); a.borders(); } mm.addFrame();

void keyPressed(){ if (key == ‘ ‘){ mm.finish(); } } void exportPoints(){ output = createWriter(“kAgentPoints.txt”); for(int i = 0; i < population.size(); i++){ kAgent k = (kAgent) population.get(i); for(int j = 0; j < k.kHistory.size(); j++){ kVec a = (kVec) k.kHistory.get(j); output.print(a.x + “,” + a.y + “,” + a.z + “ “); } output.println(“”); } output.flush(); output.close(); } void exportPoints1(){ output = createWriter(“upAgentPoints.txt”); for(int i = 0; i < upPop.size(); i++){ upAgent k = (upAgent) upPop.get(i); for(int j = 0; j < k.upHistory.size(); j++){ kVec a = (kVec) k.upHistory.get(j); output.print(a.x + “,” + a.y + “,” + a.z + “ “); } output.println(“”); } output.flush(); output.close(); } void exportPoints2(){ output = createWriter(“splitUpAgentPoints.txt”); for(int i = 0; i < splitUpAgent.size(); i++){ upAgent k = (upAgent) splitUpAgent.get(i); for(int j = 0; j < k.upHistory.size(); j++){


The relationship between structure and ornament was interrogated and rethought through non-linear design tools, through th behavioral design methodologies. The posited application of swarm systems within architectural design involves encoding simple architectural decisions within a distributed system of autonomous computational entities - agents. It is the interaction of these local decisions that self-organizes design intention, giving rise to a form of collective intelligence and emergent behavior at the global scale.


THE EDGE: EXPOSITION PARK Identity For The Contemporary City . Los Angeles Studio Critic: Michael Maltzan . Fall 2009

EXPOSITION CORRIDOR

MLK BLVD CORRIDOR

The edge conditions of Exposition Park are in need of new concepts for connecting and transitioning between the park, neighbors and greater area. The current edge conditions and response to the surrounding neighbor was investigated. We narrowed our lens on the four large edges of Expo Park, taking note of the neighbors, buildings, and the street. In addition to the park’s connection to the exterior influences, the focus also considered the connection of the edge with the interior. This in depth study provided us with opportunities to explore the “soft transition” between the park, edge, neighbors and the interior. This study showed the lack and disappearance of an edge, especially in the southern corners. The undefined edge is only a problem if the space continues to be defined as a “park”. The best solution for this land, might be to redefine its purpose and role in the landscape of Los Angeles.


EAST TO WEST SECTIONS

NORTH TO SOUTH SECTIONS


HAND SKETCHING Fountain Pens & Sketchbook . Italy & Beyond Studio Critic: Anthony Viscard . 2000 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Today


Most of these sketches were drawn in ink from around the Venetian region of Italy, with the exception of the drawing of a house, which was drawn in Nantucket, MA. Many of the sketches are taken from analytiques that describe spaces, focal points, and details through drawings.


HAND RENDERING Graphite, Watercolor, Pastels, Color Pencil . Pennsylvania Studio Critic: Christine Usler . 2000 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2003


The different renderings were drawn in a variety of mediums, including color pencil, watercolor, and pencil with graphite shavings. Also, different views were used including: exploded axonmetric and two different perspective drawings. The drawings are completed on mylar, heavy art paper, and watercolor paper. The use of intricate shadows and shading give the drawings depth and 3D qualities.


IRVINGTON RESIDENCE Opacic Architects Renovation & Addition. Irvington, NY Principal: Radoslav Opacic . 2007-2008

This property in Irvington, New York, required a renovation to the dining room, kitchen, pantry, pool house, and carriage house. To connect these spaces, a living room, 2nd story apartment, mudroom and breezeway were added. All interior and exterior design and layout was completed by the principal. I completed the construction set, site measurements, and project management. All drawings were completed with AutoCAD.


COPPER ROOF ICE AND WATER SHIELD OVER LAPPED ONTO COPPER (8" MIN) 3/4" PLYWOOD SHEATHING ROOF RAFTERS

BUILT-IN GUTTER LINED WITH COPPER

SOLID WOOD FASCIA SOLID WOOD TRIM R-30 FIBERGLSS BATT INSULATION CEILING JOISTS

AIR CEDAR LATICE SPACED 2" X 2"

5/8" GYP. BD.

(1) LAYER 5/8" TYPE 'X' GYP. BD. R-19 CRAFT FACE FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION AT EACH BAY 2 X 6 STUD WALL @ 16" O.C.

