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Events


WELCOME Some 16th and 17th century preachers complained that the blasts of theatre trumpets were enticing people away from the tolling of church bells. Solemn congregations were turning into garish audiences. The morals of theatre audiences were called into question, too. Summer events at the Globe complement the theatre season and its theme The Word is God and explore the Heard Word as spoken in pulpits and playhouses. A series of lectures, presented in association with Southwark Cathedral, will mark the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. Speakers include David Crystal, Arnold Hunt, Bryan Crockett and Diarmaid McCulloch, whose lecture on Thomas Cranmer is dedicated to the memory of the late Colin Slee, Dean of Southwark, who initiated the series.

TOP: Colin Hurley as Thomas Cranmer in Henry VIII, 2010 Photographer: John Tramper, 2010

Graham Holderness is the 2011 Sam Wanamaker Fellow and will speak about Shakespeare and the King James Bible. Howard Brenton will discuss his Anne Boleyn and his fascination with Tyndale’s Bible while John Wolfson’s annual talk will explore the more secular short story collections that provided Shakespeare with much of his source material.

Leading international Shakespeare scholars will be Setting the Scene and will offer introductions to the plays before selected Tuesday and Thursday evening performances. This year’s talks will be illustrated with the help of Globe actors. Theatre company members will also be Talking Theatre after selected Wednesday and Saturday matinees, sharing their experiences of playing in the Globe. ChildsPlay workshops, on selected Saturdays, offer children an active drama-based introduction to Much Ado About Nothing. Staged readings also reflect the season’s biblical theme and the repercussions of the Protestant Reformation. Plays include Peele’s David and Bethsabe and Marlowe’s rarely performed The Massacre at Paris. I hope you will come to the playhouse this summer and enjoy the plays and much more besides.

Patrick Spottiswoode Director, Globe Education

LEFT: John Dougall as Thomas Cromwell in Anne Boleyn, 2010 Photographer: Manuel Harlan, 2010 SUMMER 2011 | 3


Setting the Scene Leading Shakespeare scholars provide introductions to the evening play, supported by a Globe actor. All’s Well That Ends Well

Hamlet

Much Ado About Nothing

Doctor Faustus

12 May

21 June

3 May

Professor George W. Williams

26 May Professor Henry Schvey

Dr Charlotte Scott

Time Selected Tuesdays and Thursdays 18.00 – 19.00

Dr Jane Kingsley-Smith

Duke University (Professor Emeritus)

Washington University in St Louis

Goldsmiths, University of London

Roehampton University

7 July

12 July

5 May

Dr Farah Karim-Cooper

31 May Professor Helen Cooper

Professor Robert Henke

Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe

University of Cambridge

Washington University in St Louis

Tickets

2 June

26 July

Professor Peter Holland University of Notre Dame

Professor Tom Healy

7 June

28 July

Professor Andrew Hadfield

Dr Emma Smith

Goldsmiths, University of London

University of Sussex

University of Oxford

19 May

14 July

13 September

Professor Michael Dobson Birkbeck, University of London

Globe Education, Shakespeare’s Globe

10 May Dr Clare McManus Roehampton University

As You Like It

24 May

Professor Russ McDonald

Professor Suzanne Gossett Loyola University Chicago

30 June Dr Subha Mukherji University of Cambridge

19 July Professor Helen Wilcox Bangor University

11 August Dr Bridget Escolme Queen Mary, University of London

17 May

University of Sussex

Professor Lois Potter

Dr Paul Prescott

University College London

University of Delaware

University of Warwick

16 JUNE

8 September

15 September

Professor Tony Howard

Dr Martin Wiggins

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

University of Warwick

2 August

22 September

Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham

Dr Eric Langley

Dr Paul Edmondson

Professor Stanley Wells The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

Professor Michael Cordner

20 September

University of York

Dr Lucy Munro

Venue

£6 FoSG/concs £5 Students £4

Supported by Arden Shakespeare

Keele University

16 August Professor Ann Thompson King’s College London

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Sam Wanamaker Fellowship Lecture ‘Bible Bable’: Shakespeare and the King James Version Tuesday 14 June Professor Graham Holderness (University of Hertfordshire)

Sam Wanamaker, an American actor, director and producer, was the founder of the project to rebuild Shakespeare’s Globe. He died in 1993 after 23 years of tireless campaigning, advancing research into the appearance of the original Globe and planning its reconstruction.

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‘The Bible’ and ‘The Complete Works of Shakespeare’ were regarded, in the classic BBC radio programme Desert Island Discs, as essential equipment for a shipwrecked castaway. Louis Marder predicted that the first books to be offered to alien visitors from another planet to represent ‘the fruits of our terrestrial culture’ would be the Bible and Shakespeare. There are of course many versions of both these works, but the most famous are the King James Bible of 1611, whose quatercentenary is celebrated this year, and the First Folio of Shakespeare’s works published in 1623. Thus the two books are contiguous in history, and have ever since been linked together in the popular imagination. But what else connects them? The Bible is inside Shakespeare, but not

the King James Version, since that post-dated virtually all his plays. It has been suggested that Shakespeare’s language is echoed in the KJV, though this seems unlikely, given the antagonism of theatre and Reformed church: the man who proposed the new translation to King James, Dr John Rainolds, was author of an aggressive denunciation of the theatre, Th’overthrow of Stage-Playes. And then there is the legend that Shakespeare was personally involved in the 1611 translation, his name and age buried in the new version of the 46th Psalm. Graham Holderness looks at the relationship between Shakespeare and the King James Bible, and explores the underlying reasons why the two books are continually, though not always rationally, interconnected.

Time 19.00

Venue Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets £12 FoSG/concs/students £10 Including a glass of wine/juice

SUMMER 2011 | 7


TOP: Colin Hurley as Cardinal Wolsey in Anne Boleyn, 2010

A series of lectures presented in association with Southwark Cathedral, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible. Fools in the Pulpit? Preachers in Shakespeare’s London

BOTTOM: James Garnon as King James I in Anne Boleyn, 2010 Photographer: Manuel Harlan, 2010

The Perfect Circle and the “Wooden O”: Pulpit and Stage in Shakespeare’s Day

Shakespeare, King James, and modern English idiom

Thomas Cranmer: The Missing Preacher

Thursday 21 July

Professor Diarmaid McCulloch

Tuesday 28 June

Tuesday 5 July

Professor David Crystal OBE

(University of Oxford)

Dr Arnold Hunt

Professor Bryan Crockett

(Bangor University)

(The British Library)

(Loyola University Maryland)

The serious, moralistic world of 16th and 17th century preaching might seem to have little in common with the lively, secular world of the playhouse. But churches and theatres existed side by side in early modern London, and preachers and players often found themselves competing for an audience. Thomas Wilson remarked in 1553 that even the most serious preachers ‘must now and then play the fools in the pulpit, to serve the tickle ears of their fleeting audience’. This lecture will show how preachers sought to attract and persuade their listeners with the help of dramatic and histrionic techniques that were not so different from those of the theatre.

The sermons of Shakespeare’s day were performances. The preachers and the players competed for the same audiences, used the same gestures, and often spoke in the same idiom. The rivalry between the prophets in their pulpits and the players on their stages grew bitter at times, but the competition arose out of a deep connection. As much as they sometimes hated to admit it, the preachers and the players were the closest of kin.

Who contributed more to the idiom of the English language: Shakespeare or the translators who produced the King James Bible? The answer depends on which aspects of the language we choose to examine. For vocabulary, Shakespeare is the easy winner. For idioms, it is the Bible - but in an unexpected way, for though the King James version originated few idioms, it popularised many. David Crystal’s anniversary talk looks at the remarkable range of contexts in which biblical idioms are found in modern English. It includes extracts from the 1611 Bible read in period pronunciation by actor Ben Crystal.

Thomas Cranmer was a man at the heart of the English Reformation, and so remains at the heart of worldwide Anglican identity. But his preaching is entirely lost to us: an astonishing silence for one of the great names in Protestant origins. Professor MacCulloch tries to recover the real man who was the friend of kings and who shaped Anglican worship over centuries.