3/4" CDX PLYWOOD EXTERIOR SHEATHING, SPIKE @ 16" O.C. 1/2" X 1-1/8" CEDAR LATTICE SPACED 2" X 2" (PAINT) 5/4" X 4" CEDAR FRAME

3/4" HARDWOOD FLOORING 3/4" PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR

PARGE FOUNDATION WALL AT ALL EXPOSED SURFACES. PARGING TO EXTEND 1'-0" BELOW GRADE

APPROXIMATE GRADE FIN. FLOOR

12" X 2" TJI

6 MIL. POLYETHYLENE VAPOR BARRIER OVER SEALANT @ ALL BELOW GRADE WALLS

PROVIDE 3X3X3 TRENCH OF 3/4" CLEAN GRAVEL AT FOOTING DRAIN

10" REINFORCED CONCRETE FOUNDATION #4 REBAR @ 16" OC EACH WAY

CLEAN AND COMPACTED BACKFILL @ 8" LIFTS PROVIDE 1" PROTECTION BOARD @ ENTIRE EXTERIOR FACE OF FOUNDATION WALL PROVIDE TROWEL APPLIED BITUMINOUS SEALANT AT ENTIRE EXTERIOR FACE OF FOUNDATION WALL

PROVIDE 2" RIGID INSULATION AT GARAGE PERIMETER 10 MIL POLYETHYLENE 6" GRAVEL

"MARAFI" 140 N CONTINUOUS FILTER FABRIC 4" PVC PERFORATED FOOTING DRAIN. SEE DRAWING A-5.0 FOR PITCH ALL FOOTINGS TO BEAR ON UNDISTURBED VIRGIN SOIL 1'-10"W X 1'-0" CONTINUOUS REINFORCED CONCRETE FOOTING W/(2) #5 REBARS (ALL FOOTINGS SHALL BE FORMED, TYP.)


5 21 "

3/4" X 1 1/2" CEDAR LATTICE 3 4"

4b

ALIGN

C-4

A-7.0

ALIGN

1 43 "

PROVIDE SHUTTER AND HARDWARE FOR WINDOW. G.C. SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR COORDINATING ALL SHUTTER QUANTITIES AND LOCATIONS WITH THE C-6 EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS. MANUFACTURER 5 21 " 5 21 " SHALL 5 21 " 1 21 " (FIELD) BE(FIELD) TIMBERLANE WOODCRAFTERS INC., TEL. No.: 1-800-250-2221 SHUTTERS : STANDARD RAISED PANEL, STYLE #CB1 HINGES : NEW YORK STYLE L-HINGE, HEAVY DUTY 1 1/2" TAIL 5-3/4", ITEM #35501TIE BACKS : RAT LAG MOUNT, WITH (C-4) REAR HOLDING CLIP.

2X8

1 21 "

4 21 " 6"

C-7

EQ.

A-7.0 3/4" PRESSURE TREATED NAILER

4d A-7.0

6X10 GIRDER (C-4)

3 4"

COPPER FLASHING (ONE PIECE) (C-3)

4c

9'-0" FROM FIRST FLOOR

5 43 "

6"

CEDAR PLUG WITH GLUE

CL

CL

EQ.

4 21 "

1 2"

6"

1 2"

3 4"

8'-6" FROM FIRST FLR.

CENTER RAIL OF SHUTTER SHALL BE CENTERED ON THE MEETING RAIL OF THE WINDOW. 3a

DYKES #194 (PINE)

LEVELING BED MASONRY STUCCO CONCRETE COLUMN

2"

ANCHOR BOLT (C-5)

DOBBS FERRY RESIDENCE 1 2"

3 4"

PROVIDE SHUTTER AND HARDWARE FOR WINDOW. G.C. SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR COORDINATING ALL SHUTTER QUANTITIES AND LOCATIONS WITH THE EXTERIOR ELEVATIONS. MANUFACTURER SHALL BE TIMBERLANE WOODCRAFTERS INC., TEL. No.: 1-800-250-2221 SHUTTERS : STANDARD RAISED PANEL, STYLE #CB1 HINGES : NEW YORK STYLE L-HINGE, HEAVY DUTY TIE BACKS : RAT TAIL 5-3/4", ITEM #35501LAG MOUNT, WITH REAR HOLDING CLIP.

5 21 "

1 43 "

Opacic Architects Residential New Construction. Dobbs Ferry, NY Principal: Radoslav Opacic . 2008 - 2009 4b A-7.0 4 21 "

EQ.

4c A-7.0 12

4d

1 2"

CL

CL

EQ.

4 21 "

4.5

A-7.0

CL

CENTER RAIL OF SHUTTER SHALL BE CENTERED ON THE MEETING RAIL OF THE WINDOW.

1

2"

A-4.0

1 A-4.0

1'-9" DIA.

1 A-4.0

14" DIA.

1 A-4.0

5 A-2.0

6 A-2.0

5 A-2.0

METAL RAILING

7 A-2.0


12 4.5 CL

228.22' MASTER BED.

218.22' LIV./ DINING 216.59' ENTRY

209.04' BASEMENT 207.95 MUDROOM

205.5' GARAGE

This property in Dobbs Ferry, New York, was new construction, using a partial existing foundation. The plan of the living room was angled to get the best views of the Hudson River. To connect the two plans, a breezeway was added. All interior and exterior design and layout was completed by the principal. I completed the construction set and site measurements. All drawings were completed with AutoCAD.

Hayley Burns's Architecture & Design Portfolio  

The work featured in my portfolio are projects from Graduate School in The University of Southern California's Master of Architecture Progra...

Hayley Burns's Architecture & Design Portfolio  

The work featured in my portfolio are projects from Graduate School in The University of Southern California's Master of Architecture Progra...

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