Time 19.00

Venue Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets £12 FoSG/concs/students £10 Including a glass of wine/juice

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Wednesday 31 August

The final lecture of the series is dedicated to the memory of the Very Reverend Colin Slee, Dean of Southwark. Time 19.00

Venue UnderGlobe Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets £12 FoSG/concs/students £10 A pay bar will be available SUMMER 2011 | 9


Calendar SUMMER 2011 MAY

JUNE

JULY

03

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

01

Talking Theatre Much Ado About Nothing

02

Study Day Doctor Faustus

11

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

05 05

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

02

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

The Heard Word: Pulpit vs. Playhouse

16

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

07

Study Day All’s Well That Ends Well

04

ChildsPlay Much Ado About Nothing

17

Talking Theatre All’s Well That Ends Well

18

Perspective Anne Boleyn

20

Talking Theatre The Globe Mysteries

31

The Heard Word: Pulpit vs. Playhouse

10

12 15

17

Setting the Scene Hamlet

12

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

14

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

Talking Theatre Much Ado About Nothing

16

Talking Theatre Anne Boleyn

11

Study Day Much Ado About Nothing

19

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

14

Sam Wanamaker Fellowship Lecture 20

16

Setting the Scene As You Like It

Talking Theatre All’s Well That Ends Well

21

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

23

Perspective

25

ChildsPlay Much Ado About Nothing

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

07

Setting the Scene Hamlet

08

Read Not Dead The Love of King David and Fair Bethsabe Setting the Scene As You Like It

19

Setting the Scene As You Like It

24

Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

25

07

Talking Theatre All’s Well That Ends Well

28 26

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

28

Talking Theatre Much Ado About Nothing

31

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

30

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The Heard Word: Pulpit vs. Playhouse Setting the Scene All’s Well That Ends Well

21

The Heard Word: Pulpit vs. Playhouse

26

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

27

Talking Theatre Doctor Faustus

28

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

31

Read Not Dead The Tragedy of Herod and Antipater

AUGUST 02

Setting the Scene As You Like It

10

Talking Theatre Anne Boleyn

SEPTEMBER 03

ChildsPlay Much Ado About Nothing

08

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing

10

Talking Theatre The God of Soho

13

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

15

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

18

Read Not Dead The Massacre at Paris

20

Setting the Scene Doctor Faustus

21

Talking Theatre Doctor Faustus

22

Setting the Scene Much Ado About Nothing SUMMER 2011 | 11


Talking Theatre Talking Theatre provides audiences with an opportunity to meet members of the cast and creative team in free post-show discussions.

Time Selected Wednesdays and Saturdays – 20 minutes after the matinee performance

Venue Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets Free but must be booked in advance

ChildsPlay Much Ado About Nothing Saturday 4 June Saturday 25 June Saturday 3 September Globe Education Practitioners provide eight to eleven year olds with active introductions to the matinee play that their parents/guardians are attending. As part of the workshop, children will join the Groundlings to watch 15 minutes of the play from the yard. The workshop will also include storytelling and art activities.

For more details see shakespearesglobe.com

Time 13.30

Venue Gather at the Globe Education Reception Desk

Tickets £15

Love’s Labour’s Lost, 2009 Photographer: Lee Mawdsley, 2009 12 | EVENTS

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Study Days Study Days provide a comprehensive exploration of theatrical and scholarly perspectives on the plays in the theatre season, led by Shakespeare scholars and Globe Education theatre practitioners. These sessions are designed so participants can choose to journey through the plays in a variety of ways by opting for either “active learning” or “formal learning” approaches.

Perspectives Time 10.00 – 18.00

Venue Gather at the Globe Education Reception Desk, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

Tickets £50 FoSG/concs £45 Students £40 Tea/coffee provided. Lunch not included.

Study Day plays are as follows:

All’s Well That Ends Well Saturday 7 May

Study Day Tickets do not include tickets for a performance of the play. Participants may choose to see the production before or after attending the Study Day.

William Shakespeare and the Short Story Collections Thursday 23 June John Wolfson (Honorary Curator of Rare Books, Shakespeare’s Globe) Out of 36 plays in the First Folio, 16 have plots which were based on stories that Shakespeare read in collections of short stories which were published in the 16th Century in English, French or Italian. While the stories that inspired 16 of Shakespeare’s plays are well known, the story collections that they came from have never before been looked upon as a single unit of inspiration for Shakespeare’s genius.

Anne Boleyn Thursday 18 August Playwright Howard Brenton returns to discuss the process and staging of the play celebrating the great English heroine Anne Boleyn. The production returns to Shakespeare’s Globe this season following a sell-out run last year.

Time 18.00

Venue Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets £10 FoSG/concs/students £8

Much Ado About Nothing Saturday 11 June

DOCTOR Faustus Saturday 2 July

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SUMMER 2011 | 15


TOP: Ian McNiece as Cardinal Wolsey in Henry VIII, 2010 bottom: Dominic Rowan as Touchstone in As You Like It, 2009

Read not dead & rarely played

Photographer: John Tramper, 2009

Actors provide ‘performances with scripts’ of rarely performed plays to complement the theatre season. The Love of King David and Fair Bethsabe

The Tragedy of Herod and Antipater

The Massacre at Paris

(1622)

(1594)

(1599)

by George Peele

by Gervase Markham & William Simpson

Sunday 15 May

Sunday 31 July

Turning to the Bible, Peele conjures stories of adultery, treachery, rape, incest and rebellion. A voyeuristic David watches Bethsabe bathing in a spring and arranges the death of her husband so that he can seduce her. David’s court quickly falls apart and his son Absalom rises against him. Peele wrote plays in every early modern genre: city pageants, courtly entertainments and public shows, and this play shows off his stylistic range.

Originally written by Gervase Markham, and apparently revised by William Sampson before publication, Herod and Antipater tells the story of the Biblical tyrant and his bastard son Antipater. These two men live by the motto that ‘Power makes all things lawful’, and spend the play seeking to outwit and destroy their enemies and each other. Set at the time that Augustus defeated Antony and Cleopatra and became Herod’s new master, the bastard Antipater begins to have devilish visions tempting him to subterfuge and atrocities which bring down his father’s court.

by Christopher Marlowe

Sunday 18 September This account of a recent Parisian atrocity is possibly the most controversial play of the period. The St Bartholomew’s Day massacre of 1572 sent shockwaves through Protestant England and brought many refugees to Marlowe’s hometown of Canterbury. Written in an elliptical and disorienting manner, this is Marlowe’s most confrontational and unusual play. Poisoned gloves, severed ears, defenestration and blank verse: this very peculiar combination of violence and rhetoric will delight anyone interested in the period.

Rarely Played Inspiring and engaging introductions prior to the Read Not Dead performances with Dr Diana Devlin or Dr Andy Kesson.

Time Selected Sundays 12.00 – 14.00

Venue Gather at the Globe Education Reception Desk

Tickets £13 FoSG/concs/students £10 Includes ticket to the Read Not Dead performance

Time 15.00

Venue Nancy W. Knowles Lecture Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe

Tickets £8 FoSG/concs/students £6 16 | EVENTS

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Globe Education Globe Education was founded in 1989 to ensure that an established programme of workshops, courses and events for people of all ages and nationalities was in place before the Globe Theatre opened in 1997. Globe Education is now one of the largest Arts education organisations and has established an international reputation for its work. Over 100,000 people participate in Globe Education programmes every year; some meeting Shakespeare for the first time at the Globe; some coming to complement school study of Shakespeare; some teachers coming to discover more about Globe Education’s practical “active learning” approaches to teaching Shakespeare; some undergraduates and graduates joining a course at the Globe; some members of the general public wishing to attend an evening lecture or event.

Discovery Space The Discovery Space is Globe Education’s online resource for anyone who wishes to engage with Shakespeare’s theatre, plays and contemporaries: Adopt an Actor

Resource Library

Sign up to exclusive rehearsal diaries and podcasts from some of this season’s actors. Gain unique insights into the process of preparing a role at Shakespeare’s Globe by following actors from the first day to the final bow! Over 150 actors from 45 different productions are featured.

Discover over a decade of past productions at Shakespeare’s Globe with findings from productions that used Original Practices, interviews with directors and designers, conference papers and research bulletins.

Production Notes Behind the scenes interviews with the creative team, press clippings, and more.

For more info about Globe Education, visit shakespearesglobe.com or follow Shakespeare’s Globe on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Left to right: Matthew Kelly, Ania Sowinski and Laura Pyper in Troilus and Cressida, 2009 Photographer: Keith Pattison, 2009 18 | EVENTS

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How to book

Tickets for Globe Education public events must be booked through the Globe Box Office unless otherwise stated.

For all general Globe Education Events enquiries please call or visit Globe Education online.

online

by phone

online

shakespearesglobe.com

+44 (0)20 7401 9919

shakespearesglobe.com

by post

Opening hours

by phone

Shakespeare’s Globe Box Office 21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London SE1 9DT

10:00 – 17:00

+44 (0)20 7902 1438

The Shakespeare Globe Trust is a registered charity No.266916.

Summer 2011 Brochure  

Ed Events Summer 2011 Brochure - Pulpit

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